World Cup - Paper Round: Suarez 'set to demand move from Liverpool'

Luis Suarez is set to shock Liverpool and once again demand a move away from the club; while Madrid are set to make a move for another Liverpool star and all the rest of the fallout from another day of World Cup action.

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World Cup - Paper Round: Suarez 'set to demand move from Liverpool'
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Luis Suarez scored both of Uruguay's goals against England

Suarez set to demand transfer to Spain: Luis Suarez will shock Liverpool and demand that the club honour the release clause in his contract and allow him to move to Spain, report the Sunday Times. The paper states that both Barcelona and Real Madrid are ready to activate the clause, which is thought to stand at £67.9 million. The player’s wife, Sofia, has family in Barcelona and, as such, the Uruguayan is thought to favour a move to Catalonia.

Paper Round’s view: This transfer saga is sickeningly predictably despite the player signing a new bumper contract at the Merseyside club in December of last year. The club have shown at times what could be described as misguided support to the striker and, while he had repaid that faith on the pitch, this alleged attempt to manufacture a move does not sit well. This time, expect him to go.

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Real Madrid set for Sterling swoop: Real Madrid are set to test Liverpool’s resolve with a move for forward Raheem Sterling, according to the Sunday Mirror. However, there is some good news of sorts, as Madrid boss Carlo Ancelotti won’t make the move this summer but will wait to see how the England youngster progresses over the next year before making a move in 2015.

Paper Round’s view: Sterling has been the one major bright spot in a dismal World Cup campaign for England and it is perfectly logical that he will have been attracting interest from the world’s elite. However, the fact that his rise has been so meteoric makes the caution shown by Madrid understandable. He has been great but for one season at most. This isn’t to say that he is a one-season wonder but it is wise to see whether he can sustain such levels of performance.

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And here is the fall out on the 10th day of the 2014 World Cup – with Latin American supremacy, Lionel Messi and England’s problems all featuring.

Jeremy Wilson (The Telegraph): Amid all the goals, thrills and English inquests, a wider pattern is unfolding in Brazil that might yet develop into the World Cup’s most significant narrative. That is potentially eight Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Chile, Colombia, Uruguay, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Argentina) teams into the last 16 of the tournament. It would be a feat unprecedented in World Cup history but also the continuation of a surprising wider trend that has seen countries from this region steadily increase their participation in the knockout phase from three in 2002, to four in 2006 and then six in 2010. And, for all Europe’s money, structures, academies and 10-year plans, are we discovering that the best footballers are still those who spent their childhoods honing their technical skills and temperament away from formal coaching and in fiercely competitive street matches.

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Ian Herbert (The Independent): The Argentinians were horrified to find a banner which proclaimed: “Welcome to the next world champions” had been erected at their training base at Vespasiano, a short distance north of here, when they arrived two weeks ago. The superstitious squad ordered the well-meaning local Brazilians to take it down, and this extraordinary match underlined why there can be few certainties in football. It turned into one of the great containment jobs – and so nearly the greatest – that this tournament has ever seen. For 90 minutes the best strike-force in the competition could not breach the barriers which the world’s 43rd-ranked team placed before them. Only then did the golden foot of the player the world is watching provide a moment of incredible, near-impossible theatre. There was no obvious space for Lionel Messi to move into and a wall of Iranian red before him. He dropped his shoulder, took the ball to the first man’s left and curled it around two defenders and the goalkeeper.

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Michael Ballack (The Times): One of the big problems is that England do not have a philosophy. When you watch Italy, Germany and Holland you have a good idea of how they’re going to play and they’re fairly consistent, even if some players are out of form. With England you never know what you’re going to get. They have some promising players, like Daniel Sturridge and Raheem Sterling, as well as Wayne Rooney, of course, but they play as individuals, not as a team. There is always something missing. As individuals, England are not weaker than the other teams in their group, but as a team it seems that they are. From the outside, it looks as if they lack trust in each other, and their own ability. It may be down to their history of poor results and failing to meet the country’s expectations, which means they cannot get results at tournaments when it really matters.

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Ian Ladyman (Daily Mail): With the most instinctive extension of his leg at the far post on Saturday night, Miroslav Klose moved one step closer to immortality. This is how the really great goalscorers do it; without fuss. It’s their job and to people like Klose it comes naturally. In scoring the 15th goal of his remarkable World Cup career, the German centre forward – on as a second half substitute – edged level with the Brazilian Ronaldo at the top of the all-time table. Perhaps just as importantly to him, he moved ahead of his compatriot, the great Gerd Mueller. Important players do important things, though, and when the big German defender Bendikt Hoewedes rose to flick on a corner 19 minutes from time, Klose was in the right place to earn his team a point.

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