N.C. to vote on HB2 repeal measure; will it be enough to satisfy NCAA, pro leagues?

The problem of corruption in college basketball isn't a result of NCAA or NBA rules. Changing those rules would solve nothing.

Thursdaypromises to be a day of madness before the Madness resumes.

The day will begin with the North Carolina Legislature considering a compromise measure that would repeal HB2. The LGBTQ-related law has cost the state millions of dollars in revenue as college and professional athletic events have been moved to other states in response to its passage a little over a year ago. The leaders of North Carolina's House and Senate announced late Wednesday it had reached an agreement with Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper on a repeal of the law.

MORE: NBA says 2019 ASG to Charlotte if HB2 changed

Based on initial reports, the pact might not be sufficient to get those events back.

The NCAA has set a Thursday deadline for the Legislature to act on HB2 or else face the further loss of events into 2022. Marathon negotiations Wednesday in the Tar Heel State produced the compromise.

House Speaker Tim Moore, Senate leader Phil Berger and Cooper announced the agreement repeals HB2, but parts of the legislation being voted on Thursday, HB142, appear to contradict that characterization.

Responsibility for regulating public facilities (i.e., the "bathroom bill" part) would return to state lawmakers, which they had prior to HB2. Also, municipalities like Charlotte would not be able to enact nondiscrimination laws for three years.

Would the NCAA, ACC, et. al call that good? This list provided by the (Raleigh, N.C.) News and Observer's Luke DeCock raises doubts.

The NCAA and ACC declined to comment early Thursday on the North Carolina announcement, per DeCock.

MORE: UNC's Williams opposed to 'stupid' HB2| Coach K rips law

A partial list of events taken out of North Carolina after HB2's passage:

— The 2017 NBA All-Star Game was moved from Charlotte to New Orleans.

— First-round games in this year's NCAA men's basketball tournament were shifted from Greensboro to Greenville, S.C.

— The ACC's football championship game was transferred from Charlotte to Orlando, Fla.

NCAA president Mark Emmert is scheduled to deliver his annual address to media at 6:30 p.m. ET in Glendale, Ariz., site of this year's Final Four. He and the association should have a response to HB142 by then, if not much sooner. The question for North Carolina lawmakers: Will they like what they hear?

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