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Marjorie Taylor Greene once again teases running for Senate or governor of Georgia: 'I have options'

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene at a hearing on Capitol Hill on July 19, 2023.
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene at a hearing on Capitol Hill on July 19, 2023.Drew Angerer/Getty Images
  • Marjorie Taylor Greene is once again teasing a potential higher office bid — even governor of Georgia.

  • "I have options. Anything from a governor's race to a Senate seat," she said.

  • She made the comments as she prepares to release a new tell-all book.

Marjorie Taylor Greene is once again teasing a run for higher office.

The controversial House Republican from Georgia and close ally of former President Donald Trump plans to release a tell-all book in November, the Washington Examiner first reported.

And that book, the congresswoman acknowledged, could play a role in laying the groundwork for a campaign for higher office — not just for the US Senate, as Trump has encouraged her to do before, but potentially for governor of Georgia.

"I have options," she told the Examiner. "Anything from a governor's race to a Senate seat."

Also said to be a potential vice presidential pick for Trump, Greene said she hasn't "closed the door on anything."

Greene said her book would be about "setting the record straight" and to allow "people to hear my side of the story."

This isn't the first time the congresswoman has floated herself as a statewide candidate in Georgia. And Democrats would likely view a general election campaign against the congresswoman as a gift.

"She can do whatever she wants. Wherever she runs, we'll beat her," Sen. Gary Peters of Michigan, currently the head of Senate Democrats' campaign arm, told Insider in March when asked about a potential 2026 Senate bid by Greene.

Democratic Sen. Jon Ossoff, who currently holds that seat, shrugged off the question at the time.

"I'm not giving much thought to prospective challengers," Ossoff said in March. "Anyone is free to run. And I'll be ready."

"I have no doubt Georgia will remain a highly competitive state," he added.

 

Read the original article on Business Insider