Bolton Wanderers

Bolton Wanderers slideshow

National Security Adviser John Bolton (L) listens as U.S. President Donald Trump speaks while hosting a working luncheon with Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida U.S., April 18, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Trump hosts working lunch with Japan’s Prime Minister Abe at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida
National Security Adviser John Bolton (L) listens as U.S. President Donald Trump speaks while hosting a working luncheon with Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida U.S., April 18, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
We're into the final month of the season across England's top four tiers, and there is still plenty to play for. The Premier League title is wrapped up, and the bottom three clubs are looking increasingly to be relegated, but lower down the footballing pyramid there is plenty still at stake. Here, we round-up who can still finish where in the Premier League and Football League. Premier League Every team has either four or five games remaining, but it wouldn't be all that surprising if everyone finished in exactly the position they currently find themselves - or at least in the positions that truly matter. Manchester City are champions, while Manchester United, Liverpool and Tottenham are looking good to finish in the top four, barring a significant late collapse coupled with a Chelsea recovery. Arsenal and Burnley are battling it out for sixth place (though Arsenal can technically still finish in the top four), with the losers of that race to go into the Europa League at the second qualifying stage - which starts on July 26. Everyone from Leicester in eighth and below can - mathematically - still be relegated, but it would take something dramatic for any of the teams above West Ham to be pulled back in to the dogfight. Southampton, Stoke and West Brom, all at least five points adrift of safety, are in real trouble. Premier League | Who can still get what? Championship Wolves are all but secure of the Championship title, 12 points clear of Cardiff, who have four games left and a vastly inferior goal difference. Cardiff are battling it out with Fulham and Aston Villa for the second remaining automatic play-off spot, though the Welsh side are in the best position to secure promotion. Two of those sides will go into the play-offs, joined by two more of Middlesbrough, Millwall, Derby, Preston, Sheffield United, Brentford and Bristol City, though the final four of those sides face an uphill task to sneak in. At the other end of the table, Sunderland are on the brink of a second successive relegation and last position, rooted to the foot of the Championship. Burton and Barnsley currently make up the bottom three, though Barnsley have a game in hand on Birmingham and Bolton, two points above them, just outside the relegation zone. Every side up to Nottingham Forest can still technically go down, but everyone from Reading and up should survive. Championship | What can still happen? League One Wigan and Blackburn look like they have won the race for the two automatic promotion spots, though Shrewsbury could technically still catch either. Whichever of those teams does not get into the top two will go into the play-offs, and with many sides still having to play five more games, the race for the three remaining play-off places is very, very open. Every team between Rotherham in fourth and Southend in 15th (apart from Fleetwood, due to the combination of other teams' games) can still make it into the play-offs, though realistically, it is unlikely that anyone below ninth will. At the bottom, Bury are down, while everyone up to Bradford in 10th could feasibly get sucked into the relegation battle. Given only eight points separate Rochdale in 21st and Doncaster in 12th, there is an awful lot still to play for. League One | What can still happen? League Two Accrington Stanley have sealed promotion to League One, and Luton will join them with one more win. Wycombe are in pole position to secure the third and final automatic promotion slot, but every side currently in the play-off places is still in contention. The play-off berths will be filled by four teams from those currently between second and 14th (apart from Crawley, who have too few games remaining to make it into seventh). Relegation from the Football League is looking perilously likely for both Chesterfield and Barnet, though everyone up to Crewe in 17th could still be dragged into the drop zone, however unlikely that actually is. League Two | What can still happen?
Premier League and Football League relegation, promotion and play-offs: who can still finish where?
We're into the final month of the season across England's top four tiers, and there is still plenty to play for. The Premier League title is wrapped up, and the bottom three clubs are looking increasingly to be relegated, but lower down the footballing pyramid there is plenty still at stake. Here, we round-up who can still finish where in the Premier League and Football League. Premier League Every team has either four or five games remaining, but it wouldn't be all that surprising if everyone finished in exactly the position they currently find themselves - or at least in the positions that truly matter. Manchester City are champions, while Manchester United, Liverpool and Tottenham are looking good to finish in the top four, barring a significant late collapse coupled with a Chelsea recovery. Arsenal and Burnley are battling it out for sixth place (though Arsenal can technically still finish in the top four), with the losers of that race to go into the Europa League at the second qualifying stage - which starts on July 26. Everyone from Leicester in eighth and below can - mathematically - still be relegated, but it would take something dramatic for any of the teams above West Ham to be pulled back in to the dogfight. Southampton, Stoke and West Brom, all at least five points adrift of safety, are in real trouble. Premier League | Who can still get what? Championship Wolves are all but secure of the Championship title, 12 points clear of Cardiff, who have four games left and a vastly inferior goal difference. Cardiff are battling it out with Fulham and Aston Villa for the second remaining automatic play-off spot, though the Welsh side are in the best position to secure promotion. Two of those sides will go into the play-offs, joined by two more of Middlesbrough, Millwall, Derby, Preston, Sheffield United, Brentford and Bristol City, though the final four of those sides face an uphill task to sneak in. At the other end of the table, Sunderland are on the brink of a second successive relegation and last position, rooted to the foot of the Championship. Burton and Barnsley currently make up the bottom three, though Barnsley have a game in hand on Birmingham and Bolton, two points above them, just outside the relegation zone. Every side up to Nottingham Forest can still technically go down, but everyone from Reading and up should survive. Championship | What can still happen? League One Wigan and Blackburn look like they have won the race for the two automatic promotion spots, though Shrewsbury could technically still catch either. Whichever of those teams does not get into the top two will go into the play-offs, and with many sides still having to play five more games, the race for the three remaining play-off places is very, very open. Every team between Rotherham in fourth and Southend in 15th (apart from Fleetwood, due to the combination of other teams' games) can still make it into the play-offs, though realistically, it is unlikely that anyone below ninth will. At the bottom, Bury are down, while everyone up to Bradford in 10th could feasibly get sucked into the relegation battle. Given only eight points separate Rochdale in 21st and Doncaster in 12th, there is an awful lot still to play for. League One | What can still happen? League Two Accrington Stanley have sealed promotion to League One, and Luton will join them with one more win. Wycombe are in pole position to secure the third and final automatic promotion slot, but every side currently in the play-off places is still in contention. The play-off berths will be filled by four teams from those currently between second and 14th (apart from Crawley, who have too few games remaining to make it into seventh). Relegation from the Football League is looking perilously likely for both Chesterfield and Barnet, though everyone up to Crewe in 17th could still be dragged into the drop zone, however unlikely that actually is. League Two | What can still happen?
White House Chief of Staff John Kelly and National Security Advisor John Bolton attend U.S. President Donald Trump's a bilateral meeting with Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida U.S., April 17, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Kelly and Bolton attend Trump-Abe bilateral meeting at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida
White House Chief of Staff John Kelly and National Security Advisor John Bolton attend U.S. President Donald Trump's a bilateral meeting with Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida U.S., April 17, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Wolverhampton Wanderers are ready to spend £20 million to sign loan players Benik Afobe and Willy Bolyafter sealing promotion to the Premier League. Bournemouth forward Afobe is poised to complete his return to Molineux this summer for a fee of about £10m, following an impressive spell on loan. The striker, who left Wolves for Bournemouth in January 2016, has scored five goals since joining his old club in the January transfer window. Wolves are also planning on triggering an option to sign Boly, one of their stars of the season, in a long-term £10m deal from Porto. The French central defender was signed in July by his former Porto manager Nuno Espirito Santo and has been outstanding during his season’s loan. Wolves also have other options to sign loan players Leo Bonatini and Alfred N’Diaye as they prepare for a return to the top-flight, for the first time since 2012. Afobe said: “Obviously I’m contracted to Bournemouth, I’ve had a great time there and I’m only on loan. Benik Afobe has scored five goals since his return to Molineux on loan in January Credit: James Baylis - AMA/Getty Images “I’ve got to show respect to Bournemouth so we’ll have to look and see what happens in the summer. It has been great here from day one and to be top of the league and promoted with three games is to go is unreal. “The manager and staff have been great and it’s been an unbelievable experience.” Wolves will clinch the Championship title if they take a point against Bolton on Saturday, while they could also top 100 points from their remaining games. And it has emerged that Wolves’ squad and coaching staff are heading to China for a post-season celebration when the campaign is finished. Fosun, the Chinese owners, are ready to roll out the red carpet after an excellent season for the club they purchased for just £30m in July 2016.
Wolves poised to spend £20m to sign Willy Boly and Benik Afobe on long-term deals
Wolverhampton Wanderers are ready to spend £20 million to sign loan players Benik Afobe and Willy Bolyafter sealing promotion to the Premier League. Bournemouth forward Afobe is poised to complete his return to Molineux this summer for a fee of about £10m, following an impressive spell on loan. The striker, who left Wolves for Bournemouth in January 2016, has scored five goals since joining his old club in the January transfer window. Wolves are also planning on triggering an option to sign Boly, one of their stars of the season, in a long-term £10m deal from Porto. The French central defender was signed in July by his former Porto manager Nuno Espirito Santo and has been outstanding during his season’s loan. Wolves also have other options to sign loan players Leo Bonatini and Alfred N’Diaye as they prepare for a return to the top-flight, for the first time since 2012. Afobe said: “Obviously I’m contracted to Bournemouth, I’ve had a great time there and I’m only on loan. Benik Afobe has scored five goals since his return to Molineux on loan in January Credit: James Baylis - AMA/Getty Images “I’ve got to show respect to Bournemouth so we’ll have to look and see what happens in the summer. It has been great here from day one and to be top of the league and promoted with three games is to go is unreal. “The manager and staff have been great and it’s been an unbelievable experience.” Wolves will clinch the Championship title if they take a point against Bolton on Saturday, while they could also top 100 points from their remaining games. And it has emerged that Wolves’ squad and coaching staff are heading to China for a post-season celebration when the campaign is finished. Fosun, the Chinese owners, are ready to roll out the red carpet after an excellent season for the club they purchased for just £30m in July 2016.
Wolverhampton Wanderers are ready to spend £20 million to sign loan players Benik Afobe and Willy Bolyafter sealing promotion to the Premier League. Bournemouth forward Afobe is poised to complete his return to Molineux this summer for a fee of about £10m, following an impressive spell on loan. The striker, who left Wolves for Bournemouth in January 2016, has scored five goals since joining his old club in the January transfer window. Wolves are also planning on triggering an option to sign Boly, one of their stars of the season, in a long-term £10m deal from Porto. The French central defender was signed in July by his former Porto manager Nuno Espirito Santo and has been outstanding during his season’s loan. Wolves also have other options to sign loan players Leo Bonatini and Alfred N’Diaye as they prepare for a return to the top-flight, for the first time since 2012. Afobe said: “Obviously I’m contracted to Bournemouth, I’ve had a great time there and I’m only on loan. Benik Afobe has scored five goals since his return to Molineux on loan in January Credit: James Baylis - AMA/Getty Images “I’ve got to show respect to Bournemouth so we’ll have to look and see what happens in the summer. It has been great here from day one and to be top of the league and promoted with three games is to go is unreal. “The manager and staff have been great and it’s been an unbelievable experience.” Wolves will clinch the Championship title if they take a point against Bolton on Saturday, while they could also top 100 points from their remaining games. And it has emerged that Wolves’ squad and coaching staff are heading to China for a post-season celebration when the campaign is finished. Fosun, the Chinese owners, are ready to roll out the red carpet after an excellent season for the club they purchased for just £30m in July 2016.
Wolves poised to spend £20m to sign Willy Boly and Benik Afobe on long-term deals
Wolverhampton Wanderers are ready to spend £20 million to sign loan players Benik Afobe and Willy Bolyafter sealing promotion to the Premier League. Bournemouth forward Afobe is poised to complete his return to Molineux this summer for a fee of about £10m, following an impressive spell on loan. The striker, who left Wolves for Bournemouth in January 2016, has scored five goals since joining his old club in the January transfer window. Wolves are also planning on triggering an option to sign Boly, one of their stars of the season, in a long-term £10m deal from Porto. The French central defender was signed in July by his former Porto manager Nuno Espirito Santo and has been outstanding during his season’s loan. Wolves also have other options to sign loan players Leo Bonatini and Alfred N’Diaye as they prepare for a return to the top-flight, for the first time since 2012. Afobe said: “Obviously I’m contracted to Bournemouth, I’ve had a great time there and I’m only on loan. Benik Afobe has scored five goals since his return to Molineux on loan in January Credit: James Baylis - AMA/Getty Images “I’ve got to show respect to Bournemouth so we’ll have to look and see what happens in the summer. It has been great here from day one and to be top of the league and promoted with three games is to go is unreal. “The manager and staff have been great and it’s been an unbelievable experience.” Wolves will clinch the Championship title if they take a point against Bolton on Saturday, while they could also top 100 points from their remaining games. And it has emerged that Wolves’ squad and coaching staff are heading to China for a post-season celebration when the campaign is finished. Fosun, the Chinese owners, are ready to roll out the red carpet after an excellent season for the club they purchased for just £30m in July 2016.
Donald Trump considered launching a strike three times as big on Syria, potentially including hitting Russian air defence systems, but was dissuaded by James Mattis, his defence secretary. The Pentagon presented Mr Trump with three options for how to respond to the chemical attack by the Syrian regime in Douma on April 7, the Wall Street Journal reported. A first, and most cautious, option consisted of a limited strike on Syrian chemical weapons facilities, while a second targeted those plus military command posts. The third option had the aim of devastating Bashar al-Assad's military forces and could have targeted Syrian-based Russian air defence capabilities as part of that. Such a strike would have been three times the size of the military action that was eventually launched by the US, UK and France in the early hours of Saturday. Syria - The targets In all, 105 missiles were launched at Syria. During several days of intense planning meetings with his top national security advisers last week Mr Trump was said to have asked about hitting both Russian and Iranian targets if that was required to hurt Assad militarily, the Wall Street Journal reported. He and Nikki Haley, the US ambassador to the United Nations, were said to have been pushing for a more robust strike. But having laid out the three options Mr Mattis, according to the report, urged caution and suggested the third one could lead to an escalation by Russia or Iran. James Mattis, the US defence secretary, urged caution Credit: Reuters The strike that ultimately happened reportedly drew from the first two options that he had presented. That decision was being seen in Washington as confirmation of the elevated standing of Mr Mattis within the administration. Asked whether Mr Trump had been pushing for proposals that included hitting Russian and Iranian targets in Syria, Sarah Sanders, the White House press secretary, said "a number of options" had been, and remained, on the table. She said: "We're not going to get into any other options that were on the table. Syria strikes | Read latest "We're going to continue to keep a number of options on the table if Syria and Russia and Iran don't show to be better actors in this process. "So, I can't go any further than the targets that were part of the strike and successfully hit." Meanwhile, Mr Trump dismissed claims by Syria and Russia that some US missiles were shot down. He said: "We had well over 100 missiles. They didn't shoot one down. Their equipment didn't work too well...every one (of ours) hit its target, not one shot down." John Bolton, Mr Trump's new national security adviser, was said to have pushed for the toughest response possible, but not to have advocated the third option, believing it could draw the US further into a conflict in Syria. The three Syrian targets ultimately chosen were involved in the "research, development and deployment" of chemical weapons, the Pentagon said. One was a scientific facility near Damascus and the other two were chemical weapons storage sites near Homs, one of which had been used as a military command post. The strike involved more than double the number of missiles used in the US air strike on Syria in April 2017.
Donald Trump considered launching Syria strikes 'three times bigger'
Donald Trump considered launching a strike three times as big on Syria, potentially including hitting Russian air defence systems, but was dissuaded by James Mattis, his defence secretary. The Pentagon presented Mr Trump with three options for how to respond to the chemical attack by the Syrian regime in Douma on April 7, the Wall Street Journal reported. A first, and most cautious, option consisted of a limited strike on Syrian chemical weapons facilities, while a second targeted those plus military command posts. The third option had the aim of devastating Bashar al-Assad's military forces and could have targeted Syrian-based Russian air defence capabilities as part of that. Such a strike would have been three times the size of the military action that was eventually launched by the US, UK and France in the early hours of Saturday. Syria - The targets In all, 105 missiles were launched at Syria. During several days of intense planning meetings with his top national security advisers last week Mr Trump was said to have asked about hitting both Russian and Iranian targets if that was required to hurt Assad militarily, the Wall Street Journal reported. He and Nikki Haley, the US ambassador to the United Nations, were said to have been pushing for a more robust strike. But having laid out the three options Mr Mattis, according to the report, urged caution and suggested the third one could lead to an escalation by Russia or Iran. James Mattis, the US defence secretary, urged caution Credit: Reuters The strike that ultimately happened reportedly drew from the first two options that he had presented. That decision was being seen in Washington as confirmation of the elevated standing of Mr Mattis within the administration. Asked whether Mr Trump had been pushing for proposals that included hitting Russian and Iranian targets in Syria, Sarah Sanders, the White House press secretary, said "a number of options" had been, and remained, on the table. She said: "We're not going to get into any other options that were on the table. Syria strikes | Read latest "We're going to continue to keep a number of options on the table if Syria and Russia and Iran don't show to be better actors in this process. "So, I can't go any further than the targets that were part of the strike and successfully hit." Meanwhile, Mr Trump dismissed claims by Syria and Russia that some US missiles were shot down. He said: "We had well over 100 missiles. They didn't shoot one down. Their equipment didn't work too well...every one (of ours) hit its target, not one shot down." John Bolton, Mr Trump's new national security adviser, was said to have pushed for the toughest response possible, but not to have advocated the third option, believing it could draw the US further into a conflict in Syria. The three Syrian targets ultimately chosen were involved in the "research, development and deployment" of chemical weapons, the Pentagon said. One was a scientific facility near Damascus and the other two were chemical weapons storage sites near Homs, one of which had been used as a military command post. The strike involved more than double the number of missiles used in the US air strike on Syria in April 2017.
Donald Trump considered launching a strike three times as big on Syria, potentially including hitting Russian air defence systems, but was dissuaded by James Mattis, his defence secretary. The Pentagon presented Mr Trump with three options for how to respond to the chemical attack by the Syrian regime in Douma on April 7, the Wall Street Journal reported. A first, and most cautious, option consisted of a limited strike on Syrian chemical weapons facilities, while a second targeted those plus military command posts. The third option had the aim of devastating Bashar al-Assad's military forces and could have targeted Syrian-based Russian air defence capabilities as part of that. Such a strike would have been three times the size of the military action that was eventually launched by the US, UK and France in the early hours of Saturday. Syria - The targets In all, 105 missiles were launched at Syria. During several days of intense planning meetings with his top national security advisers last week Mr Trump was said to have asked about hitting both Russian and Iranian targets if that was required to hurt Assad militarily, the Wall Street Journal reported. He and Nikki Haley, the US ambassador to the United Nations, were said to have been pushing for a more robust strike. But having laid out the three options Mr Mattis, according to the report, urged caution and suggested the third one could lead to an escalation by Russia or Iran. James Mattis, the US defence secretary, urged caution Credit: Reuters The strike that ultimately happened reportedly drew from the first two options that he had presented. That decision was being seen in Washington as confirmation of the elevated standing of Mr Mattis within the administration. Asked whether Mr Trump had been pushing for proposals that included hitting Russian and Iranian targets in Syria, Sarah Sanders, the White House press secretary, said "a number of options" had been, and remained, on the table. She said: "We're not going to get into any other options that were on the table. Syria strikes | Read latest "We're going to continue to keep a number of options on the table if Syria and Russia and Iran don't show to be better actors in this process. "So, I can't go any further than the targets that were part of the strike and successfully hit." Meanwhile, Mr Trump dismissed claims by Syria and Russia that some US missiles were shot down. He said: "We had well over 100 missiles. They didn't shoot one down. Their equipment didn't work too well...every one (of ours) hit its target, not one shot down." John Bolton, Mr Trump's new national security adviser, was said to have pushed for the toughest response possible, but not to have advocated the third option, believing it could draw the US further into a conflict in Syria. The three Syrian targets ultimately chosen were involved in the "research, development and deployment" of chemical weapons, the Pentagon said. One was a scientific facility near Damascus and the other two were chemical weapons storage sites near Homs, one of which had been used as a military command post. The strike involved more than double the number of missiles used in the US air strike on Syria in April 2017.
Donald Trump considered launching Syria strikes 'three times bigger'
Donald Trump considered launching a strike three times as big on Syria, potentially including hitting Russian air defence systems, but was dissuaded by James Mattis, his defence secretary. The Pentagon presented Mr Trump with three options for how to respond to the chemical attack by the Syrian regime in Douma on April 7, the Wall Street Journal reported. A first, and most cautious, option consisted of a limited strike on Syrian chemical weapons facilities, while a second targeted those plus military command posts. The third option had the aim of devastating Bashar al-Assad's military forces and could have targeted Syrian-based Russian air defence capabilities as part of that. Such a strike would have been three times the size of the military action that was eventually launched by the US, UK and France in the early hours of Saturday. Syria - The targets In all, 105 missiles were launched at Syria. During several days of intense planning meetings with his top national security advisers last week Mr Trump was said to have asked about hitting both Russian and Iranian targets if that was required to hurt Assad militarily, the Wall Street Journal reported. He and Nikki Haley, the US ambassador to the United Nations, were said to have been pushing for a more robust strike. But having laid out the three options Mr Mattis, according to the report, urged caution and suggested the third one could lead to an escalation by Russia or Iran. James Mattis, the US defence secretary, urged caution Credit: Reuters The strike that ultimately happened reportedly drew from the first two options that he had presented. That decision was being seen in Washington as confirmation of the elevated standing of Mr Mattis within the administration. Asked whether Mr Trump had been pushing for proposals that included hitting Russian and Iranian targets in Syria, Sarah Sanders, the White House press secretary, said "a number of options" had been, and remained, on the table. She said: "We're not going to get into any other options that were on the table. Syria strikes | Read latest "We're going to continue to keep a number of options on the table if Syria and Russia and Iran don't show to be better actors in this process. "So, I can't go any further than the targets that were part of the strike and successfully hit." Meanwhile, Mr Trump dismissed claims by Syria and Russia that some US missiles were shot down. He said: "We had well over 100 missiles. They didn't shoot one down. Their equipment didn't work too well...every one (of ours) hit its target, not one shot down." John Bolton, Mr Trump's new national security adviser, was said to have pushed for the toughest response possible, but not to have advocated the third option, believing it could draw the US further into a conflict in Syria. The three Syrian targets ultimately chosen were involved in the "research, development and deployment" of chemical weapons, the Pentagon said. One was a scientific facility near Damascus and the other two were chemical weapons storage sites near Homs, one of which had been used as a military command post. The strike involved more than double the number of missiles used in the US air strike on Syria in April 2017.
Wolves secured a return to the Premier League without kicking a ball on Saturday after Brentford stole a dramatic 1-1 draw at promotion-chasing Fulham. The Cottagers needed a win in the late kick-off to regain second place from Cardiff in the Sky Bet Championship and to deny Wolves a top-flight spot for the first time since 2012. Aleksandar Mitrovic's 70th-minute goal had looked like putting Wolves' party on hold but Neal Maupay's last-gasp header for Brentford sent Nuno Espirito Santo's side up. Wolves can celebrate at home to Birmingham on Sunday, but third-placed Fulham will have to gather themselves after falling a point and a place behind Cardiff - who have a game in hand. The Bluebirds left it late but kept themselves on course for an automatic promotion place with a 2-0 win at Norwich. Neil Warnock's side know three wins from their remaining four games will be enough to join Wolves in the Premier League but they had to dig deep to earn a vital three points at Carrow Road. Kenneth Zohore squeezed the ball past Angus Gunn in the 86th minute before Junior Hoilett's goal in added time ensured Cardiff's two-game losing streak was brought to an end. Junior Hoilett celebrates his injury time goal in Cardiff City's 2-0 win over Norwich Credit: PA Middlesbrough stormed into the play-off places after coming from behind to beat Bristol City 2-1 at the Riverside Stadium. Milan Djuric volleyed the visitors into a 13th-minute lead before George Friend levelled for Boro five minutes later. Daniel Ayala then headed home the winner in the 68th minute, moving Middlesbrough up to fifth while also denting Bristol City's own top-six hopes. Veteran striker Steve Morison struck his fifth goal of the season for Millwall as they came back to draw 1-1 against fellow play-off hopefuls Sheffield United in the early kick-off. Leon Clarke opened the scoring for the Blades in the 74th minute, but Morison equalised instantly to grab his side a point. The sixth-placed Lions remain unbeaten in the league since New Year's Day and Sheffield United, who are ninth, have not lost at home since late January. Ryan Sessegnon (L) was unable to help Fulham get all three points against Brentford and Romaine Sawyers (R) Derby slipped out of the top six, but Burton moved off the bottom and to within five points of safety after a 3-1 victory over the Rams at the Pirelli Stadium. Liam Boyce tapped home from close range to put the hosts in front after 24 minutes, but their lead did not last long as David Nugent equalised moments later. Luke Murphy curled a beautiful effort past Scott Carson to restore the Brewers' lead just before the break and Lucas Akins added a third in the 68th minute. Oli McBurnie's added-time equaliser secured a vital 2-2 draw for Barnsley at home to fellow strugglers Bolton. Gary Gardner scored from 10 yards midway through the first half for the Tykes before Adam Le Fondre levelled from the spot after 82 minutes. Craig Noone thought he had won it for Bolton three minutes later, but McBurnie had the final say to keep Barnsley within two points of the 21st-placed Trotters. Sunderland slipped to the foot of the table and remain six points below Bolton after drawing 2-2 at Reading. Liam Kelly gave the Royals the lead from the penalty spot after Lee Camp brought down Jon Dadi Bodvarsson in the box after 20 minutes. Paddy McNair fired home a stunning equaliser for the Black Cats just after the break before Lee Cattermole's first goal since August 2014 put the visitors in front in the 66th minute. Yann Kermorgant restored parity for Reading with 11 minutes remaining to leave Chris Coleman's side on the brink with three games left. Ben Brereton's late penalty and Joe Lolley's goal in added time secured an unlikely 2-1 win for Nottingham Forest against Ipswich, who had led through Grant Ward's first-half header. Elsewhere, Callum Robinson's double sealed a 2-1 win for Preston against QPR, who had Matt Smith on the scoresheet, while Jordan
Wolves seal promotion to Premier League as Fulham concede late goal
Wolves secured a return to the Premier League without kicking a ball on Saturday after Brentford stole a dramatic 1-1 draw at promotion-chasing Fulham. The Cottagers needed a win in the late kick-off to regain second place from Cardiff in the Sky Bet Championship and to deny Wolves a top-flight spot for the first time since 2012. Aleksandar Mitrovic's 70th-minute goal had looked like putting Wolves' party on hold but Neal Maupay's last-gasp header for Brentford sent Nuno Espirito Santo's side up. Wolves can celebrate at home to Birmingham on Sunday, but third-placed Fulham will have to gather themselves after falling a point and a place behind Cardiff - who have a game in hand. The Bluebirds left it late but kept themselves on course for an automatic promotion place with a 2-0 win at Norwich. Neil Warnock's side know three wins from their remaining four games will be enough to join Wolves in the Premier League but they had to dig deep to earn a vital three points at Carrow Road. Kenneth Zohore squeezed the ball past Angus Gunn in the 86th minute before Junior Hoilett's goal in added time ensured Cardiff's two-game losing streak was brought to an end. Junior Hoilett celebrates his injury time goal in Cardiff City's 2-0 win over Norwich Credit: PA Middlesbrough stormed into the play-off places after coming from behind to beat Bristol City 2-1 at the Riverside Stadium. Milan Djuric volleyed the visitors into a 13th-minute lead before George Friend levelled for Boro five minutes later. Daniel Ayala then headed home the winner in the 68th minute, moving Middlesbrough up to fifth while also denting Bristol City's own top-six hopes. Veteran striker Steve Morison struck his fifth goal of the season for Millwall as they came back to draw 1-1 against fellow play-off hopefuls Sheffield United in the early kick-off. Leon Clarke opened the scoring for the Blades in the 74th minute, but Morison equalised instantly to grab his side a point. The sixth-placed Lions remain unbeaten in the league since New Year's Day and Sheffield United, who are ninth, have not lost at home since late January. Ryan Sessegnon (L) was unable to help Fulham get all three points against Brentford and Romaine Sawyers (R) Derby slipped out of the top six, but Burton moved off the bottom and to within five points of safety after a 3-1 victory over the Rams at the Pirelli Stadium. Liam Boyce tapped home from close range to put the hosts in front after 24 minutes, but their lead did not last long as David Nugent equalised moments later. Luke Murphy curled a beautiful effort past Scott Carson to restore the Brewers' lead just before the break and Lucas Akins added a third in the 68th minute. Oli McBurnie's added-time equaliser secured a vital 2-2 draw for Barnsley at home to fellow strugglers Bolton. Gary Gardner scored from 10 yards midway through the first half for the Tykes before Adam Le Fondre levelled from the spot after 82 minutes. Craig Noone thought he had won it for Bolton three minutes later, but McBurnie had the final say to keep Barnsley within two points of the 21st-placed Trotters. Sunderland slipped to the foot of the table and remain six points below Bolton after drawing 2-2 at Reading. Liam Kelly gave the Royals the lead from the penalty spot after Lee Camp brought down Jon Dadi Bodvarsson in the box after 20 minutes. Paddy McNair fired home a stunning equaliser for the Black Cats just after the break before Lee Cattermole's first goal since August 2014 put the visitors in front in the 66th minute. Yann Kermorgant restored parity for Reading with 11 minutes remaining to leave Chris Coleman's side on the brink with three games left. Ben Brereton's late penalty and Joe Lolley's goal in added time secured an unlikely 2-1 win for Nottingham Forest against Ipswich, who had led through Grant Ward's first-half header. Elsewhere, Callum Robinson's double sealed a 2-1 win for Preston against QPR, who had Matt Smith on the scoresheet, while Jordan
Wolves secured a return to the Premier League without kicking a ball on Saturday after Brentford stole a dramatic 1-1 draw at promotion-chasing Fulham. The Cottagers needed a win in the late kick-off to regain second place from Cardiff in the Sky Bet Championship and to deny Wolves a top-flight spot for the first time since 2012. Aleksandar Mitrovic's 70th-minute goal had looked like putting Wolves' party on hold but Neal Maupay's last-gasp header for Brentford sent Nuno Espirito Santo's side up. Wolves can celebrate at home to Birmingham on Sunday, but third-placed Fulham will have to gather themselves after falling a point and a place behind Cardiff - who have a game in hand. The Bluebirds left it late but kept themselves on course for an automatic promotion place with a 2-0 win at Norwich. Neil Warnock's side know three wins from their remaining four games will be enough to join Wolves in the Premier League but they had to dig deep to earn a vital three points at Carrow Road. Kenneth Zohore squeezed the ball past Angus Gunn in the 86th minute before Junior Hoilett's goal in added time ensured Cardiff's two-game losing streak was brought to an end. Junior Hoilett celebrates his injury time goal in Cardiff City's 2-0 win over Norwich Credit: PA Middlesbrough stormed into the play-off places after coming from behind to beat Bristol City 2-1 at the Riverside Stadium. Milan Djuric volleyed the visitors into a 13th-minute lead before George Friend levelled for Boro five minutes later. Daniel Ayala then headed home the winner in the 68th minute, moving Middlesbrough up to fifth while also denting Bristol City's own top-six hopes. Veteran striker Steve Morison struck his fifth goal of the season for Millwall as they came back to draw 1-1 against fellow play-off hopefuls Sheffield United in the early kick-off. Leon Clarke opened the scoring for the Blades in the 74th minute, but Morison equalised instantly to grab his side a point. The sixth-placed Lions remain unbeaten in the league since New Year's Day and Sheffield United, who are ninth, have not lost at home since late January. Ryan Sessegnon (L) was unable to help Fulham get all three points against Brentford and Romaine Sawyers (R) Derby slipped out of the top six, but Burton moved off the bottom and to within five points of safety after a 3-1 victory over the Rams at the Pirelli Stadium. Liam Boyce tapped home from close range to put the hosts in front after 24 minutes, but their lead did not last long as David Nugent equalised moments later. Luke Murphy curled a beautiful effort past Scott Carson to restore the Brewers' lead just before the break and Lucas Akins added a third in the 68th minute. Oli McBurnie's added-time equaliser secured a vital 2-2 draw for Barnsley at home to fellow strugglers Bolton. Gary Gardner scored from 10 yards midway through the first half for the Tykes before Adam Le Fondre levelled from the spot after 82 minutes. Craig Noone thought he had won it for Bolton three minutes later, but McBurnie had the final say to keep Barnsley within two points of the 21st-placed Trotters. Sunderland slipped to the foot of the table and remain six points below Bolton after drawing 2-2 at Reading. Liam Kelly gave the Royals the lead from the penalty spot after Lee Camp brought down Jon Dadi Bodvarsson in the box after 20 minutes. Paddy McNair fired home a stunning equaliser for the Black Cats just after the break before Lee Cattermole's first goal since August 2014 put the visitors in front in the 66th minute. Yann Kermorgant restored parity for Reading with 11 minutes remaining to leave Chris Coleman's side on the brink with three games left. Ben Brereton's late penalty and Joe Lolley's goal in added time secured an unlikely 2-1 win for Nottingham Forest against Ipswich, who had led through Grant Ward's first-half header. Elsewhere, Callum Robinson's double sealed a 2-1 win for Preston against QPR, who had Matt Smith on the scoresheet, while Jordan
Wolves seal promotion to Premier League as Fulham concede late goal
Wolves secured a return to the Premier League without kicking a ball on Saturday after Brentford stole a dramatic 1-1 draw at promotion-chasing Fulham. The Cottagers needed a win in the late kick-off to regain second place from Cardiff in the Sky Bet Championship and to deny Wolves a top-flight spot for the first time since 2012. Aleksandar Mitrovic's 70th-minute goal had looked like putting Wolves' party on hold but Neal Maupay's last-gasp header for Brentford sent Nuno Espirito Santo's side up. Wolves can celebrate at home to Birmingham on Sunday, but third-placed Fulham will have to gather themselves after falling a point and a place behind Cardiff - who have a game in hand. The Bluebirds left it late but kept themselves on course for an automatic promotion place with a 2-0 win at Norwich. Neil Warnock's side know three wins from their remaining four games will be enough to join Wolves in the Premier League but they had to dig deep to earn a vital three points at Carrow Road. Kenneth Zohore squeezed the ball past Angus Gunn in the 86th minute before Junior Hoilett's goal in added time ensured Cardiff's two-game losing streak was brought to an end. Junior Hoilett celebrates his injury time goal in Cardiff City's 2-0 win over Norwich Credit: PA Middlesbrough stormed into the play-off places after coming from behind to beat Bristol City 2-1 at the Riverside Stadium. Milan Djuric volleyed the visitors into a 13th-minute lead before George Friend levelled for Boro five minutes later. Daniel Ayala then headed home the winner in the 68th minute, moving Middlesbrough up to fifth while also denting Bristol City's own top-six hopes. Veteran striker Steve Morison struck his fifth goal of the season for Millwall as they came back to draw 1-1 against fellow play-off hopefuls Sheffield United in the early kick-off. Leon Clarke opened the scoring for the Blades in the 74th minute, but Morison equalised instantly to grab his side a point. The sixth-placed Lions remain unbeaten in the league since New Year's Day and Sheffield United, who are ninth, have not lost at home since late January. Ryan Sessegnon (L) was unable to help Fulham get all three points against Brentford and Romaine Sawyers (R) Derby slipped out of the top six, but Burton moved off the bottom and to within five points of safety after a 3-1 victory over the Rams at the Pirelli Stadium. Liam Boyce tapped home from close range to put the hosts in front after 24 minutes, but their lead did not last long as David Nugent equalised moments later. Luke Murphy curled a beautiful effort past Scott Carson to restore the Brewers' lead just before the break and Lucas Akins added a third in the 68th minute. Oli McBurnie's added-time equaliser secured a vital 2-2 draw for Barnsley at home to fellow strugglers Bolton. Gary Gardner scored from 10 yards midway through the first half for the Tykes before Adam Le Fondre levelled from the spot after 82 minutes. Craig Noone thought he had won it for Bolton three minutes later, but McBurnie had the final say to keep Barnsley within two points of the 21st-placed Trotters. Sunderland slipped to the foot of the table and remain six points below Bolton after drawing 2-2 at Reading. Liam Kelly gave the Royals the lead from the penalty spot after Lee Camp brought down Jon Dadi Bodvarsson in the box after 20 minutes. Paddy McNair fired home a stunning equaliser for the Black Cats just after the break before Lee Cattermole's first goal since August 2014 put the visitors in front in the 66th minute. Yann Kermorgant restored parity for Reading with 11 minutes remaining to leave Chris Coleman's side on the brink with three games left. Ben Brereton's late penalty and Joe Lolley's goal in added time secured an unlikely 2-1 win for Nottingham Forest against Ipswich, who had led through Grant Ward's first-half header. Elsewhere, Callum Robinson's double sealed a 2-1 win for Preston against QPR, who had Matt Smith on the scoresheet, while Jordan
Wolves secured a return to the Premier League without kicking a ball on Saturday after Brentford stole a dramatic 1-1 draw at promotion-chasing Fulham. The Cottagers needed a win in the late kick-off to regain second place from Cardiff in the Sky Bet Championship and to deny Wolves a top-flight spot for the first time since 2012. Aleksandar Mitrovic's 70th-minute goal had looked like putting Wolves' party on hold but Neal Maupay's last-gasp header for Brentford sent Nuno Espirito Santo's side up. Wolves can celebrate at home to Birmingham on Sunday, but third-placed Fulham will have to gather themselves after falling a point and a place behind Cardiff - who have a game in hand. The Bluebirds left it late but kept themselves on course for an automatic promotion place with a 2-0 win at Norwich. Neil Warnock's side know three wins from their remaining four games will be enough to join Wolves in the Premier League but they had to dig deep to earn a vital three points at Carrow Road. Kenneth Zohore squeezed the ball past Angus Gunn in the 86th minute before Junior Hoilett's goal in added time ensured Cardiff's two-game losing streak was brought to an end. Junior Hoilett celebrates his injury time goal in Cardiff City's 2-0 win over Norwich Credit: PA Middlesbrough stormed into the play-off places after coming from behind to beat Bristol City 2-1 at the Riverside Stadium. Milan Djuric volleyed the visitors into a 13th-minute lead before George Friend levelled for Boro five minutes later. Daniel Ayala then headed home the winner in the 68th minute, moving Middlesbrough up to fifth while also denting Bristol City's own top-six hopes. Veteran striker Steve Morison struck his fifth goal of the season for Millwall as they came back to draw 1-1 against fellow play-off hopefuls Sheffield United in the early kick-off. Leon Clarke opened the scoring for the Blades in the 74th minute, but Morison equalised instantly to grab his side a point. The sixth-placed Lions remain unbeaten in the league since New Year's Day and Sheffield United, who are ninth, have not lost at home since late January. Ryan Sessegnon (L) was unable to help Fulham get all three points against Brentford and Romaine Sawyers (R) Derby slipped out of the top six, but Burton moved off the bottom and to within five points of safety after a 3-1 victory over the Rams at the Pirelli Stadium. Liam Boyce tapped home from close range to put the hosts in front after 24 minutes, but their lead did not last long as David Nugent equalised moments later. Luke Murphy curled a beautiful effort past Scott Carson to restore the Brewers' lead just before the break and Lucas Akins added a third in the 68th minute. Oli McBurnie's added-time equaliser secured a vital 2-2 draw for Barnsley at home to fellow strugglers Bolton. Gary Gardner scored from 10 yards midway through the first half for the Tykes before Adam Le Fondre levelled from the spot after 82 minutes. Craig Noone thought he had won it for Bolton three minutes later, but McBurnie had the final say to keep Barnsley within two points of the 21st-placed Trotters. Sunderland slipped to the foot of the table and remain six points below Bolton after drawing 2-2 at Reading. Liam Kelly gave the Royals the lead from the penalty spot after Lee Camp brought down Jon Dadi Bodvarsson in the box after 20 minutes. Paddy McNair fired home a stunning equaliser for the Black Cats just after the break before Lee Cattermole's first goal since August 2014 put the visitors in front in the 66th minute. Yann Kermorgant restored parity for Reading with 11 minutes remaining to leave Chris Coleman's side on the brink with three games left. Ben Brereton's late penalty and Joe Lolley's goal in added time secured an unlikely 2-1 win for Nottingham Forest against Ipswich, who had led through Grant Ward's first-half header. Elsewhere, Callum Robinson's double sealed a 2-1 win for Preston against QPR, who had Matt Smith on the scoresheet, while Jordan
Wolves seal promotion to Premier League as Fulham concede late goal
Wolves secured a return to the Premier League without kicking a ball on Saturday after Brentford stole a dramatic 1-1 draw at promotion-chasing Fulham. The Cottagers needed a win in the late kick-off to regain second place from Cardiff in the Sky Bet Championship and to deny Wolves a top-flight spot for the first time since 2012. Aleksandar Mitrovic's 70th-minute goal had looked like putting Wolves' party on hold but Neal Maupay's last-gasp header for Brentford sent Nuno Espirito Santo's side up. Wolves can celebrate at home to Birmingham on Sunday, but third-placed Fulham will have to gather themselves after falling a point and a place behind Cardiff - who have a game in hand. The Bluebirds left it late but kept themselves on course for an automatic promotion place with a 2-0 win at Norwich. Neil Warnock's side know three wins from their remaining four games will be enough to join Wolves in the Premier League but they had to dig deep to earn a vital three points at Carrow Road. Kenneth Zohore squeezed the ball past Angus Gunn in the 86th minute before Junior Hoilett's goal in added time ensured Cardiff's two-game losing streak was brought to an end. Junior Hoilett celebrates his injury time goal in Cardiff City's 2-0 win over Norwich Credit: PA Middlesbrough stormed into the play-off places after coming from behind to beat Bristol City 2-1 at the Riverside Stadium. Milan Djuric volleyed the visitors into a 13th-minute lead before George Friend levelled for Boro five minutes later. Daniel Ayala then headed home the winner in the 68th minute, moving Middlesbrough up to fifth while also denting Bristol City's own top-six hopes. Veteran striker Steve Morison struck his fifth goal of the season for Millwall as they came back to draw 1-1 against fellow play-off hopefuls Sheffield United in the early kick-off. Leon Clarke opened the scoring for the Blades in the 74th minute, but Morison equalised instantly to grab his side a point. The sixth-placed Lions remain unbeaten in the league since New Year's Day and Sheffield United, who are ninth, have not lost at home since late January. Ryan Sessegnon (L) was unable to help Fulham get all three points against Brentford and Romaine Sawyers (R) Derby slipped out of the top six, but Burton moved off the bottom and to within five points of safety after a 3-1 victory over the Rams at the Pirelli Stadium. Liam Boyce tapped home from close range to put the hosts in front after 24 minutes, but their lead did not last long as David Nugent equalised moments later. Luke Murphy curled a beautiful effort past Scott Carson to restore the Brewers' lead just before the break and Lucas Akins added a third in the 68th minute. Oli McBurnie's added-time equaliser secured a vital 2-2 draw for Barnsley at home to fellow strugglers Bolton. Gary Gardner scored from 10 yards midway through the first half for the Tykes before Adam Le Fondre levelled from the spot after 82 minutes. Craig Noone thought he had won it for Bolton three minutes later, but McBurnie had the final say to keep Barnsley within two points of the 21st-placed Trotters. Sunderland slipped to the foot of the table and remain six points below Bolton after drawing 2-2 at Reading. Liam Kelly gave the Royals the lead from the penalty spot after Lee Camp brought down Jon Dadi Bodvarsson in the box after 20 minutes. Paddy McNair fired home a stunning equaliser for the Black Cats just after the break before Lee Cattermole's first goal since August 2014 put the visitors in front in the 66th minute. Yann Kermorgant restored parity for Reading with 11 minutes remaining to leave Chris Coleman's side on the brink with three games left. Ben Brereton's late penalty and Joe Lolley's goal in added time secured an unlikely 2-1 win for Nottingham Forest against Ipswich, who had led through Grant Ward's first-half header. Elsewhere, Callum Robinson's double sealed a 2-1 win for Preston against QPR, who had Matt Smith on the scoresheet, while Jordan
New National Security Adviser John Bolton and White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders listen to U.S. President Donald Trump's statement on Syria at the White House in Washington, U.S., April 13, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Donald Trump makes a statement about Syria
New National Security Adviser John Bolton and White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders listen to U.S. President Donald Trump's statement on Syria at the White House in Washington, U.S., April 13, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Donald Trump arrives to announce military strikes on Syria as new National Security Advisor John Bolton follows behind at the White House in Washington, U.S., April 13, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Trump arrives to announce military strikes on Syria while delivering a statement from the White House in Washington
U.S. President Donald Trump arrives to announce military strikes on Syria as new National Security Advisor John Bolton follows behind at the White House in Washington, U.S., April 13, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
China is set to hold live-fire drills in the Taiwan Strait next week in a move certain to ratchet tensions with Taipei, after Chinese president Xi Jinping oversaw the biggest naval exercises in the country's history. The new drills, which are planned for Wednesday, come as tensions between Beijing and Taiwan simmer over increased American support for the government of the self-ruled island. Tsai Ing-wen, Taiwan's president, on Friday presided over her first military drills since she took office in 2016, but those exercises did not involve live fire. Tensions between Beijing and Taipei have escalated in recent weeks amid speculation of a visit to Taiwan by new US national security adviser John Bolton and Washington's backing of Taiwan's plans to build an indigenous submarine force. Chinese media said a decision by Donald Trump's administration to give the go ahead for US defence contractors to help Taiwan build the submarine fleet has made war between Taiwan and China "more probable". China's drills next week will be the first in the Strait since just before the 2015 presidential election, which saw Mrs Tsai, the candidate for the pro-independence Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), sweep to power. Beijing has viewed the Taiwanese president with suspicion and believes she is preparing to move Taiwan towards formal independence - a move that would represent a red line for China. Chinese President Xi Jinping delivers a speech as he reviews a military display of Chinese People's Liberation Army Navy in the South China Sea Credit: Li Gang/Xinhua via REUTERS China views Taiwan as a renegade province which will one day be reunited with the mainland - by force if necessary. On Thursday President Xi presided over huge exercises in the South China Sea in an unmistakable show of force to Beijing's regional rivals. The drills involved 48 ships, among them China's sole operating aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, along with 76 helicopters, fighter jets and bombers, and more than 10,000 personnel. Chinese media said it was the largest of its kind. "The mission of building a mighty people's navy has never been more urgent than it is today," Mr Xi, dressed in army fatigues, said in remarks on the helicopter deck of one of China's most advanced destroyers. "Strive to make the people's navy a first-rate world navy." The nationalist Global Times newspaper warned in a commentary on Taiwan's drills that the island's leaders were making a gamble they couldn't afford to lose. The Liaoning aircraft carrier is accompanied by navy frigates and submarines Credit: Li Gang/Xinhua via AP "The mainland has abundant capability to take back the Taiwan authorities' bargaining chips one at a time until it deals a decisive blow to 'Taiwan independence'," the state-run newspaper said. China's state television broadcaster cited China's Taiwan Affairs Office as saying that Beijing had firm will and the ability to "thwart any kind of Taiwan independence separatist plot and action, and safeguard national sovereignty and territorial integrity". Beijing has claimed Taiwan since defeated Nationalist forces fled to the island in 1949 after losing the civil war with Mao Tse-tung's Communists. China has become increasingly assertive on the world stage since Mr Xi assumed power five years ago. The Chinese president has also oversaw the rapid modernisation of China's military - which is the world's largest. China's increasing power has caused concern among its neighbours in the South China Sea. Beijing claims nearly all of the strategic waters, despite partial counter-claims from Taiwan and several south-east Asian nations including the Philippines, Brunei, Malaysia, and Vietnam. The US Navy has been confronting China in the region with 'freedom of navigation' exercises. The US aircraft carriers Theodore Roosevelt and Carl Vinson have sailed through the South China Sea in recent months, angering Beijing.
Xi Jinping plans live-fire drills in Taiwan Strait after biggest naval exercises in China's history
China is set to hold live-fire drills in the Taiwan Strait next week in a move certain to ratchet tensions with Taipei, after Chinese president Xi Jinping oversaw the biggest naval exercises in the country's history. The new drills, which are planned for Wednesday, come as tensions between Beijing and Taiwan simmer over increased American support for the government of the self-ruled island. Tsai Ing-wen, Taiwan's president, on Friday presided over her first military drills since she took office in 2016, but those exercises did not involve live fire. Tensions between Beijing and Taipei have escalated in recent weeks amid speculation of a visit to Taiwan by new US national security adviser John Bolton and Washington's backing of Taiwan's plans to build an indigenous submarine force. Chinese media said a decision by Donald Trump's administration to give the go ahead for US defence contractors to help Taiwan build the submarine fleet has made war between Taiwan and China "more probable". China's drills next week will be the first in the Strait since just before the 2015 presidential election, which saw Mrs Tsai, the candidate for the pro-independence Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), sweep to power. Beijing has viewed the Taiwanese president with suspicion and believes she is preparing to move Taiwan towards formal independence - a move that would represent a red line for China. Chinese President Xi Jinping delivers a speech as he reviews a military display of Chinese People's Liberation Army Navy in the South China Sea Credit: Li Gang/Xinhua via REUTERS China views Taiwan as a renegade province which will one day be reunited with the mainland - by force if necessary. On Thursday President Xi presided over huge exercises in the South China Sea in an unmistakable show of force to Beijing's regional rivals. The drills involved 48 ships, among them China's sole operating aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, along with 76 helicopters, fighter jets and bombers, and more than 10,000 personnel. Chinese media said it was the largest of its kind. "The mission of building a mighty people's navy has never been more urgent than it is today," Mr Xi, dressed in army fatigues, said in remarks on the helicopter deck of one of China's most advanced destroyers. "Strive to make the people's navy a first-rate world navy." The nationalist Global Times newspaper warned in a commentary on Taiwan's drills that the island's leaders were making a gamble they couldn't afford to lose. The Liaoning aircraft carrier is accompanied by navy frigates and submarines Credit: Li Gang/Xinhua via AP "The mainland has abundant capability to take back the Taiwan authorities' bargaining chips one at a time until it deals a decisive blow to 'Taiwan independence'," the state-run newspaper said. China's state television broadcaster cited China's Taiwan Affairs Office as saying that Beijing had firm will and the ability to "thwart any kind of Taiwan independence separatist plot and action, and safeguard national sovereignty and territorial integrity". Beijing has claimed Taiwan since defeated Nationalist forces fled to the island in 1949 after losing the civil war with Mao Tse-tung's Communists. China has become increasingly assertive on the world stage since Mr Xi assumed power five years ago. The Chinese president has also oversaw the rapid modernisation of China's military - which is the world's largest. China's increasing power has caused concern among its neighbours in the South China Sea. Beijing claims nearly all of the strategic waters, despite partial counter-claims from Taiwan and several south-east Asian nations including the Philippines, Brunei, Malaysia, and Vietnam. The US Navy has been confronting China in the region with 'freedom of navigation' exercises. The US aircraft carriers Theodore Roosevelt and Carl Vinson have sailed through the South China Sea in recent months, angering Beijing.
China is set to hold live-fire drills in the Taiwan Strait next week in a move certain to ratchet tensions with Taipei, after Chinese president Xi Jinping oversaw the biggest naval exercises in the country's history. The new drills, which are planned for Wednesday, come as tensions between Beijing and Taiwan simmer over increased American support for the government of the self-ruled island. Tsai Ing-wen, Taiwan's president, on Friday presided over her first military drills since she took office in 2016, but those exercises did not involve live fire. Tensions between Beijing and Taipei have escalated in recent weeks amid speculation of a visit to Taiwan by new US national security adviser John Bolton and Washington's backing of Taiwan's plans to build an indigenous submarine force. Chinese media said a decision by Donald Trump's administration to give the go ahead for US defence contractors to help Taiwan build the submarine fleet has made war between Taiwan and China "more probable". China's drills next week will be the first in the Strait since just before the 2015 presidential election, which saw Mrs Tsai, the candidate for the pro-independence Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), sweep to power. Beijing has viewed the Taiwanese president with suspicion and believes she is preparing to move Taiwan towards formal independence - a move that would represent a red line for China. Chinese President Xi Jinping delivers a speech as he reviews a military display of Chinese People's Liberation Army Navy in the South China Sea Credit: Li Gang/Xinhua via REUTERS China views Taiwan as a renegade province which will one day be reunited with the mainland - by force if necessary. On Thursday President Xi presided over huge exercises in the South China Sea in an unmistakable show of force to Beijing's regional rivals. The drills involved 48 ships, among them China's sole operating aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, along with 76 helicopters, fighter jets and bombers, and more than 10,000 personnel. Chinese media said it was the largest of its kind. "The mission of building a mighty people's navy has never been more urgent than it is today," Mr Xi, dressed in army fatigues, said in remarks on the helicopter deck of one of China's most advanced destroyers. "Strive to make the people's navy a first-rate world navy." The nationalist Global Times newspaper warned in a commentary on Taiwan's drills that the island's leaders were making a gamble they couldn't afford to lose. The Liaoning aircraft carrier is accompanied by navy frigates and submarines Credit: Li Gang/Xinhua via AP "The mainland has abundant capability to take back the Taiwan authorities' bargaining chips one at a time until it deals a decisive blow to 'Taiwan independence'," the state-run newspaper said. China's state television broadcaster cited China's Taiwan Affairs Office as saying that Beijing had firm will and the ability to "thwart any kind of Taiwan independence separatist plot and action, and safeguard national sovereignty and territorial integrity". Beijing has claimed Taiwan since defeated Nationalist forces fled to the island in 1949 after losing the civil war with Mao Tse-tung's Communists. China has become increasingly assertive on the world stage since Mr Xi assumed power five years ago. The Chinese president has also oversaw the rapid modernisation of China's military - which is the world's largest. China's increasing power has caused concern among its neighbours in the South China Sea. Beijing claims nearly all of the strategic waters, despite partial counter-claims from Taiwan and several south-east Asian nations including the Philippines, Brunei, Malaysia, and Vietnam. The US Navy has been confronting China in the region with 'freedom of navigation' exercises. The US aircraft carriers Theodore Roosevelt and Carl Vinson have sailed through the South China Sea in recent months, angering Beijing.
Xi Jinping plans live-fire drills in Taiwan Strait after biggest naval exercises in China's history
China is set to hold live-fire drills in the Taiwan Strait next week in a move certain to ratchet tensions with Taipei, after Chinese president Xi Jinping oversaw the biggest naval exercises in the country's history. The new drills, which are planned for Wednesday, come as tensions between Beijing and Taiwan simmer over increased American support for the government of the self-ruled island. Tsai Ing-wen, Taiwan's president, on Friday presided over her first military drills since she took office in 2016, but those exercises did not involve live fire. Tensions between Beijing and Taipei have escalated in recent weeks amid speculation of a visit to Taiwan by new US national security adviser John Bolton and Washington's backing of Taiwan's plans to build an indigenous submarine force. Chinese media said a decision by Donald Trump's administration to give the go ahead for US defence contractors to help Taiwan build the submarine fleet has made war between Taiwan and China "more probable". China's drills next week will be the first in the Strait since just before the 2015 presidential election, which saw Mrs Tsai, the candidate for the pro-independence Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), sweep to power. Beijing has viewed the Taiwanese president with suspicion and believes she is preparing to move Taiwan towards formal independence - a move that would represent a red line for China. Chinese President Xi Jinping delivers a speech as he reviews a military display of Chinese People's Liberation Army Navy in the South China Sea Credit: Li Gang/Xinhua via REUTERS China views Taiwan as a renegade province which will one day be reunited with the mainland - by force if necessary. On Thursday President Xi presided over huge exercises in the South China Sea in an unmistakable show of force to Beijing's regional rivals. The drills involved 48 ships, among them China's sole operating aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, along with 76 helicopters, fighter jets and bombers, and more than 10,000 personnel. Chinese media said it was the largest of its kind. "The mission of building a mighty people's navy has never been more urgent than it is today," Mr Xi, dressed in army fatigues, said in remarks on the helicopter deck of one of China's most advanced destroyers. "Strive to make the people's navy a first-rate world navy." The nationalist Global Times newspaper warned in a commentary on Taiwan's drills that the island's leaders were making a gamble they couldn't afford to lose. The Liaoning aircraft carrier is accompanied by navy frigates and submarines Credit: Li Gang/Xinhua via AP "The mainland has abundant capability to take back the Taiwan authorities' bargaining chips one at a time until it deals a decisive blow to 'Taiwan independence'," the state-run newspaper said. China's state television broadcaster cited China's Taiwan Affairs Office as saying that Beijing had firm will and the ability to "thwart any kind of Taiwan independence separatist plot and action, and safeguard national sovereignty and territorial integrity". Beijing has claimed Taiwan since defeated Nationalist forces fled to the island in 1949 after losing the civil war with Mao Tse-tung's Communists. China has become increasingly assertive on the world stage since Mr Xi assumed power five years ago. The Chinese president has also oversaw the rapid modernisation of China's military - which is the world's largest. China's increasing power has caused concern among its neighbours in the South China Sea. Beijing claims nearly all of the strategic waters, despite partial counter-claims from Taiwan and several south-east Asian nations including the Philippines, Brunei, Malaysia, and Vietnam. The US Navy has been confronting China in the region with 'freedom of navigation' exercises. The US aircraft carriers Theodore Roosevelt and Carl Vinson have sailed through the South China Sea in recent months, angering Beijing.
China is set to hold live-fire drills in the Taiwan Strait next week in a move certain to ratchet tensions with Taipei, after Chinese president Xi Jinping oversaw the biggest naval exercises in the country's history. The new drills, which are planned for Wednesday, come as tensions between Beijing and Taiwan simmer over increased American support for the government of the self-ruled island. Tsai Ing-wen, Taiwan's president, on Friday presided over her first military drills since she took office in 2016, but those exercises did not involve live fire. Tensions between Beijing and Taipei have escalated in recent weeks amid speculation of a visit to Taiwan by new US national security adviser John Bolton and Washington's backing of Taiwan's plans to build an indigenous submarine force. Chinese media said a decision by Donald Trump's administration to give the go ahead for US defence contractors to help Taiwan build the submarine fleet has made war between Taiwan and China "more probable". China's drills next week will be the first in the Strait since just before the 2015 presidential election, which saw Mrs Tsai, the candidate for the pro-independence Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), sweep to power. Beijing has viewed the Taiwanese president with suspicion and believes she is preparing to move Taiwan towards formal independence - a move that would represent a red line for China. Chinese President Xi Jinping delivers a speech as he reviews a military display of Chinese People's Liberation Army Navy in the South China Sea Credit: Li Gang/Xinhua via REUTERS China views Taiwan as a renegade province which will one day be reunited with the mainland - by force if necessary. On Thursday President Xi presided over huge exercises in the South China Sea in an unmistakable show of force to Beijing's regional rivals. The drills involved 48 ships, among them China's sole operating aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, along with 76 helicopters, fighter jets and bombers, and more than 10,000 personnel. Chinese media said it was the largest of its kind. "The mission of building a mighty people's navy has never been more urgent than it is today," Mr Xi, dressed in army fatigues, said in remarks on the helicopter deck of one of China's most advanced destroyers. "Strive to make the people's navy a first-rate world navy." The nationalist Global Times newspaper warned in a commentary on Taiwan's drills that the island's leaders were making a gamble they couldn't afford to lose. The Liaoning aircraft carrier is accompanied by navy frigates and submarines Credit: Li Gang/Xinhua via AP "The mainland has abundant capability to take back the Taiwan authorities' bargaining chips one at a time until it deals a decisive blow to 'Taiwan independence'," the state-run newspaper said. China's state television broadcaster cited China's Taiwan Affairs Office as saying that Beijing had firm will and the ability to "thwart any kind of Taiwan independence separatist plot and action, and safeguard national sovereignty and territorial integrity". Beijing has claimed Taiwan since defeated Nationalist forces fled to the island in 1949 after losing the civil war with Mao Tse-tung's Communists. China has become increasingly assertive on the world stage since Mr Xi assumed power five years ago. The Chinese president has also oversaw the rapid modernisation of China's military - which is the world's largest. China's increasing power has caused concern among its neighbours in the South China Sea. Beijing claims nearly all of the strategic waters, despite partial counter-claims from Taiwan and several south-east Asian nations including the Philippines, Brunei, Malaysia, and Vietnam. The US Navy has been confronting China in the region with 'freedom of navigation' exercises. The US aircraft carriers Theodore Roosevelt and Carl Vinson have sailed through the South China Sea in recent months, angering Beijing.
Xi Jinping plans live-fire drills in Taiwan Strait after biggest naval exercises in China's history
China is set to hold live-fire drills in the Taiwan Strait next week in a move certain to ratchet tensions with Taipei, after Chinese president Xi Jinping oversaw the biggest naval exercises in the country's history. The new drills, which are planned for Wednesday, come as tensions between Beijing and Taiwan simmer over increased American support for the government of the self-ruled island. Tsai Ing-wen, Taiwan's president, on Friday presided over her first military drills since she took office in 2016, but those exercises did not involve live fire. Tensions between Beijing and Taipei have escalated in recent weeks amid speculation of a visit to Taiwan by new US national security adviser John Bolton and Washington's backing of Taiwan's plans to build an indigenous submarine force. Chinese media said a decision by Donald Trump's administration to give the go ahead for US defence contractors to help Taiwan build the submarine fleet has made war between Taiwan and China "more probable". China's drills next week will be the first in the Strait since just before the 2015 presidential election, which saw Mrs Tsai, the candidate for the pro-independence Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), sweep to power. Beijing has viewed the Taiwanese president with suspicion and believes she is preparing to move Taiwan towards formal independence - a move that would represent a red line for China. Chinese President Xi Jinping delivers a speech as he reviews a military display of Chinese People's Liberation Army Navy in the South China Sea Credit: Li Gang/Xinhua via REUTERS China views Taiwan as a renegade province which will one day be reunited with the mainland - by force if necessary. On Thursday President Xi presided over huge exercises in the South China Sea in an unmistakable show of force to Beijing's regional rivals. The drills involved 48 ships, among them China's sole operating aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, along with 76 helicopters, fighter jets and bombers, and more than 10,000 personnel. Chinese media said it was the largest of its kind. "The mission of building a mighty people's navy has never been more urgent than it is today," Mr Xi, dressed in army fatigues, said in remarks on the helicopter deck of one of China's most advanced destroyers. "Strive to make the people's navy a first-rate world navy." The nationalist Global Times newspaper warned in a commentary on Taiwan's drills that the island's leaders were making a gamble they couldn't afford to lose. The Liaoning aircraft carrier is accompanied by navy frigates and submarines Credit: Li Gang/Xinhua via AP "The mainland has abundant capability to take back the Taiwan authorities' bargaining chips one at a time until it deals a decisive blow to 'Taiwan independence'," the state-run newspaper said. China's state television broadcaster cited China's Taiwan Affairs Office as saying that Beijing had firm will and the ability to "thwart any kind of Taiwan independence separatist plot and action, and safeguard national sovereignty and territorial integrity". Beijing has claimed Taiwan since defeated Nationalist forces fled to the island in 1949 after losing the civil war with Mao Tse-tung's Communists. China has become increasingly assertive on the world stage since Mr Xi assumed power five years ago. The Chinese president has also oversaw the rapid modernisation of China's military - which is the world's largest. China's increasing power has caused concern among its neighbours in the South China Sea. Beijing claims nearly all of the strategic waters, despite partial counter-claims from Taiwan and several south-east Asian nations including the Philippines, Brunei, Malaysia, and Vietnam. The US Navy has been confronting China in the region with 'freedom of navigation' exercises. The US aircraft carriers Theodore Roosevelt and Carl Vinson have sailed through the South China Sea in recent months, angering Beijing.
Donald Trump, the US president, has warned of a tough response to a chemical attack in Syria but it is yet unclear what form this will take. Mr Trump had some strong words for Russia, which backs the Syrian regime in the war, warning President Vladimir Putin he would pay a “big price”. His comments threatened to ratchet up tensions between the two former Cold War foes. What is likely to happen next? The attack came days after Mr Trump announced a draw down of US troops, which some analysts say may have served as a green light to President Bashar al-Assad. Douma chemical attack The US and its Western allies’ general inaction over Syria has only emboldened Mr Assad, who has for years been acting with impunity as the international community sat on its hands. A US Tomahawk missiles strike on a government air base after last year’s deadly chemical attack was a sharp tap on the wrist that succeeded in destroying a few jets, but no meaningful response followed. Mr Trump and his French counterpart Emmanuel Macron discussed the strike overnight, agreeing it had been chemical in nature and what their move should be if blame could be apportioned to the regime. What will Britain do? Behind the scenes, Washington, Paris and London, had been discussing a possible trilateral response to any such chemical attack. However, the UK, whose parliament is this week in recess, has just to make any official announcement. Any action would require a parliamentary vote. The UK was in the same position in 2013 after the last big chemical attack in Syria and the vote did not pass. Syria war timeline Boris Johnson, Foreign Secretary called for a "strong and robust international response", without elaborating. Amber Rudd, the Home Secretary, has merely pointed to the United Nation’s upcoming Security Council meeting. The UK and other nations called for an emergency UN Security Council meeting to be held later today. Russia is a veto-wielding memo and has previously prevented any investigation into Syrian regime attacks. The US could partner with France in the strike directly, leaving Britain out. John Bolton, Mr Trump’s new National Security adviser, starts in the job today. He has previously advocated for strikes against Syria and will likely do the same now he has the president’s ear. Any action will likely be limited to cruise missiles strikes on Syrian aircraft. Both will be looking not to get dragged further into the intractable conflict, particularly Mr Trump who had campaigned on getting America out of Middle East conflicts. Syria chemical attack What about Israel? It looks as though the strike on T4, or Tyras, base in Homs, central Syria, in the early hours of Monday morning was from Israeli. Israel is not part of the US-led coalition and its decision to unilaterally strike will be seen as the Jewish state acting in its own national interest. It likely had its own intelligence about Syrian government and Iranian assets on the ground, which it was keen to destroy before it had the chance to move anything like it did after before last year’s Tomahawk strike. Iran is a key backer of Mr Assad. Will there be a World War Three? It is unlikely. We have been here before and both the US and Russia have looked to avoid a direct confrontation at all costs. Having said that, the political landscape has changed considerably in the last year. US and Russia relations are as bad as they have ever been under Mr Trump. Syrian Army soldiers gathering in an area on the eastern outskirts of Douma, as they continue their fierce offensive to retake the last opposition holdout in Eastern Ghouta Credit: AFP/AFP The US has expanded sanctions against Moscow and expelled a number of its diplomats over the poisoning of a former Russian spy in Salisbury. "We're not heading to a nuclear war with the Russians, but this is a dangerous period," said Ian Bremmer, president of geopolitical-risk firm Eurasia Group. "If the Americans engage in direct strikes against Assad — given their direct support by the Russians and the Iranians — it is a dangerous thing to do, but I do think that it's an appropriate thing to do in this environment." The Russians have too much invested to back down and Mr Trump has already signalled he does not see America has any business left in Syria beyond defeating Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant.
What happens next in Syria – could Britain be drawn into World War Three?
Donald Trump, the US president, has warned of a tough response to a chemical attack in Syria but it is yet unclear what form this will take. Mr Trump had some strong words for Russia, which backs the Syrian regime in the war, warning President Vladimir Putin he would pay a “big price”. His comments threatened to ratchet up tensions between the two former Cold War foes. What is likely to happen next? The attack came days after Mr Trump announced a draw down of US troops, which some analysts say may have served as a green light to President Bashar al-Assad. Douma chemical attack The US and its Western allies’ general inaction over Syria has only emboldened Mr Assad, who has for years been acting with impunity as the international community sat on its hands. A US Tomahawk missiles strike on a government air base after last year’s deadly chemical attack was a sharp tap on the wrist that succeeded in destroying a few jets, but no meaningful response followed. Mr Trump and his French counterpart Emmanuel Macron discussed the strike overnight, agreeing it had been chemical in nature and what their move should be if blame could be apportioned to the regime. What will Britain do? Behind the scenes, Washington, Paris and London, had been discussing a possible trilateral response to any such chemical attack. However, the UK, whose parliament is this week in recess, has just to make any official announcement. Any action would require a parliamentary vote. The UK was in the same position in 2013 after the last big chemical attack in Syria and the vote did not pass. Syria war timeline Boris Johnson, Foreign Secretary called for a "strong and robust international response", without elaborating. Amber Rudd, the Home Secretary, has merely pointed to the United Nation’s upcoming Security Council meeting. The UK and other nations called for an emergency UN Security Council meeting to be held later today. Russia is a veto-wielding memo and has previously prevented any investigation into Syrian regime attacks. The US could partner with France in the strike directly, leaving Britain out. John Bolton, Mr Trump’s new National Security adviser, starts in the job today. He has previously advocated for strikes against Syria and will likely do the same now he has the president’s ear. Any action will likely be limited to cruise missiles strikes on Syrian aircraft. Both will be looking not to get dragged further into the intractable conflict, particularly Mr Trump who had campaigned on getting America out of Middle East conflicts. Syria chemical attack What about Israel? It looks as though the strike on T4, or Tyras, base in Homs, central Syria, in the early hours of Monday morning was from Israeli. Israel is not part of the US-led coalition and its decision to unilaterally strike will be seen as the Jewish state acting in its own national interest. It likely had its own intelligence about Syrian government and Iranian assets on the ground, which it was keen to destroy before it had the chance to move anything like it did after before last year’s Tomahawk strike. Iran is a key backer of Mr Assad. Will there be a World War Three? It is unlikely. We have been here before and both the US and Russia have looked to avoid a direct confrontation at all costs. Having said that, the political landscape has changed considerably in the last year. US and Russia relations are as bad as they have ever been under Mr Trump. Syrian Army soldiers gathering in an area on the eastern outskirts of Douma, as they continue their fierce offensive to retake the last opposition holdout in Eastern Ghouta Credit: AFP/AFP The US has expanded sanctions against Moscow and expelled a number of its diplomats over the poisoning of a former Russian spy in Salisbury. "We're not heading to a nuclear war with the Russians, but this is a dangerous period," said Ian Bremmer, president of geopolitical-risk firm Eurasia Group. "If the Americans engage in direct strikes against Assad — given their direct support by the Russians and the Iranians — it is a dangerous thing to do, but I do think that it's an appropriate thing to do in this environment." The Russians have too much invested to back down and Mr Trump has already signalled he does not see America has any business left in Syria beyond defeating Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant.
Donald Trump, the US president, has warned of a tough response to a chemical attack in Syria but it is yet unclear what form this will take. Mr Trump had some strong words for Russia, which backs the Syrian regime in the war, warning President Vladimir Putin he would pay a “big price”. His comments threatened to ratchet up tensions between the two former Cold War foes. What is likely to happen next? The attack came days after Mr Trump announced a draw down of US troops, which some analysts say may have served as a green light to President Bashar al-Assad. Douma chemical attack The US and its Western allies’ general inaction over Syria has only emboldened Mr Assad, who has for years been acting with impunity as the international community sat on its hands. A US Tomahawk missiles strike on a government air base after last year’s deadly chemical attack was a sharp tap on the wrist that succeeded in destroying a few jets, but no meaningful response followed. Mr Trump and his French counterpart Emmanuel Macron discussed the strike overnight, agreeing it had been chemical in nature and what their move should be if blame could be apportioned to the regime. What will Britain do? Behind the scenes, Washington, Paris and London, had been discussing a possible trilateral response to any such chemical attack. However, the UK, whose parliament is this week in recess, has just to make any official announcement. Any action would require a parliamentary vote. The UK was in the same position in 2013 after the last big chemical attack in Syria and the vote did not pass. Syria war timeline Boris Johnson, Foreign Secretary called for a "strong and robust international response", without elaborating. Amber Rudd, the Home Secretary, has merely pointed to the United Nation’s upcoming Security Council meeting. The UK and other nations called for an emergency UN Security Council meeting to be held later today. Russia is a veto-wielding memo and has previously prevented any investigation into Syrian regime attacks. The US could partner with France in the strike directly, leaving Britain out. John Bolton, Mr Trump’s new National Security adviser, starts in the job today. He has previously advocated for strikes against Syria and will likely do the same now he has the president’s ear. Any action will likely be limited to cruise missiles strikes on Syrian aircraft. Both will be looking not to get dragged further into the intractable conflict, particularly Mr Trump who had campaigned on getting America out of Middle East conflicts. Syria chemical attack What about Israel? It looks as though the strike on T4, or Tyras, base in Homs, central Syria, in the early hours of Monday morning was from Israeli. Israel is not part of the US-led coalition and its decision to unilaterally strike will be seen as the Jewish state acting in its own national interest. It likely had its own intelligence about Syrian government and Iranian assets on the ground, which it was keen to destroy before it had the chance to move anything like it did after before last year’s Tomahawk strike. Iran is a key backer of Mr Assad. Will there be a World War Three? It is unlikely. We have been here before and both the US and Russia have looked to avoid a direct confrontation at all costs. Having said that, the political landscape has changed considerably in the last year. US and Russia relations are as bad as they have ever been under Mr Trump. Syrian Army soldiers gathering in an area on the eastern outskirts of Douma, as they continue their fierce offensive to retake the last opposition holdout in Eastern Ghouta Credit: AFP/AFP The US has expanded sanctions against Moscow and expelled a number of its diplomats over the poisoning of a former Russian spy in Salisbury. "We're not heading to a nuclear war with the Russians, but this is a dangerous period," said Ian Bremmer, president of geopolitical-risk firm Eurasia Group. "If the Americans engage in direct strikes against Assad — given their direct support by the Russians and the Iranians — it is a dangerous thing to do, but I do think that it's an appropriate thing to do in this environment." The Russians have too much invested to back down and Mr Trump has already signalled he does not see America has any business left in Syria beyond defeating Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant.
What happens next in Syria – could Britain be drawn into World War Three?
Donald Trump, the US president, has warned of a tough response to a chemical attack in Syria but it is yet unclear what form this will take. Mr Trump had some strong words for Russia, which backs the Syrian regime in the war, warning President Vladimir Putin he would pay a “big price”. His comments threatened to ratchet up tensions between the two former Cold War foes. What is likely to happen next? The attack came days after Mr Trump announced a draw down of US troops, which some analysts say may have served as a green light to President Bashar al-Assad. Douma chemical attack The US and its Western allies’ general inaction over Syria has only emboldened Mr Assad, who has for years been acting with impunity as the international community sat on its hands. A US Tomahawk missiles strike on a government air base after last year’s deadly chemical attack was a sharp tap on the wrist that succeeded in destroying a few jets, but no meaningful response followed. Mr Trump and his French counterpart Emmanuel Macron discussed the strike overnight, agreeing it had been chemical in nature and what their move should be if blame could be apportioned to the regime. What will Britain do? Behind the scenes, Washington, Paris and London, had been discussing a possible trilateral response to any such chemical attack. However, the UK, whose parliament is this week in recess, has just to make any official announcement. Any action would require a parliamentary vote. The UK was in the same position in 2013 after the last big chemical attack in Syria and the vote did not pass. Syria war timeline Boris Johnson, Foreign Secretary called for a "strong and robust international response", without elaborating. Amber Rudd, the Home Secretary, has merely pointed to the United Nation’s upcoming Security Council meeting. The UK and other nations called for an emergency UN Security Council meeting to be held later today. Russia is a veto-wielding memo and has previously prevented any investigation into Syrian regime attacks. The US could partner with France in the strike directly, leaving Britain out. John Bolton, Mr Trump’s new National Security adviser, starts in the job today. He has previously advocated for strikes against Syria and will likely do the same now he has the president’s ear. Any action will likely be limited to cruise missiles strikes on Syrian aircraft. Both will be looking not to get dragged further into the intractable conflict, particularly Mr Trump who had campaigned on getting America out of Middle East conflicts. Syria chemical attack What about Israel? It looks as though the strike on T4, or Tyras, base in Homs, central Syria, in the early hours of Monday morning was from Israeli. Israel is not part of the US-led coalition and its decision to unilaterally strike will be seen as the Jewish state acting in its own national interest. It likely had its own intelligence about Syrian government and Iranian assets on the ground, which it was keen to destroy before it had the chance to move anything like it did after before last year’s Tomahawk strike. Iran is a key backer of Mr Assad. Will there be a World War Three? It is unlikely. We have been here before and both the US and Russia have looked to avoid a direct confrontation at all costs. Having said that, the political landscape has changed considerably in the last year. US and Russia relations are as bad as they have ever been under Mr Trump. Syrian Army soldiers gathering in an area on the eastern outskirts of Douma, as they continue their fierce offensive to retake the last opposition holdout in Eastern Ghouta Credit: AFP/AFP The US has expanded sanctions against Moscow and expelled a number of its diplomats over the poisoning of a former Russian spy in Salisbury. "We're not heading to a nuclear war with the Russians, but this is a dangerous period," said Ian Bremmer, president of geopolitical-risk firm Eurasia Group. "If the Americans engage in direct strikes against Assad — given their direct support by the Russians and the Iranians — it is a dangerous thing to do, but I do think that it's an appropriate thing to do in this environment." The Russians have too much invested to back down and Mr Trump has already signalled he does not see America has any business left in Syria beyond defeating Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant.
President Donald Trump is expected to demand that Pyongyang abolish its nuclear weapons capability within a year when he sits down for talks with Kim Jong-un, the North Korean dictator, but will offer to open an embassy in the North’s capital and provide humanitarian assistance as an incentive. The details offer a sense of the rapid pace of progress towards talks although analysts suggest the timetable may be overambitious. Quoting sources in Washington, South Korea’s Chosun Ilbo newspaper said Mr Trump rejected Pyongyang's proposals for “phased and synchronised” steps to eliminate the North’s nuclear arsenal and will instead insist that full denuclearisation is completed within 12 months of their meeting. The Dong-A Ilbo newspaper added that North Korea and the US have already started discussing an outline of the agenda for when their two leaders meet - Mr Trump has suggested the summit is likely to take place in May or early June - and that Washington is willing to “compensate” Pyongyang by boosting the regime’s standing by opening a liaison office and an embassy, as well as delivering humanitarian aid. Analysts, however, say the time frame is “unrealistic”. Donald Trump surprised the world when he agreed to meet Kim Jong-un Credit: Getty Images Daniel Pinkston, a professor of international relations at the Seoul campus of Troy University, said: “Complete denuclearisation will mean the North declaring all its nuclear facilities and programmes - military and civilian - and then having independent inspectors draw up inventories of everything they have. “Exports will need to be accounted for, nuclear cooperation deals will need to be examined - such as for the nuclear reactor agreement with Syria - and there will then need to be full dismantling of all facilities in accordance with [International Atomic Energy Agency] guidelines." Verification would add another level of complexity. “That is not a trivial matter, as this comment seems to suggest, and it cannot be completed in that narrow a time frame," he said. North Korea's nuclear history: key moments At a meeting with governors at the White House on Thursday, Mr Trump predicted the his summit with Mr Kim would be “terrific” and praised China for helping to crack down on the regime through sanctions. “Meetings are being set up right now between myself and Kim Jong-un,” he said. “I think it will be terrific. I think we’ll go in with a lot of respect and we’ll see what happens, but China has really helped us at the border and we appreciate it." Mr Trump’s optimistic prediction followed-high level meetings in Washington between John Bolton, his newly appointed national security adviser, and his South Korean and Japanese counterparts. North Korea’s nuclear progress - estimated yields per test South Korean media reported on Friday that US and North Korean officials, known to be communicating through intelligence back channels, are likely to agree on the summit venue and dates as early as next week. Currently Mongolian capital Ulaanbaatar is a hot favourite for the unprecedented event, but Pyongyang, the militarised border between North and South, Sweden, Geneva and Iceland have all been touted as possibilities. A number of those venues may immediately be off the list, however, because there are questions over how Mr Kim would reach them. How North Korea's airline keeps its Soviet-era fleet ready for service Mr Kim has three personal aircraft, although the most modern is an Ilyushin IL-62 that was built by the Soviet Union in the 1960s and all three jets have a habit of being out of operation due to a shortage of spare components. Without the range to reliably reach Europe or North America - and fearful of being embarrassed by a breakdown - it is believed that Mr Kim will opt for a venue closer to home.
Donald Trump 'to tell Kim Jong-un to scrap nuclear arsenal within year in return for US embassy in Pyongyang'
President Donald Trump is expected to demand that Pyongyang abolish its nuclear weapons capability within a year when he sits down for talks with Kim Jong-un, the North Korean dictator, but will offer to open an embassy in the North’s capital and provide humanitarian assistance as an incentive. The details offer a sense of the rapid pace of progress towards talks although analysts suggest the timetable may be overambitious. Quoting sources in Washington, South Korea’s Chosun Ilbo newspaper said Mr Trump rejected Pyongyang's proposals for “phased and synchronised” steps to eliminate the North’s nuclear arsenal and will instead insist that full denuclearisation is completed within 12 months of their meeting. The Dong-A Ilbo newspaper added that North Korea and the US have already started discussing an outline of the agenda for when their two leaders meet - Mr Trump has suggested the summit is likely to take place in May or early June - and that Washington is willing to “compensate” Pyongyang by boosting the regime’s standing by opening a liaison office and an embassy, as well as delivering humanitarian aid. Analysts, however, say the time frame is “unrealistic”. Donald Trump surprised the world when he agreed to meet Kim Jong-un Credit: Getty Images Daniel Pinkston, a professor of international relations at the Seoul campus of Troy University, said: “Complete denuclearisation will mean the North declaring all its nuclear facilities and programmes - military and civilian - and then having independent inspectors draw up inventories of everything they have. “Exports will need to be accounted for, nuclear cooperation deals will need to be examined - such as for the nuclear reactor agreement with Syria - and there will then need to be full dismantling of all facilities in accordance with [International Atomic Energy Agency] guidelines." Verification would add another level of complexity. “That is not a trivial matter, as this comment seems to suggest, and it cannot be completed in that narrow a time frame," he said. North Korea's nuclear history: key moments At a meeting with governors at the White House on Thursday, Mr Trump predicted the his summit with Mr Kim would be “terrific” and praised China for helping to crack down on the regime through sanctions. “Meetings are being set up right now between myself and Kim Jong-un,” he said. “I think it will be terrific. I think we’ll go in with a lot of respect and we’ll see what happens, but China has really helped us at the border and we appreciate it." Mr Trump’s optimistic prediction followed-high level meetings in Washington between John Bolton, his newly appointed national security adviser, and his South Korean and Japanese counterparts. North Korea’s nuclear progress - estimated yields per test South Korean media reported on Friday that US and North Korean officials, known to be communicating through intelligence back channels, are likely to agree on the summit venue and dates as early as next week. Currently Mongolian capital Ulaanbaatar is a hot favourite for the unprecedented event, but Pyongyang, the militarised border between North and South, Sweden, Geneva and Iceland have all been touted as possibilities. A number of those venues may immediately be off the list, however, because there are questions over how Mr Kim would reach them. How North Korea's airline keeps its Soviet-era fleet ready for service Mr Kim has three personal aircraft, although the most modern is an Ilyushin IL-62 that was built by the Soviet Union in the 1960s and all three jets have a habit of being out of operation due to a shortage of spare components. Without the range to reliably reach Europe or North America - and fearful of being embarrassed by a breakdown - it is believed that Mr Kim will opt for a venue closer to home.
President Donald Trump is expected to demand that Pyongyang abolish its nuclear weapons capability within a year when he sits down for talks with Kim Jong-un, the North Korean dictator, but will offer to open an embassy in the North’s capital and provide humanitarian assistance as an incentive. The details offer a sense of the rapid pace of progress towards talks although analysts suggest the timetable may be overambitious. Quoting sources in Washington, South Korea’s Chosun Ilbo newspaper said Mr Trump rejected Pyongyang's proposals for “phased and synchronised” steps to eliminate the North’s nuclear arsenal and will instead insist that full denuclearisation is completed within 12 months of their meeting. Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un appear on a TV screen at Seoul Railway Station Credit: AP The Dong-A Ilbo newspaper added that North Korea and the US have already started discussing an outline of the agenda for when their two leaders meet - Mr Trump has suggested the summit is likely to take place in May or early June - and that Washington is willing to “compensate” Pyongyang by boosting the regime’s standing by opening a liaison office and an embassy, as well as delivering humanitarian aid. Analysts, however, say the time frame is “unrealistic”. Donald Trump surprised the world when he agreed to meet Kim Jong-un Credit: Getty Images Daniel Pinkston, a professor of international relations at the Seoul campus of Troy University, said: “Complete denuclearisation will mean the North declaring all its nuclear facilities and programmes - military and civilian - and then having independent inspectors draw up inventories of everything they have. “Exports will need to be accounted for, nuclear cooperation deals will need to be examined - such as for the nuclear reactor agreement with Syria - and there will then need to be full dismantling of all facilities in accordance with [International Atomic Energy Agency] guidelines." Verification would add another level of complexity. “That is not a trivial matter, as this comment seems to suggest, and it cannot be completed in that narrow a time frame," he said. North Korea's nuclear history: key moments At a meeting with governors at the White House on Thursday, Mr Trump predicted the his summit with Mr Kim would be “terrific” and praised China for helping to crack down on the regime through sanctions. “Meetings are being set up right now between myself and Kim Jong-un,” he said. “I think it will be terrific. I think we’ll go in with a lot of respect and we’ll see what happens, but China has really helped us at the border and we appreciate it." Mr Trump’s optimistic prediction followed-high level meetings in Washington between John Bolton, his newly appointed national security adviser, and his South Korean and Japanese counterparts. North Korea’s nuclear progress - estimated yields per test South Korean media reported on Friday that US and North Korean officials, known to be communicating through intelligence back channels, are likely to agree on the summit venue and dates as early as next week. Currently Mongolian capital Ulaanbaatar is a hot favourite for the unprecedented event, but Pyongyang, the militarised border between North and South, Sweden, Geneva and Iceland have all been touted as possibilities. A number of those venues may immediately be off the list, however, because there are questions over how Mr Kim would reach them. How North Korea's airline keeps its Soviet-era fleet ready for service Mr Kim has three personal aircraft, although the most modern is an Ilyushin IL-62 that was built by the Soviet Union in the 1960s and all three jets have a habit of being out of operation due to a shortage of spare components. Without the range to reliably reach Europe or North America - and fearful of being embarrassed by a breakdown - it is believed that Mr Kim will opt for a venue closer to home.
Donald Trump 'to tell Kim Jong-un to scrap nuclear arsenal within year in return for US embassy in Pyongyang'
President Donald Trump is expected to demand that Pyongyang abolish its nuclear weapons capability within a year when he sits down for talks with Kim Jong-un, the North Korean dictator, but will offer to open an embassy in the North’s capital and provide humanitarian assistance as an incentive. The details offer a sense of the rapid pace of progress towards talks although analysts suggest the timetable may be overambitious. Quoting sources in Washington, South Korea’s Chosun Ilbo newspaper said Mr Trump rejected Pyongyang's proposals for “phased and synchronised” steps to eliminate the North’s nuclear arsenal and will instead insist that full denuclearisation is completed within 12 months of their meeting. Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un appear on a TV screen at Seoul Railway Station Credit: AP The Dong-A Ilbo newspaper added that North Korea and the US have already started discussing an outline of the agenda for when their two leaders meet - Mr Trump has suggested the summit is likely to take place in May or early June - and that Washington is willing to “compensate” Pyongyang by boosting the regime’s standing by opening a liaison office and an embassy, as well as delivering humanitarian aid. Analysts, however, say the time frame is “unrealistic”. Donald Trump surprised the world when he agreed to meet Kim Jong-un Credit: Getty Images Daniel Pinkston, a professor of international relations at the Seoul campus of Troy University, said: “Complete denuclearisation will mean the North declaring all its nuclear facilities and programmes - military and civilian - and then having independent inspectors draw up inventories of everything they have. “Exports will need to be accounted for, nuclear cooperation deals will need to be examined - such as for the nuclear reactor agreement with Syria - and there will then need to be full dismantling of all facilities in accordance with [International Atomic Energy Agency] guidelines." Verification would add another level of complexity. “That is not a trivial matter, as this comment seems to suggest, and it cannot be completed in that narrow a time frame," he said. North Korea's nuclear history: key moments At a meeting with governors at the White House on Thursday, Mr Trump predicted the his summit with Mr Kim would be “terrific” and praised China for helping to crack down on the regime through sanctions. “Meetings are being set up right now between myself and Kim Jong-un,” he said. “I think it will be terrific. I think we’ll go in with a lot of respect and we’ll see what happens, but China has really helped us at the border and we appreciate it." Mr Trump’s optimistic prediction followed-high level meetings in Washington between John Bolton, his newly appointed national security adviser, and his South Korean and Japanese counterparts. North Korea’s nuclear progress - estimated yields per test South Korean media reported on Friday that US and North Korean officials, known to be communicating through intelligence back channels, are likely to agree on the summit venue and dates as early as next week. Currently Mongolian capital Ulaanbaatar is a hot favourite for the unprecedented event, but Pyongyang, the militarised border between North and South, Sweden, Geneva and Iceland have all been touted as possibilities. A number of those venues may immediately be off the list, however, because there are questions over how Mr Kim would reach them. How North Korea's airline keeps its Soviet-era fleet ready for service Mr Kim has three personal aircraft, although the most modern is an Ilyushin IL-62 that was built by the Soviet Union in the 1960s and all three jets have a habit of being out of operation due to a shortage of spare components. Without the range to reliably reach Europe or North America - and fearful of being embarrassed by a breakdown - it is believed that Mr Kim will opt for a venue closer to home.
President Donald Trump is expected to demand that Pyongyang abolish its nuclear weapons capability within a year when he sits down for talks with Kim Jong-un, the North Korean dictator, but will offer to open an embassy in the North’s capital and provide humanitarian assistance as an incentive. The details offer a sense of the rapid pace of progress towards talks although analysts suggest the timetable may be overambitious. Quoting sources in Washington, South Korea’s Chosun Ilbo newspaper said Mr Trump rejected Pyongyang's proposals for “phased and synchronised” steps to eliminate the North’s nuclear arsenal and will instead insist that full denuclearisation is completed within 12 months of their meeting. Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un appear on a TV screen at Seoul Railway Station Credit: AP The Dong-A Ilbo newspaper added that North Korea and the US have already started discussing an outline of the agenda for when their two leaders meet - Mr Trump has suggested the summit is likely to take place in May or early June - and that Washington is willing to “compensate” Pyongyang by boosting the regime’s standing by opening a liaison office and an embassy, as well as delivering humanitarian aid. Analysts, however, say the time frame is “unrealistic”. Donald Trump surprised the world when he agreed to meet Kim Jong-un Credit: Getty Images Daniel Pinkston, a professor of international relations at the Seoul campus of Troy University, said: “Complete denuclearisation will mean the North declaring all its nuclear facilities and programmes - military and civilian - and then having independent inspectors draw up inventories of everything they have. “Exports will need to be accounted for, nuclear cooperation deals will need to be examined - such as for the nuclear reactor agreement with Syria - and there will then need to be full dismantling of all facilities in accordance with [International Atomic Energy Agency] guidelines." Verification would add another level of complexity. “That is not a trivial matter, as this comment seems to suggest, and it cannot be completed in that narrow a time frame," he said. North Korea's nuclear history: key moments At a meeting with governors at the White House on Thursday, Mr Trump predicted the his summit with Mr Kim would be “terrific” and praised China for helping to crack down on the regime through sanctions. “Meetings are being set up right now between myself and Kim Jong-un,” he said. “I think it will be terrific. I think we’ll go in with a lot of respect and we’ll see what happens, but China has really helped us at the border and we appreciate it." Mr Trump’s optimistic prediction followed-high level meetings in Washington between John Bolton, his newly appointed national security adviser, and his South Korean and Japanese counterparts. North Korea’s nuclear progress - estimated yields per test South Korean media reported on Friday that US and North Korean officials, known to be communicating through intelligence back channels, are likely to agree on the summit venue and dates as early as next week. Currently Mongolian capital Ulaanbaatar is a hot favourite for the unprecedented event, but Pyongyang, the militarised border between North and South, Sweden, Geneva and Iceland have all been touted as possibilities. A number of those venues may immediately be off the list, however, because there are questions over how Mr Kim would reach them. How North Korea's airline keeps its Soviet-era fleet ready for service Mr Kim has three personal aircraft, although the most modern is an Ilyushin IL-62 that was built by the Soviet Union in the 1960s and all three jets have a habit of being out of operation due to a shortage of spare components. Without the range to reliably reach Europe or North America - and fearful of being embarrassed by a breakdown - it is believed that Mr Kim will opt for a venue closer to home.
Donald Trump 'to tell Kim Jong-un to scrap nuclear arsenal within year in return for US embassy in Pyongyang'
President Donald Trump is expected to demand that Pyongyang abolish its nuclear weapons capability within a year when he sits down for talks with Kim Jong-un, the North Korean dictator, but will offer to open an embassy in the North’s capital and provide humanitarian assistance as an incentive. The details offer a sense of the rapid pace of progress towards talks although analysts suggest the timetable may be overambitious. Quoting sources in Washington, South Korea’s Chosun Ilbo newspaper said Mr Trump rejected Pyongyang's proposals for “phased and synchronised” steps to eliminate the North’s nuclear arsenal and will instead insist that full denuclearisation is completed within 12 months of their meeting. Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un appear on a TV screen at Seoul Railway Station Credit: AP The Dong-A Ilbo newspaper added that North Korea and the US have already started discussing an outline of the agenda for when their two leaders meet - Mr Trump has suggested the summit is likely to take place in May or early June - and that Washington is willing to “compensate” Pyongyang by boosting the regime’s standing by opening a liaison office and an embassy, as well as delivering humanitarian aid. Analysts, however, say the time frame is “unrealistic”. Donald Trump surprised the world when he agreed to meet Kim Jong-un Credit: Getty Images Daniel Pinkston, a professor of international relations at the Seoul campus of Troy University, said: “Complete denuclearisation will mean the North declaring all its nuclear facilities and programmes - military and civilian - and then having independent inspectors draw up inventories of everything they have. “Exports will need to be accounted for, nuclear cooperation deals will need to be examined - such as for the nuclear reactor agreement with Syria - and there will then need to be full dismantling of all facilities in accordance with [International Atomic Energy Agency] guidelines." Verification would add another level of complexity. “That is not a trivial matter, as this comment seems to suggest, and it cannot be completed in that narrow a time frame," he said. North Korea's nuclear history: key moments At a meeting with governors at the White House on Thursday, Mr Trump predicted the his summit with Mr Kim would be “terrific” and praised China for helping to crack down on the regime through sanctions. “Meetings are being set up right now between myself and Kim Jong-un,” he said. “I think it will be terrific. I think we’ll go in with a lot of respect and we’ll see what happens, but China has really helped us at the border and we appreciate it." Mr Trump’s optimistic prediction followed-high level meetings in Washington between John Bolton, his newly appointed national security adviser, and his South Korean and Japanese counterparts. North Korea’s nuclear progress - estimated yields per test South Korean media reported on Friday that US and North Korean officials, known to be communicating through intelligence back channels, are likely to agree on the summit venue and dates as early as next week. Currently Mongolian capital Ulaanbaatar is a hot favourite for the unprecedented event, but Pyongyang, the militarised border between North and South, Sweden, Geneva and Iceland have all been touted as possibilities. A number of those venues may immediately be off the list, however, because there are questions over how Mr Kim would reach them. How North Korea's airline keeps its Soviet-era fleet ready for service Mr Kim has three personal aircraft, although the most modern is an Ilyushin IL-62 that was built by the Soviet Union in the 1960s and all three jets have a habit of being out of operation due to a shortage of spare components. Without the range to reliably reach Europe or North America - and fearful of being embarrassed by a breakdown - it is believed that Mr Kim will opt for a venue closer to home.
The shakeup plays out while Trump's new pick for secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, awaits confirmation by Congress.
Another national security official departs Trump White House as John Bolton cleans house
The shakeup plays out while Trump's new pick for secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, awaits confirmation by Congress.
South Korea's National Security Office chief Chung Eui-yong arrives at Incheon International Airport in Incheon
South Korea's national security adviser in U.S. to meet Bolton: officials
South Korea's National Security Office chief Chung Eui-yong arrives at Incheon International Airport in Incheon
South Korea's National Security Office chief Chung Eui-yong arrives at Incheon International Airport in Incheon
South Korea's national security adviser in U.S. to meet Bolton: officials
South Korea's National Security Office chief Chung Eui-yong arrives at Incheon International Airport in Incheon
South Korea's national security adviser in U.S. to meet Bolton: officials
South Korea's national security adviser in U.S. to meet Bolton: officials
South Korea's national security adviser in U.S. to meet Bolton: officials
South Korea's national security adviser in U.S. to meet Bolton: officials
South Korea's national security adviser in U.S. to meet Bolton: officials
South Korea's national security adviser in U.S. to meet Bolton: officials
Another high-ranking member of Trump’s National Security Council resigns following John Bolton appointment
Another high-ranking member of Trump’s National Security Council resigns following John Bolton appointment
Another high-ranking member of Trump’s National Security Council resigns following John Bolton appointment
Another high-ranking member of Trump’s National Security Council resigns following John Bolton appointment
Another high-ranking member of Trump’s National Security Council resigns following John Bolton appointment
Another high-ranking member of Trump’s National Security Council resigns following John Bolton appointment
Another high-ranking member of Trump’s National Security Council resigns following John Bolton appointment
Another high-ranking member of Trump’s National Security Council resigns following John Bolton appointment
Another high-ranking member of Trump’s National Security Council resigns following John Bolton appointment
Another high-ranking member of Trump’s National Security Council resigns following John Bolton appointment
Another high-ranking member of Trump’s National Security Council resigns following John Bolton appointment
Another high-ranking member of Trump’s National Security Council resigns following John Bolton appointment
Another high-ranking member of Trump’s National Security Council resigns following John Bolton appointment
Another high-ranking member of Trump’s National Security Council resigns following John Bolton appointment
Another high-ranking member of Trump’s National Security Council resigns following John Bolton appointment
Secretary of Defense James Mattis waits to meet Ambassador John Bolton, President Donald Trump's nominee to be National Security Advisor, as he arrives at the Pentagon in Washington, U.S., March 29, 2018. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
Secretary of Defense James Mattis waits to meet Ambassador John Bolton, President Donald Trump's nominee to be National Security Advisor, as he arrives at the Pentagon in Washington
Secretary of Defense James Mattis waits to meet Ambassador John Bolton, President Donald Trump's nominee to be National Security Advisor, as he arrives at the Pentagon in Washington, U.S., March 29, 2018. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
Trump met late Monday with senior military leaders and his national security team -- including new National Security Advisor John Bolton (R)-- at the White House
Trump met late Monday with senior military leaders and his national security team -- including new National Security Advisor John Bolton (R)-- at the White House
Trump met late Monday with senior military leaders and his national security team -- including new National Security Advisor John Bolton (R)-- at the White House
President Donald Trump has pulled out of his first trip to Latin America and is sending Mike Pence to the Summit of the Americas instead. Mr Trump becomes the first US president not to attend the regional gathering since it was founded 24 years ago. The White House said on Tuesday morning that the president was staying in Washington to deal with the Syria crisis. “President Trump will not attend the 8th Summit of the Americas in Lima, Peru or travel to Bogota, Colombia as originally scheduled," said Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the press secretary. "At the president’s request, the vice president will travel in his stead. "The president will remain in the United States to oversee the American response to Syria and to monitor developments around the world.” John Bolton, who on Monday became Mr Trump’s national security adviser, urged Mr Trump to stay in Washington, White House officials told AP. Mr Pence has previously served as Mr Trump's envoy to Latin America, visiting Argentina, Chile, Colombia and Panama on a mission to “increase the pressure against the Maduro regime and negotiate better trade deals that benefit American workers," according to Mr Pence’s spokesman. Mr Pence has also frequently had to paper over somewhat fraught relations with the region, damping down fears of military invasion after Mr Trump floated the idea of sending troops into Venezuela, and reassuring Latin American leaders that the economic and strategic partnership remained important. The Summit, held in the Peruvian capital Lima, had been eagerly anticipated by Latin American leaders, wanting to get their first face-to-face encounter with Mr Trump. The last Summit, held in Panama in April 2015, saw Barack Obama hold a bilateral meeting with Raul Castro - the first time the two countries' leaders had met since the Cuban Revolution. Mr Obama told the assembled Latin American rulers that America wanted to help their countries develop economically, but that the old era of unwanted American interference were over. He told the forum that "the days in which our agenda in this hemisphere presumed that the United States could meddle with impunity, those days are past". But he also gave a defiant and markedly personal defence of Washington's support for opposition groups. "We've stood up, at great cost, for freedom and human dignity, not just in our own country, but elsewhere. I'm proud of that," Mr Obama said, citing the US civil rights movement. "As you work for change, the United States will stand up alongside you every step of the way." Mr Trump's message of America First, however, was expected to be far less embraced by the attendees. Syria chemical attack | Read more The Summit, held in the Peruvian capital Lima, had been eagerly anticipated by Latin American leaders, wanting to get their first face-to-face encounter with Mr Trump. The last Summit, held in Panama in April 2015, saw Barack Obama hold a bilateral meeting with Raul Castro - the first time the two countries' leaders had met since the Cuban Revolution. Mr Obama told the assembled Latin American rulers that America wanted to help their countries develop economically, but that the old era of unwanted American interference was over. "The days in which our agenda in this hemisphere presumed that the United States could meddle with impunity, those days are past," he told the forum. Mr Trump's message of America First, however, was expected to be far less embraced by the attendees. The week leading up to the Summit, which was first held in Miami in 1994, was marked by Mr Trump's decision to send US National Guard troops to the border with Mexico, and a fierce rebuke by the Mexican president, Enrique Pena Nieto, to Mr Trump's words. "If your recent statements are the result of frustration due to domestic policy issues, to your laws or to your Congress, it is to them that you should turn to, not to Mexicans,” he said on Friday. “The bilateral relationship entails enormous opportunities that should benefit both nations. It is an intense and dynamic relationship, which understandably also poses challenges. "Nevertheless, these will never justify threatening or disrespectful attitudes between our countries." The Summit is being held under the theme of reducing corruption and comes at a highly sensitive time of transition in the region, with presidential elections in Mexico, Brazil, Venezuela and Cuba - where the country will, from next week, be led by someone other than a Castro for the first time since 1959. Nicolas Maduro, the Venezuelan president, is aiming for re-election in May in a vote which much of the opposition has vowed to boycott. Spurned by his fellow Latin American leaders, Mr Maduro has had his invitation revoked - but he vows to attend anyway, setting the stage for a dramatic showdown in Peru. Some diplomats expressed relief that Mr Trump was not coming. A Peruvian diplomat said the cancellation will make it easier for Latin American leaders to discuss topics ranging from Venezuela to the fight against corruption. "He's a controversial figure. A lot of people on the streets in Latin America don’t like him, so you have that awkwardness out of the picture," said the diplomat. But Richard Feinberg, who led Latin America policy in the Clinton White House, called the change in plans a "shocking abandonment of US leadership in our own hemisphere" and said it made Mr Trump look like he was afraid of confronting the consequences of his rhetoric for the region.
Donald Trump cancels first trip to Latin America 'to deal with Syria crisis'
President Donald Trump has pulled out of his first trip to Latin America and is sending Mike Pence to the Summit of the Americas instead. Mr Trump becomes the first US president not to attend the regional gathering since it was founded 24 years ago. The White House said on Tuesday morning that the president was staying in Washington to deal with the Syria crisis. “President Trump will not attend the 8th Summit of the Americas in Lima, Peru or travel to Bogota, Colombia as originally scheduled," said Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the press secretary. "At the president’s request, the vice president will travel in his stead. "The president will remain in the United States to oversee the American response to Syria and to monitor developments around the world.” John Bolton, who on Monday became Mr Trump’s national security adviser, urged Mr Trump to stay in Washington, White House officials told AP. Mr Pence has previously served as Mr Trump's envoy to Latin America, visiting Argentina, Chile, Colombia and Panama on a mission to “increase the pressure against the Maduro regime and negotiate better trade deals that benefit American workers," according to Mr Pence’s spokesman. Mr Pence has also frequently had to paper over somewhat fraught relations with the region, damping down fears of military invasion after Mr Trump floated the idea of sending troops into Venezuela, and reassuring Latin American leaders that the economic and strategic partnership remained important. The Summit, held in the Peruvian capital Lima, had been eagerly anticipated by Latin American leaders, wanting to get their first face-to-face encounter with Mr Trump. The last Summit, held in Panama in April 2015, saw Barack Obama hold a bilateral meeting with Raul Castro - the first time the two countries' leaders had met since the Cuban Revolution. Mr Obama told the assembled Latin American rulers that America wanted to help their countries develop economically, but that the old era of unwanted American interference were over. He told the forum that "the days in which our agenda in this hemisphere presumed that the United States could meddle with impunity, those days are past". But he also gave a defiant and markedly personal defence of Washington's support for opposition groups. "We've stood up, at great cost, for freedom and human dignity, not just in our own country, but elsewhere. I'm proud of that," Mr Obama said, citing the US civil rights movement. "As you work for change, the United States will stand up alongside you every step of the way." Mr Trump's message of America First, however, was expected to be far less embraced by the attendees. Syria chemical attack | Read more The Summit, held in the Peruvian capital Lima, had been eagerly anticipated by Latin American leaders, wanting to get their first face-to-face encounter with Mr Trump. The last Summit, held in Panama in April 2015, saw Barack Obama hold a bilateral meeting with Raul Castro - the first time the two countries' leaders had met since the Cuban Revolution. Mr Obama told the assembled Latin American rulers that America wanted to help their countries develop economically, but that the old era of unwanted American interference was over. "The days in which our agenda in this hemisphere presumed that the United States could meddle with impunity, those days are past," he told the forum. Mr Trump's message of America First, however, was expected to be far less embraced by the attendees. The week leading up to the Summit, which was first held in Miami in 1994, was marked by Mr Trump's decision to send US National Guard troops to the border with Mexico, and a fierce rebuke by the Mexican president, Enrique Pena Nieto, to Mr Trump's words. "If your recent statements are the result of frustration due to domestic policy issues, to your laws or to your Congress, it is to them that you should turn to, not to Mexicans,” he said on Friday. “The bilateral relationship entails enormous opportunities that should benefit both nations. It is an intense and dynamic relationship, which understandably also poses challenges. "Nevertheless, these will never justify threatening or disrespectful attitudes between our countries." The Summit is being held under the theme of reducing corruption and comes at a highly sensitive time of transition in the region, with presidential elections in Mexico, Brazil, Venezuela and Cuba - where the country will, from next week, be led by someone other than a Castro for the first time since 1959. Nicolas Maduro, the Venezuelan president, is aiming for re-election in May in a vote which much of the opposition has vowed to boycott. Spurned by his fellow Latin American leaders, Mr Maduro has had his invitation revoked - but he vows to attend anyway, setting the stage for a dramatic showdown in Peru. Some diplomats expressed relief that Mr Trump was not coming. A Peruvian diplomat said the cancellation will make it easier for Latin American leaders to discuss topics ranging from Venezuela to the fight against corruption. "He's a controversial figure. A lot of people on the streets in Latin America don’t like him, so you have that awkwardness out of the picture," said the diplomat. But Richard Feinberg, who led Latin America policy in the Clinton White House, called the change in plans a "shocking abandonment of US leadership in our own hemisphere" and said it made Mr Trump look like he was afraid of confronting the consequences of his rhetoric for the region.
Donald Trump's homeland security adviser, Tom Bossert, has resigned amid a shakeup of the administration's foreign policy team. The resignation comes a day after John Bolton, Mr Trump's new foreign policy hawk, took up his role at the White House. The hardliner is expected to shake up the national security team, hinting at a change in foreign policy approach. On Thursday Mike Pompeo, the CIA director, is expected to be sworn in as the new secretary of state. Both Mr Bolton, who served as George W Bush's UN ambassador, and Mr Pompeo, are known for their hawkish foreign policy views that are more in line with Mr Trump's stances. The turnover rate of top White House staff under Mr Trump is far higher than any of his recent predecessors, according to academic research. Just this Sunday Mr Bossert had done a round of media interviews on US television networks to comment on the suspected Syrian chemical attack in his capacity as a White House official. Appearing on US network ABC, Mr Bossert said no options should be taken "off the table" in response to the attack. He said: "I would note the timing of this, it’s the first thing that struck me, this is the one year anniversary of our action the last time they made the mistake of using these weapons and pushing the rest of the world. "I wouldn’t take anything off the table. These are horrible photos". Sarah Sanders, the White House press secretary, said: “The President is grateful for Tom’s commitment to the safety and security of our great country. "Tom led the White House’s efforts to protect the homeland from terrorist threats, strengthen our cyber defenses, and respond to an unprecedented series of natural disasters. President Trump thanks him for his patriotic service and wishes him well.” In recent weeks Rex Tillerson, the Secretary of State, Gary Cohn, Mr Trump's top economics adviser, and Hope Hicks, his communications director, have all left the administration. John Dowd, Mr Trump's lawyer, also quit amid reports he feared the president was no longer following his advice. Mr Trump is thought to have orchestrated the change to his top foreign policy advisers ahead of his face-to-face meeting with Kim Jong-un, the North Korean leader. The US president has previously said a meeting with the regime may take place as early as May or June.
Donald Trump's homeland security adviser Tom Bossert resigns
Donald Trump's homeland security adviser, Tom Bossert, has resigned amid a shakeup of the administration's foreign policy team. The resignation comes a day after John Bolton, Mr Trump's new foreign policy hawk, took up his role at the White House. The hardliner is expected to shake up the national security team, hinting at a change in foreign policy approach. On Thursday Mike Pompeo, the CIA director, is expected to be sworn in as the new secretary of state. Both Mr Bolton, who served as George W Bush's UN ambassador, and Mr Pompeo, are known for their hawkish foreign policy views that are more in line with Mr Trump's stances. The turnover rate of top White House staff under Mr Trump is far higher than any of his recent predecessors, according to academic research. Just this Sunday Mr Bossert had done a round of media interviews on US television networks to comment on the suspected Syrian chemical attack in his capacity as a White House official. Appearing on US network ABC, Mr Bossert said no options should be taken "off the table" in response to the attack. He said: "I would note the timing of this, it’s the first thing that struck me, this is the one year anniversary of our action the last time they made the mistake of using these weapons and pushing the rest of the world. "I wouldn’t take anything off the table. These are horrible photos". Sarah Sanders, the White House press secretary, said: “The President is grateful for Tom’s commitment to the safety and security of our great country. "Tom led the White House’s efforts to protect the homeland from terrorist threats, strengthen our cyber defenses, and respond to an unprecedented series of natural disasters. President Trump thanks him for his patriotic service and wishes him well.” In recent weeks Rex Tillerson, the Secretary of State, Gary Cohn, Mr Trump's top economics adviser, and Hope Hicks, his communications director, have all left the administration. John Dowd, Mr Trump's lawyer, also quit amid reports he feared the president was no longer following his advice. Mr Trump is thought to have orchestrated the change to his top foreign policy advisers ahead of his face-to-face meeting with Kim Jong-un, the North Korean leader. The US president has previously said a meeting with the regime may take place as early as May or June.
The White House did not give a reason for Bossert's departure.
Trump's homeland security advisor Tom Bossert resigns a day after John Bolton starts as national security advisor
The White House did not give a reason for Bossert's departure.
Theresa May is facing mounting pressure from senior Conservative MPs to support US-led airstrikes against the Syrian President Bashar Assad's regime. Tom Tugendhat, chairman of the foreign affairs committee, and Nick Boles, a former minister, have both urged Mrs May to back the strikes without seeking parliamentary approval. President Donald Trump promised on Monday that a "major decision" would be taken on Syria within the next two days, as a US navy destroyer appeared to be getting in position to attack. French President Emmanuel Macron, who spoke with Mr Trump on Sunday, has indicated France's support for the US. Mrs May is due to speak with Mr Trump on Tuesday. The senior Conservative MP and former soldier Tom Tugendhat has called for action to "degrade" Syria's chemical weapon resources, after the Syrian town of Douma was attacked with suspected chlorine gas on Saturday. He said: “Striking Syria’s stockpiles of chemical weapons would degrade their ability to commit further war crimes and could be done together with allies. It would not require a vote in Parliament.” Dominic Grieve, the former attorney general, has also thrown his weight behind an attack. He told the Evening Standard on Tuesday: “In view of the enormity of what has been done, if there is a way of preventing its recurrence by the limited use of force that is one thing and I would be supportive.” Former minister Nick Boles said the Prime Minister had his "strong support" is she decides to join the US and France in taking action against President Assad. Theresa May is due to chair a national security council meeting on Tuesday afternoon or on Wednesday. It comes as President Trump - who last year ordered missile strikes on a Syrian airfield after seeing distressing images of civilians poisoned with sarin - looked poised to act again. "Nothing is off the table," said Mr Trump, when asked whether he was considering military action. "We are making a decision with respect to what to do with the horrible attack on Syria," he said. "It will be met, and it will be met forcefully. I won’t say when, as I don’t like talking about timing. "We’re going to make a decision tonight, or very shortly after, and you’ll be hearing the decision. "We can’t let atrocities happen. In our world, we can’t let that happen, because of the power of the United States, the power of our country, when we can stop it." Mr Trump's comments were followed by a warning from France early on Tuesday morning that it will retaliate against the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad if evidence emerges that it was behind the suspected chlorine gas attack. After President Emmanuel Macron and Mr Trump spoke again last night, spokesperson Benjamin Griveaux told Europe 1 radio: "If the red line has been crossed, there will be a response," adding that intelligence "in theory confirms the use of chemical weapons." Children from Eastern Ghouta are treated for symptoms from Saturday's suspected gas attack. Mr Trump said on Monday night he was consulting with his military and national security advisers, but that he personally had little doubt that the attack was carried out by President Bashar al-Assad's regime, with the possible support of his allies. "To me there's not much a doubt, but the generals will figure it out," he said. "So we'll be looking at that barbaric act and studying what's going on. We're trying to get people in there. As you know, it's been surrounded. "So it's very hard to get people in because not only has it been hit, it's been surrounded. And if they're innocent, why aren't they allowing people to go in and prove? Because as you know, they're claiming they didn't make the attack. "So if it's Russia, if it's Syria, if it's Iran, if it's all of them together, we'll figure it out and we'll know the answers quite soon. So we're looking at that very, very strongly and very seriously." President's options | What could military action in Syria look like? Amid the tough talk in the White House, the US military appeared to be in position to carry out any attack order. A navy destroyer, the USS Donald Cook, was underway in the eastern Mediterranean on Monday after completing a port call at Larnaca, Cyprus. A defiant Moscow said on Monday that it had examined patients affected and it did not find traces of chemicals. The UN-backed Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons is carrying out its own investigation, but is likely to take some time to report the findings. Douma chemical attack Russia's ambassador to the UN, Vassily Nebenzia, lashed out at Britain, the US and France, accusing them of “slander, insults, hawkish rhetoric, and blackmail”. “The tone of what is being done has gone beyond the threshold of what even happened in the Cold War,” he said, repeating Kremlin accusations that the Eastern Ghouta attack was "fake news" being used in a bid to discredit Russia and to distract from the Skripal poisoning case. He said the OPCW was welcome to visit, under Syrian and Russian protection. The chemical attack, which doctors on the ground told the Telegraph they suspected to have been chlorine mixed with a nerve agent, left more than 40 dead. The images of children and babies left fronthing at the mouth has led to international outrage, but so far no direct response. Syria war timeline Mr Trump described the gas attack as "a barbarity" and said it was a crisis for humanity. And Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the White House press secretary, said that Mr Trump "is confident" that the Assad regime and its allies were to blame. "He's been briefed by his national security team and being kept up to date constantly and regularly on the intelligence around that," she said. She insisted that his wish for American troops to pull out of Syria did not affect his resolve to respond to the Eastern Ghouta attack. "The president wants to bring our troops home after we complete the mission to eradicate ISIS in Syria. At the same time he wants to make sure Assad is deterred from chemical weapons attacks on innocent civilians," she said. "Signalling we want to remove our troops in no way degrades our ability to hold parties responsible." She said Mr Trump hoped to coordinate the response with Britain and France. "We certainly have a great relationship with both countries, and are continuing conversations with both the UK as well as France, and hope to work with all of our allies and partners in a response," she said. John Bolton, his new national security adviser, was on Monday, in his first day in the job, holding a "principals" meeting to prepare options for the president in dealing with Syria. Mr Bolton and Mike Pompeo, his nominee for secretary of state, are both critical of Iranian influence in the region, which foreign policy experts believe may have a significant impact on US action in Syria. Ilan Berman, a former consultant to the CIA and Department of Defense, said: "It seems that the new foreign policy advisers are pushing for more involvement in terms of military presence on the ground. "Certainly both Mr Bolton and Mr Pompeo are much more concerned with rolling back Iranian influence and the most visible example of Iranian influence today is their involvement in Syria. "It's another action entirely to make a military strike against the Syrians when the Russians and Iranians are so closely involved - anything that Mr Trump does has the potential for fairly significant escalation depending on the targets hit. "The thing that is least complicated is repeating something they did before - submarine strikes that don't come into Russian airspace or hit Russian troops." The attack, which came days after an announcement that US troops would soon be withdrawing, will muddle Mr Trump's exit plan and threaten to draw America into a direct confrontation with Russia. Syria what next Relations between Moscow and Washington are the worst they have been under Mr Trump, who has in the last few months expanded sanctions and expelled scores of Russian diplomats over the poisoning of a former spy in Salisbury. On Monday the United Nations Security Council held an emergency meeting on Syria. Nikki Haley, US ambassador to the UN, said the US was prepared to respond unilaterally. “We are beyond appeals to conscience,” she said. “We have reached the moment when the world must see justice done. History will record this as the moment when the Security Council either discharged its duty or demonstrated its utter and complete failure to protect the people of Syria. “Either way, the United States will respond.” Syria chemical attack | Read more She said that the Russian “regime” had its “hands covered in the blood of Syrian children” and accused Moscow of “enabling the Assad regime’s murderous destruction.” “Only a monster targets civilians and then ensures that there are no ambulances to transfer the wounded,” she said. “No hospitals to save their lives. No doctors or medicine to ease their pain.” Karen Pierce, Britain’s ambassador to the UN, said that her Russian counterpart’s suggestion of sending in an OPCW team was worth pursuing, providing the team were guaranteed complete freedom to investigate. She described the attack as “an escalatory and a diabolical act,” and accused Russia of attempting to muddy the waters. Moscow, she said, seeks to “turn the debate away from a discussion on chemical weapons into a dispute between east and west, turning itself into the victim. “Russia’s crocodile tears for the people of Eastern Ghouta has an easy answer. It is to join us,” she said.
Senior Tories call on Theresa May to back Donald Trump's airstrikes in Syria
Theresa May is facing mounting pressure from senior Conservative MPs to support US-led airstrikes against the Syrian President Bashar Assad's regime. Tom Tugendhat, chairman of the foreign affairs committee, and Nick Boles, a former minister, have both urged Mrs May to back the strikes without seeking parliamentary approval. President Donald Trump promised on Monday that a "major decision" would be taken on Syria within the next two days, as a US navy destroyer appeared to be getting in position to attack. French President Emmanuel Macron, who spoke with Mr Trump on Sunday, has indicated France's support for the US. Mrs May is due to speak with Mr Trump on Tuesday. The senior Conservative MP and former soldier Tom Tugendhat has called for action to "degrade" Syria's chemical weapon resources, after the Syrian town of Douma was attacked with suspected chlorine gas on Saturday. He said: “Striking Syria’s stockpiles of chemical weapons would degrade their ability to commit further war crimes and could be done together with allies. It would not require a vote in Parliament.” Dominic Grieve, the former attorney general, has also thrown his weight behind an attack. He told the Evening Standard on Tuesday: “In view of the enormity of what has been done, if there is a way of preventing its recurrence by the limited use of force that is one thing and I would be supportive.” Former minister Nick Boles said the Prime Minister had his "strong support" is she decides to join the US and France in taking action against President Assad. Theresa May is due to chair a national security council meeting on Tuesday afternoon or on Wednesday. It comes as President Trump - who last year ordered missile strikes on a Syrian airfield after seeing distressing images of civilians poisoned with sarin - looked poised to act again. "Nothing is off the table," said Mr Trump, when asked whether he was considering military action. "We are making a decision with respect to what to do with the horrible attack on Syria," he said. "It will be met, and it will be met forcefully. I won’t say when, as I don’t like talking about timing. "We’re going to make a decision tonight, or very shortly after, and you’ll be hearing the decision. "We can’t let atrocities happen. In our world, we can’t let that happen, because of the power of the United States, the power of our country, when we can stop it." Mr Trump's comments were followed by a warning from France early on Tuesday morning that it will retaliate against the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad if evidence emerges that it was behind the suspected chlorine gas attack. After President Emmanuel Macron and Mr Trump spoke again last night, spokesperson Benjamin Griveaux told Europe 1 radio: "If the red line has been crossed, there will be a response," adding that intelligence "in theory confirms the use of chemical weapons." Children from Eastern Ghouta are treated for symptoms from Saturday's suspected gas attack. Mr Trump said on Monday night he was consulting with his military and national security advisers, but that he personally had little doubt that the attack was carried out by President Bashar al-Assad's regime, with the possible support of his allies. "To me there's not much a doubt, but the generals will figure it out," he said. "So we'll be looking at that barbaric act and studying what's going on. We're trying to get people in there. As you know, it's been surrounded. "So it's very hard to get people in because not only has it been hit, it's been surrounded. And if they're innocent, why aren't they allowing people to go in and prove? Because as you know, they're claiming they didn't make the attack. "So if it's Russia, if it's Syria, if it's Iran, if it's all of them together, we'll figure it out and we'll know the answers quite soon. So we're looking at that very, very strongly and very seriously." President's options | What could military action in Syria look like? Amid the tough talk in the White House, the US military appeared to be in position to carry out any attack order. A navy destroyer, the USS Donald Cook, was underway in the eastern Mediterranean on Monday after completing a port call at Larnaca, Cyprus. A defiant Moscow said on Monday that it had examined patients affected and it did not find traces of chemicals. The UN-backed Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons is carrying out its own investigation, but is likely to take some time to report the findings. Douma chemical attack Russia's ambassador to the UN, Vassily Nebenzia, lashed out at Britain, the US and France, accusing them of “slander, insults, hawkish rhetoric, and blackmail”. “The tone of what is being done has gone beyond the threshold of what even happened in the Cold War,” he said, repeating Kremlin accusations that the Eastern Ghouta attack was "fake news" being used in a bid to discredit Russia and to distract from the Skripal poisoning case. He said the OPCW was welcome to visit, under Syrian and Russian protection. The chemical attack, which doctors on the ground told the Telegraph they suspected to have been chlorine mixed with a nerve agent, left more than 40 dead. The images of children and babies left fronthing at the mouth has led to international outrage, but so far no direct response. Syria war timeline Mr Trump described the gas attack as "a barbarity" and said it was a crisis for humanity. And Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the White House press secretary, said that Mr Trump "is confident" that the Assad regime and its allies were to blame. "He's been briefed by his national security team and being kept up to date constantly and regularly on the intelligence around that," she said. She insisted that his wish for American troops to pull out of Syria did not affect his resolve to respond to the Eastern Ghouta attack. "The president wants to bring our troops home after we complete the mission to eradicate ISIS in Syria. At the same time he wants to make sure Assad is deterred from chemical weapons attacks on innocent civilians," she said. "Signalling we want to remove our troops in no way degrades our ability to hold parties responsible." She said Mr Trump hoped to coordinate the response with Britain and France. "We certainly have a great relationship with both countries, and are continuing conversations with both the UK as well as France, and hope to work with all of our allies and partners in a response," she said. John Bolton, his new national security adviser, was on Monday, in his first day in the job, holding a "principals" meeting to prepare options for the president in dealing with Syria. Mr Bolton and Mike Pompeo, his nominee for secretary of state, are both critical of Iranian influence in the region, which foreign policy experts believe may have a significant impact on US action in Syria. Ilan Berman, a former consultant to the CIA and Department of Defense, said: "It seems that the new foreign policy advisers are pushing for more involvement in terms of military presence on the ground. "Certainly both Mr Bolton and Mr Pompeo are much more concerned with rolling back Iranian influence and the most visible example of Iranian influence today is their involvement in Syria. "It's another action entirely to make a military strike against the Syrians when the Russians and Iranians are so closely involved - anything that Mr Trump does has the potential for fairly significant escalation depending on the targets hit. "The thing that is least complicated is repeating something they did before - submarine strikes that don't come into Russian airspace or hit Russian troops." The attack, which came days after an announcement that US troops would soon be withdrawing, will muddle Mr Trump's exit plan and threaten to draw America into a direct confrontation with Russia. Syria what next Relations between Moscow and Washington are the worst they have been under Mr Trump, who has in the last few months expanded sanctions and expelled scores of Russian diplomats over the poisoning of a former spy in Salisbury. On Monday the United Nations Security Council held an emergency meeting on Syria. Nikki Haley, US ambassador to the UN, said the US was prepared to respond unilaterally. “We are beyond appeals to conscience,” she said. “We have reached the moment when the world must see justice done. History will record this as the moment when the Security Council either discharged its duty or demonstrated its utter and complete failure to protect the people of Syria. “Either way, the United States will respond.” Syria chemical attack | Read more She said that the Russian “regime” had its “hands covered in the blood of Syrian children” and accused Moscow of “enabling the Assad regime’s murderous destruction.” “Only a monster targets civilians and then ensures that there are no ambulances to transfer the wounded,” she said. “No hospitals to save their lives. No doctors or medicine to ease their pain.” Karen Pierce, Britain’s ambassador to the UN, said that her Russian counterpart’s suggestion of sending in an OPCW team was worth pursuing, providing the team were guaranteed complete freedom to investigate. She described the attack as “an escalatory and a diabolical act,” and accused Russia of attempting to muddy the waters. Moscow, she said, seeks to “turn the debate away from a discussion on chemical weapons into a dispute between east and west, turning itself into the victim. “Russia’s crocodile tears for the people of Eastern Ghouta has an easy answer. It is to join us,” she said.
President Donald Trump promised on Monday that a "major decision" would be taken on Syria within the next two days, as a US navy destroyer appeared to be getting in position to attack. The US commander-in-chief - who last year ordered missile strikes on a Syrian airfield after seeing distressing images of civilians poisoned with sarin - looked poised to act again. "Nothing is off the table," said Mr Trump, when asked whether he was considering military action. "We are making a decision with respect to what to do with the horrible attack on Syria," he said. "It will be met, and it will be met forcefully. I won’t say when, as I don’t like talking about timing. "We’re going to make a decision tonight, or very shortly after, and you’ll be hearing the decision. "We can’t let atrocities happen. In our world, we can’t let that happen, because of the power of the United States, the power of our country, when we can stop it." Mr Trump's comments were followed by a warning from France early on Tuesday morning that it will retaliate against the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad if evidence emerges that it was behind the suspected chlorine gas attack. After President Emmanuel Macron and Mr Trump spoke again last night, spokesperson Benjamin Griveaux told Europe 1 radio: "If the red line has been crossed, there will be a response," adding that intelligence "in theory confirms the use of chemical weapons." Children from Eastern Ghouta are treated for symptoms from Saturday's suspected gas attack. Mr Trump said on Monday night he was consulting with his military and national security advisers, but that he personally had little doubt that the attack was carried out by President Bashar al-Assad's regime, with the possible support of his allies. "To me there's not much a doubt, but the generals will figure it out," he said. "So we'll be looking at that barbaric act and studying what's going on. We're trying to get people in there. As you know, it's been surrounded. "So it's very hard to get people in because not only has it been hit, it's been surrounded. And if they're innocent, why aren't they allowing people to go in and prove? Because as you know, they're claiming they didn't make the attack. "So if it's Russia, if it's Syria, if it's Iran, if it's all of them together, we'll figure it out and we'll know the answers quite soon. So we're looking at that very, very strongly and very seriously." President's options | What could military action in Syria look like? Amid the tough talk in the White House, the US military appeared to be in position to carry out any attack order. A navy destroyer, the USS Donald Cook, was underway in the eastern Mediterranean on Monday after completing a port call at Larnaca, Cyprus. A defiant Moscow said on Monday that it had examined patients affected and it did not find traces of chemicals. The UN-backed Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons is carrying out its own investigation, but is likely to take some time to report the findings. Douma chemical attack Russia's ambassador to the UN, Vassily Nebenzia, lashed out at Britain, the US and France, accusing them of “slander, insults, hawkish rhetoric, and blackmail”. “The tone of what is being done has gone beyond the threshold of what even happened in the Cold War,” he said, repeating Kremlin accusations that the Eastern Ghouta attack was "fake news" being used in a bid to discredit Russia and to distract from the Skripal poisoning case. He said the OPCW was welcome to visit, under Syrian and Russian protection. The chemical attack, which doctors on the ground told the Telegraph they suspected to have been chlorine mixed with a nerve agent, left more than 40 dead. The images of children and babies left fronthing at the mouth has led to international outrage, but so far no direct response. Syria war timeline Mr Trump described the gas attack as "a barbarity" and said it was a crisis for humanity. And Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the White House press secretary, said that Mr Trump "is confident" that the Assad regime and its allies were to blame. "He's been briefed by his national security team and being kept up to date constantly and regularly on the intelligence around that," she said. She insisted that his wish for American troops to pull out of Syria did not affect his resolve to respond to the Eastern Ghouta attack. "The president wants to bring our troops home after we complete the mission to eradicate ISIS in Syria. At the same time he wants to make sure Assad is deterred from chemical weapons attacks on innocent civilians," she said. "Signalling we want to remove our troops in no way degrades our ability to hold parties responsible." She said Mr Trump hoped to coordinate the response with Britain and France. "We certainly have a great relationship with both countries, and are continuing conversations with both the UK as well as France, and hope to work with all of our allies and partners in a response," she said. John Bolton, his new national security adviser, was on Monday, in his first day in the job, holding a "principals" meeting to prepare options for the president in dealing with Syria. Mr Bolton and Mike Pompeo, his nominee for secretary of state, are both critical of Iranian influence in the region, which foreign policy experts believe may have a significant impact on US action in Syria. Ilan Berman, a former consultant to the CIA and Department of Defense, said: "It seems that the new foreign policy advisers are pushing for more involvement in terms of military presence on the ground. "Certainly both Mr Bolton and Mr Pompeo are much more concerned with rolling back Iranian influence and the most visible example of Iranian influence today is their involvement in Syria. "It's another action entirely to make a military strike against the Syrians when the Russians and Iranians are so closely involved - anything that Mr Trump does has the potential for fairly significant escalation depending on the targets hit. "The thing that is least complicated is repeating something they did before - submarine strikes that don't come into Russian airspace or hit Russian troops." The attack, which came days after an announcement that US troops would soon be withdrawing, will muddle Mr Trump's exit plan and threaten to draw America into a direct confrontation with Russia. Syria what next Relations between Moscow and Washington are the worst they have been under Mr Trump, who has in the last few months expanded sanctions and expelled scores of Russian diplomats over the poisoning of a former spy in Salisbury. On Monday the United Nations Security Council held an emergency meeting on Syria. Nikki Haley, US ambassador to the UN, said the US was prepared to respond unilaterally. “We are beyond appeals to conscience,” she said. “We have reached the moment when the world must see justice done. History will record this as the moment when the Security Council either discharged its duty or demonstrated its utter and complete failure to protect the people of Syria. “Either way, the United States will respond.” Syria chemical attack | Read more She said that the Russian “regime” had its “hands covered in the blood of Syrian children” and accused Moscow of “enabling the Assad regime’s murderous destruction.” “Only a monster targets civilians and then ensures that there are no ambulances to transfer the wounded,” she said. “No hospitals to save their lives. No doctors or medicine to ease their pain.” Karen Pierce, Britain’s ambassador to the UN, said that her Russian counterpart’s suggestion of sending in an OPCW team was worth pursuing, providing the team were guaranteed complete freedom to investigate. She described the attack as “an escalatory and a diabolical act,” and accused Russia of attempting to muddy the waters. Moscow, she said, seeks to “turn the debate away from a discussion on chemical weapons into a dispute between east and west, turning itself into the victim. “Russia’s crocodile tears for the people of Eastern Ghouta has an easy answer. It is to join us,” she said.
Trump promises 'forceful' response on Syria and France warns of 'red line' as US Navy destroyer heads to region
President Donald Trump promised on Monday that a "major decision" would be taken on Syria within the next two days, as a US navy destroyer appeared to be getting in position to attack. The US commander-in-chief - who last year ordered missile strikes on a Syrian airfield after seeing distressing images of civilians poisoned with sarin - looked poised to act again. "Nothing is off the table," said Mr Trump, when asked whether he was considering military action. "We are making a decision with respect to what to do with the horrible attack on Syria," he said. "It will be met, and it will be met forcefully. I won’t say when, as I don’t like talking about timing. "We’re going to make a decision tonight, or very shortly after, and you’ll be hearing the decision. "We can’t let atrocities happen. In our world, we can’t let that happen, because of the power of the United States, the power of our country, when we can stop it." Mr Trump's comments were followed by a warning from France early on Tuesday morning that it will retaliate against the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad if evidence emerges that it was behind the suspected chlorine gas attack. After President Emmanuel Macron and Mr Trump spoke again last night, spokesperson Benjamin Griveaux told Europe 1 radio: "If the red line has been crossed, there will be a response," adding that intelligence "in theory confirms the use of chemical weapons." Children from Eastern Ghouta are treated for symptoms from Saturday's suspected gas attack. Mr Trump said on Monday night he was consulting with his military and national security advisers, but that he personally had little doubt that the attack was carried out by President Bashar al-Assad's regime, with the possible support of his allies. "To me there's not much a doubt, but the generals will figure it out," he said. "So we'll be looking at that barbaric act and studying what's going on. We're trying to get people in there. As you know, it's been surrounded. "So it's very hard to get people in because not only has it been hit, it's been surrounded. And if they're innocent, why aren't they allowing people to go in and prove? Because as you know, they're claiming they didn't make the attack. "So if it's Russia, if it's Syria, if it's Iran, if it's all of them together, we'll figure it out and we'll know the answers quite soon. So we're looking at that very, very strongly and very seriously." President's options | What could military action in Syria look like? Amid the tough talk in the White House, the US military appeared to be in position to carry out any attack order. A navy destroyer, the USS Donald Cook, was underway in the eastern Mediterranean on Monday after completing a port call at Larnaca, Cyprus. A defiant Moscow said on Monday that it had examined patients affected and it did not find traces of chemicals. The UN-backed Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons is carrying out its own investigation, but is likely to take some time to report the findings. Douma chemical attack Russia's ambassador to the UN, Vassily Nebenzia, lashed out at Britain, the US and France, accusing them of “slander, insults, hawkish rhetoric, and blackmail”. “The tone of what is being done has gone beyond the threshold of what even happened in the Cold War,” he said, repeating Kremlin accusations that the Eastern Ghouta attack was "fake news" being used in a bid to discredit Russia and to distract from the Skripal poisoning case. He said the OPCW was welcome to visit, under Syrian and Russian protection. The chemical attack, which doctors on the ground told the Telegraph they suspected to have been chlorine mixed with a nerve agent, left more than 40 dead. The images of children and babies left fronthing at the mouth has led to international outrage, but so far no direct response. Syria war timeline Mr Trump described the gas attack as "a barbarity" and said it was a crisis for humanity. And Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the White House press secretary, said that Mr Trump "is confident" that the Assad regime and its allies were to blame. "He's been briefed by his national security team and being kept up to date constantly and regularly on the intelligence around that," she said. She insisted that his wish for American troops to pull out of Syria did not affect his resolve to respond to the Eastern Ghouta attack. "The president wants to bring our troops home after we complete the mission to eradicate ISIS in Syria. At the same time he wants to make sure Assad is deterred from chemical weapons attacks on innocent civilians," she said. "Signalling we want to remove our troops in no way degrades our ability to hold parties responsible." She said Mr Trump hoped to coordinate the response with Britain and France. "We certainly have a great relationship with both countries, and are continuing conversations with both the UK as well as France, and hope to work with all of our allies and partners in a response," she said. John Bolton, his new national security adviser, was on Monday, in his first day in the job, holding a "principals" meeting to prepare options for the president in dealing with Syria. Mr Bolton and Mike Pompeo, his nominee for secretary of state, are both critical of Iranian influence in the region, which foreign policy experts believe may have a significant impact on US action in Syria. Ilan Berman, a former consultant to the CIA and Department of Defense, said: "It seems that the new foreign policy advisers are pushing for more involvement in terms of military presence on the ground. "Certainly both Mr Bolton and Mr Pompeo are much more concerned with rolling back Iranian influence and the most visible example of Iranian influence today is their involvement in Syria. "It's another action entirely to make a military strike against the Syrians when the Russians and Iranians are so closely involved - anything that Mr Trump does has the potential for fairly significant escalation depending on the targets hit. "The thing that is least complicated is repeating something they did before - submarine strikes that don't come into Russian airspace or hit Russian troops." The attack, which came days after an announcement that US troops would soon be withdrawing, will muddle Mr Trump's exit plan and threaten to draw America into a direct confrontation with Russia. Syria what next Relations between Moscow and Washington are the worst they have been under Mr Trump, who has in the last few months expanded sanctions and expelled scores of Russian diplomats over the poisoning of a former spy in Salisbury. On Monday the United Nations Security Council held an emergency meeting on Syria. Nikki Haley, US ambassador to the UN, said the US was prepared to respond unilaterally. “We are beyond appeals to conscience,” she said. “We have reached the moment when the world must see justice done. History will record this as the moment when the Security Council either discharged its duty or demonstrated its utter and complete failure to protect the people of Syria. “Either way, the United States will respond.” Syria chemical attack | Read more She said that the Russian “regime” had its “hands covered in the blood of Syrian children” and accused Moscow of “enabling the Assad regime’s murderous destruction.” “Only a monster targets civilians and then ensures that there are no ambulances to transfer the wounded,” she said. “No hospitals to save their lives. No doctors or medicine to ease their pain.” Karen Pierce, Britain’s ambassador to the UN, said that her Russian counterpart’s suggestion of sending in an OPCW team was worth pursuing, providing the team were guaranteed complete freedom to investigate. She described the attack as “an escalatory and a diabolical act,” and accused Russia of attempting to muddy the waters. Moscow, she said, seeks to “turn the debate away from a discussion on chemical weapons into a dispute between east and west, turning itself into the victim. “Russia’s crocodile tears for the people of Eastern Ghouta has an easy answer. It is to join us,” she said.
Theresa May is facing mounting pressure from senior Conservative MPs to support US-led airstrikes against the Syrian President Bashar Assad's regime. Tom Tugendhat, chairman of the foreign affairs committee, and Nick Boles, a former minister, have both urged Mrs May to back the strikes without seeking parliamentary approval. President Donald Trump promised on Monday that a "major decision" would be taken on Syria within the next two days, as a US navy destroyer appeared to be getting in position to attack. French President Emmanuel Macron, who spoke with Mr Trump on Sunday, has indicated France's support for the US. Mrs May is due to speak with Mr Trump on Tuesday. The senior Conservative MP and former soldier Tom Tugendhat has called for action to "degrade" Syria's chemical weapon resources, after the Syrian town of Douma was attacked with suspected chlorine gas on Saturday. He said: “Striking Syria’s stockpiles of chemical weapons would degrade their ability to commit further war crimes and could be done together with allies. It would not require a vote in Parliament.” Dominic Grieve, the former attorney general, has also thrown his weight behind an attack. He told the Evening Standard on Tuesday: “In view of the enormity of what has been done, if there is a way of preventing its recurrence by the limited use of force that is one thing and I would be supportive.” Former minister Nick Boles said the Prime Minister had his "strong support" is she decides to join the US and France in taking action against President Assad. Theresa May is due to chair a national security council meeting on Tuesday afternoon or on Wednesday. It comes as President Trump - who last year ordered missile strikes on a Syrian airfield after seeing distressing images of civilians poisoned with sarin - looked poised to act again. "Nothing is off the table," said Mr Trump, when asked whether he was considering military action. "We are making a decision with respect to what to do with the horrible attack on Syria," he said. "It will be met, and it will be met forcefully. I won’t say when, as I don’t like talking about timing. "We’re going to make a decision tonight, or very shortly after, and you’ll be hearing the decision. "We can’t let atrocities happen. In our world, we can’t let that happen, because of the power of the United States, the power of our country, when we can stop it." Mr Trump's comments were followed by a warning from France early on Tuesday morning that it will retaliate against the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad if evidence emerges that it was behind the suspected chlorine gas attack. After President Emmanuel Macron and Mr Trump spoke again last night, spokesperson Benjamin Griveaux told Europe 1 radio: "If the red line has been crossed, there will be a response," adding that intelligence "in theory confirms the use of chemical weapons." Children from Eastern Ghouta are treated for symptoms from Saturday's suspected gas attack. Mr Trump said on Monday night he was consulting with his military and national security advisers, but that he personally had little doubt that the attack was carried out by President Bashar al-Assad's regime, with the possible support of his allies. "To me there's not much a doubt, but the generals will figure it out," he said. "So we'll be looking at that barbaric act and studying what's going on. We're trying to get people in there. As you know, it's been surrounded. "So it's very hard to get people in because not only has it been hit, it's been surrounded. And if they're innocent, why aren't they allowing people to go in and prove? Because as you know, they're claiming they didn't make the attack. "So if it's Russia, if it's Syria, if it's Iran, if it's all of them together, we'll figure it out and we'll know the answers quite soon. So we're looking at that very, very strongly and very seriously." President's options | What could military action in Syria look like? Amid the tough talk in the White House, the US military appeared to be in position to carry out any attack order. A navy destroyer, the USS Donald Cook, was underway in the eastern Mediterranean on Monday after completing a port call at Larnaca, Cyprus. A defiant Moscow said on Monday that it had examined patients affected and it did not find traces of chemicals. The UN-backed Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons is carrying out its own investigation, but is likely to take some time to report the findings. Douma chemical attack Russia's ambassador to the UN, Vassily Nebenzia, lashed out at Britain, the US and France, accusing them of “slander, insults, hawkish rhetoric, and blackmail”. “The tone of what is being done has gone beyond the threshold of what even happened in the Cold War,” he said, repeating Kremlin accusations that the Eastern Ghouta attack was "fake news" being used in a bid to discredit Russia and to distract from the Skripal poisoning case. He said the OPCW was welcome to visit, under Syrian and Russian protection. The chemical attack, which doctors on the ground told the Telegraph they suspected to have been chlorine mixed with a nerve agent, left more than 40 dead. The images of children and babies left fronthing at the mouth has led to international outrage, but so far no direct response. Syria war timeline Mr Trump described the gas attack as "a barbarity" and said it was a crisis for humanity. And Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the White House press secretary, said that Mr Trump "is confident" that the Assad regime and its allies were to blame. "He's been briefed by his national security team and being kept up to date constantly and regularly on the intelligence around that," she said. She insisted that his wish for American troops to pull out of Syria did not affect his resolve to respond to the Eastern Ghouta attack. "The president wants to bring our troops home after we complete the mission to eradicate ISIS in Syria. At the same time he wants to make sure Assad is deterred from chemical weapons attacks on innocent civilians," she said. "Signalling we want to remove our troops in no way degrades our ability to hold parties responsible." She said Mr Trump hoped to coordinate the response with Britain and France. "We certainly have a great relationship with both countries, and are continuing conversations with both the UK as well as France, and hope to work with all of our allies and partners in a response," she said. John Bolton, his new national security adviser, was on Monday, in his first day in the job, holding a "principals" meeting to prepare options for the president in dealing with Syria. Mr Bolton and Mike Pompeo, his nominee for secretary of state, are both critical of Iranian influence in the region, which foreign policy experts believe may have a significant impact on US action in Syria. Ilan Berman, a former consultant to the CIA and Department of Defense, said: "It seems that the new foreign policy advisers are pushing for more involvement in terms of military presence on the ground. "Certainly both Mr Bolton and Mr Pompeo are much more concerned with rolling back Iranian influence and the most visible example of Iranian influence today is their involvement in Syria. "It's another action entirely to make a military strike against the Syrians when the Russians and Iranians are so closely involved - anything that Mr Trump does has the potential for fairly significant escalation depending on the targets hit. "The thing that is least complicated is repeating something they did before - submarine strikes that don't come into Russian airspace or hit Russian troops." The attack, which came days after an announcement that US troops would soon be withdrawing, will muddle Mr Trump's exit plan and threaten to draw America into a direct confrontation with Russia. Syria what next Relations between Moscow and Washington are the worst they have been under Mr Trump, who has in the last few months expanded sanctions and expelled scores of Russian diplomats over the poisoning of a former spy in Salisbury. On Monday the United Nations Security Council held an emergency meeting on Syria. Nikki Haley, US ambassador to the UN, said the US was prepared to respond unilaterally. “We are beyond appeals to conscience,” she said. “We have reached the moment when the world must see justice done. History will record this as the moment when the Security Council either discharged its duty or demonstrated its utter and complete failure to protect the people of Syria. “Either way, the United States will respond.” Syria chemical attack | Read more She said that the Russian “regime” had its “hands covered in the blood of Syrian children” and accused Moscow of “enabling the Assad regime’s murderous destruction.” “Only a monster targets civilians and then ensures that there are no ambulances to transfer the wounded,” she said. “No hospitals to save their lives. No doctors or medicine to ease their pain.” Karen Pierce, Britain’s ambassador to the UN, said that her Russian counterpart’s suggestion of sending in an OPCW team was worth pursuing, providing the team were guaranteed complete freedom to investigate. She described the attack as “an escalatory and a diabolical act,” and accused Russia of attempting to muddy the waters. Moscow, she said, seeks to “turn the debate away from a discussion on chemical weapons into a dispute between east and west, turning itself into the victim. “Russia’s crocodile tears for the people of Eastern Ghouta has an easy answer. It is to join us,” she said.
Senior Tories call on Theresa May to back Donald Trump's airstrikes in Syria
Theresa May is facing mounting pressure from senior Conservative MPs to support US-led airstrikes against the Syrian President Bashar Assad's regime. Tom Tugendhat, chairman of the foreign affairs committee, and Nick Boles, a former minister, have both urged Mrs May to back the strikes without seeking parliamentary approval. President Donald Trump promised on Monday that a "major decision" would be taken on Syria within the next two days, as a US navy destroyer appeared to be getting in position to attack. French President Emmanuel Macron, who spoke with Mr Trump on Sunday, has indicated France's support for the US. Mrs May is due to speak with Mr Trump on Tuesday. The senior Conservative MP and former soldier Tom Tugendhat has called for action to "degrade" Syria's chemical weapon resources, after the Syrian town of Douma was attacked with suspected chlorine gas on Saturday. He said: “Striking Syria’s stockpiles of chemical weapons would degrade their ability to commit further war crimes and could be done together with allies. It would not require a vote in Parliament.” Dominic Grieve, the former attorney general, has also thrown his weight behind an attack. He told the Evening Standard on Tuesday: “In view of the enormity of what has been done, if there is a way of preventing its recurrence by the limited use of force that is one thing and I would be supportive.” Former minister Nick Boles said the Prime Minister had his "strong support" is she decides to join the US and France in taking action against President Assad. Theresa May is due to chair a national security council meeting on Tuesday afternoon or on Wednesday. It comes as President Trump - who last year ordered missile strikes on a Syrian airfield after seeing distressing images of civilians poisoned with sarin - looked poised to act again. "Nothing is off the table," said Mr Trump, when asked whether he was considering military action. "We are making a decision with respect to what to do with the horrible attack on Syria," he said. "It will be met, and it will be met forcefully. I won’t say when, as I don’t like talking about timing. "We’re going to make a decision tonight, or very shortly after, and you’ll be hearing the decision. "We can’t let atrocities happen. In our world, we can’t let that happen, because of the power of the United States, the power of our country, when we can stop it." Mr Trump's comments were followed by a warning from France early on Tuesday morning that it will retaliate against the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad if evidence emerges that it was behind the suspected chlorine gas attack. After President Emmanuel Macron and Mr Trump spoke again last night, spokesperson Benjamin Griveaux told Europe 1 radio: "If the red line has been crossed, there will be a response," adding that intelligence "in theory confirms the use of chemical weapons." Children from Eastern Ghouta are treated for symptoms from Saturday's suspected gas attack. Mr Trump said on Monday night he was consulting with his military and national security advisers, but that he personally had little doubt that the attack was carried out by President Bashar al-Assad's regime, with the possible support of his allies. "To me there's not much a doubt, but the generals will figure it out," he said. "So we'll be looking at that barbaric act and studying what's going on. We're trying to get people in there. As you know, it's been surrounded. "So it's very hard to get people in because not only has it been hit, it's been surrounded. And if they're innocent, why aren't they allowing people to go in and prove? Because as you know, they're claiming they didn't make the attack. "So if it's Russia, if it's Syria, if it's Iran, if it's all of them together, we'll figure it out and we'll know the answers quite soon. So we're looking at that very, very strongly and very seriously." President's options | What could military action in Syria look like? Amid the tough talk in the White House, the US military appeared to be in position to carry out any attack order. A navy destroyer, the USS Donald Cook, was underway in the eastern Mediterranean on Monday after completing a port call at Larnaca, Cyprus. A defiant Moscow said on Monday that it had examined patients affected and it did not find traces of chemicals. The UN-backed Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons is carrying out its own investigation, but is likely to take some time to report the findings. Douma chemical attack Russia's ambassador to the UN, Vassily Nebenzia, lashed out at Britain, the US and France, accusing them of “slander, insults, hawkish rhetoric, and blackmail”. “The tone of what is being done has gone beyond the threshold of what even happened in the Cold War,” he said, repeating Kremlin accusations that the Eastern Ghouta attack was "fake news" being used in a bid to discredit Russia and to distract from the Skripal poisoning case. He said the OPCW was welcome to visit, under Syrian and Russian protection. The chemical attack, which doctors on the ground told the Telegraph they suspected to have been chlorine mixed with a nerve agent, left more than 40 dead. The images of children and babies left fronthing at the mouth has led to international outrage, but so far no direct response. Syria war timeline Mr Trump described the gas attack as "a barbarity" and said it was a crisis for humanity. And Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the White House press secretary, said that Mr Trump "is confident" that the Assad regime and its allies were to blame. "He's been briefed by his national security team and being kept up to date constantly and regularly on the intelligence around that," she said. She insisted that his wish for American troops to pull out of Syria did not affect his resolve to respond to the Eastern Ghouta attack. "The president wants to bring our troops home after we complete the mission to eradicate ISIS in Syria. At the same time he wants to make sure Assad is deterred from chemical weapons attacks on innocent civilians," she said. "Signalling we want to remove our troops in no way degrades our ability to hold parties responsible." She said Mr Trump hoped to coordinate the response with Britain and France. "We certainly have a great relationship with both countries, and are continuing conversations with both the UK as well as France, and hope to work with all of our allies and partners in a response," she said. John Bolton, his new national security adviser, was on Monday, in his first day in the job, holding a "principals" meeting to prepare options for the president in dealing with Syria. Mr Bolton and Mike Pompeo, his nominee for secretary of state, are both critical of Iranian influence in the region, which foreign policy experts believe may have a significant impact on US action in Syria. Ilan Berman, a former consultant to the CIA and Department of Defense, said: "It seems that the new foreign policy advisers are pushing for more involvement in terms of military presence on the ground. "Certainly both Mr Bolton and Mr Pompeo are much more concerned with rolling back Iranian influence and the most visible example of Iranian influence today is their involvement in Syria. "It's another action entirely to make a military strike against the Syrians when the Russians and Iranians are so closely involved - anything that Mr Trump does has the potential for fairly significant escalation depending on the targets hit. "The thing that is least complicated is repeating something they did before - submarine strikes that don't come into Russian airspace or hit Russian troops." The attack, which came days after an announcement that US troops would soon be withdrawing, will muddle Mr Trump's exit plan and threaten to draw America into a direct confrontation with Russia. Syria what next Relations between Moscow and Washington are the worst they have been under Mr Trump, who has in the last few months expanded sanctions and expelled scores of Russian diplomats over the poisoning of a former spy in Salisbury. On Monday the United Nations Security Council held an emergency meeting on Syria. Nikki Haley, US ambassador to the UN, said the US was prepared to respond unilaterally. “We are beyond appeals to conscience,” she said. “We have reached the moment when the world must see justice done. History will record this as the moment when the Security Council either discharged its duty or demonstrated its utter and complete failure to protect the people of Syria. “Either way, the United States will respond.” Syria chemical attack | Read more She said that the Russian “regime” had its “hands covered in the blood of Syrian children” and accused Moscow of “enabling the Assad regime’s murderous destruction.” “Only a monster targets civilians and then ensures that there are no ambulances to transfer the wounded,” she said. “No hospitals to save their lives. No doctors or medicine to ease their pain.” Karen Pierce, Britain’s ambassador to the UN, said that her Russian counterpart’s suggestion of sending in an OPCW team was worth pursuing, providing the team were guaranteed complete freedom to investigate. She described the attack as “an escalatory and a diabolical act,” and accused Russia of attempting to muddy the waters. Moscow, she said, seeks to “turn the debate away from a discussion on chemical weapons into a dispute between east and west, turning itself into the victim. “Russia’s crocodile tears for the people of Eastern Ghouta has an easy answer. It is to join us,” she said.
The state of play in Syria remains uncertain this morning, but a decision on military action is expected from President Donald Trump in the next 24-48 hours, and Theresa May is under domestic and foreign pressure to join any action. It’s almost exactly a year since American cruise missiles rained down on Shayrat airbase in Syria in response to a chemical weapons attack by Bashar al-Assad’s regime. On Saturday, Assad’s forces once again resorted to chemical weapons. The death toll is still uncertain, but the French representative at the UN Security Council said poison gas had deliberately been used as it could seep down to the basements of Douma, where hundreds of families had sought refuge from bombing. Medical groups say the estimated deaths could rise as rescue workers gain access to those basements. The complicating factors Several factors make this event much more complex than that in 2017, when the US acted in sudden and unilateral fashion. The first is the obvious failure of the Shayrat strikes to act as a deterrent – greater force may now be needed. Second, yesterday was the first day on the job for Donald Trump’s new National Security Adviser, John Bolton. Bolton is the most hawkish of hawks and is also deeply concerned by the expansion of Iranian influence in the Middle East, in which Syria is a key theatre. Third is the parlous state of relations between Russia – a major military ally of Assad – and the West. The Russian representative to the UN Security Council warned that the use of armed force against Syria “could lead to grave repercussions”, raising fears of escalation. The possible desire for a greater use of force than last year, a focus on the broader strategic picture in the Middle East, and the danger of rapid escalation between American and Russian forces make this a much more delicate situation than April 2017. Which is likely why Trump is pushing for a broader Western coalition. The Westminster problem Theresa May was riding high before Easter after her success in coordinated an impressive international response to the poisoning of Sergei Skripal. However, that turned somewhat sour last week after poor communication created confusion over Britain’s evidence of Russian responsibility. So Britain’s response, or lack thereof, to the chemical weapons attack in Syria now takes on added meaning. A failure to act might undo the good work on the Skripal case and reaffirm the impression some have that Britain is a diminished figure on the world stage. But it’s not a completely straightforward decision for May. She is reportedly worried about Britain damaging its reputation for upholding international law, and, more practically, has a dilemma over whether to consult Parliament. The precedent created by her predecessor over Libya in 2011 and then over Syria in 2013 (a vote the Government lost), as well as the campaign against Isil, is that Parliament should be consulted on such matters. May’s problem is that with a slim majority and the former chairman of Stop the War Coalition, Jeremy Corbyn, leading the Opposition, victory would be far from assured. Senior Cabinet ministers are said to be urging her to bypass Parliament with one minister telling The Telegraph: "Why would we want to open that pandora's box again? There's no need to go to there, the Prime Minister should take direct action then go to Parliament afterwards.” A defining moment ​ The PM has a difficult few hours ahead of her, but it’s events like these that can define a premiership. If she wants to be known as more than just the Brexit PM, its her actions on Syria as much as any social reforms that will count. Nor should the global consequence be forgotten. Writing in The Telegraph, former Foreign Secretary Lord Hague calls for “swift military action” and warns of an “arms race” in chemical weapons if the West fails to act. Recalling the 2013 parliamentary defeat he writes: “Our efforts to bring about peace evaporated without a readiness to use hard power when it was needed.”
Front Bench: Theresa's May's choice on Syria could define her premiership
The state of play in Syria remains uncertain this morning, but a decision on military action is expected from President Donald Trump in the next 24-48 hours, and Theresa May is under domestic and foreign pressure to join any action. It’s almost exactly a year since American cruise missiles rained down on Shayrat airbase in Syria in response to a chemical weapons attack by Bashar al-Assad’s regime. On Saturday, Assad’s forces once again resorted to chemical weapons. The death toll is still uncertain, but the French representative at the UN Security Council said poison gas had deliberately been used as it could seep down to the basements of Douma, where hundreds of families had sought refuge from bombing. Medical groups say the estimated deaths could rise as rescue workers gain access to those basements. The complicating factors Several factors make this event much more complex than that in 2017, when the US acted in sudden and unilateral fashion. The first is the obvious failure of the Shayrat strikes to act as a deterrent – greater force may now be needed. Second, yesterday was the first day on the job for Donald Trump’s new National Security Adviser, John Bolton. Bolton is the most hawkish of hawks and is also deeply concerned by the expansion of Iranian influence in the Middle East, in which Syria is a key theatre. Third is the parlous state of relations between Russia – a major military ally of Assad – and the West. The Russian representative to the UN Security Council warned that the use of armed force against Syria “could lead to grave repercussions”, raising fears of escalation. The possible desire for a greater use of force than last year, a focus on the broader strategic picture in the Middle East, and the danger of rapid escalation between American and Russian forces make this a much more delicate situation than April 2017. Which is likely why Trump is pushing for a broader Western coalition. The Westminster problem Theresa May was riding high before Easter after her success in coordinated an impressive international response to the poisoning of Sergei Skripal. However, that turned somewhat sour last week after poor communication created confusion over Britain’s evidence of Russian responsibility. So Britain’s response, or lack thereof, to the chemical weapons attack in Syria now takes on added meaning. A failure to act might undo the good work on the Skripal case and reaffirm the impression some have that Britain is a diminished figure on the world stage. But it’s not a completely straightforward decision for May. She is reportedly worried about Britain damaging its reputation for upholding international law, and, more practically, has a dilemma over whether to consult Parliament. The precedent created by her predecessor over Libya in 2011 and then over Syria in 2013 (a vote the Government lost), as well as the campaign against Isil, is that Parliament should be consulted on such matters. May’s problem is that with a slim majority and the former chairman of Stop the War Coalition, Jeremy Corbyn, leading the Opposition, victory would be far from assured. Senior Cabinet ministers are said to be urging her to bypass Parliament with one minister telling The Telegraph: "Why would we want to open that pandora's box again? There's no need to go to there, the Prime Minister should take direct action then go to Parliament afterwards.” A defining moment ​ The PM has a difficult few hours ahead of her, but it’s events like these that can define a premiership. If she wants to be known as more than just the Brexit PM, its her actions on Syria as much as any social reforms that will count. Nor should the global consequence be forgotten. Writing in The Telegraph, former Foreign Secretary Lord Hague calls for “swift military action” and warns of an “arms race” in chemical weapons if the West fails to act. Recalling the 2013 parliamentary defeat he writes: “Our efforts to bring about peace evaporated without a readiness to use hard power when it was needed.”
Tuesday 10 April Class of Mum and Dad Channel 4, 8.00pm Another week, another Channel 4 series about education. Hold off on the black marks, however, because this one is pretty good. The premise is simple: Blackrod Primary School just outside of Bolton has thrown open its doors to a class made up of pupils’ parents (and one grandparent). They’ve agreed to go back to school for the summer term to see what modern education is really like, sports day, Sats tests and all. Naturally, its harder than many of them were expecting – 36-year-old decorator Jonny states early on that he thought he’d be able to slope off for a swift cigarette break rather than having to adhere to strict class rules – but there are some touching stories amid the more obvious moments. Most notably, this opening episode focuses on two parents with challenging home lives – Julia, who is raising her 10-year-old cousin Asha after Asha’s mother died, and Mark, who has two autistic sons. While the parents’ travails are interesting, the children are the real scene-stealers, however, from those delighted that their mothers and fathers are taking part to those who are more sceptical. The pair of five-year-olds who spend their time corpsing in front of the camera are particularly endearing. Sarah Hughes Champions League Football: Manchester City v Liverpool BT Sport 2, 7.45pm The Etihad Stadium is the setting as City and Liverpool fight it out for a place in the semi-finals. Liverpool have the advantage following a 3-0 win at Anfield in the first leg. This Time Next Year ITV, 8.00pm Davina McCall returns with another set of heart-tugging stories of people attempting to transform their lives over the course of a year. First up are two new parents who dream of making life wonderful for their baby girl who has been deaf since birth and a couple desperate to start a family. Come Home BBC One, 9.00pm Danny Brocklehurst’s claustrophobic family drama comes to a head as we flashback to find out exactly what went wrong in Greg (Christopher Eccleston) and Marie’s (Paula Malcomson) marriage. Hospital BBC Two, 9.00pm The engrossing fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with Nottingham University Hospitals Trust struggling to cope with the new NHS ruling regarding the cancellation of all non-urgent surgery. The episode focuses on Val, a 55-year-old with mouth cancer whose surgeon is desperately trying to ensure that her operation goes ahead. Here and Now Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm With only two episodes left to go, Alan Ball’s family drama continues to tread water in the most frustrating ways. On paper, there are a whole bunch of interesting stories in the mix, from Kristen’s (Sosie Bacon) possible relationship with Navid (Marwan Salama) to Ramon’s (Daniel Zovatto) continuing visions, but the problem is nothing much happens with any of them as each story moves on only incrementally each week. In this episode, Audrey (Holly Hunter) finally turns the tables on the perpetually smug Greg (Tim Robbins). Cunk on Britain BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm Diane Morgan’s pitch-perfect send-up of history programmes moves to the Tudor era and beyond as Cunk takes on Henry VIII, aka “The kingiest king who kinged over Britain” before giving us her unique perspective on “Bloody” Mary Tudor (“horrible like the drink”) and Elizabeth I. SH Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The acerbic Sarah Jessica Parker sitcom has been firing on all cylinders throughout its second series – possibly because it’s more interesting watching Frances (Parker) and Robert (the excellent Thomas Haden Church) navigate life after divorce than it was watching them get there. Here, Frances tries to make a new contact in the art world. SH Speed (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm “There’s a bomb on the bus!” is the most famous line and basically the entire plot of one of the best action thrillers of the Nineties. The sizzling chemistry between LAPD Swat specialist Jack Traven (Keanu Reeves) and passenger Annie Porter (Sandra Bullock) sexes up the exhilarating action scenes, while Dennis Hopper is fantastically unhinged as a revenge-driven, retired bomb squad member turned terrorist. Fast & Furious 7 (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm Paul Walker was killed in a car crash part-way through making this film so it was completed with the help of his two younger brothers and some subtle computer graphics. The good news is that this is the best film in the franchise and does justice to Walker. It isn’t polished blockbuster film-making – though if it was, it wouldn’t be Fast & Furious. But it speaks straight to your adrenal glands. The Witches of Eastwick (1987) ★★★☆☆ Syfy, 9.00pm It is remarkable that director George Miller’s daft, unfettered romp of a film works at all. But, thanks to Jack Nicholson’s delicious overacting as Daryl Van Horne, a manic gentleman who closely resembles the devil, and the three gorgeous, single small-town friends, Alexandra (Cher), Jane (Susan Sarandon) and Sukie (Michelle Pfeiffer), who vie for his debased attentions, it somehow does. Wednesday 11 April Family ties: Edgar Ramirez and Penelope Cruz Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s been fascinating to discover the “true” story behind the 1997 murder of fhion designer Gianni Versace in Ryan Murphy’s glitzy drama, which has expertly depicted the inner world of the perpetrator, a Walter Mitty-style serial killer called Andrew Cunanan (a career-defining role for Darren Criss). This episode, however, has a mid-series lull about it as Cunanan ascends to the higher echelons of gay society, shaping himself meticulously into the posh, preppy eye-candy who saw a sugar daddy (or two) as his way to the top. Elsewhere, the Versace siblings return at last. Gianni (Edgar Ramirez), now in failing health decides to champion his insecure sister Donatella (Penélope Cruz in a frightful wig) and turns her into both designer and muse. Despite a lack of characters to root for – the Versaces’ moments of vulnerability dissolve into tedious histrionics and are eclipsed by Cunanan’s cold-blooded machinations – it’s all quite a fabulous mix of fashion, high society and brutal murder, with some interesting commentary on homophobia in the Nineties as well. Vicki Power The Secret Helpers BBC Two, 8.00pm Watch and weep as timid elderly widow Lesley begins a new life as an out gay woman in this life-affirming docu-series. She’s encouraged with warmth and wisdom by amateur “sages” from abroad, who talk to her secretly through a hidden earpiece. From World War to Cold War Yesterday, 8.00pm As the Second World War drew to a close, Churchill, Stalin and Roosevelt met at Yalta in the Crimea to broker post-war peace. This brisk two-part documentary raids the archives for clips and letters from those who attended, and gathers experts and relatives – including FDR’s grandson – to investigate power plays by Stalin that wrong-footed his Allied counterparts. It’s a detailed look at how and why the compromises reached at Yalta were quickly cast aside. Bacchus Uncovered: Ancient God of Ecstasy BBC Four, 9.00pm Historian Bettany Hughes continues to explore ancient civilisations, moving on to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine. Hughes’s odyssey starts under the City of London, where an 1,800-year-old Roman temple to Bacchus was discovered less than 100 years ago, and takes her to Greece, the Middle East and the Caucasus to explore the god’s roots and influence. VP Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Fluffy as candyfloss, this lewd seaside comedy provides some fun, particularly in the retro casting of stars of yesteryear. This week, an exuberant Sammy (Shane Richie) tries to persuade Monty (John Challis) that, after his successful comeback gig, he is ready for an evening slot. One Born Every Minute Channel 4, 9.00pm This feelgood documentary series brings more poignant tales from a Birmingham labour ward. This week we meet Chantell, about to deliver her third child, who regales us with a moving story of how parenthood with partner Phil has healed the wounds of a traumatic past. First Dates Channel 4, 10.00pm The thoughtful dating show pairs up four more couples, but the road to love is bumpy – septuagenarian Deanna finds her date more interested in the waiter than her. More promising is the match between Bianca and Teza, who allow their vulnerabilities to show. VP The Thin Red Line (1998) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 3.10pm This lyrical Second World War drama, directed by Terrence Malick, tells the story of a group of young US soldiers fighting the Japanese for control of the island of Guadalcanal. Full of stars such as Sean Penn and George Clooney, it struggles with its own battle to squeeze in so many characters but is still an atmospheric meditation on the nature of war. Nick Nolte and Adrien Brody also star. The Remains of the Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 3.55pm The success of Merchant Ivory’s adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Thirties-set novel, a well-observed study of regret, is built around its perfectly cast leads: Anthony Hopkins as James, the butler to the doltish aristocrat Lord Darlington (James Fox) and Emma Thompson as a housekeeper who tries to draw him out of his sterile shell. Lush visuals give it an added richness. Transporter 2 (2005) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A martial arts action sequel, in which Jason Statham and Alessandro Gassman are the sporadically thrilling stars. Statham is Frank Martin, who accepts a job as chauffeur to Jack (Hunter Clary), the son of Miami’s politician Jefferson Billings (Matthew Modine). But the local Colombian drug dealers aren’t happy with his boss’s efforts to clean up the city. Cue a kidnapping, and a potentially deadly encounter with a cocaine baron. Thursday 12 April Changing attitudes: Holly and Hollie Credit: BBC Living with the Brainy Bunch BBC Two, 8.00pm Enterprising, PR-conscious Ash Ali is headmaster of Chessington Community College, a fast-improving school with a few problem pupils. Among them are Jack and Hollie who, on the surface, are comically awful teenagers. Hollie gripes constantly, throws strops and storms out of classrooms if things aren’t going her way. Jack is sullen, lazy and has clocked up 15 suspensions in the past year. It will come as no surprise to regular viewers of such documentaries that their behaviour is rooted in low self-esteem, although their parents unquestionably indulge their foibles. Ali’s novel solution is to place Hollie with Holly, tapdancing head girl and gregarious boffin, and Jack with Tharush, a Sri Lankan immigrant by way of Italy, whose talents are only matched by his work ethic. Now that Jack and Hollie are in the bosom of new families for six weeks, it’s hoped that a new environment, greater discipline and rigid routines will see their results improve and attitudes pick up. There are setbacks on the largely familiar narrative trajectory, but it’s cast to perfection and, as a demonstration of the importance of parenting in academic achievement, the experiment gets an A-star. Gabriel Tate European Tour Golf: The Open de Espana Sky Sports Golf, 11.00am The opening day’s play of the event from the Centro Nacional de Golf in Madrid, which was won by Andrew Johnston the last time it was held in 2016. War Above the Trenches Yesterday, 8.00pm This decent two-parter tells the story of the Royal Flying Corps and their battle to win control of the air in the First World War. Based on Peter Hart’s book Bloody April, it draws affectingly on the testimony of veterans to show there was more to the Western Front than trench warfare. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm The modern age draws closer, as Simon Schama tackles the theme of radiance, guiding us through Gothic cathedrals, Baroque Venetian masterpieces and dazzling Japanese woodblock prints. The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm The second real-life case of the series sees Mark Williams-Thomas investigating the 1977 murders of three women in Glasgow. The suspect is Angus Sinclair, who is currently serving a life sentence for killing two other women that same year. We hear from his ex-wife, and learn how he was a prime suspect but escaped charges for the first killings when key evidence went missing. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm This diverting documentary series concludes with a Himalayan trek, a controversial article in the school newspaper and the GCSE retakes that were the goal of the entire enterprise. Will Alfie, Harry, Jack and co see their grades improve? Urban Myths: Marilyn Monroe and Billy Wilder Sky Arts, 9.00pm Sky Arts’ boldly cast series of vaguely apocryphal tales from the pop-culture frontlines returns with a dispatch from the set of Some Like It Hot, the magnificent 1959 comedy that is almost certainly more fun to watch than it was to make. In this minor but entertaining reimagining, Tony Curtis (Alex Pettyfer) is threatening to cuckold Arthur Miller (Dougray Scott) by making off with Marilyn Monroe (Gemma Arterton), whose caprice, drinking and sensitivity is driving director Billy Wilder (James Purefoy) to distraction. GT Still Game BBC One, 9.30pm; BBC Two Wales, 10.00pm Justifying its prime-time BBC One slot, the Scottish sitcom bows out in triumph with a typically well-wrought farce involving a Hollywood stuntman, a disastrous driving lesson and romance for the widowed Isa (Jane McCarry). GT The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Christopher Lee steals the show as the titular assassin, Francisco Scaramanga, in this classic Bond adventure. Roger Moore’s secret agent, in his second outing as 007, must pursue him, with the help of sidekick Mary Goodnight (Britt Ekland), to the villain’s island lair in order to prevent him harnessing the power of the Sun for evil. The confrontations between Moore and Lee are easily the film’s highlights. Swordfish (2001) ★★☆☆☆ TCM, 9.00pm The most often quoted bit of trivia about this film is that Halle Berry was paid an additional £500,000 to go topless. It’s rather lucky she agreed because she’s probably the most appealing aspect of this frenetic thriller. John Travolta and Hugh Jackman put on testosterone-fuelled displays as a morally dubious counter-terrorist agent and the hacker he blackmails into accessing billions of dollars of government money. Some Like It Hot (1959, b/w) ★★★★★ Sky Arts, 9.30pm When two musicians (Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis) witness a mob hit, they flee the state disguised as women in an all-female band, but further complications arise in the form of demure ukulele player Sugar Kane, superbly played by Marilyn Monroe. Billy Wilder’s classic comedy is effortlessly wacky and clever. Before, at 9pm, is Urban Myths, which imagines what happened on the set of this romcom. Friday 13 April Dishing out opinions: John Torode and Gregg Wallace Credit: BBC MasterChef: The Final BBC One, 8.30pm It has taken 25 episodes over seven weeks to whittle down the 56 amateur contestants to three finalists, and in the process, MasterChef 2018 has produced some of the best cooking – and some of the toughest competition – in the series’ long history. (It has been running in one form or another since 1990; and since 2005 in, roughly, its current format with judges Gregg Wallace and John Torode presenting.) This last week has been no exception, with the finalists having to dig deeper than ever to produce the best dishes of their lives and some great moments – notably during the spectacular trip to South America when they met Peruvian superchef Gaston Acurio and took on a service at the fifth best restaurant in the world, the Central in Lima, under Michelin-starred maestro Virgilio Martínez Véliz. In the finale, it’s all about who cooks the best food, though, as the final three return to the studio kitchen to undergo a test of culinary skills and nerve as they set about creating the most important three-course meal of their lives – in the hope of being judged worthy of a title that has launched many a great career: MasterChef champion. Gerard O’Donovan Chef’s Table: Pastry Netflix, from today This mouth-watering spin-off from Netflix’s popular global foodie series Chef’s Table puts the focus entirely on sweet stuff, talking the cameras inside the kitchens of some of the world’s best pastry chefs, among them Christina Tosi’s Milk Bar in New York, Corrado Assenza’s Caffé Sicilia in Noto, Sicily, Jordi Roca’s El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, and Will Goldfarb’s Room4Dessert in Bali. Lost in Space Netflix, from today Not so much a rerun as a spectacular new take on the classic Sixties sci-fi series about a family marooned in space when their ship runs into difficulty on their way to a new colony and crashes on an unknown and surprisingly hostile planet. There are plenty of thrills and impressive visual effects, and Toby Stephens and Molly Parker are excellent as the pioneering Robinson parents John and Judy, while Parker Posey is an enigmatic (and now female) Dr Smith. GO The City & The City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Cop thrillers don’t come much more weirdly dystopian than China Miéville’s award-winning 2009 novel and this ultra-stylish adaptation serves its source material very well. In episode two, Inspector Borlú (David Morrissey) ventures back across the border while investigating the murder of a foreign student. Episodes BBC Two, 10.00pm; Wales, 11.05pm Having overcome last week’s unfortunate episode in this sitcom, Matt (Matt LeBlanc) is back on top and leveraging his spurt in the ratings for all it’s worth, handing Sean (Stephen Mangan) and Beverly (Tamsin Greig) a welcome opportunity for escape. Lee and Dean Channel 4, 10.00pm More rough charm, as life gets complicated for Stevenage’s very own Dumb and Dumber when Lee’s (Miles Chapman) financial worries mount and Dean (Mark O’Sullivan) is persuaded to premiere his poetry at the local arts club. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm Freedom of speech and censorship are under the spotlight as host Mary Beard and guests discuss Theatre Clwyd’s production The Assassination of Katie Hopkins and former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s new book Fascism: A Warning. GO Alien: Covenant (2017) ★★★★★ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm The latest film in the Alien saga from Ridley Scott is arguably a mad scientist movie. It follows the crew of the colony ship Covenant (including Katherine Waterson) as they discover what they think is an uncharted paradise, but what they uncover a threat beyond their imagination. Michael Fassbender puts in a spectacular turn as kindly robot David and his twisted “brother” Walter. Invictus (2009) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.45pm Following the death of Nelson Mandela’s ex-wife Winnie last week, aged 81, here’s Clint Eastwood’s take on South Africa’s World Cup victory in 1995. As the country emerges from apartheid, the newly elected President Mandela (an uncanny Morgan Freeman) sees the potential for the national rugby team, led by François Pienaar (Matt Damon), to be a catalyst for harmony. This is a polished and uplifting film. Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982) ★★★★☆ Gold, 1.40am Much like the Secret Policeman’s Ball, this comedy performance film sees the Monty Python gang take to the stage, but this time they’re in Hollywood. Among the sketches are the Silly Olympics, where athletes compete in absurd sports, The Lumberjack Song, and The Ministry of Silly Walks. This film also features Carol Cleveland in numerous supporting roles. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: Class of Mum and Dad, Cunk on Britain and more
Tuesday 10 April Class of Mum and Dad Channel 4, 8.00pm Another week, another Channel 4 series about education. Hold off on the black marks, however, because this one is pretty good. The premise is simple: Blackrod Primary School just outside of Bolton has thrown open its doors to a class made up of pupils’ parents (and one grandparent). They’ve agreed to go back to school for the summer term to see what modern education is really like, sports day, Sats tests and all. Naturally, its harder than many of them were expecting – 36-year-old decorator Jonny states early on that he thought he’d be able to slope off for a swift cigarette break rather than having to adhere to strict class rules – but there are some touching stories amid the more obvious moments. Most notably, this opening episode focuses on two parents with challenging home lives – Julia, who is raising her 10-year-old cousin Asha after Asha’s mother died, and Mark, who has two autistic sons. While the parents’ travails are interesting, the children are the real scene-stealers, however, from those delighted that their mothers and fathers are taking part to those who are more sceptical. The pair of five-year-olds who spend their time corpsing in front of the camera are particularly endearing. Sarah Hughes Champions League Football: Manchester City v Liverpool BT Sport 2, 7.45pm The Etihad Stadium is the setting as City and Liverpool fight it out for a place in the semi-finals. Liverpool have the advantage following a 3-0 win at Anfield in the first leg. This Time Next Year ITV, 8.00pm Davina McCall returns with another set of heart-tugging stories of people attempting to transform their lives over the course of a year. First up are two new parents who dream of making life wonderful for their baby girl who has been deaf since birth and a couple desperate to start a family. Come Home BBC One, 9.00pm Danny Brocklehurst’s claustrophobic family drama comes to a head as we flashback to find out exactly what went wrong in Greg (Christopher Eccleston) and Marie’s (Paula Malcomson) marriage. Hospital BBC Two, 9.00pm The engrossing fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with Nottingham University Hospitals Trust struggling to cope with the new NHS ruling regarding the cancellation of all non-urgent surgery. The episode focuses on Val, a 55-year-old with mouth cancer whose surgeon is desperately trying to ensure that her operation goes ahead. Here and Now Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm With only two episodes left to go, Alan Ball’s family drama continues to tread water in the most frustrating ways. On paper, there are a whole bunch of interesting stories in the mix, from Kristen’s (Sosie Bacon) possible relationship with Navid (Marwan Salama) to Ramon’s (Daniel Zovatto) continuing visions, but the problem is nothing much happens with any of them as each story moves on only incrementally each week. In this episode, Audrey (Holly Hunter) finally turns the tables on the perpetually smug Greg (Tim Robbins). Cunk on Britain BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm Diane Morgan’s pitch-perfect send-up of history programmes moves to the Tudor era and beyond as Cunk takes on Henry VIII, aka “The kingiest king who kinged over Britain” before giving us her unique perspective on “Bloody” Mary Tudor (“horrible like the drink”) and Elizabeth I. SH Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The acerbic Sarah Jessica Parker sitcom has been firing on all cylinders throughout its second series – possibly because it’s more interesting watching Frances (Parker) and Robert (the excellent Thomas Haden Church) navigate life after divorce than it was watching them get there. Here, Frances tries to make a new contact in the art world. SH Speed (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm “There’s a bomb on the bus!” is the most famous line and basically the entire plot of one of the best action thrillers of the Nineties. The sizzling chemistry between LAPD Swat specialist Jack Traven (Keanu Reeves) and passenger Annie Porter (Sandra Bullock) sexes up the exhilarating action scenes, while Dennis Hopper is fantastically unhinged as a revenge-driven, retired bomb squad member turned terrorist. Fast & Furious 7 (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm Paul Walker was killed in a car crash part-way through making this film so it was completed with the help of his two younger brothers and some subtle computer graphics. The good news is that this is the best film in the franchise and does justice to Walker. It isn’t polished blockbuster film-making – though if it was, it wouldn’t be Fast & Furious. But it speaks straight to your adrenal glands. The Witches of Eastwick (1987) ★★★☆☆ Syfy, 9.00pm It is remarkable that director George Miller’s daft, unfettered romp of a film works at all. But, thanks to Jack Nicholson’s delicious overacting as Daryl Van Horne, a manic gentleman who closely resembles the devil, and the three gorgeous, single small-town friends, Alexandra (Cher), Jane (Susan Sarandon) and Sukie (Michelle Pfeiffer), who vie for his debased attentions, it somehow does. Wednesday 11 April Family ties: Edgar Ramirez and Penelope Cruz Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s been fascinating to discover the “true” story behind the 1997 murder of fhion designer Gianni Versace in Ryan Murphy’s glitzy drama, which has expertly depicted the inner world of the perpetrator, a Walter Mitty-style serial killer called Andrew Cunanan (a career-defining role for Darren Criss). This episode, however, has a mid-series lull about it as Cunanan ascends to the higher echelons of gay society, shaping himself meticulously into the posh, preppy eye-candy who saw a sugar daddy (or two) as his way to the top. Elsewhere, the Versace siblings return at last. Gianni (Edgar Ramirez), now in failing health decides to champion his insecure sister Donatella (Penélope Cruz in a frightful wig) and turns her into both designer and muse. Despite a lack of characters to root for – the Versaces’ moments of vulnerability dissolve into tedious histrionics and are eclipsed by Cunanan’s cold-blooded machinations – it’s all quite a fabulous mix of fashion, high society and brutal murder, with some interesting commentary on homophobia in the Nineties as well. Vicki Power The Secret Helpers BBC Two, 8.00pm Watch and weep as timid elderly widow Lesley begins a new life as an out gay woman in this life-affirming docu-series. She’s encouraged with warmth and wisdom by amateur “sages” from abroad, who talk to her secretly through a hidden earpiece. From World War to Cold War Yesterday, 8.00pm As the Second World War drew to a close, Churchill, Stalin and Roosevelt met at Yalta in the Crimea to broker post-war peace. This brisk two-part documentary raids the archives for clips and letters from those who attended, and gathers experts and relatives – including FDR’s grandson – to investigate power plays by Stalin that wrong-footed his Allied counterparts. It’s a detailed look at how and why the compromises reached at Yalta were quickly cast aside. Bacchus Uncovered: Ancient God of Ecstasy BBC Four, 9.00pm Historian Bettany Hughes continues to explore ancient civilisations, moving on to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine. Hughes’s odyssey starts under the City of London, where an 1,800-year-old Roman temple to Bacchus was discovered less than 100 years ago, and takes her to Greece, the Middle East and the Caucasus to explore the god’s roots and influence. VP Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Fluffy as candyfloss, this lewd seaside comedy provides some fun, particularly in the retro casting of stars of yesteryear. This week, an exuberant Sammy (Shane Richie) tries to persuade Monty (John Challis) that, after his successful comeback gig, he is ready for an evening slot. One Born Every Minute Channel 4, 9.00pm This feelgood documentary series brings more poignant tales from a Birmingham labour ward. This week we meet Chantell, about to deliver her third child, who regales us with a moving story of how parenthood with partner Phil has healed the wounds of a traumatic past. First Dates Channel 4, 10.00pm The thoughtful dating show pairs up four more couples, but the road to love is bumpy – septuagenarian Deanna finds her date more interested in the waiter than her. More promising is the match between Bianca and Teza, who allow their vulnerabilities to show. VP The Thin Red Line (1998) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 3.10pm This lyrical Second World War drama, directed by Terrence Malick, tells the story of a group of young US soldiers fighting the Japanese for control of the island of Guadalcanal. Full of stars such as Sean Penn and George Clooney, it struggles with its own battle to squeeze in so many characters but is still an atmospheric meditation on the nature of war. Nick Nolte and Adrien Brody also star. The Remains of the Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 3.55pm The success of Merchant Ivory’s adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Thirties-set novel, a well-observed study of regret, is built around its perfectly cast leads: Anthony Hopkins as James, the butler to the doltish aristocrat Lord Darlington (James Fox) and Emma Thompson as a housekeeper who tries to draw him out of his sterile shell. Lush visuals give it an added richness. Transporter 2 (2005) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A martial arts action sequel, in which Jason Statham and Alessandro Gassman are the sporadically thrilling stars. Statham is Frank Martin, who accepts a job as chauffeur to Jack (Hunter Clary), the son of Miami’s politician Jefferson Billings (Matthew Modine). But the local Colombian drug dealers aren’t happy with his boss’s efforts to clean up the city. Cue a kidnapping, and a potentially deadly encounter with a cocaine baron. Thursday 12 April Changing attitudes: Holly and Hollie Credit: BBC Living with the Brainy Bunch BBC Two, 8.00pm Enterprising, PR-conscious Ash Ali is headmaster of Chessington Community College, a fast-improving school with a few problem pupils. Among them are Jack and Hollie who, on the surface, are comically awful teenagers. Hollie gripes constantly, throws strops and storms out of classrooms if things aren’t going her way. Jack is sullen, lazy and has clocked up 15 suspensions in the past year. It will come as no surprise to regular viewers of such documentaries that their behaviour is rooted in low self-esteem, although their parents unquestionably indulge their foibles. Ali’s novel solution is to place Hollie with Holly, tapdancing head girl and gregarious boffin, and Jack with Tharush, a Sri Lankan immigrant by way of Italy, whose talents are only matched by his work ethic. Now that Jack and Hollie are in the bosom of new families for six weeks, it’s hoped that a new environment, greater discipline and rigid routines will see their results improve and attitudes pick up. There are setbacks on the largely familiar narrative trajectory, but it’s cast to perfection and, as a demonstration of the importance of parenting in academic achievement, the experiment gets an A-star. Gabriel Tate European Tour Golf: The Open de Espana Sky Sports Golf, 11.00am The opening day’s play of the event from the Centro Nacional de Golf in Madrid, which was won by Andrew Johnston the last time it was held in 2016. War Above the Trenches Yesterday, 8.00pm This decent two-parter tells the story of the Royal Flying Corps and their battle to win control of the air in the First World War. Based on Peter Hart’s book Bloody April, it draws affectingly on the testimony of veterans to show there was more to the Western Front than trench warfare. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm The modern age draws closer, as Simon Schama tackles the theme of radiance, guiding us through Gothic cathedrals, Baroque Venetian masterpieces and dazzling Japanese woodblock prints. The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm The second real-life case of the series sees Mark Williams-Thomas investigating the 1977 murders of three women in Glasgow. The suspect is Angus Sinclair, who is currently serving a life sentence for killing two other women that same year. We hear from his ex-wife, and learn how he was a prime suspect but escaped charges for the first killings when key evidence went missing. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm This diverting documentary series concludes with a Himalayan trek, a controversial article in the school newspaper and the GCSE retakes that were the goal of the entire enterprise. Will Alfie, Harry, Jack and co see their grades improve? Urban Myths: Marilyn Monroe and Billy Wilder Sky Arts, 9.00pm Sky Arts’ boldly cast series of vaguely apocryphal tales from the pop-culture frontlines returns with a dispatch from the set of Some Like It Hot, the magnificent 1959 comedy that is almost certainly more fun to watch than it was to make. In this minor but entertaining reimagining, Tony Curtis (Alex Pettyfer) is threatening to cuckold Arthur Miller (Dougray Scott) by making off with Marilyn Monroe (Gemma Arterton), whose caprice, drinking and sensitivity is driving director Billy Wilder (James Purefoy) to distraction. GT Still Game BBC One, 9.30pm; BBC Two Wales, 10.00pm Justifying its prime-time BBC One slot, the Scottish sitcom bows out in triumph with a typically well-wrought farce involving a Hollywood stuntman, a disastrous driving lesson and romance for the widowed Isa (Jane McCarry). GT The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Christopher Lee steals the show as the titular assassin, Francisco Scaramanga, in this classic Bond adventure. Roger Moore’s secret agent, in his second outing as 007, must pursue him, with the help of sidekick Mary Goodnight (Britt Ekland), to the villain’s island lair in order to prevent him harnessing the power of the Sun for evil. The confrontations between Moore and Lee are easily the film’s highlights. Swordfish (2001) ★★☆☆☆ TCM, 9.00pm The most often quoted bit of trivia about this film is that Halle Berry was paid an additional £500,000 to go topless. It’s rather lucky she agreed because she’s probably the most appealing aspect of this frenetic thriller. John Travolta and Hugh Jackman put on testosterone-fuelled displays as a morally dubious counter-terrorist agent and the hacker he blackmails into accessing billions of dollars of government money. Some Like It Hot (1959, b/w) ★★★★★ Sky Arts, 9.30pm When two musicians (Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis) witness a mob hit, they flee the state disguised as women in an all-female band, but further complications arise in the form of demure ukulele player Sugar Kane, superbly played by Marilyn Monroe. Billy Wilder’s classic comedy is effortlessly wacky and clever. Before, at 9pm, is Urban Myths, which imagines what happened on the set of this romcom. Friday 13 April Dishing out opinions: John Torode and Gregg Wallace Credit: BBC MasterChef: The Final BBC One, 8.30pm It has taken 25 episodes over seven weeks to whittle down the 56 amateur contestants to three finalists, and in the process, MasterChef 2018 has produced some of the best cooking – and some of the toughest competition – in the series’ long history. (It has been running in one form or another since 1990; and since 2005 in, roughly, its current format with judges Gregg Wallace and John Torode presenting.) This last week has been no exception, with the finalists having to dig deeper than ever to produce the best dishes of their lives and some great moments – notably during the spectacular trip to South America when they met Peruvian superchef Gaston Acurio and took on a service at the fifth best restaurant in the world, the Central in Lima, under Michelin-starred maestro Virgilio Martínez Véliz. In the finale, it’s all about who cooks the best food, though, as the final three return to the studio kitchen to undergo a test of culinary skills and nerve as they set about creating the most important three-course meal of their lives – in the hope of being judged worthy of a title that has launched many a great career: MasterChef champion. Gerard O’Donovan Chef’s Table: Pastry Netflix, from today This mouth-watering spin-off from Netflix’s popular global foodie series Chef’s Table puts the focus entirely on sweet stuff, talking the cameras inside the kitchens of some of the world’s best pastry chefs, among them Christina Tosi’s Milk Bar in New York, Corrado Assenza’s Caffé Sicilia in Noto, Sicily, Jordi Roca’s El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, and Will Goldfarb’s Room4Dessert in Bali. Lost in Space Netflix, from today Not so much a rerun as a spectacular new take on the classic Sixties sci-fi series about a family marooned in space when their ship runs into difficulty on their way to a new colony and crashes on an unknown and surprisingly hostile planet. There are plenty of thrills and impressive visual effects, and Toby Stephens and Molly Parker are excellent as the pioneering Robinson parents John and Judy, while Parker Posey is an enigmatic (and now female) Dr Smith. GO The City & The City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Cop thrillers don’t come much more weirdly dystopian than China Miéville’s award-winning 2009 novel and this ultra-stylish adaptation serves its source material very well. In episode two, Inspector Borlú (David Morrissey) ventures back across the border while investigating the murder of a foreign student. Episodes BBC Two, 10.00pm; Wales, 11.05pm Having overcome last week’s unfortunate episode in this sitcom, Matt (Matt LeBlanc) is back on top and leveraging his spurt in the ratings for all it’s worth, handing Sean (Stephen Mangan) and Beverly (Tamsin Greig) a welcome opportunity for escape. Lee and Dean Channel 4, 10.00pm More rough charm, as life gets complicated for Stevenage’s very own Dumb and Dumber when Lee’s (Miles Chapman) financial worries mount and Dean (Mark O’Sullivan) is persuaded to premiere his poetry at the local arts club. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm Freedom of speech and censorship are under the spotlight as host Mary Beard and guests discuss Theatre Clwyd’s production The Assassination of Katie Hopkins and former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s new book Fascism: A Warning. GO Alien: Covenant (2017) ★★★★★ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm The latest film in the Alien saga from Ridley Scott is arguably a mad scientist movie. It follows the crew of the colony ship Covenant (including Katherine Waterson) as they discover what they think is an uncharted paradise, but what they uncover a threat beyond their imagination. Michael Fassbender puts in a spectacular turn as kindly robot David and his twisted “brother” Walter. Invictus (2009) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.45pm Following the death of Nelson Mandela’s ex-wife Winnie last week, aged 81, here’s Clint Eastwood’s take on South Africa’s World Cup victory in 1995. As the country emerges from apartheid, the newly elected President Mandela (an uncanny Morgan Freeman) sees the potential for the national rugby team, led by François Pienaar (Matt Damon), to be a catalyst for harmony. This is a polished and uplifting film. Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982) ★★★★☆ Gold, 1.40am Much like the Secret Policeman’s Ball, this comedy performance film sees the Monty Python gang take to the stage, but this time they’re in Hollywood. Among the sketches are the Silly Olympics, where athletes compete in absurd sports, The Lumberjack Song, and The Ministry of Silly Walks. This film also features Carol Cleveland in numerous supporting roles. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate

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