Wonder Woman's Patty Jenkins denies reports she was 'at war' with Warner Bros

Ben Arnold
·Contributor
·3-min read
Jenkins and Gal Gadot on the set of Wonder Woman 1984 (Credit: Warner Bros)
Jenkins and Gal Gadot on the set of Wonder Woman 1984 (Credit: Warner Bros)

Patty Jenkins, the director of Wonder Woman and Wonder Woman 1984, has hit back over headlines claiming that she was 'at war' with the Warner Bros studio.

In particular, Jenkins appears to have taken aim at the New York Post, which lifted quotes from a recent interview she did with Marc Maron on his podcast WTF.

During the interview, she speaks of a 'mistrust' and that the studio was 'freaked out by all the female superhero films that had failed', but she's pointed out that the use of the word 'war' is inaccurate.

Taking to Twitter, she said: “Versions of this article seems to be everywhere and not true. There was no 'war' with warner bros over ww.

Watch: Patty Jenkins on the comedy in Wonder Woman 1984

“I’m talking about 10 years of discussions with 10 different execs through them. And whole beard thing was about other projects at other studios.”

She went on: “I felt extremely supported in my vision on both films by @wbpictures, @ZackSnyder all the producers and everyone on board our eventual team. Just was a long road to make it. Let’s chill the dramatic headlines like 'war.'”

Speaking to Maron, she said that after her success with the Oscar-winning movie Monster, starring Charlize Theron, 'everybody wanted to hire me'.

Read More: Patty Jenkins explains why 'Wonder Woman 1984' has more humour than the first movie

“But I felt like they wanted to hire me like a beard; they wanted me to walk around on set being a woman director — but it was their story and their vision,” she went on.

“Even when I first joined Wonder Woman it was like, ‘Uhh, yeah, OK, but let’s do it this other way.’ But I was like, ‘Women don’t want to see that. Her being harsh and tough and cutting people’s heads off … I’m a Wonder Woman fan, that’s not what we’re looking for.’ Still, I could feel that shaky nervousness [on their part] of my point of view.

23rd Critics' Choice Awards – Photo Room – Santa Monica, California, U.S., 11/01/2018 – Gal Gadot (L) and Patty Jenkins pose with their award for Best Action Movie for "Wonder Woman". REUTERS/Monica Almeida
23rd Critics' Choice Awards – Photo Room – Santa Monica, California, U.S., 11/01/2018 – Gal Gadot (L) and Patty Jenkins pose with their award for Best Action Movie for "Wonder Woman". REUTERS/Monica Almeida

“They were all freaked out by all the female superhero films that had failed, the smaller ones that had failed, and also Christopher Nolan was making the ‘Dark Knight‘ thing, so I think they were just trying to figure out what they were doing with DC at that time. They came back to me a year later and said, ‘Do you want to do it your way?' And boom, I just went and made the movie.”

Read More: 'Wonder Woman' star Lucy Davis reveals blink-and-you'll-miss-it cameo in sequel

Her first Wonder Woman movie in 2017 was a smash, making over $820 million at the worldwide box office, and receiving rave reviews.

Fortunes of its sequel Wonder Woman 1984 have been starkly affected by the coronavirus pandemic, however, with the movie receiving a limited theatrical release, before being streamed on HBO Max.

As a result, it's earned just $118 million so far.

Reviews have been notably less celebratory too.

Watch: Wonder Woman 1984 trailer