The Rundown

The FA Cup’s top 10 greatest upsets

The Rundown

A quartet of minnows are in FA Cup action this weekend with a chance of cementing their place in the history books with a giant-killing.

Non-league Tamworth face Everton at Goodison Park; Macclesfield entertain Bolton; Fleetwood Town host Blackpool; and Salisbury City travel to Sheffield United.

So to offer them all a bit of inspiration, we run down the greatest shock results in FA Cup history.

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Sutton's Matthew Hanlan scores the winner

Sutton United 2-1 Coventry City - Third round, 1989

When Conference side Sutton took on Coventry, a solid First Division side and the FA Cup winners just 18 months previously, around 8,000 people crammed into the tiny ground. They were treated to one of the greatest ever results in the English game.

Skipper Tony Rains put the hosts ahead just before half-time, but it looked like everything was back on track for Coventry when David Phillips equalised seven minutes after the restart.

That was until Sutton winger Matthew Hanlan popped up to slot home what turned out to be a winner just before the hour mark. Coventry remain the last top-flight team to go out of the FA Cup against non-league opposition.

Worcester 2-1 Liverpool - Third round, 1959

This match was recently voted the greatest ever FA Cup upset in a Blue Square Premier League poll, and it's not hard to see why. Southern League Worcester already had a decent scalp under their belts after beating Millwall in the previous round, but they were not fancied to pull off any heroics against the then-second tier Reds at an icy St George's Lane.

Over 15,000 fans - still a club record - squeezed into the ground to see the match, and they were delighted when Tommy Skuse opened the scoring for the hosts after nine minutes. That lead was doubled with nine minutes to go when Liverpool's Geoff Twentyman accidentally lobbed his own keeper for a bizarre own goal, and while Twentyman quickly pulled one back from the spot, his side still lost.

For Liverpool fans, the result is in some way remembered fondly: the humiliating defeat led in short order to the sacking of manager Phil Taylor - and the appointment of the legendary Bill Shankly, who restored the club's fortunes in fine style.

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Wrexham's ageing Mickey Thomas holds off David Rocastle

Wrexham 2-1 Arsenal - Third round, 1992

When England striker Alan Smith put the Gunners ahead just before half-time, a routine victory looked a formality for the reigning top flight champions against the team who'd finished bottom of the Fourth Division the previous season. Even when Wrexham began throwing the kitchen sink at Arsenal after the break, George Graham's men never really looked in danger.

All that changed eight minutes from time when Wales legend Mickey Thomas lashed a free-kick past David Seaman to level things up. Then, with the cheers having barely died down, Steve Watkin beat Tony Adams to the ball and scored again for the hosts to complete a stunning victory.

Hereford 2-1 a.e.t. Newcastle - Third round replay, 1972

The Southern League side took 5,000 fans to St James' Park to face a Newcastle side that included six international players, but the Magpies seemed to have the match wrapped up as they led 2-1 early on - but Hereford player-manager Colin Addison scored a late 25-yard thunderbolt to force a replay.

Hereford had already come through three replays just to make the third round of the Cup, and the fans clearly felt something was on the cards: not only was the stadium full, but dozens climbed trees, lampposts and rooftops to try and get a glimpse of the game.

Malcolm McDonald appeared to have won the match for Newcastle when he scored with eight minutes left, but Ronnie Radford equalised three minutes later with an absolute corker from distance - sparking a huge pitch invasion - before Ricky George added a 103rd-minute winner.

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Barnsley: Great giantkilling, not so sure about the hats

Liverpool 1-2 Barnsley and Barnsley 1-0 Chelsea - Fifth round and quarter-finals, 2008

Barnsley stunned giants Liverpool with an injury-time winner in their FA Cup fifth round 2-1 victory at Anfield, Brian Howard scoring in the 93rd minute to cap an incredible comeback victory.

But that was nothing compared to what happened at Oakwell a few weeks later as Kayode Odejayi rose above Carlo Cudicini to head home and put the Tykes into the semi-finals. Barnsley's squad, assembled for around £350,000, had beaten Chelsea, assembled for £212.4m, to give the club two of the biggest scalps in English football in consecutive rounds of the Cup.

Yeovil Town 2-1 Sunderland - Fourth round, 1949

The Southern League side came into their match against the Black Cats full of confidence after beating Second Division Bury in the third round, and the fairytale got off to a perfect start as Alec Stock put the hosts ahead after 28 minutes.

Replacement goalkeeper Dickie Dyke, making just his second appearance for Yeovil, was a revelation as he kept the well-heeled visitors at bay but he misjudged a free-kick to allow Jackie Robinson to equalise just after the hour mark, and that is how the match finished at 90 minutes.

Normally that would have meant a replay, but post-war fuel restrictions meant matches were decided in extra time - and Eric Bryant popped up in the 105th minute to score the winner.

Yeovil came crashing back to earth as they lost 8-0 to Manchester United in the next round.

Birmingham City 1-2 Altrincham - Third round replay, 1986

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Birmingham's Robert Hopkins, whose own goal made him an Altrincham legend

Robert Hopkins scored to put the Blues on track for a routine victory against a side who were newly promoted to the Conference, but Altrincham pulled one back to level things up and keep themselves in the match.

Hopkins was the man who settled the tie, however, sliding back to try and clear the ball but succeeding only in guiding it past a young David Seaman. Birmingham became only the second top flight team to lose at home against non-league opposition - and, to date, they are the last.

Burnley 0-1 Wimbledon - Third round, 1975

The Clarets had been promoted as Division Two champions two seasons before, and had finished sixth in the top flight as well as making the FA Cup semi-final the previous term.

Yet they were made to look silly by the Southern League side in what was the first ever home defeat for a top flight team on home turf. Dickie Guy's astonishing heroics in goal helped Wimbledon to a famous 1-0 win; Guy repeated his display in the next round against reigning English champions Leeds - saving a Peter Lorimer penalty - at Elland Road as the Dons earned a replay. The Cup run came to an end in the replay, moved to Selhurst Park and watched by 40,000, as Wimbledon lost after an own-goal by a certain Dave Bassett. Guy is now president of AFC Wimbledon.

Three years later the Dons warned election to the Football League - and 10 years after that they lifted the FA Cup at Wembley with a famous 1-0 win over Liverpool.

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Andy Thorn and Alan Pardew celebrate the winner against Liverpool

Crystal Palace 4-3 Liverpool - Semi-final, 1990

Newly-promoted Palace's season had begun against Liverpool in abject fashion as the Eagles were destroyed 9-0 at Anfield, still one of the biggest thrashings in league history.

But Steve Coppell's men got their own back on a far bigger stage as the two sides met at Villa Park, with Andy Gray's header in the dying seconds to force extra time and Alan Pardew's 109th-minute winner carving an indelible place for both in the Palace record books.

Palace almost pulled off an equally big shock in the final as they led in extra time against Manchester United before the match finished 3-3, but they were thumped in the replay as some bloke called Alex Ferguson managed the Red Devils to a trophy for the first time.

West Brom 2-4 Woking - Third round, 1991

The Diadora League side looked certain to be going out of the FA Cup against their Second Division hosts at The Hawthorns when they went in 1-0 down at half-time.

But nobody counted on the efforts of a Gibraltan international cricketer by the name of Tim Buzaglo, who notched a second-half hat-trick as Woking ran the Baggies ragged. "I didn't think we had a chance of winning," Buzaglo later admitted of his hopes before the game, "but once I got out on the pitch, I was totally different and I didn't care who the opposition were. I would back myself against anybody."

Woking almost pulled off an even greater shock in the next round: they drew Everton at Goodison Park and put on a great showing, but were unable to score and ended up losing 1-0.

Have we missed out your favourite shock result? Share it with everybody in the comment box below!

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