'You wake up and you know' – Morgan felt the time was right for international retirement

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Eoin Morgan says he knew the time was right to step away from international cricket after the England white-ball captain confirmed his international retirement.

Morgan announced he would be quitting the side on Tuesday, leaving England needing to appoint a new skipper less than four months before the start of the T20 World Cup in Australia.

He skippered England to their first Cricket World Cup title on home soil in 2019, but has struggled for form as of late, with a pair of ducks in their three-match series against the Netherlands earlier this month.

The Dublin-born batter took the armband in late 2014, but admitted the time is now for him to leave his role, with his struggles against the Dutch the final push needed for him to make the call.

"I've been open and honest about when the time would come, over the last three years," Morgan told Sky Sports. "I've engaged a lot with ex-players about when they stopped, how it came about.

"Each person said there's a time and a place when it hits you, or that you wake up and you know, and that moment came for me in Amsterdam.

"I think it's a culmination of a lot of things that over the course of my international career, which has been a long time, I've just come to the end.

"I'm glad I was in a sound enough space to understand that feeling and be aware of what it meant, and also what it means both for the England white-ball side and me in my personal life.

"The day it hit me was quite a sad day, reaching the end of such a special journey. But since that day I've been incredibly proud, content with the decision and excited for English cricket going forward.

Morgan had previously spoken to new England Test coach Brendon McCullum about retirement before, and explained that advice reinforced his decision.

"Baz is one of my close mates," he added. "I've spoke to him about retirement for a long time, and particularly around his, and the transition for him, and he said 'you will know, there'll be a feeling that hits you, just recognise it when it comes'."

Asked if he would like to stay involved in the England set-up, the 35-year-old said: "I think at the moment the best thing is for me to come out of it, let the new captain find his feet, build a relationship with the new coach and ultimately drive towards the next World Cup.

"They come thick and fast, and the potential the team has is unbelievable. I'm excited to sit back and watch, I'm lucky to be a part of such a special time, but I think what's to come might be even more special."

Jos Buttler is tipped to succeed Morgan as captain, with new white-ball coach Matthew Mott previously appointed in May.

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