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Donald Trump Is Officially the Presumptive GOP Presidential Nominee, Securing More than Half of Delegates

After Tuesday's primary elections, Trump and Biden each received the necessary delegates to become their parties' respective presidential nominees at this summer's conventions

<p>Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty</p> Donald Trump speaks to New Hampshire voters in January, with opponent-turned-ally Tim Scott joining him on stage

Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty

Donald Trump speaks to New Hampshire voters in January, with opponent-turned-ally Tim Scott joining him on stage

Donald Trump has crossed the threshold required to become the presumptive Republican nominee for president in 2024, securing more than half of the total GOP delegates after Tuesday's primary elections.

The same goes for Joe Biden, who formally became the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee on Tuesday evening thanks to a flood of delegates from Georgia, Washington, Mississippi and Hawaii.

Related: President Biden's Energetic State of the Union Brings Him Best Fundraising Hours of 2024 Campaign

If all goes as planned, Trump, 77, and Biden, 81, will now be declared the major party nominees at their parties' conventions this summer. The 2024 Republican National Convention will span July 15 to 18 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The Democratic National Convention is scheduled for August 19 to 22 in Chicago.

<p>Chip Somodevilla/Getty</p> Donald Trump at a New Hampshire event in January. Shortly after, he would nominate his daughter-in-law Lara Trump (behind him, on the left) to help lead the RNC

Chip Somodevilla/Getty

Donald Trump at a New Hampshire event in January. Shortly after, he would nominate his daughter-in-law Lara Trump (behind him, on the left) to help lead the RNC

After leaving the White House in January 2021, Trump spent nearly two years teasing that he would seek another term, officially announcing his 2024 campaign at the Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach, Florida, in November 2022.

"America's comeback starts right now," the former president said before explaining his priorities for the nation. "We are here tonight to declare that it does not have to be this way."

Later in his speech, he said, "In order to make America great and glorious again I am tonight announcing my candidacy for president of the United States."

Related: Trump's 2024 Veepstakes Have Begun: A Look at His Top Choices for Running Mate

Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP/Shutterstock Melania and Donald Trump disembark from Air Force One for the final time in West Palm Beach, during Joe Biden's 2021 inauguration
Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP/Shutterstock Melania and Donald Trump disembark from Air Force One for the final time in West Palm Beach, during Joe Biden's 2021 inauguration

Trump left after one term in office in January 2021, becoming the first president in modern history to not personally welcome his successor to the White House by attending the inaugural ceremonies. Instead, he flew to his members-only club in Florida while Joe Biden was sworn in.

In the years since, the twice-impeached former president's post-White House prestige has been overshadowed by intensifying investigations on various fronts, as well as lawsuits and judgments against him.

So far, four of those investigations have led to indictments covering 91 criminal counts. The first indictment made Trump the only U.S. president to face criminal charges, and the next two further distinguished him as the only president to face federal charges.

Related: Every Crime Donald Trump Has Been Charged With

Trump faces other legal issues, too.

In February, a court ordered him to pay $355 million as a penalty for fraud, plus about $100 million in interest. In a 92-page ruling following a lengthy civil trial, Judge Arthur Engoron barred Trump from serving as an officer or director of any New York corporations or legal entities for three years. It also restricted him and the Trump Organization from applying for loans from New York-chartered financial institutions during the same time frame.

The ruling came just three weeks after a New York jury ordered Trump to pay $83.3 million in damages to former Elle columnist E. Jean Carroll for defamatory statements he made about her in 2019.

Trump, his family and supporters have repeatedly and insistently denied wrongdoing in the various criminal, congressional and civil inquiries.

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Trump did not participate in any of the Republican presidential debates in an unprecedented show of confidence, aiming to secure the party's nomination by firing up his existing base on social media and holding his own town halls on networks like Fox News and CNN. For his part, the strategy appears to have worked.

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