Will automation replace jobs in these 15 Canadian communities?

Canada’s workforce is set to change drastically in the next few decades.

Previous reports have estimated that over 40 per cent of jobs are at high risk of being replaced through automation and the Canadian economy could shed between 1.5 million and 7.5 million positions.

But where exactly will these jobs be lost? And which communities are the most vulnerable?

To figure this out, the Brookfield Institute put together data on automation from consulting firm McKinsey & Company and employment statistics from the 2011 census to map the potential impacts.

The results were released in a report by the Toronto-based think tank on Thursday.

The research indicated that smaller regional economies that revolve around mining or manufacturing are the most vulnerable to automation. These are primarily concentrated in southwestern Ontario, southern Quebec and the Canada Prairies.

Click through the gallery to see which communities are facing the greatest risk.

These are the 15 communities in Canada likely to get hit by automation the hardest

No. 15: Steinbach, Man.
Proportion of work with the potential to be automated: 48 per cent
Population: 10,320
Farm equipment sits idle beside Highway 12 near Steinbach, Man. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods)

These are the 15 communities in Canada likely to get hit by automation the hardest

No. 14: Stratford, Ont.
Proportion of work with the potential to be automated: 48 per cent
Population: 25,175
(Karin Laakes / Wikimedia Commons)

These are the 15 communities in Canada likely to get hit by automation the hardest

No. 13: Wood Buffalo, Alta.
Proportion of work with the potential to be automated: 49 per cent
Population: 54,230
An aerial view of Fort McKay, Alta., Monday, Sept. 19, 2011. The community of Fort McKay is situated in the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo, approximately 65 kilometers north of Fort McMurray. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh)

These are the 15 communities in Canada likely to get hit by automation the hardest

No. 12: Saint-Georges, Que.
Proportion of work with the potential to be automated: 49 per cent
Population: 28,130
(Zec Jaro / Wikimedia Commons)

These are the 15 communities in Canada likely to get hit by automation the hardest

No. 11: Norfolk County, Ont.
Proportion of work with the potential to be automated: 49 per cent
Population: 51,705
(Tudor Costache / Wikimedia Commons)

These are the 15 communities in Canada likely to get hit by automation the hardest

No. 10: Cowansville, Que.
Proportion of work with the potential to be automated: 49 per cent
Population: 10,070
(Samuel Freli / Wikimedia Commons)

These are the 15 communities in Canada likely to get hit by automation the hardest

No. 9: Lachute, Que.
Proportion of work with the potential to be automated: 49 per cent
Population: 10,435
Quebec Liberal Party leader Jean Charest tours an electronics plant with company President Bernard Cyr, left, as he campaigns Thursday, August 23, 2012 in Lachute, Que. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz)

These are the 15 communities in Canada likely to get hit by automation the hardest

No. 8: Brooks, Alta.
Proportion of work with the potential to be automated: 49 per cent
Population: 17,530
Cattle look out form a feedlot in Brooks, Alta., Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh)

These are the 15 communities in Canada likely to get hit by automation the hardest

No. 7: Granby, Que.
Proportion of work with the potential to be automated: 49 per cent
Population: 62,650
(Louis-Philippe Rousselle-Brosseau / Wikimedia Commons)

These are the 15 communities in Canada likely to get hit by automation the hardest

No. 6: Drummondville, Que.
Proportion of work with the potential to be automated: 49 per cent
Population: 71,195
Various brands of beer are seen on display inside a store in Drummondville, Que., on July 23, 2015. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz)

These are the 15 communities in Canada likely to get hit by automation the hardest

No. 5: Woodstock, Ont.
Proportion of work with the potential to be automated: 50 per cent
Population: 30,470
An employee looks over a Rav 4 vehicle at the end of the assembly line, at the opening of the Toyota Motor Manuafacturing Canada, Inc. new automotive plant in Woodstock, Ont., Thursday December 4, 2008. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Dave Chidley)

These are the 15 communities in Canada likely to get hit by automation the hardest

No. 4: Leamington, Ont.
Proportion of work with the potential to be automated: 50 per cent
Population: 37,540
Ignancio Vazquez, a migrant worker from Cuijing, Mexico, harvests cucumbers in Leamington, Ont. on Thursday May 30, 2002. (CP PHOTO – Jason Kryk)

These are the 15 communities in Canada likely to get hit by automation the hardest

No. 3: Quesnel, B.C.
Proportion of work with the potential to be automated: 50 per cent
Population: 18,160
FILE — Logs are piled up at West Fraser Timber in Quesnel, B.C., Tuesday, April 21, 2009. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward)

These are the 15 communities in Canada likely to get hit by automation the hardest

No. 2: Tillsonburg, Ont.
Proportion of work with the potential to be automated: 50 per cent
Population: 12,770

These are the 15 communities in Canada likely to get hit by automation the hardest

No. 1: Ingersoll, Ont.
Proportion of work with the potential to be automated: 50 per cent
Population: 9,700
Production of the General Motors’ CAMI Automotive facility in Ingersoll, Ontario, is shown in this Thursday, Dec. 21, 2006 file photo. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Dave Chidley)

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