6 ways to make your bathroom more sustainable right now

Melanie Sutrathada
·5-min read
Sustainable Bathroom Products
Sustainable Bathroom Products

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Melanie Sutrathada is In The Know’s lifestyle contributor. Follow her on Instagram and Twitter for more.

Sustainability has been a burning topic for years. With climate change impacts becoming more and more tumultuous (That’s an SAT word — you’re welcome!) and literal plastic islands the size of Texas in our oceans, something needs to be done. Just do a quick Google search of “fatberg,” and I’m sure you’ll agree that we all have to make changes to lessen our impact on the environment.

But going green isn’t just a trend. It’s a way of life — and it begins with the products we choose to buy.

These are some of the best eco-friendly products to help transform your bathroom into a more sustainable space. Want more recommendations? Check out these sustainable product for your kitchen.

Go from bottles to bars

Shop: HiBar Shampoo And Conditioner Bars, $26.50

Credit: Hibar
Credit: Hibar

Sometimes the easiest thing you can do is go back to the basics. Do you really think your grandma used those oversized plastic shampoo bottles to wash her hair? Of course not! Enter HiBar Shampoo and Conditioner Bars, a solid haircare duo that skips the need for plastic packaging.

The bars have no sulfates, parabens or phthalates, and they are 100 percent cruelty-free. These salon-quality bars are safe for color-treated hair, and are a great plastic-free swap.

Kick the toothpaste tube

Shop: Bite Toothpaste Bits, $30

Credit: Bite
Credit: Bite

Bite Toothpaste Bits are the next big thing in the world of oral care. Bite is a carbon-neutral company reinventing traditional toothpaste. And it’s even delivered to you with zero emissions and zero waste.

These naturally-whitening toothpaste tablets are cruelty-free and contain a non-toxic fluoride alternative. Best of all, Bite Toothpaste Bits come in a refillable glass jar instead of a plastic tube, which means that every time you buy Bits, you aren’t adding to the 1 billion plastic toothpaste tubes that end up in landfills and oceans every year.

Wipe out regular toilet paper

Shop: Seventh Generation Unbleached Bathroom Tissue, $12.99

Credit: Seventh Generation

If you’re wondering why you haven’t seen this toilet paper before, it’s because it’s almost always sold out. I found it once in a grocery store, and basically ran over to grab two packages immediately. Yes, I get that excited about TP. And I have no shame about that when it’s as amazing as this one.

Bio-degradable, eco-friendly and completely natural, the gentle unbleached toilet paper from Seventh Generation is one of the best ways to go green in your bathroom. Seventh Generation uses natural, unbleached pulp paper which saves energy, water and trees. Plus, this unbleached TP doesn’t contain chlorine, formaldehyde, artificial dyes and artificial scents.

Ditch the plastic containers and get scrubbing

Shop: Peach Moisturizing Hand And Body Soap, $7.95

Credit: Roven

I don’t know about you, but I’ve definitely spent way more time washing my hands this year than ever before. Having gone through about 1,389,204 bottles of soap while singing “Happy Birthday” twice under my breath has left me feeling like there’s got to be a better way.

The exfoliating Peach Moisturizing Hand and Body Soap is perfect for buffing away dead skin and washing away bacteria. This eco-friendly swap is not only 100 percent plastic-free, but boasts natural, fresh ingredients like coconut oil, shea butter and pink Himalayan sea salt to nourish and protect your skin.

Get rid of wasteful makeup wipes and cotton pads

Shop: MakeUp Eraser, $20

Credit: MakeUp Eraser

What we use to take off our makeup can be so wasteful. I mean, how many cotton pads or wipes does it take to wipe off that waterproof mascara and red lip? The answer: A lot.

Plus, despite cotton being a renewable resource, farmers tend to use a lot of water and pesticides to grow it. So maybe cotton might not actually be that eco-friendly after all. And wipes? Don’t even get me started on how bad they are for the environment and your skin.

That’s why I can’t recommend the MakeUp Eraser enough. I’ve suggested it to basically everyone I know, and even to people I don’t know (I’m that person giving unsolicited advice in a Sephora to complete strangers). It’s hard not to tell people about this reusable, machine-washable piece of cloth magic that removes all makeup with just water. Yes, you read that right — just water.

Not to get all infomercial on you, but wait — there’s more! One Makeup Eraser is the equivalent of 3,600 wipes and can last a whopping 3 to 5 years. It truly is the most sustainable makeup remover out there — and you 100 percent need it in your life.

Say buh-bye to chemical cleaners

Shop: Mrs. Meyers Multi-Surface Cleaner, $3.94

Credit: Mrs. Meyer’s

Keeping your bathroom clean is just as important as keeping your skin cleansed. Unlike harsh chemical cleaners, Mrs. Meyer’s Multi-Surface Cleaner contains essential oils and plant-based ingredients.

The product is 100 percent cruelty-free, and available in a range of different fragrances including fresh-cut grass (which is my personal favorite!), lavender, mint, rosemary and more. You can use this cleaner literally anywhere in your house, including the kitchen and the bathroom. Go ahead and stock up now!

If you enjoyed this article, check out Melanie Sutrathada’s ideas for making your kitchen more sustainable!

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