Iowa parts ways with strength coach accused of mistreating players based on race

Sporting News

Iowa parted ways with strength and conditioning coach Chris Doyle on Monday.

Doyle had been accused of mistreating football players at Iowa because of their race. He had been placed on administrative leave on June 6 after several former players shared social media posts detailing alleged mistreatment while playing for the Hawkeyes.

Doyle had been an assistant with the Hawkeyes under Kirk Ferentz since 1999.

Scroll to continue with content
Ad

MORE: Clemson's Dabo Swinney shares message of support for Black Lives Matter protests

As part of the separation agreement, Doyle will receive 15 months of base salary, which equates to “two separate lump sum payments of $556,249.50,” according to the university. He had been the highest-paid strength coach in the country, making $800,000 a year.

He released a statement following the announcement:

"Iowa City has been home to our family for 21 years," Doyle said. "I am grateful Iowa football provided an opportunity to work with incredible players, coaches, and support staff. I have worked diligently to make a positive impact on the lives of student-athletes, support them as they speak out, and look forward to continued growth. I am confident that my record and character will be confirmed in the course of the independent review. The university and I have reached an agreement and it is time to move on from Iowa football. My family and I are looking forward to the next chapter."

Ferentz has been under scrutiny since the suspension, and he addressed those concerns at a press conference Friday. Ferentz, who took over at Iowa in 1999, is the longest-tenured coach in the FBS.

"The biggest question to me is, why the blind spot?" Ferentz said Friday. "And I think every person has a blind spot. I’m sure every leader has a blind spot. The former players were very forthcoming. They were very direct, and just pointed out some things that perhaps gave me a new awareness."

Iowa also has hired a Kansas City law firm to conduct an independent review of issues and allegations relating to racial disparities within the program. Raimond Braithwaite will serve as the interim strength and conditioning coach.

What to read next