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Benfica vs Manchester United: TV channel, stream, kick-off time, odds & match preview

Benfica vs Manchester United: TV channel, stream, kick-off time, odds & match preview

The Red Devils can put themselves at least five points clear of third place at the halfway stage in Group A by winning in Lisbon on Wednesday

Benfica vs Manchester United: TV channel, stream, kick-off time, odds & match preview

The Red Devils can put themselves at least five points clear of third place at the halfway stage in Group A by winning in Lisbon on Wednesday

Benfica vs Manchester United: TV channel, stream, kick-off time, odds & match preview

The Red Devils can put themselves at least five points clear of third place at the halfway stage in Group A by winning in Lisbon on Wednesday

Benfica vs Manchester United: TV channel, stream, kick-off time, odds & match preview

The Red Devils can put themselves at least five points clear of third place at the halfway stage in Group A by winning in Lisbon on Wednesday

Benfica vs Manchester United: TV channel, stream, kick-off time, odds & match preview

The Red Devils can put themselves at least five points clear of third place at the halfway stage in Group A by winning in Lisbon on Wednesday

Benfica vs Manchester United: TV channel, stream, kick-off time, odds & match preview

The Red Devils can put themselves at least five points clear of third place at the halfway stage in Group A by winning in Lisbon on Wednesday

Benfica vs Manchester United: TV channel, stream, kick-off time, odds & match preview

The Red Devils can put themselves at least five points clear of third place at the halfway stage in Group A by winning in Lisbon on Wednesday

Benfica vs Manchester United: TV channel, stream, kick-off time, odds & match preview

The Red Devils can put themselves at least five points clear of third place at the halfway stage in Group A by winning in Lisbon on Wednesday

Benfica vs Manchester United: TV channel, stream, kick-off time, odds & match preview

The Red Devils can put themselves at least five points clear of third place at the halfway stage in Group A by winning in Lisbon on Wednesday

Benfica vs Manchester United: TV channel, stream, kick-off time, odds & match preview

The Red Devils can put themselves at least five points clear of third place at the halfway stage in Group A by winning in Lisbon on Wednesday

Benfica vs Manchester United: TV channel, stream, kick-off time, odds & match preview

The Red Devils can put themselves at least five points clear of third place at the halfway stage in Group A by winning in Lisbon on Wednesday

Benfica vs Manchester United: TV channel, stream, kick-off time, odds & match preview

Jose Mourinho: Ending my career at Manchester United is 'mission impossible'

Jose Mourinho has insisted he has no plans to leave Manchester United but admitted there had been no talks over a new contract. The United manager also sidestepped questions about his long-term future at Old Trafford and claimed it would be “mission impossible” to see out his career at the club ahead of their Champions League tie against Benfica in his ­native Portugal on Wednesday evening. Mourinho flirted publicly with Paris St-Germain in an interview in France at the weekend, around the same time reports emerged that he could walk out of United amid claims he was frustrated with ­executive vice-chairman Ed ­Woodward’s handling of the club. The Daily Telegraph reported in September Mourinho was expected to be approached over extending his contract next month, the mid-point of his existing deal, which would explain why there have been no talks yet. There is also the option in the contract to extend by a ­further 12 months to June 2020. Some fans will wonder whether the timing and nature of Mourinho’s interview with Telefoot, in which he admitted his son had recently chosen to watch PSG over United because it was a club that has a “magic about the place, youth and quality” and “something special right now”, as well as his reported discontent with Woodward, are merely an attempt to strengthen his hand when it comes to contract negotiations. Neymar left speechless by PSG move 00:35 But the only clarity Mourinho was prepared to offer over his future on Tuesday when pressed was his insistence he would manage elsewhere after United because the days of a person staying at the club for decades were over. “The only thing that I said, and is true, and there was not misinterpretation of my words, is I am not going to end my career at Manchester United,” Mourinho said. “I ask how is it possible in modern football that any manager is going to last 15 or 20 years in the same club? I think [Arsene] Wenger [at Arsenal] is the last one to do that. “I think it is impossible for us, with everything that surrounds the job, with all the pressure that surrounds every job, to last for so long. “If in this moment I want to finish my career in two, three, four or five years, I would say, ‘Yes, my ambition is to end my career at Man United’. I think I’m going to be here 15 more years minimum in football [management]. I think it’s impossible to stay 17 years in the same club, it’s an impossible mission. “So, I don’t think I’m going to end my career at Manchester United. After that, some people try to be clever, malicious, and they say many different things. But the reality is simple – didn’t sign a new contract, but I am not thinking about leaving too.” Jose Mourinho during Tuesday's press conference Credit: GETTY IMAGES When asked about the option of extending his contract, though, Mourinho was evasive. “I don’t think there is an answer for that,” he said. “I’m not in conditions to answer that because I don’t think there is anything to answer. I have a contract and that’s it. “I have my contract that ends in May, June 2019? We are in October 2017, so I don’t know what to say and I think you don’t know what to say, too, because one day you say I am going to sign a five-year contract and the next day you say I’m leaving and going to Paris St-Germain. “The answer … is that nothing is happening, I’m not signing a new five-year contract, and I am not leaving for Paris St-Germain. The future in football is tomorrow.” Of much more immediate concern to Mourinho is the game against a struggling Benfica, when victory would give United nine points from nine and leave them in pole position to qualify early. Paul Pogba, Eric Bailly, Marouane Fellaini and Michael Carrick are all unavailable due to injury but Luke Shaw travelled to Lisbon on Monday, with United flying out a day early so Mourinho could see family, and is available for selection. Another defender, Marcos Rojo, was also a surprise inclusion in the travelling party, although Mourinho said he will not be able to play for another fortnight after six months out with a cruciate knee ligament injury. Jose Mourinho oversees Man Utd training Credit: ACTION IMAGES This will be United’s first run out since Mourinho attracted widespread criticism for his defensive approach during the goalless draw against Liverpool at Anfield on Saturday. A withering look crossed Mourinho’s face when asked if the criticism was fair before he shut down any discussion of the matter. “I have just one comment – that’s none,” he said. “Actually, no comment.” Mourinho was forthcoming on the subject of Liverpool defender Dejan Lovren’s claims that he had been deliberately stamped on the head by United striker Romelu Lukaku. “You know, I read something but there is a big contradiction there because he [Lovren] says, ‘Let’s move on and forget what happened’ but then he spends 10 minutes speaking about what he thinks happened and didn’t happen, so for me, they are words without any meaning and the FA committee is there to analyse and make decisions. I have no comments,” Mourinho said. Benfica have won just two of their past seven matches and were thrashed 5-0 by Basel in their last Champions League outing after an opening 2-1 defeat at home to CSKA Moscow, but Ashley Young is convinced they will raise their game for the visit of United. “Obviously they haven’t got off to such a good start in the Champions League but when United turn up, it’s going to be a different story,” Young said.

Jose Mourinho: Ending my career at Manchester United is 'mission impossible'

Jose Mourinho has insisted he has no plans to leave Manchester United but admitted there had been no talks over a new contract. The United manager also sidestepped questions about his long-term future at Old Trafford and claimed it would be “mission impossible” to see out his career at the club ahead of their Champions League tie against Benfica in his ­native Portugal on Wednesday evening. Mourinho flirted publicly with Paris St-Germain in an interview in France at the weekend, around the same time reports emerged that he could walk out of United amid claims he was frustrated with ­executive vice-chairman Ed ­Woodward’s handling of the club. The Daily Telegraph reported in September Mourinho was expected to be approached over extending his contract next month, the mid-point of his existing deal, which would explain why there have been no talks yet. There is also the option in the contract to extend by a ­further 12 months to June 2020. Some fans will wonder whether the timing and nature of Mourinho’s interview with Telefoot, in which he admitted his son had recently chosen to watch PSG over United because it was a club that has a “magic about the place, youth and quality” and “something special right now”, as well as his reported discontent with Woodward, are merely an attempt to strengthen his hand when it comes to contract negotiations. Neymar left speechless by PSG move 00:35 But the only clarity Mourinho was prepared to offer over his future on Tuesday when pressed was his insistence he would manage elsewhere after United because the days of a person staying at the club for decades were over. “The only thing that I said, and is true, and there was not misinterpretation of my words, is I am not going to end my career at Manchester United,” Mourinho said. “I ask how is it possible in modern football that any manager is going to last 15 or 20 years in the same club? I think [Arsene] Wenger [at Arsenal] is the last one to do that. “I think it is impossible for us, with everything that surrounds the job, with all the pressure that surrounds every job, to last for so long. “If in this moment I want to finish my career in two, three, four or five years, I would say, ‘Yes, my ambition is to end my career at Man United’. I think I’m going to be here 15 more years minimum in football [management]. I think it’s impossible to stay 17 years in the same club, it’s an impossible mission. “So, I don’t think I’m going to end my career at Manchester United. After that, some people try to be clever, malicious, and they say many different things. But the reality is simple – didn’t sign a new contract, but I am not thinking about leaving too.” Jose Mourinho during Tuesday's press conference Credit: GETTY IMAGES When asked about the option of extending his contract, though, Mourinho was evasive. “I don’t think there is an answer for that,” he said. “I’m not in conditions to answer that because I don’t think there is anything to answer. I have a contract and that’s it. “I have my contract that ends in May, June 2019? We are in October 2017, so I don’t know what to say and I think you don’t know what to say, too, because one day you say I am going to sign a five-year contract and the next day you say I’m leaving and going to Paris St-Germain. “The answer … is that nothing is happening, I’m not signing a new five-year contract, and I am not leaving for Paris St-Germain. The future in football is tomorrow.” Of much more immediate concern to Mourinho is the game against a struggling Benfica, when victory would give United nine points from nine and leave them in pole position to qualify early. Paul Pogba, Eric Bailly, Marouane Fellaini and Michael Carrick are all unavailable due to injury but Luke Shaw travelled to Lisbon on Monday, with United flying out a day early so Mourinho could see family, and is available for selection. Another defender, Marcos Rojo, was also a surprise inclusion in the travelling party, although Mourinho said he will not be able to play for another fortnight after six months out with a cruciate knee ligament injury. Jose Mourinho oversees Man Utd training Credit: ACTION IMAGES This will be United’s first run out since Mourinho attracted widespread criticism for his defensive approach during the goalless draw against Liverpool at Anfield on Saturday. A withering look crossed Mourinho’s face when asked if the criticism was fair before he shut down any discussion of the matter. “I have just one comment – that’s none,” he said. “Actually, no comment.” Mourinho was forthcoming on the subject of Liverpool defender Dejan Lovren’s claims that he had been deliberately stamped on the head by United striker Romelu Lukaku. “You know, I read something but there is a big contradiction there because he [Lovren] says, ‘Let’s move on and forget what happened’ but then he spends 10 minutes speaking about what he thinks happened and didn’t happen, so for me, they are words without any meaning and the FA committee is there to analyse and make decisions. I have no comments,” Mourinho said. Benfica have won just two of their past seven matches and were thrashed 5-0 by Basel in their last Champions League outing after an opening 2-1 defeat at home to CSKA Moscow, but Ashley Young is convinced they will raise their game for the visit of United. “Obviously they haven’t got off to such a good start in the Champions League but when United turn up, it’s going to be a different story,” Young said.

Jose Mourinho: Ending my career at Manchester United is 'mission impossible'

Jose Mourinho has insisted he has no plans to leave Manchester United but admitted there had been no talks over a new contract. The United manager also sidestepped questions about his long-term future at Old Trafford and claimed it would be “mission impossible” to see out his career at the club ahead of their Champions League tie against Benfica in his ­native Portugal on Wednesday evening. Mourinho flirted publicly with Paris St-Germain in an interview in France at the weekend, around the same time reports emerged that he could walk out of United amid claims he was frustrated with ­executive vice-chairman Ed ­Woodward’s handling of the club. The Daily Telegraph reported in September Mourinho was expected to be approached over extending his contract next month, the mid-point of his existing deal, which would explain why there have been no talks yet. There is also the option in the contract to extend by a ­further 12 months to June 2020. Some fans will wonder whether the timing and nature of Mourinho’s interview with Telefoot, in which he admitted his son had recently chosen to watch PSG over United because it was a club that has a “magic about the place, youth and quality” and “something special right now”, as well as his reported discontent with Woodward, are merely an attempt to strengthen his hand when it comes to contract negotiations. Neymar left speechless by PSG move 00:35 But the only clarity Mourinho was prepared to offer over his future on Tuesday when pressed was his insistence he would manage elsewhere after United because the days of a person staying at the club for decades were over. “The only thing that I said, and is true, and there was not misinterpretation of my words, is I am not going to end my career at Manchester United,” Mourinho said. “I ask how is it possible in modern football that any manager is going to last 15 or 20 years in the same club? I think [Arsene] Wenger [at Arsenal] is the last one to do that. “I think it is impossible for us, with everything that surrounds the job, with all the pressure that surrounds every job, to last for so long. “If in this moment I want to finish my career in two, three, four or five years, I would say, ‘Yes, my ambition is to end my career at Man United’. I think I’m going to be here 15 more years minimum in football [management]. I think it’s impossible to stay 17 years in the same club, it’s an impossible mission. “So, I don’t think I’m going to end my career at Manchester United. After that, some people try to be clever, malicious, and they say many different things. But the reality is simple – didn’t sign a new contract, but I am not thinking about leaving too.” Jose Mourinho during Tuesday's press conference Credit: GETTY IMAGES When asked about the option of extending his contract, though, Mourinho was evasive. “I don’t think there is an answer for that,” he said. “I’m not in conditions to answer that because I don’t think there is anything to answer. I have a contract and that’s it. “I have my contract that ends in May, June 2019? We are in October 2017, so I don’t know what to say and I think you don’t know what to say, too, because one day you say I am going to sign a five-year contract and the next day you say I’m leaving and going to Paris St-Germain. “The answer … is that nothing is happening, I’m not signing a new five-year contract, and I am not leaving for Paris St-Germain. The future in football is tomorrow.” Of much more immediate concern to Mourinho is the game against a struggling Benfica, when victory would give United nine points from nine and leave them in pole position to qualify early. Paul Pogba, Eric Bailly, Marouane Fellaini and Michael Carrick are all unavailable due to injury but Luke Shaw travelled to Lisbon on Monday, with United flying out a day early so Mourinho could see family, and is available for selection. Another defender, Marcos Rojo, was also a surprise inclusion in the travelling party, although Mourinho said he will not be able to play for another fortnight after six months out with a cruciate knee ligament injury. Jose Mourinho oversees Man Utd training Credit: ACTION IMAGES This will be United’s first run out since Mourinho attracted widespread criticism for his defensive approach during the goalless draw against Liverpool at Anfield on Saturday. A withering look crossed Mourinho’s face when asked if the criticism was fair before he shut down any discussion of the matter. “I have just one comment – that’s none,” he said. “Actually, no comment.” Mourinho was forthcoming on the subject of Liverpool defender Dejan Lovren’s claims that he had been deliberately stamped on the head by United striker Romelu Lukaku. “You know, I read something but there is a big contradiction there because he [Lovren] says, ‘Let’s move on and forget what happened’ but then he spends 10 minutes speaking about what he thinks happened and didn’t happen, so for me, they are words without any meaning and the FA committee is there to analyse and make decisions. I have no comments,” Mourinho said. Benfica have won just two of their past seven matches and were thrashed 5-0 by Basel in their last Champions League outing after an opening 2-1 defeat at home to CSKA Moscow, but Ashley Young is convinced they will raise their game for the visit of United. “Obviously they haven’t got off to such a good start in the Champions League but when United turn up, it’s going to be a different story,” Young said.

Champions League - Benfica Press Conference

Soccer Football - Champions League - Benfica Press Conference - Seixal, Portugal - October 17, 2017 Benfica coach Rui Vitoria during the press conference REUTERS/Carl Recine

Champions League - Benfica Training & Press Conference

Soccer Football - Champions League - Benfica Press Conference - Seixal, Portugal - October 17, 2017 Benfica coach Rui Vitoria during the press conference REUTERS/Carl Recine

Champions League - Benfica Training & Press Conference

Soccer Football - Champions League - Benfica Press Conference - Seixal, Portugal - October 17, 2017 Benfica coach Rui Vitoria during the press conference REUTERS/Carl Recine

'Opponents raise their game against Man Utd' - Young expecting Benfica to follow trend

'Opponents raise their game against Man Utd' - Young expecting Benfica to follow trend

'Opponents raise their game against Man Utd' - Young expecting Benfica to follow trend

'Opponents raise their game against Man Utd' - Young expecting Benfica to follow trend

'Opponents raise their game against Man Utd' - Young expecting Benfica to follow trend

The England international is expecting a difficult test in Portugal, even though the Red Devils' opponents are yet to pick up a point so far in Europe

'Opponents raise their game against Man Utd' - Young expecting Benfica to follow trend

The England international is expecting a difficult test in Portugal, even though the Red Devils' opponents are yet to pick up a point so far in Europe

UCL LIVE: Liverpool Routs Maribor; Man City Leads Napoli; Madrid, Spurs Level

The Champions League group stage hits its halfway point for half of the teams in the field on Tuesday, with Matchday 3 kicking off with a few scintillating matchups.

Real Madrid hosts Tottenham in a clash of Group H leaders, while Manchester City welcomes Napoli to the Etihad, where two of Europe's most prolific attacks will go head-to-head.

Elsewhere, Besiktas will look to continue its impressive run in the competition at Monaco, while Christian Pulisic aims to rebound from the USA's World Cup qualifying disappointment in Borussia Dortmund's match in Cyprus, where the Bundesliga power seeks its first points in the group at APOEL.

Here is the full slate for today's matches (all begin at 2:45 p.m. ET):

Spartak Moscow vs. Sevilla

Maribor vs. Liverpool

Manchester City vs. Napoli

Feyenoord vs. Shakhtar Donetsk

Monaco vs. Besiktas

RB Leipzig vs. Porto

Real Madrid vs. Tottenham

APOEL vs. Borussia Dortmund

Stay tuned here for live updates and highlights of goals and key plays (refresh for most recent updates).

LIVERPOOL SUPPLIES THE EXCLAMATION POINT

Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain and Trent Alexander-Arnold put the finishing touches on Liverpool's thrashing of Maribor, scoring the Reds' sixth and seventh of the day to make it 7-0 in Slovenia. The result, coupled with Spartak Moscow's result vs. Sevilla, will shoot Liverpool to the top of the group.

NAPOLI PULLS ONE BACK

Given the gift of a second penalty, Napoli happily took advantage, with Amadou Diawara beating Ederson from the spot to make it 2-1 at the Etihad in the 73rd minute.

APOEL STUNS DORTMUND–FOR A MOMENT

Dortmund figured it'd get back on track in the Champions League at lowly APOEL, but the Cypriot side has other ideas. Mickael Pote's goal just after the hour mark put Dortmund stunningly behind 1-0 and in need of a change in fortune–and fast. That came from its captain, as Sokratis Papastathopoulos finished off a pass from Mario Gotze five minutes later to make it 1-1.

SPARTAK PULLS AWAY

Spartak Moscow took another lead on Sevilla after conceding the equalizer, with Lorenzo Melgarejo scoring the go-ahead goal off Quincy Promes's assist in the 58th minute. It extended that lead to 3-1 soon after, with Denis Glushakov doing the honors and coming up with the vital insurance goal.

Luiz Adriano netted the fourth in the 74th minute, making it 4-1 and adding to the Russian champions' statement, which comes on the heels of drawing Liverpool on Matchday 2.

LLORIS ROBS BENZEMA

?Real Madrid looked like it would take a 2-1 lead in the second half, with Karim Benzema having a point-blank chance, but Hugo Lloris came to the rescue, with a full-extension kick save on the goal line. Just tremendous.

BESIKTAS TAKES ITS FIRST LEAD

Cenk Tosun scored his second of the day, giving Besiktas a 2-1 lead in the 54th minute at Monaco and putting the Turkish club in line for its third win in as many matches.

BERNARD SENDS SHAKHTAR AHEAD

?Bernard scored for a second time in response to Feyenoord's opener, giving Shakhtar Donetsk its first lead of the day, a 2-1 advantage.

FIRMINO MAKES IT HIGH FIVE FOR LIVERPOOL

Three points are going Liverpool's way. Roberto Firmino struck for his second of the day with a glancing header, making it 5-0 at Maribor.

RONALDO PK BRINGS REAL MADRID LEVEL

Serge Aurier gifted Real Madrid an opportunity to equalize after fouling Toni Kroos with a rash challenge, and Cristiano Ronaldo obliged, beating Hugo Lloris from the spot just minutes before halftime to make it 1-1 in Madrid.

SALAH MAKES IT FOUR

Mohamed Salah, fresh off becoming Egypt's hero in World Cup qualifying, boosted his own stock with his second goal of the day, as both he and Roberto Firmino converged on a cross at the far post before the former tapped home to give Liverpool a 4-0 lead over Maribor.

EDERSON SAVES MERTENS'S PK

Ederson bailed out his teammate, Kyle Walker, saving a penalty kick from Dries Mertens after the England fullback committed the foul. The save preserved Man City's 2-0 lead.

GOALS GALORE IN LEIPZIG

RB Leipzig scored twice in quick succession to seemingly pull away from Porto, but Ivan Marcano pulled one back just before halftime, and the two sides went into the locker room with the hosts leading 3-2. The match also featured this sensational show of skill from Jean-Kevin Augustin.

MONACO, BESIKTAS GO BLOW FOR BLOW

Monaco is looking to give Besiktas its first setback of the competition, and was on its way after Radamel Falcao's opener at the half-hour mark. But the in-form Cenk Tosun answered four minutes later on a wonderful header, making it 1-1.

VARANE OWN GOAL GIVES SPURS LEAD

All eyes were on Harry Kane at the Bernabeu, where it's speculated that Real Madrid will make a massive offer for the Tottenham star, and he made an impact in the 28th minute. Serge Aurier crossed for Kane, whose run prompted Raphael Varane to inadvertently direct the ball into his own goal to give Spurs a 1-0 lead in the Spanish capital.

Real Madrid had wasted an earlier chance, after Cristiano Ronaldo's header clanged off the post and Karim Benzema pulled the rebound wide of an empty net.

SEVILLA RECOVERS AFTER EARLY CONCESSION

It's never easy going on the road, but Sevilla, which entered the day atop Group E, expected a simpler match at Spartak Moscow. It went down early as Quincy Promes scored in the 18th minute, but Simon Kjaer responded in the 30th off the corner kick to make it 1-1.

SALAH MAKES IT THREE

It certainly appears to be Liverpool's day. After setting up Roberto Firmino for the opener, Mohamed Salah makes it 3-0 for Liverpool–with Firmino returning the favor–within 20 minutes at Maribor.

RB LEIPZIG, PORTO EXCHANGE EARLY GOALS

Willi Orban scored in the eighth minute for host RB Leipzig, but Vincent Aboubakar answered 10 minutes later off a throw-in sequence, bringing Porto level at 1-1 in their anticipated Group G clash.

MAN CITY CAN'T BE STOPPED

Gabriel Jesus made it 2-0, finishing off a sensational ball from Kevin De Bruyne to double the Manchester City advantage over Napoli at the 13-minute mark.

COUTINHO DOUBLES THE LIVERPOOL LEAD

It's been all Liverpool in Slovenia, where Philippe Coutinho doubled the advantage for Jurgen Klopp's side, scoring for a fourth straight game.

STERLING SCORES FIRST VS. NAPOLI

Manchester City's sizzling form continued early vs. Napoli at the Etihad, where Raheem Sterling pounced on a blocked shot to score the opener for the Premier League side.

FEYENOORD HOLDS RARE ADVANTAGE, GIVES IT UP

?Dutch champion Feyenoord has had a brutal start to the competition, losing its first two games to Man City and Napoli, but it got off to a good start against Shakhtar Donetsk, with Steven Berghuis scoring in the seventh minute. That didn't last all that long, though, with Bernard equalizing in the 24th minute.

FIRMINO GIVES LIVERPOOL EARLY LEAD

Roberto Firmino wasted no time, finishing off an early cross from Mohamed Salah on the counterattack to give Liverpool a 1-0 lead in the fourth minute.

Here are the lineups for today's games:

Spartak Moscow vs. Sevilla

?

Maribor vs. Liverpool

Manchester City vs. Napoli

?

Feyenoord vs. Shakhtar Donetsk

?

Monaco vs. Besiktas

?

RB Leipzig vs. Porto

?

Real Madrid vs. Tottenham

?

APOEL vs. Borussia Dortmund

?

Matchday 3 concludes on Wednesday, with Chelsea-Roma highlighting the slate. PSG is also in action, at Anderlecht, while Jose Mourinho returns to Portugal as Manchester United meets Benfica.

UCL: Liverpool Routs Maribor; Man City Edges Napoli; Real Madrid, Tottenham Draw

The Champions League group stage hit its halfway point for half of the teams in the field on Tuesday, with Matchday 3 featuring some scintillating matchups and some eye-opening results.

Tottenham went to Real Madrid and earned a 1-1 draw, with Hugo Lloris coming up big in goal. Spurs' Premier League mates Liverpool and Manchester City were big winners Tuesday, with the former rolling to a 7-0 thrashing vs. Maribor, while the latter held off high-powered Napoli. The big surprise of the day happened in Cyprus, where Borussia Dortmund had to fight for a mere draw vs. APOEL, and though it didn't lose ground on Group H-leading Real Madrid and Tottenham, it missed a golden opportunity to make up some.

Elsewhere, Besiktas stayed perfect, coming from behind to win at Monaco, while in the other game in that group, RB Leipzig held off Porto in a five-goal thriller.

Here are the results for the day:

Spartak Moscow 5, Sevilla 1

Maribor 0, Liverpool 7

Manchester City 2 Napoli 1

Feyenoord 1, Shakhtar Donetsk 2

Monaco 1, Besiktas 2

RB Leipzig 3, Porto 2

Real Madrid 1, Tottenham 1

APOEL 1, Borussia Dortmund 1

And here's how the day played out across the competition.

LIVERPOOL SUPPLIES THE EXCLAMATION POINT

Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain and Trent Alexander-Arnold put the finishing touches on Liverpool's thrashing of Maribor, scoring the Reds' sixth and seventh of the day to make it 7-0 in Slovenia. The result, coupled with Spartak Moscow's result vs. Sevilla, will shoot Liverpool to the top of the group.

NAPOLI PULLS ONE BACK

Given the gift of a second penalty, Napoli happily took advantage, with Amadou Diawara beating Ederson from the spot to make it 2-1 at the Etihad in the 73rd minute.

APOEL STUNS DORTMUND–FOR A MOMENT

Dortmund figured it'd get back on track in the Champions League at lowly APOEL, but the Cypriot side has other ideas. Mickael Pote's goal just after the hour mark put Dortmund stunningly behind 1-0 and in need of a change in fortune–and fast. That came from its captain, as Sokratis Papastathopoulos finished off a pass from Mario Gotze five minutes later to make it 1-1.

SPARTAK PULLS AWAY

Spartak Moscow took another lead on Sevilla after conceding the equalizer, with Lorenzo Melgarejo scoring the go-ahead goal off Quincy Promes's assist in the 58th minute. It extended that lead to 3-1 soon after, with Denis Glushakov doing the honors and coming up with the vital insurance goal.

Luiz Adriano netted the fourth in the 74th minute, making it 4-1 and adding to the Russian champions' statement, which comes on the heels of drawing Liverpool on Matchday 2.

LLORIS ROBS BENZEMA

?Real Madrid looked like it would take a 2-1 lead in the second half, with Karim Benzema having a point-blank chance, but Hugo Lloris came to the rescue, with a full-extension kick save on the goal line. Just tremendous.

BESIKTAS TAKES ITS FIRST LEAD

Cenk Tosun scored his second of the day, giving Besiktas a 2-1 lead in the 54th minute at Monaco and putting the Turkish club in line for its third win in as many matches.

BERNARD SENDS SHAKHTAR AHEAD

?Bernard scored for a second time in response to Feyenoord's opener, giving Shakhtar Donetsk its first lead of the day, a 2-1 advantage.

FIRMINO MAKES IT HIGH FIVE FOR LIVERPOOL

Three points are going Liverpool's way. Roberto Firmino struck for his second of the day with a glancing header, making it 5-0 at Maribor.

RONALDO PK BRINGS REAL MADRID LEVEL

Serge Aurier gifted Real Madrid an opportunity to equalize after fouling Toni Kroos with a rash challenge, and Cristiano Ronaldo obliged, beating Hugo Lloris from the spot just minutes before halftime to make it 1-1 in Madrid.

SALAH MAKES IT FOUR

Mohamed Salah, fresh off becoming Egypt's hero in World Cup qualifying, boosted his own stock with his second goal of the day, as both he and Roberto Firmino converged on a cross at the far post before the former tapped home to give Liverpool a 4-0 lead over Maribor.

EDERSON SAVES MERTENS'S PK

Ederson bailed out his teammate, Kyle Walker, saving a penalty kick from Dries Mertens after the England fullback committed the foul. The save preserved Man City's 2-0 lead.

GOALS GALORE IN LEIPZIG

RB Leipzig scored twice in quick succession to seemingly pull away from Porto, but Ivan Marcano pulled one back just before halftime, and the two sides went into the locker room with the hosts leading 3-2. The match also featured this sensational show of skill from Jean-Kevin Augustin.

MONACO, BESIKTAS GO BLOW FOR BLOW

Monaco is looking to give Besiktas its first setback of the competition, and was on its way after Radamel Falcao's opener at the half-hour mark. But the in-form Cenk Tosun answered four minutes later on a wonderful header, making it 1-1.

VARANE OWN GOAL GIVES SPURS LEAD

All eyes were on Harry Kane at the Bernabeu, where it's speculated that Real Madrid will make a massive offer for the Tottenham star, and he made an impact in the 28th minute. Serge Aurier crossed for Kane, whose run prompted Raphael Varane to inadvertently direct the ball into his own goal to give Spurs a 1-0 lead in the Spanish capital.

Real Madrid had wasted an earlier chance, after Cristiano Ronaldo's header clanged off the post and Karim Benzema pulled the rebound wide of an empty net.

SEVILLA RECOVERS AFTER EARLY CONCESSION

It's never easy going on the road, but Sevilla, which entered the day atop Group E, expected a simpler match at Spartak Moscow. It went down early as Quincy Promes scored in the 18th minute, but Simon Kjaer responded in the 30th off the corner kick to make it 1-1.

SALAH MAKES IT THREE

It certainly appears to be Liverpool's day. After setting up Roberto Firmino for the opener, Mohamed Salah makes it 3-0 for Liverpool–with Firmino returning the favor–within 20 minutes at Maribor.

RB LEIPZIG, PORTO EXCHANGE EARLY GOALS

Willi Orban scored in the eighth minute for host RB Leipzig, but Vincent Aboubakar answered 10 minutes later off a throw-in sequence, bringing Porto level at 1-1 in their anticipated Group G clash.

MAN CITY CAN'T BE STOPPED

Gabriel Jesus made it 2-0, finishing off a sensational ball from Kevin De Bruyne to double the Manchester City advantage over Napoli at the 13-minute mark.

COUTINHO DOUBLES THE LIVERPOOL LEAD

It's been all Liverpool in Slovenia, where Philippe Coutinho doubled the advantage for Jurgen Klopp's side, scoring for a fourth straight game.

STERLING SCORES FIRST VS. NAPOLI

Manchester City's sizzling form continued early vs. Napoli at the Etihad, where Raheem Sterling pounced on a blocked shot to score the opener for the Premier League side.

FEYENOORD HOLDS RARE ADVANTAGE, GIVES IT UP

?Dutch champion Feyenoord has had a brutal start to the competition, losing its first two games to Man City and Napoli, but it got off to a good start against Shakhtar Donetsk, with Steven Berghuis scoring in the seventh minute. That didn't last all that long, though, with Bernard equalizing in the 24th minute.

FIRMINO GIVES LIVERPOOL EARLY LEAD

Roberto Firmino wasted no time, finishing off an early cross from Mohamed Salah on the counterattack to give Liverpool a 1-0 lead in the fourth minute.

Here are the lineups for today's games:

Spartak Moscow vs. Sevilla

?

Maribor vs. Liverpool

Manchester City vs. Napoli

?

Feyenoord vs. Shakhtar Donetsk

?

Monaco vs. Besiktas

?

RB Leipzig vs. Porto

?

Real Madrid vs. Tottenham

?

APOEL vs. Borussia Dortmund

?

Matchday 3 concludes on Wednesday, with Chelsea-Roma highlighting the slate. PSG is also in action, at Anderlecht, while Jose Mourinho returns to Portugal as Manchester United meets Benfica.

Mourinho to park the bus again? Man Utd boss would take another draw against Benfica

The Red Devils were accused of playing for 0-0 at Anfield, and their manager insists he would take another stalemate in Champions League competition

Mourinho to park the bus again? Man Utd boss would take another draw against Benfica

Mourinho to park the bus again? Man Utd boss would take another draw against Benfica

Mourinho to park the bus again? Man Utd boss would take another draw against Benfica

The Red Devils were accused of playing for 0-0 at Anfield, and their manager insists he would take another stalemate in Champions League competition

Manchester United expecting a tough game against Benfica, says Ashley Young

Manchester United expecting a tough game against Benfica, says Ashley Young

Manchester United expecting a tough game against Benfica, says Ashley Young

Ashley Young is expecting a difficult test against Benfica, even though they are yet to pick up a point so far in the competition.

Mourinho would be happy with draw against wounded Benfica

Mourinho would be happy with draw against wounded Benfica

Manchester United were accused of playing for a draw against Liverpool but Jose Mourinho would be happy with the same result at Benfica.

Mourinho would be happy with draw against wounded Benfica

As Napoli bring 'Sarri-ball' to Man City, a glossary of football's tactical systems

Ahead of Manchester City's Champions League match with Napoli, Telegraph Sport looks at the tactics that have helped the Serie A team make a scintillating start to the season.  Sarri-ball Where did it come from? 'Sarri-ball' is the name given to the brave, progressive tactics of Napoli manager Maurizio Sarri.  How does it work? The style of play was described by L'Equipe as "vertical tiki-taka", and is a possession-based style with plenty of short, quick passes but an emphasis on moving up the pitch quickly. In other words: "liquid football".  Así sale jugando Napoli pic.twitter.com/2mwus1n6dM— El Tano. (@ElTano_) August 1, 2017 How successful is it?  At present, Sarri-ball is working to devastating effect, with Napoli top of Serie A having won all eight of their league matches this season. In his first two seasons at Napoli, Sarri led the club to second and third placed finishes, but he has spent most of his managerial career in Italy's lower leagues.  Napoli are top of Serie A having made a perfect start to the season  Tiki-taka Where did it come from? A possession-based style of play that dates back to Johan Cruyff's all-conquering Barcelona team of the early 1990s, and was perfected by the Spanish national side that won three consecutive major tournaments between 2008 and 2012.  How does it work? Tiki-taka relies on highly technical players, who are all comfortable on the ball and can move opposition players out of position with patient and accurate passing.  It can also be a defensive tactic in the way that it suffocates opponents by depriving them off the ball and gradually drains their energy.  Man City 2 - 0 Stoke (Raheem Sterling, 19 min) As well as Spain, tiki-taka is most associated with Pep Guardiola's Barcelona team of the same 2008-2012 period. Guardiola though despises the term and said in 2013: "I loathe all that passing for the sake of it, all that tiki-taka. It's so much rubbish and has no purpose. You have to pass the ball with a clear intention, with the aim of making it into the opposition's goal. It's not about passing for the sake of it." Pep Guardiola claims to hate 'tiki-taka' How successful is it?  Hugely, in the case of Spain and Barcelona. Less so in the case of Arsenal, who over the last decade have employed a similar style.  The tactic has drawn criticism in recent years for its obsession with keeping possession, and when executed badly, tiki-taka has been described as 'sterile domination'.  Gegenpressing Where did it come from? The tactic of hounding opposition players as soon as possession is lost is another of Guardiola's hallmarks, but the term 'gegenpressing' was made popular by Jurgen Klopp's Borussia Dortmund team of 2008-2015. Arrigo Sacchi’s AC Milan team of the 1980s and 1990s also played with a highly effective counter-pressing style as they won consecutive European cups in 1989 and 1990.  How does it work? Guardiola's Barcelona employed the 'six-second rule' where his players were instructed to launch into high-intensity sprints to win the ball back in the immediate aftermath of having lost it.  The idea is that the whole team presses together to try and force their opponents into giving up the ball, and does so high up the pitch where losing possession is most costly.  Talking tactics: Liverpool's heavy metal football 02:02 How successful is it?  Dortmund and Barcelona enjoyed great success with their high press, while Mauricio Pochettino's Tottenham have used the tactic to great effect in the last few years.  Klopp's protege at Dortmund David Wagner meanwhile used a gegenpress-fuelled 4-2-3-1 system to achieve promotion to the Premier League with Huddersfield last season. Klopp has received criticism though for running his teams into the ground and causing them injury with the tactic.  Catenaccio Where did it come from? Italian for 'door-bolt', catenaccio is a defensive tactic that evolved in the 1960s with the addition of a 'libero' (sweeper) into a back four to make a back five.  The system has since become synonymous with defensively minded Italian national and club teams.  How does it work? The basic idea of catenaccio is that a team has four defenders who can focus solely on snapping away at the player they are marking, while the libero picks up any loose balls and acts as the spare man.  There is also an often overlooked attacking element to the system, which is that the libero allows the full-backs to get forward more and join in with attacks. In many ways, the system laid the foundations for the 3-5-2 system and the 3-4-3, which is currently en vogue.  Using catenaccio, Inter Milan won consecutive European cups in the 1960s How successful is it?  The Argentine manager, Helenio Herrera, is credited as the man who introduced catenaccio to the world, and his Inter Milan team of the 1960s won three Serie A titles and two European cups.  Other catenaccio-fuelled successes include the limited Greece side triumphing at Euro 2004 under Otto Rehhagel, and Giovanni Trapatonni winning the Portuguese Liga with Benfica a year later.  The Italian national side have enjoyed mixed results with catenaccio and have on occasion been criticised for leaning too heavily on the model at the expense of creativity. Barry Davies, you may remember, almost went into meltdown when an unnecessarily defensive-minded Italy were knocked out of the 2002 World Cup by South Korea. "And the Italians are out because they will not learn," the exasperated commentator lamented.  Four years later Marcelo Lippi leaned on catenaccio in the second round win against Australia when the Azzurri were reduced to 10 men en route to lifting the 2006 World Cup.  Totaalvoetbal Where did it come from? Ajax employed variants of the system from the early 20th century, while the Austrian 'Wunderteam' of the 1930s is accepted to be the first national team to play it.  Totaalvoetbal (or Total Football) really took off in the 1960s however, when Ajax manager Rinus Michels relaunched the system with Johan Cruyff as its figurehead. Michels then used the system with the Dutch national team at the 1974 World Cup.  Johann Cruyff was the key player in Ajax and Holland's Total Football teams of the 1970s How does it work? Total Football is predicated on the idea that every player can play in every position, allowing for constant inter-changing among players roaming around the pitch.  Cruyff for instance was nominally a centre-forward, but he was allowed - and encouraged - to pop up all over the pitch, safe in the knowledge that a team-mate could occupy the space where the main striker was supposed to be.  How successful is it?  As with many of these systems, a manager would only attempt Total Football if he had a group of exceptionally talented footballers. This was certainly the case with the Ajax and Dutch sides that played Total Football, with the former in particular achieving a huge amount of success - most notably winning the 1971 European Cup.  Cruyff employed many of the principles of Total Football when Barcelona manager between 1988 and 1996, but it would take a very brave manager to attempt it now given the volume of matches the big teams play and the reduced number of training sessions.  

As Napoli bring 'Sarri-ball' to Man City, a glossary of football's tactical systems

Ahead of Manchester City's Champions League match with Napoli, Telegraph Sport looks at the tactics that have helped the Serie A team make a scintillating start to the season.  Sarri-ball Where did it come from? 'Sarri-ball' is the name given to the brave, progressive tactics of Napoli manager Maurizio Sarri.  How does it work? The style of play was described by L'Equipe as "vertical tiki-taka", and is a possession-based style with plenty of short, quick passes but an emphasis on moving up the pitch quickly. In other words: "liquid football".  Así sale jugando Napoli pic.twitter.com/2mwus1n6dM— El Tano. (@ElTano_) August 1, 2017 How successful is it?  At present, Sarri-ball is working to devastating effect, with Napoli top of Serie A having won all eight of their league matches this season. In his first two seasons at Napoli, Sarri led the club to second and third placed finishes, but he has spent most of his managerial career in Italy's lower leagues.  Napoli are top of Serie A having made a perfect start to the season  Tiki-taka Where did it come from? A possession-based style of play that dates back to Johan Cruyff's all-conquering Barcelona team of the early 1990s, and was perfected by the Spanish national side that won three consecutive major tournaments between 2008 and 2012.  How does it work? Tiki-taka relies on highly technical players, who are all comfortable on the ball and can move opposition players out of position with patient and accurate passing.  It can also be a defensive tactic in the way that it suffocates opponents by depriving them off the ball and gradually drains their energy.  Man City 2 - 0 Stoke (Raheem Sterling, 19 min) As well as Spain, tiki-taka is most associated with Pep Guardiola's Barcelona team of the same 2008-2012 period. Guardiola though despises the term and said in 2013: "I loathe all that passing for the sake of it, all that tiki-taka. It's so much rubbish and has no purpose. You have to pass the ball with a clear intention, with the aim of making it into the opposition's goal. It's not about passing for the sake of it." Pep Guardiola claims to hate 'tiki-taka' How successful is it?  Hugely, in the case of Spain and Barcelona. Less so in the case of Arsenal, who over the last decade have employed a similar style.  The tactic has drawn criticism in recent years for its obsession with keeping possession, and when executed badly, tiki-taka has been described as 'sterile domination'.  Gegenpressing Where did it come from? The tactic of hounding opposition players as soon as possession is lost is another of Guardiola's hallmarks, but the term 'gegenpressing' was made popular by Jurgen Klopp's Borussia Dortmund team of 2008-2015. Arrigo Sacchi’s AC Milan team of the 1980s and 1990s also played with a highly effective counter-pressing style as they won consecutive European cups in 1989 and 1990.  How does it work? Guardiola's Barcelona employed the 'six-second rule' where his players were instructed to launch into high-intensity sprints to win the ball back in the immediate aftermath of having lost it.  The idea is that the whole team presses together to try and force their opponents into giving up the ball, and does so high up the pitch where losing possession is most costly.  Talking tactics: Liverpool's heavy metal football 02:02 How successful is it?  Dortmund and Barcelona enjoyed great success with their high press, while Mauricio Pochettino's Tottenham have used the tactic to great effect in the last few years.  Klopp's protege at Dortmund David Wagner meanwhile used a gegenpress-fuelled 4-2-3-1 system to achieve promotion to the Premier League with Huddersfield last season. Klopp has received criticism though for running his teams into the ground and causing them injury with the tactic.  Catenaccio Where did it come from? Italian for 'door-bolt', catenaccio is a defensive tactic that evolved in the 1960s with the addition of a 'libero' (sweeper) into a back four to make a back five.  The system has since become synonymous with defensively minded Italian national and club teams.  How does it work? The basic idea of catenaccio is that a team has four defenders who can focus solely on snapping away at the player they are marking, while the libero picks up any loose balls and acts as the spare man.  There is also an often overlooked attacking element to the system, which is that the libero allows the full-backs to get forward more and join in with attacks. In many ways, the system laid the foundations for the 3-5-2 system and the 3-4-3, which is currently en vogue.  Using catenaccio, Inter Milan won consecutive European cups in the 1960s How successful is it?  The Argentine manager, Helenio Herrera, is credited as the man who introduced catenaccio to the world, and his Inter Milan team of the 1960s won three Serie A titles and two European cups.  Other catenaccio-fuelled successes include the limited Greece side triumphing at Euro 2004 under Otto Rehhagel, and Giovanni Trapatonni winning the Portuguese Liga with Benfica a year later.  The Italian national side have enjoyed mixed results with catenaccio and have on occasion been criticised for leaning too heavily on the model at the expense of creativity. Barry Davies, you may remember, almost went into meltdown when an unnecessarily defensive-minded Italy were knocked out of the 2002 World Cup by South Korea. "And the Italians are out because they will not learn," the exasperated commentator lamented.  Four years later Marcelo Lippi leaned on catenaccio in the second round win against Australia when the Azzurri were reduced to 10 men en route to lifting the 2006 World Cup.  Totaalvoetbal Where did it come from? Ajax employed variants of the system from the early 20th century, while the Austrian 'Wunderteam' of the 1930s is accepted to be the first national team to play it.  Totaalvoetbal (or Total Football) really took off in the 1960s however, when Ajax manager Rinus Michels relaunched the system with Johan Cruyff as its figurehead. Michels then used the system with the Dutch national team at the 1974 World Cup.  Johann Cruyff was the key player in Ajax and Holland's Total Football teams of the 1970s How does it work? Total Football is predicated on the idea that every player can play in every position, allowing for constant inter-changing among players roaming around the pitch.  Cruyff for instance was nominally a centre-forward, but he was allowed - and encouraged - to pop up all over the pitch, safe in the knowledge that a team-mate could occupy the space where the main striker was supposed to be.  How successful is it?  As with many of these systems, a manager would only attempt Total Football if he had a group of exceptionally talented footballers. This was certainly the case with the Ajax and Dutch sides that played Total Football, with the former in particular achieving a huge amount of success - most notably winning the 1971 European Cup.  Cruyff employed many of the principles of Total Football when Barcelona manager between 1988 and 1996, but it would take a very brave manager to attempt it now given the volume of matches the big teams play and the reduced number of training sessions.  

As Napoli bring 'Sarri-ball' to Man City, a glossary of football's tactical systems

Ahead of Manchester City's Champions League match with Napoli, Telegraph Sport looks at the tactics that have helped the Serie A team make a scintillating start to the season.  Sarri-ball Where did it come from? 'Sarri-ball' is the name given to the brave, progressive tactics of Napoli manager Maurizio Sarri.  How does it work? The style of play was described by L'Equipe as "vertical tiki-taka", and is a possession-based style with plenty of short, quick passes but an emphasis on moving up the pitch quickly. In other words: "liquid football".  Así sale jugando Napoli pic.twitter.com/2mwus1n6dM— El Tano. (@ElTano_) August 1, 2017 How successful is it?  At present, Sarri-ball is working to devastating effect, with Napoli top of Serie A having won all eight of their league matches this season. In his first two seasons at Napoli, Sarri led the club to second and third placed finishes, but he has spent most of his managerial career in Italy's lower leagues.  Napoli are top of Serie A having made a perfect start to the season  Tiki-taka Where did it come from? A possession-based style of play that dates back to Johan Cruyff's all-conquering Barcelona team of the early 1990s, and was perfected by the Spanish national side that won three consecutive major tournaments between 2008 and 2012.  How does it work? Tiki-taka relies on highly technical players, who are all comfortable on the ball and can move opposition players out of position with patient and accurate passing.  It can also be a defensive tactic in the way that it suffocates opponents by depriving them off the ball and gradually drains their energy.  Man City 2 - 0 Stoke (Raheem Sterling, 19 min) As well as Spain, tiki-taka is most associated with Pep Guardiola's Barcelona team of the same 2008-2012 period. Guardiola though despises the term and said in 2013: "I loathe all that passing for the sake of it, all that tiki-taka. It's so much rubbish and has no purpose. You have to pass the ball with a clear intention, with the aim of making it into the opposition's goal. It's not about passing for the sake of it." Pep Guardiola claims to hate 'tiki-taka' How successful is it?  Hugely, in the case of Spain and Barcelona. Less so in the case of Arsenal, who over the last decade have employed a similar style.  The tactic has drawn criticism in recent years for its obsession with keeping possession, and when executed badly, tiki-taka has been described as 'sterile domination'.  Gegenpressing Where did it come from? The tactic of hounding opposition players as soon as possession is lost is another of Guardiola's hallmarks, but the term 'gegenpressing' was made popular by Jurgen Klopp's Borussia Dortmund team of 2008-2015. Arrigo Sacchi’s AC Milan team of the 1980s and 1990s also played with a highly effective counter-pressing style as they won consecutive European cups in 1989 and 1990.  How does it work? Guardiola's Barcelona employed the 'six-second rule' where his players were instructed to launch into high-intensity sprints to win the ball back in the immediate aftermath of having lost it.  The idea is that the whole team presses together to try and force their opponents into giving up the ball, and does so high up the pitch where losing possession is most costly.  Talking tactics: Liverpool's heavy metal football 02:02 How successful is it?  Dortmund and Barcelona enjoyed great success with their high press, while Mauricio Pochettino's Tottenham have used the tactic to great effect in the last few years.  Klopp's protege at Dortmund David Wagner meanwhile used a gegenpress-fuelled 4-2-3-1 system to achieve promotion to the Premier League with Huddersfield last season. Klopp has received criticism though for running his teams into the ground and causing them injury with the tactic.  Catenaccio Where did it come from? Italian for 'door-bolt', catenaccio is a defensive tactic that evolved in the 1960s with the addition of a 'libero' (sweeper) into a back four to make a back five.  The system has since become synonymous with defensively minded Italian national and club teams.  How does it work? The basic idea of catenaccio is that a team has four defenders who can focus solely on snapping away at the player they are marking, while the libero picks up any loose balls and acts as the spare man.  There is also an often overlooked attacking element to the system, which is that the libero allows the full-backs to get forward more and join in with attacks. In many ways, the system laid the foundations for the 3-5-2 system and the 3-4-3, which is currently en vogue.  Using catenaccio, Inter Milan won consecutive European cups in the 1960s How successful is it?  The Argentine manager, Helenio Herrera, is credited as the man who introduced catenaccio to the world, and his Inter Milan team of the 1960s won three Serie A titles and two European cups.  Other catenaccio-fuelled successes include the limited Greece side triumphing at Euro 2004 under Otto Rehhagel, and Giovanni Trapatonni winning the Portuguese Liga with Benfica a year later.  The Italian national side have enjoyed mixed results with catenaccio and have on occasion been criticised for leaning too heavily on the model at the expense of creativity. Barry Davies, you may remember, almost went into meltdown when an unnecessarily defensive-minded Italy were knocked out of the 2002 World Cup by South Korea. "And the Italians are out because they will not learn," the exasperated commentator lamented.  Four years later Marcelo Lippi leaned on catenaccio in the second round win against Australia when the Azzurri were reduced to 10 men en route to lifting the 2006 World Cup.  Totaalvoetbal Where did it come from? Ajax employed variants of the system from the early 20th century, while the Austrian 'Wunderteam' of the 1930s is accepted to be the first national team to play it.  Totaalvoetbal (or Total Football) really took off in the 1960s however, when Ajax manager Rinus Michels relaunched the system with Johan Cruyff as its figurehead. Michels then used the system with the Dutch national team at the 1974 World Cup.  Johann Cruyff was the key player in Ajax and Holland's Total Football teams of the 1970s How does it work? Total Football is predicated on the idea that every player can play in every position, allowing for constant inter-changing among players roaming around the pitch.  Cruyff for instance was nominally a centre-forward, but he was allowed - and encouraged - to pop up all over the pitch, safe in the knowledge that a team-mate could occupy the space where the main striker was supposed to be.  How successful is it?  As with many of these systems, a manager would only attempt Total Football if he had a group of exceptionally talented footballers. This was certainly the case with the Ajax and Dutch sides that played Total Football, with the former in particular achieving a huge amount of success - most notably winning the 1971 European Cup.  Cruyff employed many of the principles of Total Football when Barcelona manager between 1988 and 1996, but it would take a very brave manager to attempt it now given the volume of matches the big teams play and the reduced number of training sessions.  

As Napoli bring 'Sarri-ball' to Man City, a glossary of football's tactical systems

Ahead of Manchester City's Champions League match with Napoli, Telegraph Sport looks at the tactics that have helped the Serie A team make a scintillating start to the season.  Sarri-ball Where did it come from? 'Sarri-ball' is the name given to the brave, progressive tactics of Napoli manager Maurizio Sarri.  How does it work? The style of play was described by L'Equipe as "vertical tiki-taka", and is a possession-based style with plenty of short, quick passes but an emphasis on moving up the pitch quickly. In other words: "liquid football".  Así sale jugando Napoli pic.twitter.com/2mwus1n6dM— El Tano. (@ElTano_) August 1, 2017 How successful is it?  At present, Sarri-ball is working to devastating effect, with Napoli top of Serie A having won all eight of their league matches this season. In his first two seasons at Napoli, Sarri led the club to second and third placed finishes, but he has spent most of his managerial career in Italy's lower leagues.  Napoli are top of Serie A having made a perfect start to the season  Tiki-taka Where did it come from? A possession-based style of play that dates back to Johan Cruyff's all-conquering Barcelona team of the early 1990s, and was perfected by the Spanish national side that won three consecutive major tournaments between 2008 and 2012.  How does it work? Tiki-taka relies on highly technical players, who are all comfortable on the ball and can move opposition players out of position with patient and accurate passing.  It can also be a defensive tactic in the way that it suffocates opponents by depriving them off the ball and gradually drains their energy.  Man City 2 - 0 Stoke (Raheem Sterling, 19 min) As well as Spain, tiki-taka is most associated with Pep Guardiola's Barcelona team of the same 2008-2012 period. Guardiola though despises the term and said in 2013: "I loathe all that passing for the sake of it, all that tiki-taka. It's so much rubbish and has no purpose. You have to pass the ball with a clear intention, with the aim of making it into the opposition's goal. It's not about passing for the sake of it." Pep Guardiola claims to hate 'tiki-taka' How successful is it?  Hugely, in the case of Spain and Barcelona. Less so in the case of Arsenal, who over the last decade have employed a similar style.  The tactic has drawn criticism in recent years for its obsession with keeping possession, and when executed badly, tiki-taka has been described as 'sterile domination'.  Gegenpressing Where did it come from? The tactic of hounding opposition players as soon as possession is lost is another of Guardiola's hallmarks, but the term 'gegenpressing' was made popular by Jurgen Klopp's Borussia Dortmund team of 2008-2015. Arrigo Sacchi’s AC Milan team of the 1980s and 1990s also played with a highly effective counter-pressing style as they won consecutive European cups in 1989 and 1990.  How does it work? Guardiola's Barcelona employed the 'six-second rule' where his players were instructed to launch into high-intensity sprints to win the ball back in the immediate aftermath of having lost it.  The idea is that the whole team presses together to try and force their opponents into giving up the ball, and does so high up the pitch where losing possession is most costly.  Talking tactics: Liverpool's heavy metal football 02:02 How successful is it?  Dortmund and Barcelona enjoyed great success with their high press, while Mauricio Pochettino's Tottenham have used the tactic to great effect in the last few years.  Klopp's protege at Dortmund David Wagner meanwhile used a gegenpress-fuelled 4-2-3-1 system to achieve promotion to the Premier League with Huddersfield last season. Klopp has received criticism though for running his teams into the ground and causing them injury with the tactic.  Catenaccio Where did it come from? Italian for 'door-bolt', catenaccio is a defensive tactic that evolved in the 1960s with the addition of a 'libero' (sweeper) into a back four to make a back five.  The system has since become synonymous with defensively minded Italian national and club teams.  How does it work? The basic idea of catenaccio is that a team has four defenders who can focus solely on snapping away at the player they are marking, while the libero picks up any loose balls and acts as the spare man.  There is also an often overlooked attacking element to the system, which is that the libero allows the full-backs to get forward more and join in with attacks. In many ways, the system laid the foundations for the 3-5-2 system and the 3-4-3, which is currently en vogue.  Using catenaccio, Inter Milan won consecutive European cups in the 1960s How successful is it?  The Argentine manager, Helenio Herrera, is credited as the man who introduced catenaccio to the world, and his Inter Milan team of the 1960s won three Serie A titles and two European cups.  Other catenaccio-fuelled successes include the limited Greece side triumphing at Euro 2004 under Otto Rehhagel, and Giovanni Trapatonni winning the Portuguese Liga with Benfica a year later.  The Italian national side have enjoyed mixed results with catenaccio and have on occasion been criticised for leaning too heavily on the model at the expense of creativity. Barry Davies, you may remember, almost went into meltdown when an unnecessarily defensive-minded Italy were knocked out of the 2002 World Cup by South Korea. "And the Italians are out because they will not learn," the exasperated commentator lamented.  Four years later Marcelo Lippi leaned on catenaccio in the second round win against Australia when the Azzurri were reduced to 10 men en route to lifting the 2006 World Cup.  Totaalvoetbal Where did it come from? Ajax employed variants of the system from the early 20th century, while the Austrian 'Wunderteam' of the 1930s is accepted to be the first national team to play it.  Totaalvoetbal (or Total Football) really took off in the 1960s however, when Ajax manager Rinus Michels relaunched the system with Johan Cruyff as its figurehead. Michels then used the system with the Dutch national team at the 1974 World Cup.  Johann Cruyff was the key player in Ajax and Holland's Total Football teams of the 1970s How does it work? Total Football is predicated on the idea that every player can play in every position, allowing for constant inter-changing among players roaming around the pitch.  Cruyff for instance was nominally a centre-forward, but he was allowed - and encouraged - to pop up all over the pitch, safe in the knowledge that a team-mate could occupy the space where the main striker was supposed to be.  How successful is it?  As with many of these systems, a manager would only attempt Total Football if he had a group of exceptionally talented footballers. This was certainly the case with the Ajax and Dutch sides that played Total Football, with the former in particular achieving a huge amount of success - most notably winning the 1971 European Cup.  Cruyff employed many of the principles of Total Football when Barcelona manager between 1988 and 1996, but it would take a very brave manager to attempt it now given the volume of matches the big teams play and the reduced number of training sessions.  

As Napoli bring 'Sarri-ball' to Man City, a glossary of football's tactical systems

Ahead of Manchester City's Champions League match with Napoli, Telegraph Sport looks at the tactics that have helped the Serie A team make a scintillating start to the season.  Sarri-ball Where did it come from? 'Sarri-ball' is the name given to the brave, progressive tactics of Napoli manager Maurizio Sarri.  How does it work? The style of play was described by L'Equipe as "vertical tiki-taka", and is a possession-based style with plenty of short, quick passes but an emphasis on moving up the pitch quickly. In other words: "liquid football".  Así sale jugando Napoli pic.twitter.com/2mwus1n6dM— El Tano. (@ElTano_) August 1, 2017 How successful is it?  At present, Sarri-ball is working to devastating effect, with Napoli top of Serie A having won all eight of their league matches this season. In his first two seasons at Napoli, Sarri led the club to second and third placed finishes, but he has spent most of his managerial career in Italy's lower leagues.  Napoli are top of Serie A having made a perfect start to the season  Tiki-taka Where did it come from? A possession-based style of play that dates back to Johan Cruyff's all-conquering Barcelona team of the early 1990s, and was perfected by the Spanish national side that won three consecutive major tournaments between 2008 and 2012.  How does it work? Tiki-taka relies on highly technical players, who are all comfortable on the ball and can move opposition players out of position with patient and accurate passing.  It can also be a defensive tactic in the way that it suffocates opponents by depriving them off the ball and gradually drains their energy.  Man City 2 - 0 Stoke (Raheem Sterling, 19 min) As well as Spain, tiki-taka is most associated with Pep Guardiola's Barcelona team of the same 2008-2012 period. Guardiola though despises the term and said in 2013: "I loathe all that passing for the sake of it, all that tiki-taka. It's so much rubbish and has no purpose. You have to pass the ball with a clear intention, with the aim of making it into the opposition's goal. It's not about passing for the sake of it." Pep Guardiola claims to hate 'tiki-taka' How successful is it?  Hugely, in the case of Spain and Barcelona. Less so in the case of Arsenal, who over the last decade have employed a similar style.  The tactic has drawn criticism in recent years for its obsession with keeping possession, and when executed badly, tiki-taka has been described as 'sterile domination'.  Gegenpressing Where did it come from? The tactic of hounding opposition players as soon as possession is lost is another of Guardiola's hallmarks, but the term 'gegenpressing' was made popular by Jurgen Klopp's Borussia Dortmund team of 2008-2015. Arrigo Sacchi’s AC Milan team of the 1980s and 1990s also played with a highly effective counter-pressing style as they won consecutive European cups in 1989 and 1990.  How does it work? Guardiola's Barcelona employed the 'six-second rule' where his players were instructed to launch into high-intensity sprints to win the ball back in the immediate aftermath of having lost it.  The idea is that the whole team presses together to try and force their opponents into giving up the ball, and does so high up the pitch where losing possession is most costly.  Talking tactics: Liverpool's heavy metal football 02:02 How successful is it?  Dortmund and Barcelona enjoyed great success with their high press, while Mauricio Pochettino's Tottenham have used the tactic to great effect in the last few years.  Klopp's protege at Dortmund David Wagner meanwhile used a gegenpress-fuelled 4-2-3-1 system to achieve promotion to the Premier League with Huddersfield last season. Klopp has received criticism though for running his teams into the ground and causing them injury with the tactic.  Catenaccio Where did it come from? Italian for 'door-bolt', catenaccio is a defensive tactic that evolved in the 1960s with the addition of a 'libero' (sweeper) into a back four to make a back five.  The system has since become synonymous with defensively minded Italian national and club teams.  How does it work? The basic idea of catenaccio is that a team has four defenders who can focus solely on snapping away at the player they are marking, while the libero picks up any loose balls and acts as the spare man.  There is also an often overlooked attacking element to the system, which is that the libero allows the full-backs to get forward more and join in with attacks. In many ways, the system laid the foundations for the 3-5-2 system and the 3-4-3, which is currently en vogue.  Using catenaccio, Inter Milan won consecutive European cups in the 1960s How successful is it?  The Argentine manager, Helenio Herrera, is credited as the man who introduced catenaccio to the world, and his Inter Milan team of the 1960s won three Serie A titles and two European cups.  Other catenaccio-fuelled successes include the limited Greece side triumphing at Euro 2004 under Otto Rehhagel, and Giovanni Trapatonni winning the Portuguese Liga with Benfica a year later.  The Italian national side have enjoyed mixed results with catenaccio and have on occasion been criticised for leaning too heavily on the model at the expense of creativity. Barry Davies, you may remember, almost went into meltdown when an unnecessarily defensive-minded Italy were knocked out of the 2002 World Cup by South Korea. "And the Italians are out because they will not learn," the exasperated commentator lamented.  Four years later Marcelo Lippi leaned on catenaccio in the second round win against Australia when the Azzurri were reduced to 10 men en route to lifting the 2006 World Cup.  Totaalvoetbal Where did it come from? Ajax employed variants of the system from the early 20th century, while the Austrian 'Wunderteam' of the 1930s is accepted to be the first national team to play it.  Totaalvoetbal (or Total Football) really took off in the 1960s however, when Ajax manager Rinus Michels relaunched the system with Johan Cruyff as its figurehead. Michels then used the system with the Dutch national team at the 1974 World Cup.  Johann Cruyff was the key player in Ajax and Holland's Total Football teams of the 1970s How does it work? Total Football is predicated on the idea that every player can play in every position, allowing for constant inter-changing among players roaming around the pitch.  Cruyff for instance was nominally a centre-forward, but he was allowed - and encouraged - to pop up all over the pitch, safe in the knowledge that a team-mate could occupy the space where the main striker was supposed to be.  How successful is it?  As with many of these systems, a manager would only attempt Total Football if he had a group of exceptionally talented footballers. This was certainly the case with the Ajax and Dutch sides that played Total Football, with the former in particular achieving a huge amount of success - most notably winning the 1971 European Cup.  Cruyff employed many of the principles of Total Football when Barcelona manager between 1988 and 1996, but it would take a very brave manager to attempt it now given the volume of matches the big teams play and the reduced number of training sessions.  

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