Going for gold: England gymnasts Joe Fraser and Jake Jarman both eyeing historic Commonwealth Games feat

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·2-min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
Commonwealth Games - Artistic Gymnastics - Men's Team Final - Subdivision 3 - Arena Birmingham, Birmingham, Britain - July 29, 2022 England's Jake Jarman, James Hall, Giarnni Regini-Moran, Joe Fraser and Courtney Tulloch celebrate on the podium after winning gold in the men's team final REUTERS/Jason Cairnduff
Commonwealth Games - Artistic Gymnastics - Men's Team Final - Subdivision 3 - Arena Birmingham, Birmingham, Britain - July 29, 2022 England's Jake Jarman, James Hall, Giarnni Regini-Moran, Joe Fraser and Courtney Tulloch celebrate on the podium after winning gold in the men's team final REUTERS/Jason Cairnduff

By James Toney in Birmingham

Joe Fraser and Jake Jarman will take a crack at Commonwealth Games history today.

Newcomer Jarman, in his first major championship, added the gymnastics floor title to his team and all-around golds yesterday.

And hometown hero Fraser upset defending champion Rhys McClenaghan to take his second gold on the pommel horse.

No English men's gymnast has ever won four golds at the same Games and Fraser has two gilt-edged chances on Tuesday and Jarman one. Claudia Fragapane achieved the feat eight years ago in Glasgow, while shooter Mick Gault was on target with four tops of the podium performances in 1998.

"This is a very new experience, I've never had a competition where I've done this well," said Jarman, who is one of over 1,100 elite athletes on UK Sport’s National Lottery-funded World Class Programme, allowing them to train full time, have access to the world’s best coaches and benefit from pioneering technology, science and medical support.

"I just want to keep the momentum going, I'm not going to sit back and relax."

Meanwhile, Fraser dedicated his gold to close pal Max Whitlock, who was famously beaten by McClenaghan four years ago.

“That medal was especially for Max," he said. "A routine in a pommel final is difficult so I’m over the moon to walk away as the champion. Max just sent me a message to say, ‘OMG you legend!’.

“I'm trying not to think about the pressure, I'm trying to just enjoy my moments competing."

McClenaghan will now reset his sights on this month's European Sports Championships in Munich and the World Championships in Liverpool later this year.

But he admits he must improve.

"I need to be a lot better than that and that's the thing we need to work on," he said.

"I know exactly what I need to do, the first half of my routine was absolutely faultless but one small error and that's it over. I want to take on everyone, I was disappointed Max wasn't here as I love the feeling of being pushed to be better."

National Lottery players raise more than £30million a week for good causes including vital funding into sport – from grassroots to elite. Find out how your numbers make amazing happen at: www.lotterygoodcauses.org.uk and get involved by using the hashtag: #TNLAthletes.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting