Stuart Broad planning to get ‘Nottingham roar’ going at Trent Bridge to give England boost against New Zealand

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 (AFP via Getty Images)
(AFP via Getty Images)

Stuart Broad has never been shy of the spotlight, and he has promised to continue geeing up England supporters at crucial moments this summer after turning the Lord’s Test on its head on Saturday.

Broad waved his arms at the Lord’s crowd early on day three, before New Zealand lost three wickets in three balls to spark a collapse of six for 34.

Daryl Mitchell and Tom Blundell had shared 195 to guide New Zealand into a position of strength, but Broad’s intervention brought England back into a game they eventually won by five wickets. He had Mitchell caught behind and bowled Kyle Jamieson, with Ollie Pope running out the napping Colin de Grandhomme between times.

Broad believes the trick of revving the crowd could work when the series continues at Trent Bridge, not least because of the party atmosphere in the city caused by his team Nottingham Forest being promoted to the Premier League last week.

“I ran in and felt the ground was a bit quiet, so let’s get this ground going,” he said. “I know that’s when I’m at my best. There was a real roar when I did it and Pottsy [Matt Potts] at mid-off said ‘keep it going, that’s amazing’.

“It just felt like something was happening. I need to take that into Trent Bridge, because if I get that Nottingham roar, with the party mode the Forest fans are in, it could have a huge benefit. I knew yesterday if we didn’t break that partnership, the Test match was dead. It was a key period. We need to ride that wave all summer.”

Broad has interacted keenly with the crowd in the past, but says he sensed the moment more on this occasion.

“This was more deliberate than the other ones,” he said. “The Wanderers in 2016 for example, it was a case of the ball doing the talking and the crowd feeding off that.

“But yesterday was probably using my experience, thinking the team needs something here. It adds a different pressure though. If you whip the crowd up, then bowl a half-volley and go for four you look daft. But I quite like that pressure. You’ll see this summer, when I feel we need that extra lift and momentum, I’ll do it again.”

 (Getty Images)
(Getty Images)

Broad said he did feel a different approach from England’s new leadership duo Brendon McCullum and Ben Stokes in the field, with an attacking mindset.

“It’s noticeable from Stokesy and Baz that it’s all about taking wickets,” he said. “Test cricket ebbs and flows and you do need to adjust to pitch. But if there is a chance to get that extra slip in or a short leg, jump on it, rather than not.”

Broad added that he was very impressed with how Potts, who took seven wickets on debut, slotted into the attack alongside him and Jimmy Anderson.

“Jimmy and I welcomed him, played golf with him the day before the Test match as a three,” he said.

“He’s got some great attributes, he can swing it, seam it, he brings the stumps into play. His confidence is sky high from what he’s done for Durham. And he’s built very nicely for a fast bowler - he looks like he’s made of stone. He’s had a dream debut and the way he bowls - that style - makes me think he’ll enjoy Trent Bridge too.”

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