Winter Olympics 2018: Russian curler stripped of bronze over doping violation

Sporting News
Aleksandr Krushelnitckii's bronze medal in the mixed doubles curling has been rescinded after a failed drugs test at the Winter Olympics.

Winter Olympics 2018: Russian curler stripped of bronze over doping violation

Aleksandr Krushelnitckii's bronze medal in the mixed doubles curling has been rescinded after a failed drugs test at the Winter Olympics.

Russian curler Aleksandr Krushelnitckii has been stripped of his Winter Olympics bronze medal after he admitted a doping offense.

Krushelnitckii and his wife, Anastasia Bryzgalova, competing for the Olympic Athletes from Russia, clinched third place in the mixed doubles in Pyeongchang, beating Norway for a place on the podium.

However, the Court of Arbitration for Sport confirmed that its anti-doping division had "initiated a procedure" against Krushelnitckii.

The 25-year-old delivered a positive sample for meldonium but later insisted he was not to blame, while OAR released a statement that said it was pursuing a criminal investigation to ascertain how he came to have the substance in his system.

On Thursday, CAS confirmed that Krushelnitckii has been disqualified from the Games and accepted a provisional suspension.

A CAS statement read: "Aleksandr Krushelnitckii (OAR, mixed doubles curling, ranked 3rd), positive test with meldonium; the athlete has admitted the anti-doping rule violation; he is disqualified from the mixed doubles curling event at the Olympic Winter Games Pyeongchang 2018 and the results obtained by the team OAR at the same event are disqualified with all resulting consequences.

"The athlete is excluded from the Olympic Winter Games Pyeongchang 2018; his accreditation shall be withdrawn; the proceedings shall continue between the World Curling Federation and the athlete; the IOC is no longer a party to this procedure."

The statement added that Krushelnitckii has "reserved his rights to seek the elimination or reduction of any period of ineligibility based on 'no fault or negligence' following the conclusion of the Games."


What to read next