A fashion brand is being applauded for using a model with self-harm scars, but some worry it may 'normalize' cutting

Writer
Yahoo Lifestyle
The clothing company Goodbye Bread is hoping to encourage women that they should love themselves. This woman’s self-harm scars are visible as she models the company’s swimsuit. (Photo: Goodbye Bread)
The clothing company Goodbye Bread is hoping to encourage women that they should love themselves. This woman’s self-harm scars are visible as she models the company’s swimsuit. (Photo: Goodbye Bread)

Goodbye Bread, an online fashion retailer, is being applauded for featuring models who don’t fit the industry’s “unrealistic standards.” Some of the company’s models are heavily tattooed, some have stretch marks, and one member of their #GBSQUAD is pictured with her self-harm scars.

“Body scars are a part of a person’s life journey that should not be photoshopped,” the company told Metro.co.uk. “Goodbye Bread wants to show to all girls out there that they should love themselves and reject fashion’s unrealistic standards.”

Like Goodbye Bread, many fashion companies are choosing to embrace more diverse women and body types. Some popular campaigns include models who are plus-size, have vitiligo, or have cellulite.

Let’z get wet bishes 💦👉 gbread.co/soaked

A post shared by Goodbye Bread (@goodbyebread) on Jul 2, 2018 at 12:32pm PDT


The photos, which are unretouched, were posted on Instagram and immediately garnered praise.

“Thanks for showing a woman with self-harm scars. It really gives off a hopeful feeling. A lot of us have been in similar situations and this is so uplifting. There’s nothing to be embarrassed about — everyone has their own personal journey,” one user wrote.

“I’d like to thank you for using a model with scars, and not discriminating against her for having them. It really shows that you are still beautiful, even with your scars,” wrote another.

However, some are worried that the model’s scars may be “triggering” to people who have urges to hurt themselves. For some, seeing other people’s cuts, even if they are old scars, creates a trigger to self-harm.

One Instagram user voiced this concern: “This may be a good way to uplift people with self-harm scars but I fear it may be also a way of [normalizing] it.”

However, Asimoula Georgiadi, the co-founder of the company, stands behind the decision to show women as they are, scars included. She said that showing scars is an “important step toward encouraging body positivity and self-confidence” and that it helps to show other girls in a similar situation that they’re beautiful no matter what they go through.

“Goodbye Bread is not just a store, we are a community of girls and it is important that our actions celebrate individuality and empower girls to be themselves,” Georgiadi said.

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