Caster Semenya hints at retirement in cryptic posts after CAS uphold hormone decision

Caster Semenya on day nine of the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games at Carrara Stadium on April 13, 2018 on the Gold Coast, Australia.
Caster Semenya on day nine of the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games at Carrara Stadium on April 13, 2018 on the Gold Coast, Australia.

Caster Semenya has hinted at retiring from athletics following her loss in a landmark case against governing body the IAAF.

The athlete had been in court arguing against the limitation on testosterone levels to continue competing in women’s running.

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Semenya had previously criticised the decision to uphold the limits and said she would ‘rise above’.

READ MORE: Athletics South Africa accuse CAS of 'reopening wounds of apartheid' with Semenya decision

READ MORE: Caster Semenya loses bid to overturn IAAF's testosterone regulations in landmark ruling by CAS

READ MORE: Semenya vows to 'rise above' after losing legal case against IAAF

But the South African athlete appeared to have changed her stance in the post which read: “Knowing when to walk away is wisdom. Being able to is courage.

“Walking away with your head held high is dignity.

The 28 year old then posted just two hours later saying: “That’s me and will always be.

“I’m finished.”

Semenya will now have to take medication to restrict her testosterone levels for six months before competing if they are above the prescribed level, or change the event she competes in.

The 800 metre runner is on the start list for the Doha Diamond League meet on Friday, which she is allowed to compete in. An event which could well be her last, if she does decide to retire as a result of the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) ruling.

She had previously said: "The decision of the CAS will not hold me back.

“I will once again rise above and continue to inspire young women and athletes in South Africa and around the world."

Earlier in the day Athletics South Africa (ASA) had accused CAS of ‘reopening wounds of apartheid.’

ASA called the result of the case ‘disgraceful’ and said the organisation was ‘deeply disappointed’ and ‘profoundly shocked’ saying the ruling justifies discrimination.

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