Griffiths forever grateful to Professional Cricketers' Trust

·3-min read
David Griffiths is forever grateful to the Professional Cricketers' Trust after their help when he gave his sister a kidney in Australia.
David Griffiths is forever grateful to the Professional Cricketers' Trust after their help when he gave his sister a kidney in Australia.

By Milly McEvoy

As a cricketer, David Griffiths was called into match-saving scenarios on the field - but nothing will compare to his selfless act that saved the life of his sister.

The former Hampshire and Kent player donated a kidney to his sister Emma after she suffered kidney failure while away in Australia.

And Griffiths admitted he will be forever grateful to the Professional Cricketers’ Trust for their support and help in saving his sister.

The Trust, which is the registered charity that supports members of the Professional Cricketers’ Association or their families when they are in need, supported Griffiths with flights from South Africa, where he lived, as well as hospital bills and mental health support.

Griffiths shared his experience at the Vitality Blast Finals Day – one of the Trust’s biggest days for fundraising.

“My sister, three years ago now, had kidney failure, her kidneys went down from 12% to two in a matter of months,” Griffiths explained.

“It took me about eight to 12 months to do tests and I did all the tests, and we were a complete match, which was awesome.

“So, I donated a kidney to my sister in Australia, I went there for eight weeks, did the surgery.

“Before that my sister couldn't have a baby because her kidneys weren't strong enough for her let alone a baby.

“Now she's had a baby three months ago, she brought my little niece Isla into the world, which is awesome.

“For the Professional Cricketers’ Trust to be able to help me along the way over that period financially as well as mentally has been an incredible, incredible thing.”

The Trust operate a 24-hour confidential helpline to provide support to players past and present in whatever they are dealing with.

Griffiths was interviewed live on Sky, as well as on the big screen at Edgbaston, as the Trust and county cricket celebrated the Vitality Blast Finals Day.

The 36-year-old retired from cricket in 2016 and was grateful for the support he received from the Trust four years after he had hung up his boots.

In 2021 alone, the Trust supported 106 individuals with mental health problems, taking the total since 2015 to 526.

The assistance for current and former players in England and Wales is all encompassing, whether it be for physical or mental needs including provision of specialist equipment, funding operations or specialist wellbeing support.

The Professional Cricketers’ Trust provides vital support to past and present cricketers in England and Wales and their immediate families when in desperate need.

Griffiths added: “It's an amazing thing, it's so great to see that. I stopped playing six or seven years ago and now I feel like for anyone playing cricket past and present, they're always at the end of the phone, which is the most amazing thing.

“24 hours a day there is always someone there that can speak to you which is an incredible thing.

“It’s great to be involved with the Professional Cricketers’ Trust. They have so much of an impact on individuals past and present, players as well as families, and they had a massive impact on my family with myself and my sister.

“It's an amazing thing that they do, so it's great to be here at Finals Day to support that.”

The Professional Cricketers’ Trust provides vital support to past and present cricketers in England and Wales and their immediate families when in desperate need. The charity’s work is all encompassing, whether it be for unforeseen physical or mental needs. Vitality Blast Finals Day is supporting the players’ charity - to find out more about the Professional Cricketers’ Trust, visit professionalcricketerstrust.org

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