Cricket-Boult hoping to strike in Birmingham despite Stead reluctance

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FILE PHOTO: FILE PHOTO: New Zealand v India - Second Test
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(Reuters) - New Zealand pace spearhead Trent Boult is hoping to make his international return for the second test against England but may have work to do to convince coach Gary Stead.

Left-armer Boult is set to arrive in England on Friday, having returned home to quarantine and spend time with family after the Indian Premier League's suspension.

"Everything is feeling good with what lies ahead, a big stage for the World Test Championship final, and hopefully I can get over there and be part of that second test as well,” Boult told New Zealand media on Tuesday.

"Once I smell that English fresh air and see the (Dukes) ball move about, I'll definitely be excited."

The first test starts at Lord's on Wednesday, with Matt Henry tipped to join the towering Kyle Jamieson and regulars Tim Southee and Neil Wagner in New Zealand's pace attack.

Stead said Boult would likely be rested until the inaugural World Test Championship final against India starting June 18, with seamers Doug Bracewell and Jacob Duffy in reserve if needed for the second test at Edgbaston.

"I don't think you'll see Trent in the two test matches here," Stead said in London.

"Our planning and what we're looking at doing with Trent is having him ready for the WTC final.

"He has had a week of bowling over there which has been great after the fair amount of isolation time at the end of the IPL."

Until capitalising on the IPL's suspension to spend a few nights at home with his wife and two young children, Boult was facing about nine months on the road fulfilling cricket commitments.

Another two weeks in hotel quarantine looms upon returning home after what may only be a cameo in England.

"If you can keep busy and not let yourself get too deep in your thoughts and whine about things, then you find a way to get through," said the 31-year-old.

"(We have) been very lucky to still be working in this current climate so it's the price you have to play."

(Reporting by Ian Ransom in Melbourne; Editing by Tom Hogue)

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