Billy Horschel claims 'special' Memorial Tournament win

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Billy Horschel secured victory at the Memorial Tournament on Sunday, shooting an even-par 72 to finish four strokes ahead of Aaron Wise.

Horschel had a healthy buffer at the start of play on Sunday with a five-shot lead and kept it relatively steady, but had to come up with some big shots on the back nine to take the win.

After a bogey on the sixth, the 35-year-old got back to even with a birdie on the par-three 10th.

A bogey on the 12th took him back to one-over, yet a massive putt on the par-five 15th for eagle gave Horschel a commanding lead.

It effectively shut the door on Wise, who had also birdied on 15, before he closed out the round with a bogey for a one-under 71.

It was Horschel's seventh tournament win on the PGA Tour, but his first with his family present. Greeted by them and tournament founder Jack Nicklaus after the win, Horschel spoke of the added significance of this triumph.

"It's special, it truly is," Horschel said after his round. "Jack's a legend of the game and to win his event, you've seen the guys who have won this event, just legends in their own right, it's pretty special.

"We joke about it in the family but my wife and my kids have never been to any of my victories. My parents have, and so, having a five-shot lead knowing that this was mine to sort of go out and win or lose, and having them here, I really wanted to win."

Horschel moved into the FedEx Cup's top 10 with the win, just 19 points behind Jon Rahm in ninth.

Excluding the 2021 WGC Match Play, defeating Scottie Scheffler in the final, this win is his first on the PGA Tour in a regular four-round format since the 2018 Zurich Classic.

Coming into Sunday with that five-stroke lead, Horschel was determined to maintain rather than extend that margin.

"I've watched Tiger play enough, and I wasn't around when Jack was playing in his heyday, but you knew he was unbelievable at course management," he said.

"He knew how to plot his way around a golf course and learn from those two, and understand, when you have a lead, you don't have to do anything special. You've just got to make sure you don't give any shots back.

"I did give some back and I was a little upset about it, but we just put the ball on the green, two-putting, trying not to do anything special and if I had to do something special, then I was ready for it. That eagle on 15 was huge."

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