Five NBA records that will never be broken

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Steph Curry became the all-time three-point leader in NBA history after draining his 2,974th three at Madison Square Garden in the 2021/22 campaign.

This is one of many records that should last forever, Planet Sport reveals the others that could run and run and run.

Steph Curry - Most threes in NBA history

The Golden State Warriors point-guard has 3,117 threes made in the regular season at the time of writing. This number could be matched again, but Curry will forever hold this record as he still has many years ahead of him.

Ray Allen played 1,300 games and held the record after overtaking Reggie Miller in 2009/10. It took Curry 511 less games than Allen to break the record and he is showing no signs of letting up. It's anyone's bet how many he finishes with.

Holding this record is very befitting of the man who influenced a generation and evolved the game to be extremely three-point orientated.

Wilt Chamberlain - Most points scored in a game

The freak of nature that was Wilt Chamberlain once dropped 100 points in a single game. The unfortunate opponents were the New York Knicks, who felt his wrath as the Philadelphia Warriors man led their 147-169 victory in 1962.

This record is widely considered to be one of the best in sports history.

Chamberlain averaged 50.4 points per game in the same season as his 100-point extravaganza, which is another record that will never be broken. He averaged 44.8 the season after and 38.4 the season prior, meaning he holds first, second and third-place in the single-season scoring leader record.

Bill Russell - Most titles as a player

Russell won 11 titles during his 13-year NBA career. He won them all with the Boston Celtics as he reached the final in every season he played, bar one.

The only team to come close to repeating the Celtics' success in the 1960s was the Chicago Bulls in the 90s, but their six title triumphs does not hold a candle to the all-time Boston team.

Eight of the nine players who have seven or more rings were with the Celtics during the Russell era. The odd one out is Robert Horry, who helped the Los Angeles Lakers three-peat in the 2000s.

John Stockton - Most assists and most steals in history

Stockton was a floor general, a perfect point guard and a crafty defender.

The Utah Jazz icon stole the ball 3,265 times in the regular season, leading the all-time way by close to 600. The only current player in sight is Chris Paul, who has 2,453.

He also holds the record for most assists in NBA history with 15,806. He is in charge by 3,715. Once again, Paul is the closest active player. The 36-year-old needs to drop close to 5,000 more dimes before he retires. Fat chance.

A.C. Green - Most consecutive games played

It's safe to say that Green is the most durable player in NBA history. He missed THREE games (all in his sophomore season) in his 16-year career.

He played 1,192 consecutive games, starting on November 19, 1986 when the Los Angeles Lakers beat the San Antonio Spurs. Green's run came to an end in the last game of his career on April 18, 2001. This is known as the 'ironman streak'.

NBA teams tend to rest their best players with load management taking over in recent seasons. Meaning Green's ironman streak is extremely unlikely to be surpassed.

At the time of writing, Mikal Bridges has played 309 games on the trot, so he has the best chance as things stand of breaking Green's legendary record.

The article Five NBA records that will never be broken appeared first on Planetsport.com.

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