Meghan Markle broke a major royal rule with engagement announcement

Markle went bare-legged for her engagement photo shoot. (Photo: Getty Images)

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry announced their engagement on Monday, and although many focused on the actress’s gorgeous three-diamond engagement ring designed by Harry himself, a few eagle-eyed observers noticed his bride-to-be had broken an unwritten royal rule.

The 36-year-old looked ultra stylish in a winter white wrap coat from Canadian brand Line the Label, but she decided to forgo wearing pantyhose, move that’s considered a fashion faux-pas for members of the royal family.

According to The Cut, there’s an unspoken rule among royals that dictate women wear pantyhose. Queen Elizabeth has been wearing hosiery for 91 years, while the Duchess of Cambridge prefers glossy, sheer nylons.

Markle went bare-legged for her first official photoshoot as Harry’s bride-to-be. (Photo: Getty Images)

Markle, 36, bravely decided to keep her legs bare, perhaps another sign that the royal family is modernizing its ways.

 

However, Markle did follow other unspoken royal fashion rules. For the announcement, she had her nails painted a natural nail varnish.

Both the Duchess of Cambridge and the Queen are always seen wearing neutral-colored nail polish. Royal wardrobe rules state that no colored nail polish should be worn during public engagements.

Colored nail polish is a big no-no for royals. (Photo: Getty Images)

The Queen has always followed this dictum, and has reportedly been wearing “Ballet Slippers,” a pale pink sheer finish nail polish shade by Essie, for nearly three decades!

But sometimes, even royal wardrobe rules can be broken — Kate has been spotted rocking a ruby red pedicure on the rare occasion she’s bared her toes in strappy sandals.

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