NFL Draft grades 2020: Complete results & analysis for every pick in Rounds 1-3

Sporting News

How did your team do in the first three rounds of the 2020 NFL Draft? Sporting News has you covered in tracking all the picks and issuing grades in real time Friday night.

While the Bengals and Redskins seemingly had been locked into their picks for a while, there was bound to be plenty of unpredictability. They say it takes five years to truly evaluate an NFL Draft class, but in the immediate term, we can still get a good idea of whether each pick is based on sound logic or should be second-guessed.

The key questions to ask right away: Did the team get the right player at a position of need? Did it pass on someone else who could have been a better fit? Was the player it took worthy of that high of selection vs. the promise of similar prospects? Based on our evaluations, we're providing answers for what the picks mean now and later.

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From No. 1 through No. 106, this is your hub for in-depth live reaction in Rounds 1-3, grading every team and player fit. Keep checking back for updates throughout the entire second and third rounds Friday.

MORE: Grading the 2020 NFL Draft classes for all 32 teams

NFL Draft grades 2020: Live picks & analysis

Round 1

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Joe-Burrow-022620-Getty-FTR.jpg

1. Cincinnati Bengals: Joe Burrow, QB, Bengals

  • Grade: A

Burrow (6-3, 221 pounds) cemented his status as an elite QB prospect by posting the best passing season in college football history, showing strong NFL qualities with his arm, accuracy, decision-making and leadership. Offensive-minded coach Zac Taylor gets his high-floor option to replace Andy Dalton, and Burrow should tap into some of his high ceiling starting immediately as a rookie.

2. Washington Redskins: Chase Young, DE, Ohio State

  • Grade: A+

The Redskins get the best player in the 2020 NFL Draft in this transcendent pass-rusher who had 16.5 sacks in 12 games in his final season at Ohio State. Young (6-5, 264 pounds) is an explosive, game-changing disruptor with more pro upside than two other former Buckeyes, Joey Bosa and Nick Bosa. He is a great cornerstone for coach Ron Rivera’s defensive rebuild.

3. Detroit Lions: Jeff Okudah, CB, Ohio State

  • Grade: A

The Lions traded Darius Slay and acquired Desmond Trufant, but they needed a young stud corner to fortify the back end of Matt Patricia’s defense. Okudah is a technically sound ball hawk at 6-1, 205 pounds, allowing him to cover all receiving body types. He is fluid and quick enough with great recovery skills and is strong enough in press man coverage to develop into a shutdown cornerback.

4. New York Giants: Andrew Thomas, OT, Georgia

  • Grade: A

Thomas may not have been the most obvious choice for the Giants to upgrade pass protection for Daniel Jones, but he makes a lot of sense. New York badly needed a right tackle opposite aging Nate Solder for now and a replacement for Solder later. Thomas matches great size (6-5, 315 pounds) with good hands and footwork. Saquon Barkley also will love what Thomas can do to open holes for the running game.

MORE 2020 NFL DRAFT:
Draft Central | Complete list of picks | Winners & losers

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Tua-Tagovailoa-110719-Getty-FTR.jpg

5. Miami Dolphins: Tua Tagovailoa, QB, Alabama

  • Grade: B

The Dolphins come full circle on Tagovailoa (6-0, 217 pounds) as their future franchise QB after creating several smokescreens. With Ryan Fitzpatrick under contract as a veteran bridge for one more year, they have time to get Tagovailoa up to speed physically and mentally should he need more time to heal. When healthy, Tagovailoa is an accurate, mobile, deep-ball throwing QB with the upside of Russell Wilson, only throwing with his left arm.

6. Los Angeles Chargers: Justin Herbert, QB, Oregon

  • Grade: B

The Chargers have their bridge QB option in Tyrod Taylor, but he should get some good competition from this smart passer who just needs a little more polish. Herbert (6-6, 236 pounds) is efficient and mentally tough with underrated athleticism, which manifested down the stretch of his final season with the Ducks. He needs a little help with his decision-making, but at the Senior Bowl, he proved how receptive he is to coaching. He’ll get good tutelage from Anthony Lynn and Shane Steichen.

7. Carolina Panthers: Derrick Brown, DT, Auburn

  • Grade: A

The Panthers were bound to address their front seven early in the draft, opting to beef up their front rather than their linebacker corps. Brown is a beast against the run with a little interior pass-rush pop to boot. He has shined throughout the draft process as the most impactful player at his position. At 6-5, 326 pounds, he is a quick disruptor who makes a lot of plays in the backfield.

8. Arizona Cardinals: Isaiah Simmons, LB, Clemson

  • Grade: A+

The Cardinals have been open to hybrid defenders in the past (see Tyrann Mathieu, Deone Bucannon), and here they get a steal in the best player available, given they are weak at both strongside linebacker and strong safety. Simmons (6-3, 238 pounds) seemed to be all over the field at all times in college with great speed and range. He gets everywhere in a hurry, from rushing the passer to moving laterally to get in ideal coverage positions.

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CJ-Henderson-042819-getty-ftr.jpg

9. Jacksonville Jaguars: C.J. Henderson, CB, Florida

  • Grade: B

The Jaguars get much-needed cornerback help after trading away both Jalen Ramsey and A.J. Bouye and with Brown and Simmons gone for other parts of their defense. Henderson (6-1, 204 pounds) plays bigger than his size with great athleticism and technique in his favor. He just needs to get a little more physical to be trusted against receivers who rely on body positioning to get open.

10. Cleveland Browns: Jedrick Wills, OT, Alabama

  • Grade: B

The Browns needed another tackle after signing Jack Conklin to a big contract in free agency to replace Greg Robinson on the left side. They are banking on Wills, who also played on the right side at Alabama, to be athletic enough to make the transition and hold down Baker Mayfield’s blind side sooner rather than later. At first, he will be a big asset for Nick Chubb and Kareem Hunt. At 6-4, 312 pounds, Wills is a strong, powerful run-blocker who needs a little time to develop into an elite pass-protector.

11. New York Jets: Mekhi Becton, OT, Louisville

  • Grade: B

The Jets signed George Fant to upgrade at one tackle, and it made sense for them to prioritize the other edge in front of Sam Darnold and Le’Veon Bell instead of a receiver, especially with Becton still on the board. Becton (6-7, 369 pounds) has gotten more attention for his strong and powerful frame, as he has shown he can also be smooth in his movements. He is willing to work hard to become as good in pass protection as he is overwhelming blockers when setting the edge against the run.

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Henry-Ruggs-091199-GETTY-FTR.jpg

12. Las Vegas Raiders: Henry Ruggs III, WR, Alabama

  • Grade: A

The Raiders go for the speedy, go-to wideout they desperately needed after the Antonio Brown debacle and amid the Tyrell Williams durability concerns. Ruggs (5-11, 188 pounds) fits the bill as a field-stretcher who also can use his route-running skills to win on shorter routes. He is capable of being a complete No. 1, not just a burner, because of his red-zone scoring prowess.

13. Tampa Bay Buccaneers (from Colts via 49ers): Tristan Wirfs, OT, Iowa

  • Grade: B

The Bucs shore up their big weakness at right tackle opposite Donovan Smith in a much-needed upgrade for Tom Brady’s protection, taking advantage of a mild drop for Wirfs. They get docked for giving up a little to get in position to catch him, but it made sense to get in on the run on tackles vs. going for a wide receiver, given they are loaded there and at tight end, too. Wirfs has great athleticism at 6-5, 320 pounds. He combines his pass-blocking skills with power and physicality in the running game.

14. San Francisco 49ers (from Buccaneers): Javon Kinlaw, DT, South Carolina

  • Grade: A

The 49ers opt for the ideal replacement for DeForest Buckner, whom they traded to get an extra first-rounder. They could have gone wide receiver, but keeping their interior pass rush intact to play off Nick Bosa and Arik Armstead was more pressing. Kinlaw (6-5, 324 pounds) knows how to use his size and arms to complement his strength and power at the point of attack. He delivered 6 sacks in his final season with the Gamecocks.

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15. Denver Broncos: Jerry Jeudy, WR, Alabama

  • Grade: B

The Broncos were targeting the best available wide receiver or defensive tackle on their board, so this pick was easier with Kinlaw off the board. Second-year QB Drew Lock gets a fine complement to big-bodied deep threat Courtland Sutton outside, DaeSean Hamilton in the slot and Noah Fant at tight end. Jeudy (6-1, 193 pounds) fits the profile as a No. 1 receiver who runs smooth routes inside or outside. He is a classic intermediate to deep field-stretcher and savvy drive-finisher in the red zone.

16. Atlanta Falcons: A.J. Terrell, CB, Clemson

  • Grade: B-

The Falcons address a position of need after trading Desmond Trufant to the Lions, though they did have a chance to add the explosive, versatile K’Lavon Chaisson to fill a big playmaking void at linebacker. Terrell (6-1, 195 pounds) is a versatile cover man for his size who can work both outside and inside, in both man and zone schemes. He needs to learn to win battles with better technique and handwork.

2020 DRAFT CENTRAL: Live coverage, video from Fantasy Alarm

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CeeDee-Lamb-041720-getty-ftr

17. Dallas Cowboys: CeeDee Lamb, WR, Oklahoma

  • Grade: A+

The Cowboys had other needs at cornerback and edge rusher, but Jerry Jones couldn’t resist loading up at wideout with a great value pick in Lamb. Dallas lost Randall Cobb, so they can plug in Lamb with Amari Cooper and rising star Michael Gallup. Lamb can be the Cowboys’ version of DeAndre Hopkins, an explosive field-stretcher and steady possession guy outside. At 6-1, 198 pounds, Lamb needed only 58 receptions to post 1,208 yards and 14 TDs in 13 games last season.

18. Miami Dolphins (from Steelers): Austin Jackson, OT, USC

  • Grade: C

The Dolphins got Tagovailoa to be their quarterback, so they were bound to turn their attention to protecting him soon afterward. However, this is a pick they might have been able to make in a later round, making it a bit of a reach given they passed on more bona fide elite players they need at other positions (like safety Xavier McKinney). Jackson is an impressive athlete for his size (6-5, 322 pounds), but he needs some refinement in his technique to match his quick feet.

19. Las Vegas Raiders (from Bears): Damon Arnette, CB, Ohio State

  • Grade: C

The Raiders reach a little here for their dire cornerback need, passing up on players such as Trevon Diggs, Jeff Gladney and Kristian Fulton to take a corner with some limitations in downfield coverage. What Arnette (6-0, 195 pounds) doesn't have in straight-line speed to stay with receivers on vertical routes, he makes up for with short-area quickness and toughness.

20. Jacksonville Jaguars (from Rams): K'Lavon Chaisson, OLB, LSU

  • Grade: A+

The Jaguars get a steal for their defense with this pick after landing Henderson at cornerback in the top 10. They have a dicey pass-rush situation with Calais Campbell traded and Yannick Ngakoue disgruntled, and they are a little weak at linebacker next to Myles Jack and Joe Schobert. This pick addresses both issues. Chaisson (6-3, 254 pounds) has a great name for an elite, active defender who chases after QBs and RBs alike. He had 6.5 sacks and 60 tackles during LSU’s championship run, and like several teammates, his draft stock shot up throughout the season.

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Jalen-Reagor-022720-getty-ftr.jpg

21. Philadelphia Eagles: Jalen Reagor, WR, TCU

  • Grade: B-

The Eagles desperately needed wide receiver help with Alshon Jeffery wearing down, DeSean Jackson hurting and Nelson Agholor gone. They could have done a little better with a potential true No. 1 such as Justin Jefferson or Tee HIggins, but still, it’s nice to get a home-run threat for Carson Wentz. Reagor is a productive, diminutive dasher who also provides some nice run-after-catch skills with quickness and toughness for his size (5-11, 206 pounds).

22. Minnesota Vikings (from Bills): Justin Jefferson, WR, LSU

  • Grade: A

The Vikings get their replacement for Stefon Diggs to complement Adam Thielen in a similar way. Jefferson (6-1, 202 pounds), with massive production catching passes from Burrow, emerged in LSU's passing game as a quick, efficient route-runner with good hands. He also has underrated speed.

23. Los Angeles Chargers (from Patriots): Kenneth Murray, LB, Oklahoma

  • Grade: A-

The Chargers traded back into the first round to catch Murray ahead of the Saints, Ravens and Packers, all of whom could have used his services. Los Angeles’ notable weakness in their loaded defense is at linebacker, where their starter in the middle, Denzel Perryman, is set to become a free agent in 2021. Murray will be fine making plays outside to start. He (6-2, 241 pounds) is an active, rangy playmaker who can be as effective dropping back as he is getting downhill against the run or blitzing.

24. New Orleans Saints: Cesar Ruiz, C/G, Michigan

  • Grade: B

The Saints were attached to linebacker first, wide receiver second and quarterback a distant third. But going for Ruiz (6-3, 307 pounds), the best interior offensive line prospect, is a shrewd move for 2021, when All-Pro right guard Larry Warford will be a free agent. That is bound to be Ruiz’s position after the Saints locked up Andrus Peat to a new deal at left guard and drafted Erik McCoy for center in the second round last year.

25. San Francisco 49ers (from Vikings): Brandon Aiyuk, WR, Arizona State

  • Grade: B

The 49ers get docked for giving up a lot to get Aiyuk in a deep receiver class, but he certainly fills a need with Emmanuel Sanders leaving in free agency. His skill set works nicely as a complement to Deebo Samuel and George Kittle, working both outside and inside. Aiyuk (6-0, 205 pounds) fits the profile of an impactful slot receiver with quickness made to make big plays after the catch and enough speed to get vertical down the middle, too.

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Jordan-Love-051919-GETTY-FTR.jpg

26. Green Bay Packers (from Texans via Dolphins): Jordan Love, QB, Utah State

  • Grade: D

In an NFC where the 49ers, Buccaneers and Saints are in win-now mode, the Packers trading up for a potential successor to Aaron Rodgers makes little sense over a top wide receiver or offensive tackle to help him extend his Super Bowl window coming off a 13-3 season. Love (6-4, 224 pounds) matches his size with physical skills, including a big arm, and his athleticism bodes well if his accuracy, decision-making and footwork can become cleaner with good NFL coaching.

27. Seattle Seahawks: Jordyn Brooks, LB, Texas Tech

  • Grade: D

The Seahawks needed edge rushing help early. Offensive line and depth at both wide receiver and running back were lesser priorities, but definitely bigger needs than a linebacker with some coverage limitations to put next to veteran stalwarts Bobby Wagner and K.J. Wright. Brooks (6-0, 240 pounds) has a good blend of athleticism and physicality for the second level, but he must improve rapidly to be trusted vs. the short-to-intermediate passing game. This is another head-scratching first rounder to follow Seattle’s picks of Rashaad Penny and L.J. Collier.

28. Baltimore Ravens: Patrick Queen, LB, LSU

  • Grade: A

The Ravens didn't address linebacker in the first wave of free agency, and they need more speed on the second level to better handle the run and cover short-to-intermediate routes. Queen (6-0, 229 pounds) has great range when either working downhill against the run or moving all over the field in coverage. He is relatively small but is the type of linebacker who can have a major impact from any alignment.

29. Tennessee Titans: Isaiah Wilson, OT, Georgia

  • Grade: B

The Titans get their right tackle replacement for Jack Conklin as a likely immediate starter opposite Taylor Lewan ahead of Dennis Kelly. Wilson (6-6, 350 pounds) isn't the most nimble pass-protector, but his pure power as a blocker fits with their mentality. Wilson just might have been a better value for them in the second round.

30. Miami Dolphins (from Packers): Noah Igbinoghene, CB, Auburn

  • Grade: C

The Dolphins again pass on big needs at safety and running back in a reach pick for a nickel back to place between expensive starting cornerbacks. Igbinoghene (5-10, 198 pounds) stands out as a physical cover man for his size. He closes well on receivers at the end of their routes, which translates to good finishing burst against the run, too.

31. Minnesota Vikings (from 49ers): Jeff Gladney, CB, TCU

  • Grade: A

The Vikings needed to rebuild at cornerback after releasing Xavier Rhodes and not re-signing either Trae Waynes or Mackensie Alexander. Gladney (5-10, 191 pounds) is a good fit for Mike Zimmer’s defense because of his zone sensibility and inside-outside versatility. He is scrappy and aggressive in making plays on the ball, with a knack of being honed in on receivers' routes.

32. Kansas City Chiefs: Clyde Edwards-Helaire, RB, LSU

  • Grade: A

Damien Williams will be a free agent in 2021, and the Chiefs needed a more reliable all-around back to support him before replacing him. Andy Reid gets his new version of Brian Westbrook. Edwards-Helaire (5-7, 207 pounds) is a dynamic, versatile receiver out of the backfield and in the slot, making him a major asset for an NFL passing game. He also is extremely quick when getting the ball in the open field.

Round 2

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33. Cincinnati Bengals: Tee Higgins, WR, Clemson

  • Grade: A

After getting QB Joe Burrow in the first round, the Bengals get some big-time help for him while also complementing A.J. Green and Tyler Boyd. Higgins is a dangerous, all-around playmaker who can be a force in the red zone at 6-4, 216 pounds. He posted 59 receptions for 1,167 yards and 13 TDs in 15 games last season. He also rushed for a 36-yard score against LSU in the College Football Playoff national championship game.

34. Indianapolis Colts (from Redskins): Michael Pittman Jr., WR, USC

  • Grade: B

The Colts were bound to go wide receiver in this round, and they do so rather than opting for their choice of necessary safety help. Pittman (6-4, 223 pounds) is an interesting prospect for his size because he is more of a tough technician and route-runner than just a big body working to stretch the field. He fits nicely, often as a “big slot,” between T.Y. Hilton and Zach Pascal.

35. Detroit Lions: D'Andre Swift, RB, Georgia

  • Grade: C

The Lions needed to draft a contingency for oft-injured Kerryon Johnson, but despite Swift’s talent, this is a curious pick, a running back this high over more defensive help for Matt Patricia. Swift (5-8, 212 pounds) is capable of getting the tough yards inside and breaking free for big plays in the open field. He also flashed as a receiver for the Bulldogs and can excel in the screen game.

36. New York Giants: Xavier McKinney, S, Alabama

  • Grade: A

The Giants were smart to take the best player available to improve at safety. McKinney (6-0, 201 pounds) is a complete safety who can get physical in run support and also drop back and handle intermediate coverage. There is nothing he can't do. He's also willing to do what is asked of him; he can toggle seamlessly between extra linebacker and short-area subpackage back.

37. New England Patriots (from Chargers): Kyle Dugger, S, Lenoir-Rhyne

  • Grade: A

The Patriots think about the near future with their aging safety situation with one who plays like a linebacker, fitting in with the versatile mode of Bill Belichick’s defensive back seven. Dugger can be the complete package thanks to the size (6-1, 217 pounds), speed, strength and explosiveness that would have allowed him to dominate in the FBS. He is capable of starting at either safety spot because he brings it hard against the run and has the hands and instincts to blossom in coverage.

38. Carolina Panthers: Yetur Gross-Matos, DE, Penn State

  • Grade: B

The Panthers opt for edge pass rush help for their defense rather than an elite safety or top corner after getting Derrick Brown at tackle in the first round. Gross-Matos (6-5, 266 pounds) is a well-built, explosive and versatile defender who is made to be disruptive in Phil Snow’s defense with his size and ability to engulf.

39. Miami Dolphins: Robert Hunt, G, Louisiana

Grade: B-

The Dolphins reach for interior offensive line help, following up their questionable splurge on Ereck Flowers at left guard. Hunt (6-5, 323 pounds) is a mighty run-blocker with good athleticism who probably would have been available later. He will start for either Ted Karras or Shaq Calhoun, but the opportunity cost for Miami was not getting a much-needed safety or running back.

40. Houston Texans (from Cardinals): Ross Blacklock, DT, TCU

Grade: A

The Texans needed serious help in the middle of their 3-4 defense after losing D.J. Reader in free agency. Blacklock (6-3, 290 pounds) has risen up boards as teams have realized he can convert his power into energy while trying to disrupt plays in the backfield.

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Jonathan Taylor-052119-GETTY-FTR

41. Indianapolis Colts (from Browns): Jonathan Taylor, RB, Wisconsin

  • Grade: C

The Colts did need to think about a complete back given the durability issues of Marlon Mack and the limited contributions of Nyheim Hines and Jordan Wilkins. But trading up for a running back while passing on edge rush and safety might not have been wise. Taylor (5-10, 226 pounds) has great vision and burst as a runner. He also doesn't get enough credit for what he can do as a receiver, which was on display more during his final college season.

42. Jacksonville Jaguars: Laviska Shenault Jr., WR, Colorado

  • Grade: B

Wide receiver may not have been the most obvious need for the Jags with D.J. Chark, Dede Westbrook and Chris Conley on the roster, but it was hard to pass on this value, as Shenault can grow into a speedy deep threat for them outside. Shenault (6-1, 227 pounds) is a sure-handed field stretcher who has some big-play flair after the catch.

43. Chicago Bears (from Raiders): Cole Kmet, TE, Notre Dame

  • Grade: A

The Bears gave up on oft-injured disappointment Trey Burton and can't rely on a fading Jimmy Graham or an always-hurting Adam Shaheen to be big factors for Mitchell Trubisky or Nick Foles. Kmet (6-6, 262 pounds) is still developing as a run-blocker, but his size, speed, quickness and hands make him a top-flight receiver for the position. He can contribute big-time by Year 2.

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Grant-Delpit-110719-Getty-FTR.jpg

44. Cleveland Browns (from Colts): Grant Delpit, S, LSU

  • Grade: A

The Browns are reshuffling at safety with veterans Karl Joseph and Andrew Sendejo, but they get a truly dynamic upgrade, especially with a value pick like this. Delpit (6-2, 213 pounds) flies around the field, stopping the run like an extra linebacker and making big plays on the ball in downfield coverage.

45. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Antoine Winfield Jr., S, Minnesota

  • Grade: A

This position was the big secondary need for Tampa after their corners improved at the end of last season. Winfield (5-10, 203 pounds) is a nice, versatile upgrade over what Jordan Whitehead and Justin Evans gave the Bucs. The son of the former Vikings Pro Bowl cornerback, he plays with smarts and toughness. He excels at diagnosing plays, knowing when to be aggressive against the run and how use his frame in short-area coverage.

46. Denver Broncos: K.J. Hamler, WR, Penn State

  • Grade: C

The Broncos go wide receiver again after getting Jerry Jeudy in the first round to fully load up for Drew Lock. But they did it at the cost of ignoring some critical needs on defense and the offensive line. Hamler (5-9, 178 pounds) is a smart, smooth route-runner with reliable hands and toughness in tight spaces. He can also help in the return game. But this seems like a superfluous luxury pick considering Denver already has good slot potential from another Penn State product, DaeSean Hamilton. John Elway is clearly going “all in” on offense to try to catch the Chiefs.

47. Atlanta Falcons: Marlon Davidson, DL, Auburn

  • Grade: A

The Falcons, after getting cornerback A.J. Terrell in the first round, get an absolute steal in a disruptive player to put next to Grady Jarrett for Dan Quinn’s defensive front. Davidson (6-3, 303 pounds) can be a terror rushing the passer from both the interior and the edge. He has a nice blend of strength, power and quickness to go along with sudden finishing moves. He was a strong tag-team act with Brown.

48. Seattle Seahawks (from Jets): Darrell Taylor, DE, Tennessee

  • Grade: B

The Seahawks likely won't re-sign Jadeveon Clowney, and Ezekiel Ansah remains a free agent, leaving a void for a strong all-around edge defender. This is better than their first-round pick of linebacker Jordyn Brooks, but they get docked for passing on better edge rushers, including A.J. Epenesa and Terrell Lewis. Taylor (6-4, 267 pounds) stands out as a prospect because he is a pure power pass-rusher. Improvement in his moves, mobility and instincts can make him a well-rounded contributor.

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Chase-Claypool-022720-Getty-FTR.jpg

49. Pittsburgh Steelers: Chase Claypool, WR, Notre Dame

  • Grade: B

This is an interesting pick to boost the offense at wide receiver rather than running back with J.K. Dobbins still on the board. Given the Steelers’ inconsistency and size issues behind JuJu Smith-Schuster, it does make some sense to give Big Ben a bigger target. Claypool (6-4, 238 pounds) matches his size with great speed and downfield burst. He is not the most technically sound route-runner, but he often wins with physical domination.

50. Chicago Bears: Jaylon Johnson, CB, Utah

  • Grade: A

The Bears needed some help opposite Kyle Fuller because Buster Skrine is a slot cover man and Artie Burns is a shaky flyer for the position. Johnson (6-0, 193 pounds) has some shutdown upside as an aggressive, physical cover man with the quickness to stick with receivers on the perimeter.

51. Dallas Cowboys: Trevon Diggs, CB, Alabama

  • Grade: A+

The Cowboys get their second steal of the draft and fill a big need at cornerback in the wake of losing Byron Jones in free agency. Diggs offers good size (6-1, 205 pounds), strength and downfield speed. He shot up the board quickly during his big senior season (three interceptions in 12 games).

52. Los Angeles Rams: Cam Akers, RB, Florida State

  • Grade: B

The Rams needed another option beyond Malcolm Brown and Darrell Henderson to help replace Todd Gurley. Akers (5-10, 217 pounds) is a patient runner who follows his blocks well and shoots through holes. He has a good blend of power and explosiveness. He is willing to get physical but also shows a second gear in the open field. It’s just curious they took him over J.K. Dobbins.

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Jalen-Hurts-022720-Getty-FTR.jpg

53. Philadelphia Eagles: Jalen Hurts, QB, Oklahoma

  • Grade: D

First, the positives: The 6-1, 226-pound Hurts' toughness and leadership intangibles are off the charts, and he improved as a runner and downfield passer while finishing his collegiate career in Lincoln Riley's offense. Now, the negatives: This is the wrong team for Hurts, who will be a developmental project behind Carson Wentz with little chance to start unless Wentz’s health goes really south. Considering that, this pick is more for insurance down the line rather than one for the needs the Eagles have now.

54. Buffalo Bills: A.J. Epenesa, DE, Iowa

  • Grade: A+

The Bills needed depth to help them get to the passer with Shaq Lawson gone. Epenesa (6-5, 274 pounds) is a powerful, explosive, big-bodied player. He can push blockers out of the way to get to the QB, and he can stand strong against the run.

55. Baltimore Ravens: J.K. Dobbins, RB, Ohio State

  • Grade: A+

The Ravens catch an absolute steal for their league-leading running game. Mark Ingram is 30, and both Gus Edwards and Justice Hill aren’t complete backs. Dobbins (5-9, 209 pounds) has great quickness, agility and ability to read blockers. He is an adept receiver with explosive burst once he sees a hole, hits it and gets into the open field.

56. Miami Dolphins (from Saints): Raekwon Davis, DT, Alabama

  • Grade: A

Miami needed defensive tackle pop at some point on Day 2, and it gets some with an ideal player for Brian Flores’ front. Davis (6-6, 311 pounds) is a massive, versatile player who can line up at either tackle or end to eat space against the run.

57. Los Angeles Rams (from Texans): Van Jefferson, WR, Florida

  • Grade: C

The Rams get a wide receiver to support Robert Woods and Cooper Kupp, but they reach a little considering there were other more explosive receivers available (see Denzel Mims) who could have been an upgrade from Josh Reynolds. Jefferson (6-1, 200 pounds) is the son of former NFL player Shawn, the Jets’ receivers coach. Van is polished in his hands and routes but is more of a tough slot option than an outside home-run hitter.

58. Minnesota Vikings: Ezra Cleveland, OT, Boise State

  • Grade: A-

The Vikings go for a high-upside developmental tackle with an eye on replacing aging, fading Riley Reiff on the left side by 2021. Cleveland (6-6, 311 pounds) has raw skills that can quickly developed, with his quickness and agility giving him great upside. He is fluid with his hands and legs in pass-protection.

Denzel Mims-1100719-GETTY-FTR
Denzel Mims-1100719-GETTY-FTR

59. New York Jets: Denzel Mims, WR, Baylor

  • Grade: A+

The Jets needed to complement new field-stretching speedster Breshad Perriman and reliable slot ace Jamison Crowder. Mims (6-3, 207 pounds) is a big, physical target who also knows how to use his frame to his advantage. He is best suited to be a vertical and red-zone threat on the outside, making him a great fit with Sam Darnold.

60. New England Patriots (from Ravens): Josh Uche, LB, Michigan

  • Grade: B

The Patriots fill another key defensive need after getting Dugger to be a safety/linebacker hybrid earlier in the round, going back to the same school from which they got Chase Winovich. Uche (6-1, 245 pounds) is versatile; he can play on the first or second level to get after the QB on passing downs. He was a slight reach over others at the position, but New England will try to bring out his untapped potential.

61. Tennessee Titans: Kristian Fulton, CB, LSU

  • Grade: A+

Behind Malcolm Butler and Adoree' Jackson, the Titans fill a major void at cornerback with Logan Ryan unsigned. They get a player who had first-round potential, much like the Cowboys’ earlier pick of Diggs. Fulton (6-0, 197 pounds) has the size, speed, smarts and sound coverage skills to have a long, prosperous career, which is why he felt confident enough to pull out of the Senior Bowl.

AJ Dillon-052119-GETTY-FTR
AJ Dillon-052119-GETTY-FTR

62. Green Bay Packers: A.J. Dillon, RB, Boston College

  • Grade: C-

Dillon (6-0, 147 pounds) was a productive runner in college, getting more mileage than most as a determined power back. This is another weird offensive pick for the Packers, one that doesn’t help Aaron Rodgers. The Packers are fine in the backfield with Aaron Jones leading the way. Jones is a free agent in 2021, but he is a different kind of back, making this an odd contingency selection for a contender.

63. Kansas City Chiefs (from 49ers): Willie Gay Jr., LB, Mississippi State

  • Grade: B+

The Chiefs recognized their need for improved play against the pass on the second level with Ben Niemann currently their best option in the middle. Gay (6-1, 243 pounds) is a good cover man and blitzer.

64. Carolina Panthers (from Chiefs via Seahawks): Jeremy Chinn, S, Southern Illinois

  • Grade: A

After getting Brown and Gross-Matos for their defensive line, the Panthers wisely get a reliable, ground-covering playmaker for the secondary. Chinn (6-3, 221 pounds) is a bonus because he is a linebacker hybrid. He has been on the rise because it has become evident his size, speed and athleticism translate to elite coverage skills for the position.

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Round 3

65. Cincinnati Bengals: Logan Wilson, LB, Wyoming

  • Grade: B+

The Bengals got the new leader for their offense in Burrow. Wilson can potentially give them the same thing for a defense where the linebacker corps has been an issue for a few years. Wilson (6-2, 241 pounds) is a savvy athlete with a great combination of toughness and agility.

66. Washington Redskins: Antonio Gibson, WR, Memphis

  • Grade: B

The Redskins stole Terry McLaurin in last year’s draft to be their No. 1, but they needed more big-play ability at the position. Gibson (6-0, 228 pounds) is an explosive after-the-catch player who excels in breaking free in the open field.

67. Detroit Lions: Julian Okwara, LB, Notre Dame

  • Grade: B

The Lions address their need for more big plays on the edge after getting Jeff Okudah to fortify the back end of the pass defense. Okwara (6-4, 252 pounds) is a flexible, explosive pass-rusher with great finishing burst to the quarterback.

68. New York Jets (from Giants): Ashtyn Davis, S, California

  • Grade: C

The Jets are pretty sound at safety for now, so it looks like they might be stretching to play Davis at cornerback, where they are weak with Arthur Maulet and Brian Poole being their best options. Davis (6-1, 202 pounds) has the size and speed to be a better pro fit away from safety, but he needs considerable polish with his coverage skills.

69. Seattle Seahawks (from Panthers): Damien Lewis, G, LSU

  • Grade: C

The Seahawks needed some interior offensive line help with Mike Iupati and D.J. Fluker both aging and fading, but likely reached for someone they could have gotten in Day 3. Lewis (6-2, 327 pounds) fits their run-first mentality with his powerful work in the rushing attack, but has little upside in pass protection.

70. Miami Dolphins: Brandon Jones, S, Texas

  • Grade: C

The Dolphins had a major secondary void at safety after cutting Reshad Jones, so they get another Jones to play with new cornerback Byron Jones and first-round rookie nickel back Noah Igbinoghene. This Jones (5-11, 198 pounds) is a good run-stopping, rangy player, but he needs to improve to be consistent in coverage.

71. Baltimore Ravens (from Chargers via Patriots): Justin Madubuike, DT, Texas A&M

  • Grade: A

The Ravens needed to reload up front after losing Michael Pierce in free agency. Madubuike (6-3, 293 pounds) won't be confused with the giants at the position, but he has a great combination of power and quickness. He uses his lower body to gain leverage against the run.

72. Arizona Cardinals: Josh Jones, OT, Houston

  • Grade: A+

The Cardinals waited to address right tackle opposite D.J Humphries and were rewarded with a steal, a player who many teams rated as a first-round talent. Jones has terrific athleticism for his size (6-5, 319 pounds) and can support with his toughness and relentless blocking. He is a bit raw, however; his handwork and footwork both could use refinement to maximize his natural skills.

73. Jacksonville Jaguars: Davon Hamilton, DT, Ohio State

  • Grade: A-

The Jaguars add to their impressive defensive rebuild after landing cornerback C.J. Henderson and versatile edge rusher K’Lavon Chaisson by addressing their interior need with great value. Hamilton (6-4, 320 pounds) has baseline run-stuffing ability plus potential pass-rush pop.

74. New Orleans Saints (from Browns): Zack Baun, LB, Wisconsin

  • Grade: A+

The Saints lost A.J. Klein in free agency, making strongside linebacker a position of need. Here they get a bonus in a first-round talent who is versatile enough to help them get to the quarterback, too. Baun (6-2, 238 pounds) is a smart, motivated player who displays great technique against the run. He also has started to get more attention for his pass-rush repertoire and the athleticism that fuels it.

75. Detroit Lions (from Colts): Jonah Jackson, G, Ohio State

  • Grade: A-

The Lions were wise to address their interior offensive line here after losing Graham Glasgow in free agency. Jackson (6-3, 306 pounds) is a unique prospect because he is a pure pass-protecting interior blocker. He has the frame and strength to develop in the running game.

76. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Ke'Shawn Vaughn, RB, Vanderbilt

  • Grade: B

The Bucs may have reached a little for Vaughn and perhaps should have tried to nab J.K. Dobbins earlier, but they still get the type of back they need to boost Tom Brady and complement Ronald Jones III. Vaughn (5-10, 214 pounds) is a strong, compact power back but some underrated juice and untapped potential as a receiver to be effective on third downs.

77. Denver Broncos: Michael Ojemudia, RB, Iowa

  • Grade: B

The Broncos traded for A.J. Bouye but they needed cornerback help after losing Chris Harris Jr. in free agency. Ojemudia (6-1, 200 pounds) has good developmental qualities related to his impressive size.

78. Atlanta Falcons: Matt Hennessy, G/C, Temple

  • Grade: B

The Falcons have five first-round picks now starting on their offensive line, but the glaring weakness is at left guard with James Carpenter. Hennessy (6-4, 307 pounds) isn’t a overwhelming power blocking type, but his plus athleticism is a nice fit their zone-blocking scheme.

79. New York Jets: Jabari Zuniga, DE, Florida

  • Grade: A

The Jets get a great defensive value here to improve their pass rush. Zuniga (6-3, 264 pounds) is a pure, explosive defensive end who flashes because of his athleticism with the potential to be a lot more consistent. He is an excellent fit in Gregg Williams’ scheme.

80. Las Vegas Raiders: Lynn Bowden, RB/WR, Kentucky

  • Grade: C

The Raiders get more big-play ability after landing speedy deep threat Henry Ruggs III in this versatile talent who simply has a knack for hitting home runs with the ball in his hands. They’ll have to design special plays to help him create as a running back/wideout hybrid, however. Bowden (5-11, 204 pounds) won’t be playing slot, either, with Hunter Renfrow there.

81. Las Vegas Raiders (from Bears): Bryan Edwards, WR, South Carolina

  • Grade: A

This next pick for a true wideout makes sense to put a big target opposite Ruggs outside to several as a better complement than Tyrell Williams. Edwards (6-3, 212 pounds) projects as a physical possession receiver who can dominate the short to intermediate area.

82. Dallas Cowboys: Neville Gallimore, DT, Oklahoma

  • Grade: A

The Cowboys go back to Oklahoma after getting CeeDee Lamb in the first round with another terrific value pick to address their need for increased depth in their defensive line rotation. Gallimore (6-2, 304 pounds) packs a powerful, relentless punch for his size.

83. Denver Broncos (from Steelers): Lloyd Cushenberry, C, LSU

  • Grade: A+

The Broncos got Graham Glasgow but are moving on from both Connor McGovern and Ron Leary inside. Cushenberry (6-3, 212 pounds) is a powerful run-blocker who uses his hands and strong upper body well.

84. Los Angeles Rams: Terrell Lewis, OLB, Alabama

  • Grade: A+

The Rams must also address their pass rush after losing Dante Fowler in free agency and parting ways with Clay Matthews. Lewis (6-5, 262 pounds), with his natural quickness and explosiveness, has the potential to get to the quarterback. He should have gone in the early-to-mid second round.

85. Indianapolis Colts (from Eagles via Lions): Julian Blackmon, S, Utah

  • Grade: C

The Colts have a need at safety with Clayton Geathers gone and Malik Hooker possibly being traded before the draft is finished. This is a bit of a reach pick, however, when they passed on top safeties earlier. Blackmon (6-0, 187 pounds) is better in coverage than a run support player, giving him some subpackage versatility.

86. Buffalo Bills: Zack Moss, RB, Utah

  • Grade: A+

The Bills get a running back who should have gone in the second round here as the ideal complement to Devin Singletary. Moss (5-9, 223 pounds) profiles as a compact power back suited to getting the tough yards between the tackles and more yards after initial contact. His quickness in the open field and receiving skills are underrated.

87. New England Patriots: Anfernee Jennings, LB, Alabama

  • Grade: A

The Patriots tap into Bill Belichick’s favorite college program coached by his buddy Nick Saban to land yet another classic versatile player for his defense after getting linebacker/safety Kyle Dugger and end/linebacker Josh Uche. Jennings (6-2, 256 pounds) fits nicely as he can wreak havoc from a variety of angles. He has good edge-rushing skills and the potential to be a run-stopping outside linebacker.

88. Cleveland Browns (from Saints): Jordan Elliott, DT, Missouri

  • Grade: A

The Browns address a need in their interior defensive line to upgrade from Larry Ogunjobi. Elliott (6-4, 302 pounds) plays with power against the run but also has proved to have natural interior pass-rushing skills.

89. Minnesota Vikings: Cameron Dantzler, CB, Mississippi State

  • Grade: A

The Vikings remain smart about replacing both Xavier Rhodes and Trae Waynes with another perfect fit for Mike Zimmer’s scheme, joining first-rounder Jeff Gladney. Dantzler (6-2, 188 pounds) has nice size and uses his hands and hips to be disruptive against receivers downfield.

90. Houston Texans: Jonathan Greenard, OLB, Florida

  • Grade: B

The Texans get decent value in finding some edge pass-rushing depth behind J.J. Watt and Whitney Mercilus. Greenard (6-3, 263 pounds) is a smart defender who knows how to use his athleticism to get after the quarterback and work upfield against the run.

91. New England Patriots (from Seahawks via Texans and Raiders): Devin Asiasi, TE, UCLA

  • Grade: C

The Patriots make a questionable trade up for Asiasi (6-3, 256 pounds), more of a big-body blocking type tight end vs. a more dynamic polished receiver at the position such as Washington’s Hunter Bryant, FAU’s Harrison Bryant and Purdue’s Brycen Hopkins. New England fills a big need after officially moving on from Rob Gronkowski, but settle for an incomplete prospect at the position.

92. Baltimore Ravens: Devin Duvernay, WR, Texas

  • Grade: B

The Ravens were in the market for a little more receiving pop, and they opt for a track star to further upgrade their speed from Marquise Brown and Miles Boykin, two guys who can fly. Lamar Jackson has more power running support with J.K. Dobbins, and now is further set up to take successful deep shots playing off that strength better in the downfield passing game. They’ll find a way to let Duvernay (5-10, 200 pounds) make big plays when they spread the field.

93. Tennessee Titans: Darrynton Evans, RB, Appalachian State

  • Grade: A

The Titans needed to have a better backup plan behind Derrick Henry after moving on from Dion Lewis. Evans (5-10, 203 pounds) is the perfect No. 2 for them (and a strong contingency should a long-term deal with Henry not work out for some reason). He is an explosive change of pace who can be an asset as a receiver and return man. Although he’s not meant to be a bruiser between the tackles, better suited to zip into the open field, Evans is also underrated as a finishing power back.

94. Green Bay Packers: Josiah Deguara, TE, Cincinnati

  • Grade: C

The Packers needed some help at tight end to complement Jace Sternberger and it made sense to go for more of a blocking type. They reached quite a bit, however, for Deguara (6-2, 242 pounds), who is versatile, but is limited to be an occasional soft-hands inline option as a receiver.

95. Denver Broncos (from 49ers): McTelvin Agim, DT, Arkansas

  • Grade: C

The Broncos traded for Jurrell Casey and re-signed Shelby Harris but need more pop in Vic Fangio's 3-4 line rotation. Agim (6-3, 309 pounds) does the trick as a developmental tackle with good natural quickness, but he may not be able to see significant snaps until he gets stronger and more technically sound.

96. Kansas City Chiefs: Lucas Niang, OT, TCU

  • Grade: B

The Chiefs get a good developmental prospect for their line with Mitchell Schwartz turning 31 in June and becoming a free agent in 2022. Niang (6-6, 315 pounds) is a smart, athletic tackle whose size makes him a good asset for the running game working on the right side.

97. Cleveland Browns (from Texans): Jacob Phillips, LB, LSU

  • Grade: C

The Browns lost Joe Schobert in free agency and needed some solid depth initially with some upside for their linebacker corps. Phillips (6-3, 229) provides that, but may not be athletic enough to be a reliable cover man.

98. Baltimore Ravens (from Patriots): Malik Harrison, LB, Ohio State

  • Grade: A+

The Ravens wisely addressed linebacker twice early after getting Patrick Queen in the first round. Harrison's best qualities lie in how he flies upfield against the run and finishes so well as a physical tackler at 6-3 and 247 pounds. He can grow and develop into a more viable cover man.

99. New York Giants: Matt Peart, OT, UConn

  • Grade: B

The Giants got their immediate right tackle starter in Andrew Thomas in the first round, but it makes sense to get a developmental potential replacement for left tackle Nate Solder. Peart (6-7, 318 pounds) has attracted teams with his wingspan and fluid athleticism. He needs to get stronger to improve the power aspects of his game.

100. Las Vegas Raiders (from Patriots): Tanner Muse, LB, Clemson

  • Grade: D

The Raiders have loved taking Clemson players in the Jon Gruden-Mike Mayock era because of their experience and intangibles. But they once again reached with Muse (6-2, 227 pounds), who despite a fast 40-yard dash, shows up on the field playing a little slow for NFL safety and will need to settle for run-stopping duties as a rotational linebacker at first. The hard-nosed qualities are there, but so are the playmaking limitations. He probably could have been selected as a flyer late on Day 3.

101. New England Patriots (from Seahawks): Dalton Keene, TE, Virginia Tech

  • Grade: B

The Patriots trade up for another tight end, this time for a lot more receiving upside. Keene (6-4, 253 pounds) is the classic versatile player for their offense, as he can line up and catch the ball all over the field, with some good intermediate burst in the open field.

102. Pittsburgh Steelers: Alex Highsmith, OLB, Charlotte

  • Grade: B

The Steelers get some needed depth for their already strong edge pass rush led by T.J. Watt and Bud Dupree. Highsmith (6-3, 248 pounds) fits the bill after posting 15 sacks in his final season at Charlotte.

103. Philadelphia Eagles: Davion Taylor, OLB, Colorado

  • Grade: C

The Eagles made big moves up front (Javon Hargrave) and in the secondary (Darius Slay) but need to shore up their big defensive weakness across the board on the second level. Taylor (6-0, 228 pounds) is a raw athletic talent, however, who will need time to contribute.

104. Los Angeles Rams: Terrell Burgess, S, Utah

  • Grade: B

The Rams needed more secondary depth, and they were wise to land this intriguing cornerback/safety hybrid, as they need more versality with linebacker Cory Littelton gone. Burgess (5-11, 202 pounds) has a good blend of run-support and coverage skills. He will help in nickel and dime packages.

105. New Orleans Saints (from Vikings): Adam Trautman, TE, Dayton

  • Grade: C

This is a tough one, because Trautman has a high ceiling and could be a big factor in the passing game to complement (and then replace) Jared Cook. But the Saints gave up a ton to get him, so he better have some early impact. Trautman (6-5, 255 pounds) is a skilled receiver with his hands and route-running, and given his size, he has the potential to develop into a strong NFL blocker.

106. Baltimore Ravens: Tyre Phillips, G, Mississippi State

  • Grade: B

The Ravens get a sleeper candidate to replace retired Marshal Yanda at guard. Phillips (6-5, 331 pounds) is a good fit in their power inside zone blocking scheme.

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