Future Super Bowl locations: Host cities, stadiums for Super Bowl 2019 & beyond

Sporting News

When the NFL considers sites for future Super Bowl locations, many requirements must be met by potential cities, their venues and their accommodations. Stadium quality is among the priorities, which is why all of the next four Super Bowls will be played in new or recently renovated stadiums.

That’s why Minnesota was awarded Super Bowl 52 in 2018, after all. With weather also being a factor when the NFL considers future Super Bowl locations, brand-new and climate-controlled U.S. Bank Stadium was the reason "Bold North" was possible. The league wanted to show off the impressive stadium during America’s most-watch sporting event.

That will be the case again in 2019, when the Super Bowl will be played in yet another new stadium. Here are the sites the NFL has pinned as future Super Bowl locations.

Future Super Bowl locations

Year

Super Bowl site

2019

Atlanta, Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Super Bowl 53

2020

South Florida, Hard Rock Stadium, Super Bowl 54

2021

Tampa Bay, Raymond James Stadium, Super Bowl 55

2022

Los Angeles, Los Angeles Stadium, Super Bowl 56

2023

Glendale, University of Phoenix Stadium, Super Bowl 57

2024

New Orleans, Mercedes-Benz Superdome, Super Bowl 58

Super Bowl 2019: Atlanta

Super Bowl 53 will take place at Atlanta’s Mercedes-Benz Stadium, a one-of-a-kind venue and home to the NFL’s Atlanta Falcons.

Completed just in time for the 2017 football season, Mercedes-Benz Stadium seats 71,000 people but can expand to seat more than 80,000. It’s equipped with a uniquely designed retractable roof, which, if closed, hopefully won’t be leaking by the time the Super Bowl arrives in 2019.

When the venue was being built, reasonable stadium food prices were touted as revolutionary, and sure enough, Falcons concession revenue went up in the stadium’s first year. Yes, the building located in the heart of Atlanta has a Chick-fil-A inside. No, there is no word on whether it will be open on Super Bowl Sunday.

Mercedes-Benz-Stadium-020118-Getty.jpg
Mercedes-Benz-Stadium-020118-Getty.jpg

The first pro sports stadium ever to achieve LEED Platinum Certification in the U.S., Mercedes-Benz Stadium touts itself as the most sustainable sports venue in the world. It can power up to 10 Falcons games with the renewable energy generated through its 4,000 solar panels, and it can store more than 2 million gallons of storm water on site to prevent flooding in the area. The stadium also uses 47 percent less water than baseline standards.

Mercedes-Benz Stadium was built next to the Georgia Dome, which was demolished in November. Super Bowl 53 will mark the third time Atlanta has hosted the game. The previous two (1994 and 2000) took place in the Georgia Dome.

MORE: Ranking all 31 NFL stadiums

Super Bowl 2020: South Florida

In two years for Super Bowl 54, the NFL will return to one of its favorite Super Bowl locations. The Miami area already has hosted 10 Super Bowls, and its 11th will break a tie with New Orleans for the most in the country.

Now called Hard Rock Stadium, the venue that the NFL's Miami Dolphins call home originally was named Joe Robbie Stadium when it opened in 1987. It has been renamed seven times since and has hosted five Super Bowls, with the old Miami Orange Bowl having hosted South Florida’s other five Super Bowls.

Hard-Rock-Stadium-020118-Getty.jpg
Hard-Rock-Stadium-020118-Getty.jpg

Thanks to its most recent renovation project, which was completed in 2016, Hard Rock Stadium will have a new look when the Super Bowl arrives in 2020.

While the stadium’s seating capacity was reduced from 75,000 to 65,000, the renovation that featured new video boards, suites and seating pods is at least one of the reasons the NFL is returning for Super Bowl 54.

Super Bowl 2021: Tampa Bay

This wasn't the original plan. NFL owners in May voted to move Super Bowl 55, which had been scheduled to be played in Los Angeles, to Tampa Bay. The shift came as a result of weather-related construction delays at the new LA stadium site, which will instead host Super Bowl 56 in 2022. (More on that later.)

Tampa Bay was an easy choice to fill the Super Bowl 2021 location void thanks to its success as a host in the past. The city has hosted the Super Bowl four times, two in old Tampa Stadium and two in Raymond James Stadium, the home of the NFL’s Buccaneers.

The 65,000-seat stadium that can expand to seat 75,000 hosted it’s first NFL game in 1998. And of course, like Hard Rock Stadium in South Florida, it too recently went through a renovation project.

Raymond-James-Stadium-020118-Getty.jpg
Raymond-James-Stadium-020118-Getty.jpg

Raymond James Stadium now boasts what its website calls the most advanced HD video system in use today. With two 9,600 square-foot boards (north and south ends of the stadium) and four 2,300 square-foot HD tower walls, it ranks as the third-largest video board system in the NFL.

The new sound system has 400-plus speakers throughout the stadium, providing 750,000 watts of power.

Super Bowl 2022: Los Angeles

NFL rules require a stadium to have been open two full seasons before it can host a Super Bowl, so a change needed to be made when construction delays meant the Rams and Chargers wouldn't be able to play in their new stadium until 2020.

Rather than Super Bowl 55 in 2021 as originally planned, the big game will return to LA for Super Bowl 56 in 2022. It will mark the eighth time the LA area has hosted the Super Bowl, with LA Memorial Coliseum having hosted two Super Bowls and the Rose Bowl having hosted five.

The venue, currently being built in Inglewood, is expected to be a masterpiece, in part because it will be more than a stadium, as its name — LA Stadium and Entertainment District at Hollywood Park — suggests.

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Los-Angeles-stadium-111816-HKS-FTR.jpg

The open-air stadium will seat 70,000 people with the ability to expand to seat up to 100,000.

In addition to the Super Bowl in 2022, the stadium is scheduled to host the opening and closing ceremonies of the 2028 Summer Olympics.

Renderings for the stadium in Los Angeles can be viewed here.

Super Bowl 2023: Glendale/Phoenix

For the fourth time, Arizona will host a Super Bowl when the big game returns to the desert in 2023 for Super Bowl 57. It will be the third time University of Phoenix Stadium as hosted the Super Bowl (2008 and 2015), with Sun Devil Stadium having hosted the game in 1996.

Per AZCentral.com, the cities of Phoenix and Glendale touted upgrades near the stadium and throughout the area in their pitch to land another Super Bowl. A renovated airport in Phoenix and additional hotels and parking in Glendale are expected to be in place by 2023.

university-of-phoenix-stadium-100214-getty-ftr.jpg
university-of-phoenix-stadium-100214-getty-ftr.jpg

When it opened in 2006, University of Phoenix Stadium featured the first retractable natural grass playing surface in North America and the first completely retractable roof operating at an incline. Its seating capacity is expandable to 73,000.

Super Bowl 2024: New Orleans

Some are of the opinion that the Super Bowl should be held in New Orleans every year. After all, there's a reason what's now called the Mercedes-Benz Superdome is hosting the big game for an eighth time, more than any other venue. The city is hosing the game for the 11th time; three of New Orleans' Super Bowls were played at Tulane Stadium.

The Superdome opened in 1975 and hosted its first Super Bowl in 1978, when the Cowboys beat the Broncos in Super Bowl XII. It last hosted a Super Bowl in 2013, when many of the stadium's lights infamously failed during the third quarter of the Ravens' win over the 49ers.

Superdome-122213-AP-FTR.jpg
Superdome-122213-AP-FTR.jpg

The Superdome remains one of the most iconic venues not only in the NFL, but in all of sports.


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