Cricket: Anderson urges England to silence Aussie crowds during the Ashes

After suffering whitewashes in two of his three Ashes tours of Australia, James Anderson wants England to stand up for themselves early on.

James Anderson knows from long experience all about the importance of setting the right tone early in an Ashes series Down Under, as England prepare for the first Test against Australia in Brisbane.

Anderson has played in each of England's last three visits to Australia, enjoying a rare 3-1 triumph in 2010-11 either side of humiliating 5-0 whitewashes in 2006-07 and 2013-14.

Steve Harmison's infamous wide delivery with the first ball of the contest at the Gabba in 2006 proved a sign of things to come during a meek showing under Andrew Flintoff.

And Anderson, now a battle-hardened veteran and still the leader of England's bowling attack, is well aware of the need for the tourists to stand up for themselves from the first day of the opening Test, which starts in Queensland on November 23. 

"We know what to expect from the crowds, they can be quite hostile at times but that is just part and parcel," he told Sky Sports.

"I think looking back to when we did well there in 10-11, we started pretty much every game really well and silenced the crowd, almost.

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"That is what you've got to try and do, get them on your side, play along with it and have a bit of fun with them at times.

"They're generally good humoured but getting them to warm to you is a tough task because they naturally hate you when you go out there."

England are battling uncertainty surrounding the availability of star all-rounder Ben Stokes, who has not travelled with the team and will not be considered for selection until the conclusion of a police investigation following his arrest in Bristol in September.

Anderson, though, feels Australia are also somewhat unsettled and believes either side is capable of taking control of proceedings early on. 

"Both teams have gone through a transitional phase over the last two years," he said.

"Both teams have started to show signs of real quality I think but have also been pretty inconsistent, so it is going to be about whoever starts well.

"The Gabba has been a bit of a fortress for Australia, they've not lost there since 1988 so coming away from there with a result - whether it is a draw or a win - I think is important to how the series will go."

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