Church protests Trump's immigration policy by 'detaining' Jesus, Mary, and Joseph

Yahoo Lifestyle
Church protests Trump’s immigration policy, puts the Holy Family behind bars. (Photo: Twitter/faithepinho)
Church protests Trump’s immigration policy, puts the Holy Family behind bars. (Photo: Twitter/faithepinho)

Baby Jesus, Mary, and Joseph were brought out of Christ Church Cathedral’s basement a few months early to send a message to President Trump. 

The Indianapolis church’s Rev. Lee Curtis came up with the idea to incarcerate statues of the Holy Family to protest POTUS‘s zero-tolerance immigration policy and the resulting separation of families who have crossed the border illegally.

The church shared images of the display on social media. 


The Holy Family statues were placed within a barbed-wire-topped chain-link enclosure in front of the church on Monday evening as part of its #EveryFamilyIsHoly campaign. The clergy of the Episcopal church attended the Families Belong Together rally Saturday to protest family detention.


“We are hoping to draw attention that indefinite family detention is wrong,” Curtis said to the Indianapolis Star. “This family is every family, and every family is holy.” Curtis also noted that the biblical refugee family was seeking asylum in Egypt shortly after Jesus’s birth.


According to the Indianapolis Star article, many passersby agreed with the church’s message.

“I think Jesus intended everybody to get along and be free. Nobody should be enslaved,” Randy Sylvia told the paper. “I just think it’s wrong.”

“I think it’s bold,” Matthew Roberts said. “It just makes me think about those families that are separated and pray for them.”  

The powerful images are already creating strong reactions online too.




Fred Andrews, a sexton at Christ Church Cathedral, said that he hoped the demonstration would bring people to the polls in the next election.

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