Beano and Bank of England team up on financially educating kids

Comics, including The Beano. Photo: Sarah Fabian-Baddiel/Heritage Images/Getty Images
Comics, including The Beano. Photo: Sarah Fabian-Baddiel/Heritage Images/Getty Images

In an unlikely pairing, Britain’s longest-running comic has teamed up with the Bank of England (BOE) and Tes to bring financial education to children.

The Beano is bringing its band of cheeky characters to a new initiative in the Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) curriculum.

Scroll to continue with content
Ad

Marking “My Money Week,” the resources are designed to introduce young people aged five to 11 to the basics of how money and the economy work.

It aims to give children the confidence to manage money now and in the future, introducing them to financial concepts.

Dennis the Menace, Minnie and Gnasher will feature in a series of 12 lessons.

For years, policy makers have been called on to improve financial literacy in schools. This, alongside other initiatives should go some way to helping that.

READ MORE: MPs lambast British Airways for its treatment of employees during crisis

Andrew Bailey, governor of the BOE, said: “Financial literacy is essential for everyone. The Bank’s education programme is central to our role in equipping the public with sufficient financial and economic knowledge for their daily lives.

“[The resource] will support teachers in giving young people a strong sense of the importance of economic and financial decisions from an early age.”

The BOE has not released details on how the course will look, but offers hints on its website.

Emma Scott, Beano Studios CEO, said: “Beano has been engaging children for more than 80 years, and we love bringing that experience to the classroom.

“We’ve had fun producing these unique financial literacy lessons so kids can enjoy learning about money and gain necessary life skills.”

The BoE has also launched teaching resources for secondary schools with its econoME programme, focused on the role of decision-making in the economy.

What to read next