8 dates for the diary this summer as major sporting events return

Luke BradshawSports Writer
Yahoo News UK
Mohamed Salah of Liverpool. (Photo by Alex Livesey - Danehouse/Getty Images)
Mohamed Salah of Liverpool. (Photo by Alex Livesey - Danehouse/Getty Images)

As the government eases lockdown measures, sport begins its tentative steps back into competition.

With next to no live sport since the middle of March due to the coronavirus pandemic, a number of governing bodies and organisations have announced when they will be resuming tournaments and events.

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All are subject to change, should government guidelines alter, but as it stands, here are the biggest events to look out for this summer.

June 16: Royal Ascot

The Betfair Ascot Chase at Ascot. (Photo by Alan Crowhurst/Getty Images)
The Betfair Ascot Chase at Ascot. (Photo by Alan Crowhurst/Getty Images)

Set across five days, one of the biggest events in Britain’s sporting calendar will make its overdue appearance.

The event will feature 36 races, with seven races on each of the first four days, and eight on the final day.

As with most sporting events over the period, there will be no crowds at the course itself, but punters can make do with live TV coverage.

June 17: Premier League

The Premier League has been trying to restart its season since it was abandoned on 3 April due to the coronavirus pandemic, but will finally resume with two fixtures on 17 June: Aston Villa v Sheffield United and Manchester City v Arsenal

In a packed schedule, there will be 92 games in a little over four weeks, as well as nearly a third being broadcast free to air.

READ MORE: When and where can you watch the remainder of the Premier League

June 23: Tennis

Andy Murray (R) and his brother Jamie Murray. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
Andy Murray (R) and his brother Jamie Murray. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)

British tennis fans will get to see Andy Murray back in action after his injury-induced hiatus, thanks to the organisational skills of his brother.

‘Schroders Battle of the Brits’, is the idea of Wimbledon doubles champion Jamie Murray, and will be shown on Amazon Prime, to help raise money for NHS Charities Together.

It will also feature Kyle Edmund and Dan Evans, and while there will be no women players on show, a ladies tournament is in the planning.

July 5: Formula 1

Ferrari's German driver Sebastian Vettel (L) and Mercedes' British driver Lewis Hamilton. (Photo by William West via Getty Images)
Ferrari's German driver Sebastian Vettel (L) and Mercedes' British driver Lewis Hamilton. (Photo by William West via Getty Images)

On 2 June Formula 1 announced that the 2020 season would start at the beginning of July. The schedule includes just eight races (the minimum required for a world championship), rather than the normal 21, but more may be added later on.

The great news for British race fans is that Silverstone will host two Grand Prix back to back, on the 2 and 9 of August.

July 8: Cricket

England will belatedly get their summer off to a start at the beginning of July with a three-Test series against the West Indies in Southampton.

The other two Tests will be played at Old Trafford on 16 July and 24 July.

July 15: Boxing

Anthony Joshua poses with Eddie Hearn (R) and Barry Hearn (second from left). (Photo by Richard Heathcote/Getty Images)
Anthony Joshua poses with Eddie Hearn (R) and Barry Hearn (second from left). (Photo by Richard Heathcote/Getty Images)

Boxing promoter Eddie Hearn’s plans to stage a full fight camp and night of bouts in the garden of his family mansion caught sports fans’ attention when it was announced in May.

The plan is to use the space to ensure fighters can train in the weeks beforehand and then compete in isolation, while receiving regular testing throughout.

A number of major fights have been cancelled over the summer, meaning a huge amount is riding on the ambitious show’s success.

July 22: Golf

Kicking off with the British Masters on the 22 July, the European Tour will see the ‘UK Swing’ commence. The six-week event will run intermittently until December and include the Scottish Open and PGA Championship.

No golf has been played on the tour since 8 March.

August 29: Tour de France

Egan Bernal on the Champs-Elysees at the Tour de France 2019. (Photo by Mustafa Yalcin/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)
Egan Bernal on the Champs-Elysees at the Tour de France 2019. (Photo by Mustafa Yalcin/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

Originally scheduled for 27 June, cycling’s biggest prize has been pushed back until the end of the summer.

Arguably the toughest and most gruelling event in all of sport, the delay looks set to make the race that little bit harder, with temperatures likely to be higher at the end of August than in June.


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