Meghan Markle's royal coat of arms revealed — here's what all the personal touches mean

You can’t be the newly minted Duchess of Sussex without a proper coat of arms, apparently.

Meghan Markle during an appearance at Buckingham Palace days after her wedding. (Photo: Chris Jackson/Chris Jackson/Getty Images)
Meghan Markle during an appearance at Buckingham Palace days after her wedding. (Photo: Chris Jackson/Chris Jackson/Getty Images)

Less than a week after her wedding to Prince Harry, Meghan Markle has received an official coat of arms approved by none other than the queen herself.


As with her royal wedding invitations, which were printed with American ink, the coat of arms pays homage to the new bride’s American roots.

According to Kensington Palace, the design is both “personal and representative” of her background, with three specific call-outs to her home state of California.

The blue coloring represents the Pacific Ocean, the golden poppies at the bottom are a nod to California’s state flower, and the two golden rays on the shield reference the California sunshine.

The three quills seem to be an appropriate addition for the former actress and calligrapher, as they represent “communication and the power of words.” Interestingly, her father-in-law, Prince Charles, also has three feathers on his official royal badge, which appeared on her wedding invitations.


There’s a royal influence as well, with the wintersweet flowers that grow at her home of Kensington Palace mixed with the golden poppies. The lion featured on the left, meanwhile, is a reference to Prince Harry — whose own royal coat of arms also features a lion as a supporter, which is typically an animal pictured propping up the shield.

The Duchess of Sussex chose a songbird as her personal supporter.

“It is customary for supporters of the shield to be assigned to members of the royal family, and for wives of members of the royal family to have one of their husband’s supporters and one relating to themselves,” Kensington Palace explained in a release. “The supporter relating to the Duchess of Sussex is a songbird with wings elevated as if flying and an open beak, which with the quill represents the power of communication.”

And to think: Most new brides have to settle for a new toaster and some monogrammed hand towels.

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