Zampa wants spinner-friendly wickets as he outlines Australia Test aspirations

Omnisport

Adam Zampa still harbours aspirations of pulling on the baggy green for Australia's Test team, a dream he believes would be helped by more spinner-friendly wickets.

Leg-spinner Zampa, who turned 28 in March, has played in 55 one-day internationals and 30 Twenty20s since debuting for his country in 2016.

A first Test cap has so far proved elusive, though, with Nathan Lyon established as the five-day team's premier spinner and home conditions rarely calling for a second spin option.

Scroll to continue with content
Ad

"I think that's still my ultimate goal, to play red-ball cricket, to play Test cricket for Australia," Zampa told reporters.

"I think you'd be silly if you didn't take your chance as a spinner in Australia at the moment. So that's the ultimate goal.

"I'd love to get some more first-class cricket under my belt first, but I think with the way that I've been improving over the last couple of years, particularly at international level, the last 12 months have been a really good test for me and I've come out the other side pretty well.

"I've still got the goal to play Test cricket for sure."

Zampa's case would be helped if he could impress during Australia's domestic competition, the Sheffield Shield, though his international commitments have limited his involvement in the longer format.

Former Australia international Steve O'Keefe recently said it was "a matter of urgency" that the country produced more pitches conducive to spin if they wanted to win a Test series in India, something they have not done since 2004.

"Personally, I'd love to see that obviously as a spin bowler," he added.

"There's a lot said about bowling on flat wickets but I think Nathan does that really well himself. I think realistically us other spinners are going to be partnering Nathan in the upcoming subcontinent tour.

"I don't really know what it's like to bowl on a spinning wicket in Shield cricket. The closest thing I've ever had to a spinning wicket in Shield cricket is Adelaide Oval when it's green and thatchy. That then limits the amount of overs you bowl as well, so I think there should be an emphasis put on it.

"I think we put a lot of effort into playing the swinging ball in England, we've had the Dukes ball over the last few years in Shield cricket too.

"I think it's really important and I don't know if it has to be every wicket but there has to be some sort of emphasis in bringing spin bowlers in the game."

What to read next