Olivia Colman’s stylist releases LFW shoot using only discarded clothes

Naomi May
·2-min read
 (Marco Mori)
(Marco Mori)

Before you think about throwing that old top away, or pressing ‘Head to Checkout’ with a basket full of affordable fast fashion, think again.

To raise awareness of the 3.5 tonnes of clothing thrown away every five minutes in the UK, the British Fashion Council has teamed up with Vanish to release a photoshoot styled entirely with discarded clothing.

The shoot, called the Rewear Edit, was styled by Olivia Colman’s stylist, Miranda Almond, and is accompanied by a film which Almond stars in to explain how old pieces of clothing can be re-worn, reused and restyled.

“Before you go out and buy something new, before you throw away that item that’s been unloved and unworn lying in the bottom of your wardrobe, think again,” advises Almond, “With a little imagination, love and restoration that item can be re worn and reimagined to have a super stylish second life. Think about re-wearing as the most timeless style statement yet!”

The Rewear Edit, styled by Miranda AlmondMarco Mori
The Rewear Edit, styled by Miranda AlmondMarco Mori

For the shoot, which took place against a backdrop of 3.5 tonnes of clothing waste, Almond curated the model’s looks from LBDs, chic and sharp tailoring and chunky knitwear, all of which she found in a refuse pile.

The Rewear Edit is the result of the British Fashion Council’s newest partnership with Vanish, which recently found as part of its own studies that 64 per cent of people wear certain items of their wardrobe only once, in turn adding to the 350,000 tonnes of clothing that the UK sends to landfill each year.

Bethany Williams’ genderless collection of coats made from recycled blanketsBethany Williams
Bethany Williams’ genderless collection of coats made from recycled blanketsBethany Williams

“As the world turns its attention to the incredible collections at this year’s London Fashion Week, our partnership with Vanish is here to remind people of the joy of restyling and reimagining their wardrobes and to give their clothes the lifespan they deserve,” says Caroline Rush, CEO of the British Fashion Council, on the partnership.

In fact, sustainability has been at the forefront of designer’s minds this season. Menswear designer Bethany Williams unveiled a genderless collection of coats made entirely from upcycled blankets, while staunch sustainability advocate Vivienne Westwood ensured that 90 per cent of her autumn/winter 2021 collection was made by recycled deadstock material.