Cow Corner

  • Import Tahir could stop SA choking

    Major
    tournaments and a tag of being 'amongst the favourites' has not been a happy union for South Africa in recent years.

    But the
    marriage of Imran Tahir to his (Cow Corner presumes) lovely wife could be the
    very thing which helps South Africa banish those ghosts.

    If it had
    been England who were on the receiving end of the '22 runs from one ball' incident of 1992, we'd still be grumbling about it now.

    The South
    Africans bore that on their shoulders, and then were saddled with the additional World Cup heartache
    of losing the 1999 semi-final to Australia from a position of needing one run
    from

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  • The paceman who could’ve been a Test great

    Shaun Tait, a Test great? It may sound like an absurd statement given that the Radox bath-loving, Elastoplast-sponsored paceman had already nearly hung up his boots and shoulder brace three times by the age of 25, but his potential has always been staggering.

    The South Australian, nicknamed 'The Sloon', will go down as one of cricket's great enigmas, one of this generation's lost stars: a cricketer with incredible talent and dazzling attributes, yet without the career stats to back up his ability.

    Tait is now 28-years-old, and only now has he found his market: bowling three-over maximum

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  • How England can win the World Cup

    Ask any Australian, and they'll tell you that winning the World Cup is easy (well, before yesterday, at least).

    "Aw, look mate..." they'll start, before recalling their three consecutive triumphs and reminding you of England's spectacular failures.

    From the 2007 ensemble who left us the lingering memory of Fredalo, to the 2003 side which were high on principle and low on qualifying for the knockout stage, and the 1999 team who crashed out of their own party in dismal fashion at the first opportunity.

    This year, things are different. The field's wide open and the World Cup holders are already

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  • Wilting Matilda beckons in new champions

    There will be new World Cup champions for the first time since 1996 in the 50-over format of pyjama cricket after Australia's tilt at a fourth successive title was ended by India.

    In what proved to be a hugely significant day on many fronts, the co-hosts prevailed in front of 48,000 vociferous, fervent and downright crazed supporters while one hugely despondent batsman's century proved insubstantial.

    The Little Master, Sachin Tendulkar, moved serenely past the frankly absurd landmark of 18,000 ODI runs and even had his first twirl of the arm since 2009, Ponting recorded his 30th one-day ton,

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  • The most disgraceful quarter-final showing ever?

    We were all promised something special in the World Cup quarter-finals, and we certainly got it.

    West Indies turned out perhaps the most dismal showing in a knock-out match in living memory, and it was an 'I was there' (well, for the full 63 overs, at least) type of spectacle.

    This was the side which England 'valiantly' overcame to reach the quarter-finals, but Darren Sammy's side's lethargic, uninterested, sluggish, shambolic and downright shoddy display emphatically devalued the status held by the fixture.

    While former players must have been spitting their dark rum out in disgust, the likes

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  • UDRS: Good or bad?

    There's
    been plenty of focus on the Umpire Decision Review System ever since cricket
    took the plunge and applied technology to their umpiring.

    The World
    Cup is the first major tournament where teams have had access to the review
    system, and on the whole it has led to the desired result - more correct
    decisions.

    The ICC have
    produced some statistics to suggest that now almost 98 per cent
    of decisions by the umpires have been, in the end, correct
    .

    But as
    encouraging as those numbers are, there have been several interesting and
    controversial incidents relating to the use of technology in this

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  • What Australia’s 34 and out means

    34 World
    Cup wins in a row.

    It is one
    of those ludicrous records which will likely stand forever, and have a unique, unmovable
    place in cricket statistic history, like Don Bradman's Test batting average of
    99.94 or Sachin Tendulkar's  hundred
    international centuries (admittedly he's only made 99 of those so far, but
    you'd have to be madder than a Shahid Afridi swipe to long-on to think he won't
    reach the landmark).

    Even Gavin
    Hamilton's rather special Test record (played one, scored no runs in two
    innings, took no wickets in 15 overs) has its own place in statistics history,
    and so too will

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  • Who or what is a Jade Dernbach?

    For a man whose nickname is 'Dirtbag', Jade
    Winston Dernbach is not the first name which might have sprung to mind when
    Andy Flower was looking to 'freshen up' his England squad.

    He might have a girl's name, but Jade can
    bowl pretty fast and get the ball to swing both ways with a full repertoire of
    variations and an array of surprise deliveries in his armoury.

    What is perhaps all the more surprising is
    that Dernbach was picked ahead of the prodigiously talented Chris Woakes - a
    man who excelled in the recent ODI series against Australia, and in whom the
    England Lions have invested a great

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  • Who’s the best captain in pyjama cricket?

    Every cricketing conversation or message board is awash with talk of blistering shots, searing pace, dreamy catches and Jesse Ryder's latest XXXX-inspired antics, but what about the captains?

    A skipper in cricket means much more than simply pulling up an armband every 10 minutes as in other sports: it carries with it huge responsibility, influence and tactical clout.

    An international skipper has the honour of welcoming debutants, calling powerplays, taking impromptu huddles and handing out random rollickings.

    It is a powerful position having the luxury of telling distinguished bowlers to "take

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  • What next for England’s World Cup rollercoaster?

    Ok, well this is one way to negotiate qualifying from the group stages. England are still waiting on Bangledesh's final match against South Africa, but their campaign took another twist as Andrew Strauss's side pulled their finger out against West Indies.

    Their
    World Cup campaign has taken supporters on a remarkable rollercoaster ride
    which has seen them lurch violently from a thrilling victory over South Africa,
    to a dramatic tie with India, and dismal defeats to Ireland and Bangladesh.

    Then today in Chennai, Strauss's side looked on the brink of defeat on numerous occasions, only for another

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