Ex-Arsenal goalkeeper Jens Lehmann sacked from Hertha Berlin board over racist WhatsApp message

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Simon Collings
·1-min read
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 (Getty Images)
(Getty Images)

Jens Lehmann, the former Arsenal goalkeeper, has been removed from his role on Hertha Berlin’s supervisory board after after referring to German television pundit Dennis Aogo as “a token black guy” in a WhatsApp message.

Aogo, who made 12 appearances for Germany during his playing career and now works for Sky Sport in Germany as a pundit, posted a screenshot of the message he had received from Lehmann on his Instagram story.

Lehmann, who was part of the Arsenal squad who went unbeaten in the Premier League during the 2003/04 season, sent a message to Aogo that read: “Is Dennis actually yourQuotenschwarzer (token black guy)?”

Aogo posted the screenshot along with the words: “Wow, are you serious? This message was probably not meant for me.”

Lehmann has now been removed from Hertha Berlin’s supervisory board and issued a public apology.

Lehmann wrote on Twitter: “In a private message from my mobile phone to Dennis Aogo, an impression was created for which I apologised in conversation with Dennis.

“As a former national team player he is very knowledgeable and has a great presence and drives ratings to Sky.”

Twitter: @jenslehmann
Twitter: @jenslehmann

Hertha Berlin president Werner Gegenbauer said: “Such statements in no way correspond to the values for which Hertha BSC stands and actively campaigns.

“We distance ourselves from any form of racism.”

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