Leicester look to tie James Maddison down to new deal with contract talks underway

·2-min read
Leicester look to tie James Maddison down to new deal with contract talks underway - REUTERS
Leicester look to tie James Maddison down to new deal with contract talks underway - REUTERS

Leicester have opened negotiations with England international James Maddison over a new contract.

Brendan Rodgers is yet to make an outfield signing this summer but Leicester are moving to tie Maddison down to an improved deal.

Newcastle have seen two offers of up to £40 million rejected this summer for the attacking midfielder, who has just under two years left on his current £100,000-a-week contract.

It is understood talks started with Maddison’s representatives before the bids from Newcastle, with discussions understood to be at an early stage.

Signed from Norwich City for £25 million in June 2018, Maddison was Leicester’s top scorer last season with 18 goals, also providing 12 assists in all competitions.

Rodgers said: “He’s an outstanding player and of course, Leicester City would benefit from keeping him longer. With two years left, naturally the club would want to protect the asset.

“He’s a top player at the level, so people will be interested in him, but I’ve seen no change in him whatsoever. For me, James is still the same. He’s improving, developing, and happy.”

Rodgers has insisted that Chelsea target Wesley Fofana has not handed in a transfer request, but said the French defender is unsettled.

Chelsea have failed with two bids for the 21-year-old and are expected to make another offer before the transfer window closes.

Fofana is understood to be keen on a move to Stamford Bridge, and Rodgers will make a late call on whether he faces Southampton this weekend.

“If the players aren’t totally focused and committed to the club and being here, or for whatever reason just aren’t in the right mindset, that won’t help us,” he said.

“We have to ensure everyone is really focused in order for us to play the best game we can.

“There can always be disruption but the idea is to keep the group focused. The minute the window shuts it all ends but while we’re in this period it’s challenging.”