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The Best Way To Cut Acorn Squash For Soup

Acorn squash soup in bowl
Acorn squash soup in bowl - AnastasiaKopa/Shutterstock

When the colder months roll around, there's nothing quite like a warm bowl of soup to comfort the soul, and acorn squash soup stands out for its rich, sweet flavor and creamy texture. The journey of making this delicious winter soup begins with understanding the best way to cut the vegetable. The secret? Halving the squash.

This approach balances ease of preparation with culinary efficiency. First, it eliminates the daunting task of too much chopping: No need to cut out numerous wedges, slices, or cubes. Second, it makes it easy to scoop out the squash's fleshy goodness once roasted. And third, you don't need to waste time peeling the squash, because once the halves are all cooked up in the oven, the flesh and skin will separate very easily.

However, the job of cutting through an acorn squash is often met with hesitation. The vegetable's hard exterior presents a challenge, requiring both caution and the right technique to tackle it safely. Additionally, the squash's rounded, ribbed shape can make it challenging to stabilize on a cutting board, increasing the risk of slippage and injury. Recognizing these challenges is the first step in mastering the preparation of acorn squash. The next step is understanding the step-by-step process of halving it easily and safely.

Read more: 20 Popular Canned Soups, Ranked Worst To Best

How To Cut The Acorn Squash In Half

whole and halved acorn squash
whole and halved acorn squash - AnjelikaGr/Shutterstock

Start the process of halving your acorn squash by creating a stable base and finding a sharp, sturdy chef's knife to ensure a clean cut. Wash the squash to remove any dirt from its surface, then dry it. With a firm grip on the knife and the squash securely positioned horizontally on the cutting board, slice off the stem end of the vegetable. The key here is not to slice too much off; just enough to create a flat surface that will provide stability.

Now, with the squash standing upright on the cut side, position your knife at the top center of the squash. Press the blade down firmly and steadily, applying even pressure as you cut the squash vertically down the middle. If you find this step particularly challenging, a gentle rocking motion with both hands supporting the knife can help ease the blade through the tough exterior. Remember, safety is paramount, so take your time and keep your fingers clear of the blade's path.

Once the squash is halved, use a spoon to scoop out the seeds, discarding them or setting them aside for roasting if you prefer. And that's it. What you're left with are two perfect halves of acorn squash, ready to be baked until tender then scooped out to make a delicious creamy soup.

Read the original article on Tasting Table.