French Open: Pegula ready to bring her 'A-game' for Swiatek challenge

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Jessica Pegula promised to come out fighting with her "A-game" as she aims for a "great story" by defeating the in-form Iga Swiatek at the French Open.

World number one Swiatek survived a first-set scare against Zheng Qinwen in the fourth round at Roland Garros to secure a 6-7 (5-7) 6-0 6-2 win on Monday.

That extended Swiatek's winning run to 32 matches, which means only Serena Williams (34) and Venus Williams (35) have recorded longer streaks on the WTA Tour this century.

Swiatek would match the longest winning run of the 2000s – set by Venus Williams in 2000 (35) – should she go on to lift the Coupe Suzanne Lenglen for a second time on Saturday, but first has to find a way past Pegula on Wednesday.

Pegula has only dropped two sets in Paris after reaching the quarter-finals with a 4-6 6-2 6-3 triumph over Romania’s Irina-Camelia Begu.

The world number 11 was the 16th scalp of Swiatek's incredible winning run when she lost to the Pole in Miami, and the American knows she must be at her best to contend with the top seed - who turned 21 on Tuesday.

"I know I'm going to have to play really, really well," Pegula said.

"I'm going to have to play aggressive against her, I'm going to have to go for my shots, because she is better when the point extends.

"I'm going to try and shorten the points as much as I can but at the same time try and be patient and not go for too much and miss my shots.

"But it's definitely going to be really tough. Hopefully I can bring my A-game because I need it."

Pegula and Swiatek share a 1-1 head-to-head record and is determined to be the one to end her dominance.

"I practised with her here as well before the tournament started and she's a super nice girl," Pegula revealed.

"We practised a few times. So I definitely know [her game] but obviously in the moment, it's hard to pinpoint exactly what you should do.

"She's just been so solid in every aspect. I think it's one of those things where at least I've played her so I think I do have that familiar sense, going against her, but yeah maybe a little different on clay.

"I think it goes both ways. I think sometimes it's like, 'Oh, I wish I didn't play her in the quarter-finals. I wish I played one of the other people, and didn't meet her so early, but then at the same time, it's a great chance to have a great win and a great story."

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