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‘Expect a lot of fun and a lot of love’ as UK Black Pride returns to London for its 18th year

‘Expect a lot of fun and a lot of love’ as UK Black Pride returns to London for its 18th year

UK Black Pride returns for its 18th year in London on Saturday to mark the world’s largest celebration for Black and Queer people in the world.

Founded by Phyll Opoku-Gyimah, also known as Lady Phyll, to create an event for LGBTQI+ people of African, Asian, Caribbean, Latin American and Middle Eastern descent who felt underepresented, UK Black Pride will once again bring the community together to celebrate 18 years of boosting and celebrating inclusivity.

Held in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park from 12pm, the event has fostered itself as one which is “welcome to all” in order to help create unity within diverse communities.

“Everyone who’s been before knows it’s super welcoming, it’s super fun and it is a great safe space for the community,” Black Pride communications officer, Andre Bogues, told the Standard.

“If you haven’t been before, you can expect a lot of fun, and a lot of love.”

Phyll Opoku-Gyimah, also known as Lady Phyll (PA)
Phyll Opoku-Gyimah, also known as Lady Phyll (PA)

This year’s theme is “Legacy” in order to not just mark the organisation’s achievements in the past, but to also “set the foundations for the next generation of queer people of colour”, Mr Bogues added.

At the event, revellers can expect a host of performers including Miss Banks, DJ Biggy C, KSoul and a community stage where there will be a host of panels to discuss different topics.

“We really do to take in all walks of lives and all opinions and thoughts and bring it to the community to make sure that everything we do is representative, inclusive and safe,” he said.

 (Shane Anthony Sinclair/Getty)
(Shane Anthony Sinclair/Getty)

Remarking on the 18 years since she created the event, Lady Phyll said: “When myself and a group of Black lesbians set out to create our own Pride event, as the others felt exclusive and unwelcoming, we were told we’d never get anywhere.

“That no one would support us and that any community built around a ‘Black Pride’ would fade away. Here we are, 18 years later. Bigger, bolder, braver and brighter than ever.”

After last year’s success which saw 25,000 attend, she added: “It’s been a journey, and we have to thank everyone from the community that has been with us at every and any stage.

“We cannot wait to welcome our family back and continue to leave a legacy for the next generation of Black and people of colour queer love and progress.”