Chick-fil-A's first-ever restaurant — a 56-year-old location in an Atlanta mall — is closing

·2-min read
Chick-fil-A in Greenbriar Mall
Chick-fil-A
  • Chick-fil-A's oldest restaurant is closing on Saturday after 56 years of operation, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.

  • The restaurant in Greenbriar Mall, Atlanta, first opened in 1967 and sold chicken sandwiches for $0.59.

  • Chick-fil-A describes the restaurant as a "pioneer in the modern-day food court."

Chick-fil-A's oldest restaurant, which opened in an Atlanta mall 56 years ago, is closing.

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The restaurant, located in the food court of Greenbriar Mall to the southwest of the city, is set to shut for good at 4 p.m. on Saturday, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. Printed-out signs posted at the location don't give reasons for the closure.

Chick-fil-A founder S. Truett Cathy opened the restaurant in 1967 in what was one of the first indoor malls in the Southeast. He'd previously set up a diner in Atlanta called The Dwarf Grill, later renamed The Dwarf House, with his brother Ben.

"At the time, the concept of a shopping mall restaurant was groundbreaking," Chick-fil-A says in a history of the Greenbriar Mall store, describing it as a "pioneer in the modern-day food court."

Chick-fil-A in Greenbriar Mall
Chick-fil-A

When it opened, the 384-square-foot restaurant — roughly the size of a two-car garage — sold its chicken sandwiches for just $0.59. Other items available included fries, chicken salads, coleslaw, lemon pie, and lemonade.

Staff served customers in a uniform made up of candy-striped aprons, ascots, so-called "soda jerk" hats, and ties, Chick-fil-A says. As with Chick-fil-A locations today, the restaurant was closed on Sundays.

The restaurant later relocated to a larger spot in the mall.

Chick-fil-A's first free-standing restaurant didn't open until nearly two decades later in North Druid Hills, northeast Atlanta. The fried-chicken chain now has more than 2,700 locations.

Read the original article on Business Insider