Blair Kinghorn believes developing 'a ruthless streak' will be key for his Edinburgh stand-off switch

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·2-min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
Blair Kinghorn believes developing 'a ruthless streak' will be key for his Edinburgh stand-off switch
Blair Kinghorn believes developing 'a ruthless streak' will be key for his Edinburgh stand-off switch

Blair Kinghorn believes that developing a ruthless streak is going to be key to his conversion from mercurial back-three player to Edinburgh’s chief game manager at stand-off.

The 25-year-old recognises that he is not yet the finished article in the position he previously played regularly at school, and which he began the process of returning to at the end of last season after several years as a full-back or winger – but he believes that he has shown that it is an experiment worth persevering with.

“You learn things as you go,” said Kinghorn, who is set to wear the Edinburgh No10 jersey in Saturday’s European Champions Cup qualification decider against Glasgow Warriors at Murrayfield. “I feel the rugby side of things is fine because I feel like I’m a talented football player and everyone in the team is helping out, so it’s been more tactical things [I’ve needed to focus on], like knowing when to run, when to kick, what areas of the field to play in and just being really ruthless.

“You see a lot of world-class teams and they have a ruthless operator at 10 who leads the side around the park.

“You’re controlling the game so you’ve got to know your stuff, and if you do it with confidence then the lads around you will believe.

“It will take some time, but I feel like I’m developing as I would like to.”

The decision to move Kinghorn back to stand-off raised a few eyebrows when the process began, and there was no shortage of armchair experts convinced that he had neither the temperament nor the instincts to successfully make the switch. For his part, Kinghorn says that he is able to block out any negativity which is directed his way.

“Some people are saying I’m good, some are saying I’m rubbish – everyone’s an expert behind a keyboard!” he shrugs. “I try not to pay too much attention to that sort of stuff. I deleted my Twitter account. People can think what they think but if I think I’m a good player and the lads do too then that’s fine. I don’t listen to the other stuff.

“You definitely get more scrutiny when you’re in one of the game-driving positions. If we lose it’s the 9 and 10s fault, and if we win we’re brilliant – so you can’t really win.

“But I’ve had a few beers bought for me from Edinburgh fans up at the Roseburn Bar after games, so it can’t be all bad.”

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting