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Ireland 2 Moldova 0: Daryl Murphy double sets up World Cup showdown with Wales

Beating Moldova at home was the easy part, now comes the real test in Cardiff as the Republic of Ireland head to Wales for a game they know they must win to snatch second place in Group D. It has come as no surprise to Martin O’Neill. The Ireland manager always said in private, even when his team were top of the group, that they would need to go to Wales in their final game needing something. It probably should not have been a win to snaffle a play-off place. Ireland were in such a strong position at the end of last year, they were thinking about automatic qualification and although Serbia’s shock defeat in Austria leaves that door slightly ajar, all that matters is beating Wales. Ireland have stumbled and tripped their way to this point. This was their first win of 2017, but they are still standing, still fighting and it sets up a thrilling battle with Chris Coleman’s Welshmen. “The most important thing is we go to Monday night with everything to play for,” said O’Neill. “We know what we have to do, we have to win and the chance is there. I just feel, when we have to win a game, like we did in Lille when we beat Italy to get into the last 16 of the Euros, we will just go for it. The opening goal came from Murphy's left boot Credit: pa “I always said this group would be very tight, we have a fighting chance. I’ve always suspected it would come down to this final game. We will apply ourselves and play really, really strongly. I think we can win the match.” Moldova have not won a competitive fixture for four years, but they can still be a tough nut to crack. Ireland, though, prised them open in less than two minutes when Stephen Ward’s long throw was hooked home by Daryl Murphy. Murphy scored his second minutes later, heading in Ward’s cross. The 34-year-old has been in superb form for Nottingham Forest this season, but these were only the second and third goals of his international career. Whatever happens against Wales - regardless of whether they reach the World Cup next year, having verbally agreed a new two-year contract - O’Neill has to start looking to the future. That was why Bristol City winger, Callum O’Dowda was preferred to Aiden McGeady on the left wing. At just 22, he has the best years ahead of him. At the age of 31, McGeady’s have past him by, a tale of what might have been for such a natural talent. Murphy's second came with a smart header Credit: Getty Images O’Dowda did not disappoint, firing a shot into the side netting before skilfully turning away from a defender on the edge of the area and picking out Shane Long with a perfect low cross. The Southampton striker should have scored, but put his shot narrowly wide. Moldova, who had Alexandru Gatcan sent off for shoving head into the face of Harry Arter late on, almost most pulled a goal back before the interval, but Darren Randolph managed to tip Sergiu Platica’s effort over the bar. It was a warning, but nothing more. Ireland meandered their way towards the victory. Long missed another simple chance after good work from Wes Hoolahan and O’Dowda, but the only damage done was to his pride. Long has not scored a goal since February for club or country.

Ireland 2 Moldova 0: Daryl Murphy double sets up World Cup showdown with Wales

Beating Moldova at home was the easy part, now comes the real test in Cardiff as the Republic of Ireland head to Wales for a game they know they must win to snatch second place in Group D. It has come as no surprise to Martin O’Neill. The Ireland manager always said in private, even when his team were top of the group, that they would need to go to Wales in their final game needing something. It probably should not have been a win to snaffle a play-off place. Ireland were in such a strong position at the end of last year, they were thinking about automatic qualification and although Serbia’s shock defeat in Austria leaves that door slightly ajar, all that matters is beating Wales. Ireland have stumbled and tripped their way to this point. This was their first win of 2017, but they are still standing, still fighting and it sets up a thrilling battle with Chris Coleman’s Welshmen. “The most important thing is we go to Monday night with everything to play for,” said O’Neill. “We know what we have to do, we have to win and the chance is there. I just feel, when we have to win a game, like we did in Lille when we beat Italy to get into the last 16 of the Euros, we will just go for it. The opening goal came from Murphy's left boot Credit: pa “I always said this group would be very tight, we have a fighting chance. I’ve always suspected it would come down to this final game. We will apply ourselves and play really, really strongly. I think we can win the match.” Moldova have not won a competitive fixture for four years, but they can still be a tough nut to crack. Ireland, though, prised them open in less than two minutes when Stephen Ward’s long throw was hooked home by Daryl Murphy. Murphy scored his second minutes later, heading in Ward’s cross. The 34-year-old has been in superb form for Nottingham Forest this season, but these were only the second and third goals of his international career. Whatever happens against Wales - regardless of whether they reach the World Cup next year, having verbally agreed a new two-year contract - O’Neill has to start looking to the future. That was why Bristol City winger, Callum O’Dowda was preferred to Aiden McGeady on the left wing. At just 22, he has the best years ahead of him. At the age of 31, McGeady’s have past him by, a tale of what might have been for such a natural talent. Murphy's second came with a smart header Credit: Getty Images O’Dowda did not disappoint, firing a shot into the side netting before skilfully turning away from a defender on the edge of the area and picking out Shane Long with a perfect low cross. The Southampton striker should have scored, but put his shot narrowly wide. Moldova, who had Alexandru Gatcan sent off for shoving head into the face of Harry Arter late on, almost most pulled a goal back before the interval, but Darren Randolph managed to tip Sergiu Platica’s effort over the bar. It was a warning, but nothing more. Ireland meandered their way towards the victory. Long missed another simple chance after good work from Wes Hoolahan and O’Dowda, but the only damage done was to his pride. Long has not scored a goal since February for club or country.

Ireland 2 Moldova 0: Daryl Murphy double sets up World Cup showdown with Wales

Beating Moldova at home was the easy part, now comes the real test in Cardiff as the Republic of Ireland head to Wales for a game they know they must win to snatch second place in Group D. It has come as no surprise to Martin O’Neill. The Ireland manager always said in private, even when his team were top of the group, that they would need to go to Wales in their final game needing something. It probably should not have been a win to snaffle a play-off place. Ireland were in such a strong position at the end of last year, they were thinking about automatic qualification and although Serbia’s shock defeat in Austria leaves that door slightly ajar, all that matters is beating Wales. Ireland have stumbled and tripped their way to this point. This was their first win of 2017, but they are still standing, still fighting and it sets up a thrilling battle with Chris Coleman’s Welshmen. “The most important thing is we go to Monday night with everything to play for,” said O’Neill. “We know what we have to do, we have to win and the chance is there. I just feel, when we have to win a game, like we did in Lille when we beat Italy to get into the last 16 of the Euros, we will just go for it. The opening goal came from Murphy's left boot Credit: pa “I always said this group would be very tight, we have a fighting chance. I’ve always suspected it would come down to this final game. We will apply ourselves and play really, really strongly. I think we can win the match.” Moldova have not won a competitive fixture for four years, but they can still be a tough nut to crack. Ireland, though, prised them open in less than two minutes when Stephen Ward’s long throw was hooked home by Daryl Murphy. Murphy scored his second minutes later, heading in Ward’s cross. The 34-year-old has been in superb form for Nottingham Forest this season, but these were only the second and third goals of his international career. Whatever happens against Wales - regardless of whether they reach the World Cup next year, having verbally agreed a new two-year contract - O’Neill has to start looking to the future. That was why Bristol City winger, Callum O’Dowda was preferred to Aiden McGeady on the left wing. At just 22, he has the best years ahead of him. At the age of 31, McGeady’s have past him by, a tale of what might have been for such a natural talent. Murphy's second came with a smart header Credit: Getty Images O’Dowda did not disappoint, firing a shot into the side netting before skilfully turning away from a defender on the edge of the area and picking out Shane Long with a perfect low cross. The Southampton striker should have scored, but put his shot narrowly wide. Moldova, who had Alexandru Gatcan sent off for shoving head into the face of Harry Arter late on, almost most pulled a goal back before the interval, but Darren Randolph managed to tip Sergiu Platica’s effort over the bar. It was a warning, but nothing more. Ireland meandered their way towards the victory. Long missed another simple chance after good work from Wes Hoolahan and O’Dowda, but the only damage done was to his pride. Long has not scored a goal since February for club or country.

Exclusive Greg Clarke interview: 'Mark Sampson should have been sacked years ago'

Greg Clarke, the Football Association chairman, has defended the sacking of Mark Sampson as a move that “should have been made three or four years ago” and dismissed claims that his organisation wanted to “nobble” the investigation into the former England women manager’s controversial comments to Eni Aluko and other black players. Five big issues that FA chairman Clarke has dealt with in the past year The FA’s internal inquiry into the Aluko case has resumed, but Clarke insists the first investigation, which cleared Sampson of wrongdoing, was not compromised. He also declined to blame Dan Ashworth, the FA’s technical director, for allegedly overlooking claims about Sampson’s “inappropriate” and “unacceptable” relationships with female players at Bristol Academy - now Bristol City Women. In the first interview by a senior FA executive since Sampson’s dismissal, Clarke said: “When you get to the point where the new chairman and the new chief executive find out something that wasn’t shared with the board a long time ago [details of Sampson’s time in Bristol], do you think - that’s a shame, we’d have done something if we’d known, or do you make a decision? “Martin [Glenn, the chief executive] said - ‘Look, I found this out yesterday.’ I said - ‘Right, what do you think?’ He told me, I agreed with him and we had a board conference call. We sent out some papers, we asked some questions about legalities, facts, what happened when. And we made a decision. Now, that’s the sort of decision that should have been made three or four years ago, but you can’t use that as an excuse to duck the decision today.” Sampson, who became England manager in December 2013, was sacked last month after Glenn revisited a March 2015 report compiled after anonymous concerns were expressed in March 2014. Ashworth is under pressure to reveal what, if anything, he knew about Sampson’s time at Bristol before he appointed him England coach. England has few friends abroad, says Clarke, and it needs to foster goodwill Credit: Getty Images Clarke, Glenn and Ashworth are among those called before the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) select committee on 18 October to discuss the Aluko and Sampson cases. And Clarke was forthright when we met at an FA Cup third-round qualifying tie between Hayes and Yeading and Havant and Waterlooville to mark the first anniversary of his chairmanship. “We’ve been summoned. We’ll respectfully turn up and answer every question to the best of our ability. It’s the way our country works. I don’t resent it,” he said. Of Aluko’s claim that Sampson made comments about “Ebola” and the “arrest” records of black players, Clarke said: “It’s a complicated one. I’m pleased she raised the issues. If there are issues, we want people to feel safe and raise them. But there are two sets of rights. There are the rights of the people who feel aggrieved, and the rights of the people who’ve been accused. We had an internal investigation, which came to a very simple conclusion. There had been some daft things said, but none of them posed systemic evidence of either racism or bullying. Clarke believes Mark Sampson should have been dismissed as England women's manager years ago Credit: Getty Images “Because of the gravity of the accusations we felt the need to get an independent barrister [Katharine Newton] to conduct independent reviews. I read the report and came to the same conclusion. Some people decided they weren’t going to be interviewed. They’ve now come forward and said ‘we would like to speak’. Our barrister is now collecting more evidence. If the conclusions stay the same - fine. If they differ - fine. All we want is to get to the bottom of it.” The Professional Footballers’ Association claim that the original inquiry (in which Ashworth was instrumental) was “not a genuine search for the truth” was rejected by Clarke. He said: “I think it would be reckless and foolish in the extreme to try to nobble a high profile barrister. I just don’t think they’d have it. Maybe I’m wrong, but that sounds like a high risk plan to me. Were there any inefficiencies in our whistleblowing protocols? I’ve asked UK Sport to look at our whistleblowing protocols so people feel able to bring accusations forward. But I can’t think of one high profile QC or barrister who would put their name to a whitewashing exercise and ruin their career.” Clarke was sanguine about the tide of disorder that has washed across his desk. In 12 months he has overseen the sackings of Sam Allardyce and Sampson, pushed through FA structural reforms, approved a new £100m TV deal for the FA Cup, championed diversity  and, most harrowingly, toured the country to discuss the child sex abuse scandal. Sam Allardyce, Harry Redknapp and the full story of Football For Sale 16:38 He said: “I think I’d been in my office for four days when the Sam Allardyce issue blew up, and I was thinking - Crumbs, will I last the first week? Then you have the safeguarding [child sex abuse] crisis. That was much more worrying. The Sam Allardyce thing was one of those things you knew was going to be a media storm. You’re going to make a decision and live with it.” Despite the impending DCMS date, he is not reluctant to talk about the Sampson and Aluko cases. “These two things have become entangled when they’re different, right?” he said. “Just because a safeguarding inquiry reveals some evidence [about Bristol], and that evidence leads us to believe we couldn’t continue to employ Mark Sampson in a senior leadership coaching role for the FA, it doesn’t mean he’s guilty of racism or bullying. That’s a separate inquiry. It will come to a conclusion. It will be transparent, it will be shared.” Ashworth, under increasing pressure to explain his role, was not named by Clarke in his answer to a question about the FA technical director’s role but appeared to defend him: “One of the things that has really annoyed me about football, about business, about politics, government, the public sector, is that there is a propensity for senior people to take as much credit and make as many announcements as they can, and there’s a propensity for some junior person to get all the blame,” Clarke said. "That yields a culture of fear. It yields a bureaucratic culture where no one will take a decision because they will get the blame for it. I’m not going around trying to blame this on some middle management. I’m trying to find what happened.” Clarke served a long apprenticeship for the chairman’s role. “I started as a programme seller and ended up as chairman of Leicester City, the Football League and the FA,” he said. “The FA has a habit of throwing more things at you than you expect. It’s the old ‘events dear boy, events’ quote.” But the child abuse scandal, on which a report is due next year, has left the deepest imprint. He says: “I met a lot of the victims. You sit there and you nod, and try to be supportive, but inside it’s killing you to listen to what these guys have been through. I gave a lot of reflection. I went to see all the counties - all 50 of them. “They had stories about - ‘Oh Fred’s all right, he’s been coaching for years. And now he wants to work with the kids, we’re going to get him checked out. It turns out, the police say: ‘He’s a raging paedophile, we’ve pulled him loads of times.’ These were historic stories. “And what surprised me is how these evil characters - and I can’t call them anything else - how cunning they are. How really deviously cunning they are. And they take advantage of people who think the best of other people. “I spoke to 20 or 30 [victims]. Usually in small groups. Speaking is overstating it. It’s mainly listening. Because you don’t have a lot to offer beyond a listening ear. A commitment that we will move heaven and earth to make sure no children have to go through that in the future - and a recognition that we will hunt down anyone we can and give the information to the police, because these are heinous crimes. “It was certainly a chastening experience. It leaves you feeling very inadequate. I’ve been in the game for 25 years. You think - institutionally, the game has let these people down. Really let them down.” Greg Clarke on ... | The World Cup, the Premier League and more  

Exclusive Greg Clarke interview: 'Mark Sampson should have been sacked years ago'

Greg Clarke, the Football Association chairman, has defended the sacking of Mark Sampson as a move that “should have been made three or four years ago” and dismissed claims that his organisation wanted to “nobble” the investigation into the former England women manager’s controversial comments to Eni Aluko and other black players. Five big issues that FA chairman Clarke has dealt with in the past year The FA’s internal inquiry into the Aluko case has resumed, but Clarke insists the first investigation, which cleared Sampson of wrongdoing, was not compromised. He also declined to blame Dan Ashworth, the FA’s technical director, for allegedly overlooking claims about Sampson’s “inappropriate” and “unacceptable” relationships with female players at Bristol Academy - now Bristol City Women. In the first interview by a senior FA executive since Sampson’s dismissal, Clarke said: “When you get to the point where the new chairman and the new chief executive find out something that wasn’t shared with the board a long time ago [details of Sampson’s time in Bristol], do you think - that’s a shame, we’d have done something if we’d known, or do you make a decision? “Martin [Glenn, the chief executive] said - ‘Look, I found this out yesterday.’ I said - ‘Right, what do you think?’ He told me, I agreed with him and we had a board conference call. We sent out some papers, we asked some questions about legalities, facts, what happened when. And we made a decision. Now, that’s the sort of decision that should have been made three or four years ago, but you can’t use that as an excuse to duck the decision today.” Sampson, who became England manager in December 2013, was sacked last month after Glenn revisited a March 2015 report compiled after anonymous concerns were expressed in March 2014. Ashworth is under pressure to reveal what, if anything, he knew about Sampson’s time at Bristol before he appointed him England coach. England has few friends abroad, says Clarke, and it needs to foster goodwill Credit: Getty Images Clarke, Glenn and Ashworth are among those called before the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) select committee on 18 October to discuss the Aluko and Sampson cases. And Clarke was forthright when we met at an FA Cup third-round qualifying tie between Hayes and Yeading and Havant and Waterlooville to mark the first anniversary of his chairmanship. “We’ve been summoned. We’ll respectfully turn up and answer every question to the best of our ability. It’s the way our country works. I don’t resent it,” he said. Of Aluko’s claim that Sampson made comments about “Ebola” and the “arrest” records of black players, Clarke said: “It’s a complicated one. I’m pleased she raised the issues. If there are issues, we want people to feel safe and raise them. But there are two sets of rights. There are the rights of the people who feel aggrieved, and the rights of the people who’ve been accused. We had an internal investigation, which came to a very simple conclusion. There had been some daft things said, but none of them posed systemic evidence of either racism or bullying. Clarke believes Mark Sampson should have been dismissed as England women's manager years ago Credit: Getty Images “Because of the gravity of the accusations we felt the need to get an independent barrister [Katharine Newton] to conduct independent reviews. I read the report and came to the same conclusion. Some people decided they weren’t going to be interviewed. They’ve now come forward and said ‘we would like to speak’. Our barrister is now collecting more evidence. If the conclusions stay the same - fine. If they differ - fine. All we want is to get to the bottom of it.” The Professional Footballers’ Association claim that the original inquiry (in which Ashworth was instrumental) was “not a genuine search for the truth” was rejected by Clarke. He said: “I think it would be reckless and foolish in the extreme to try to nobble a high profile barrister. I just don’t think they’d have it. Maybe I’m wrong, but that sounds like a high risk plan to me. Were there any inefficiencies in our whistleblowing protocols? I’ve asked UK Sport to look at our whistleblowing protocols so people feel able to bring accusations forward. But I can’t think of one high profile QC or barrister who would put their name to a whitewashing exercise and ruin their career.” Clarke was sanguine about the tide of disorder that has washed across his desk. In 12 months he has overseen the sackings of Sam Allardyce and Sampson, pushed through FA structural reforms, approved a new £100m TV deal for the FA Cup, championed diversity  and, most harrowingly, toured the country to discuss the child sex abuse scandal. Sam Allardyce, Harry Redknapp and the full story of Football For Sale 16:38 He said: “I think I’d been in my office for four days when the Sam Allardyce issue blew up, and I was thinking - Crumbs, will I last the first week? Then you have the safeguarding [child sex abuse] crisis. That was much more worrying. The Sam Allardyce thing was one of those things you knew was going to be a media storm. You’re going to make a decision and live with it.” Despite the impending DCMS date, he is not reluctant to talk about the Sampson and Aluko cases. “These two things have become entangled when they’re different, right?” he said. “Just because a safeguarding inquiry reveals some evidence [about Bristol], and that evidence leads us to believe we couldn’t continue to employ Mark Sampson in a senior leadership coaching role for the FA, it doesn’t mean he’s guilty of racism or bullying. That’s a separate inquiry. It will come to a conclusion. It will be transparent, it will be shared.” Ashworth, under increasing pressure to explain his role, was not named by Clarke in his answer to a question about the FA technical director’s role but appeared to defend him: “One of the things that has really annoyed me about football, about business, about politics, government, the public sector, is that there is a propensity for senior people to take as much credit and make as many announcements as they can, and there’s a propensity for some junior person to get all the blame,” Clarke said. "That yields a culture of fear. It yields a bureaucratic culture where no one will take a decision because they will get the blame for it. I’m not going around trying to blame this on some middle management. I’m trying to find what happened.” Clarke served a long apprenticeship for the chairman’s role. “I started as a programme seller and ended up as chairman of Leicester City, the Football League and the FA,” he said. “The FA has a habit of throwing more things at you than you expect. It’s the old ‘events dear boy, events’ quote.” But the child abuse scandal, on which a report is due next year, has left the deepest imprint. He says: “I met a lot of the victims. You sit there and you nod, and try to be supportive, but inside it’s killing you to listen to what these guys have been through. I gave a lot of reflection. I went to see all the counties - all 50 of them. “They had stories about - ‘Oh Fred’s all right, he’s been coaching for years. And now he wants to work with the kids, we’re going to get him checked out. It turns out, the police say: ‘He’s a raging paedophile, we’ve pulled him loads of times.’ These were historic stories. “And what surprised me is how these evil characters - and I can’t call them anything else - how cunning they are. How really deviously cunning they are. And they take advantage of people who think the best of other people. “I spoke to 20 or 30 [victims]. Usually in small groups. Speaking is overstating it. It’s mainly listening. Because you don’t have a lot to offer beyond a listening ear. A commitment that we will move heaven and earth to make sure no children have to go through that in the future - and a recognition that we will hunt down anyone we can and give the information to the police, because these are heinous crimes. “It was certainly a chastening experience. It leaves you feeling very inadequate. I’ve been in the game for 25 years. You think - institutionally, the game has let these people down. Really let them down.” Greg Clarke on ... | The World Cup, the Premier League and more  

Exclusive Greg Clarke interview: 'Mark Sampson should have been sacked years ago'

Greg Clarke, the Football Association chairman, has defended the sacking of Mark Sampson as a move that “should have been made three or four years ago” and dismissed claims that his organisation wanted to “nobble” the investigation into the former England women manager’s controversial comments to Eni Aluko and other black players. Five big issues that FA chairman Clarke has dealt with in the past year The FA’s internal inquiry into the Aluko case has resumed, but Clarke insists the first investigation, which cleared Sampson of wrongdoing, was not compromised. He also declined to blame Dan Ashworth, the FA’s technical director, for allegedly overlooking claims about Sampson’s “inappropriate” and “unacceptable” relationships with female players at Bristol Academy - now Bristol City Women. In the first interview by a senior FA executive since Sampson’s dismissal, Clarke said: “When you get to the point where the new chairman and the new chief executive find out something that wasn’t shared with the board a long time ago [details of Sampson’s time in Bristol], do you think - that’s a shame, we’d have done something if we’d known, or do you make a decision? “Martin [Glenn, the chief executive] said - ‘Look, I found this out yesterday.’ I said - ‘Right, what do you think?’ He told me, I agreed with him and we had a board conference call. We sent out some papers, we asked some questions about legalities, facts, what happened when. And we made a decision. Now, that’s the sort of decision that should have been made three or four years ago, but you can’t use that as an excuse to duck the decision today.” Sampson, who became England manager in December 2013, was sacked last month after Glenn revisited a March 2015 report compiled after anonymous concerns were expressed in March 2014. Ashworth is under pressure to reveal what, if anything, he knew about Sampson’s time at Bristol before he appointed him England coach. England has few friends abroad, says Clarke, and it needs to foster goodwill Credit: Getty Images Clarke, Glenn and Ashworth are among those called before the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) select committee on 18 October to discuss the Aluko and Sampson cases. And Clarke was forthright when we met at an FA Cup third-round qualifying tie between Hayes and Yeading and Havant and Waterlooville to mark the first anniversary of his chairmanship. “We’ve been summoned. We’ll respectfully turn up and answer every question to the best of our ability. It’s the way our country works. I don’t resent it,” he said. Of Aluko’s claim that Sampson made comments about “Ebola” and the “arrest” records of black players, Clarke said: “It’s a complicated one. I’m pleased she raised the issues. If there are issues, we want people to feel safe and raise them. But there are two sets of rights. There are the rights of the people who feel aggrieved, and the rights of the people who’ve been accused. We had an internal investigation, which came to a very simple conclusion. There had been some daft things said, but none of them posed systemic evidence of either racism or bullying. Clarke believes Mark Sampson should have been dismissed as England women's manager years ago Credit: Getty Images “Because of the gravity of the accusations we felt the need to get an independent barrister [Katharine Newton] to conduct independent reviews. I read the report and came to the same conclusion. Some people decided they weren’t going to be interviewed. They’ve now come forward and said ‘we would like to speak’. Our barrister is now collecting more evidence. If the conclusions stay the same - fine. If they differ - fine. All we want is to get to the bottom of it.” The Professional Footballers’ Association claim that the original inquiry (in which Ashworth was instrumental) was “not a genuine search for the truth” was rejected by Clarke. He said: “I think it would be reckless and foolish in the extreme to try to nobble a high profile barrister. I just don’t think they’d have it. Maybe I’m wrong, but that sounds like a high risk plan to me. Were there any inefficiencies in our whistleblowing protocols? I’ve asked UK Sport to look at our whistleblowing protocols so people feel able to bring accusations forward. But I can’t think of one high profile QC or barrister who would put their name to a whitewashing exercise and ruin their career.” Clarke was sanguine about the tide of disorder that has washed across his desk. In 12 months he has overseen the sackings of Sam Allardyce and Sampson, pushed through FA structural reforms, approved a new £100m TV deal for the FA Cup, championed diversity  and, most harrowingly, toured the country to discuss the child sex abuse scandal. Sam Allardyce, Harry Redknapp and the full story of Football For Sale 16:38 He said: “I think I’d been in my office for four days when the Sam Allardyce issue blew up, and I was thinking - Crumbs, will I last the first week? Then you have the safeguarding [child sex abuse] crisis. That was much more worrying. The Sam Allardyce thing was one of those things you knew was going to be a media storm. You’re going to make a decision and live with it.” Despite the impending DCMS date, he is not reluctant to talk about the Sampson and Aluko cases. “These two things have become entangled when they’re different, right?” he said. “Just because a safeguarding inquiry reveals some evidence [about Bristol], and that evidence leads us to believe we couldn’t continue to employ Mark Sampson in a senior leadership coaching role for the FA, it doesn’t mean he’s guilty of racism or bullying. That’s a separate inquiry. It will come to a conclusion. It will be transparent, it will be shared.” Ashworth, under increasing pressure to explain his role, was not named by Clarke in his answer to a question about the FA technical director’s role but appeared to defend him: “One of the things that has really annoyed me about football, about business, about politics, government, the public sector, is that there is a propensity for senior people to take as much credit and make as many announcements as they can, and there’s a propensity for some junior person to get all the blame,” Clarke said. "That yields a culture of fear. It yields a bureaucratic culture where no one will take a decision because they will get the blame for it. I’m not going around trying to blame this on some middle management. I’m trying to find what happened.” Clarke served a long apprenticeship for the chairman’s role. “I started as a programme seller and ended up as chairman of Leicester City, the Football League and the FA,” he said. “The FA has a habit of throwing more things at you than you expect. It’s the old ‘events dear boy, events’ quote.” But the child abuse scandal, on which a report is due next year, has left the deepest imprint. He says: “I met a lot of the victims. You sit there and you nod, and try to be supportive, but inside it’s killing you to listen to what these guys have been through. I gave a lot of reflection. I went to see all the counties - all 50 of them. “They had stories about - ‘Oh Fred’s all right, he’s been coaching for years. And now he wants to work with the kids, we’re going to get him checked out. It turns out, the police say: ‘He’s a raging paedophile, we’ve pulled him loads of times.’ These were historic stories. “And what surprised me is how these evil characters - and I can’t call them anything else - how cunning they are. How really deviously cunning they are. And they take advantage of people who think the best of other people. “I spoke to 20 or 30 [victims]. Usually in small groups. Speaking is overstating it. It’s mainly listening. Because you don’t have a lot to offer beyond a listening ear. A commitment that we will move heaven and earth to make sure no children have to go through that in the future - and a recognition that we will hunt down anyone we can and give the information to the police, because these are heinous crimes. “It was certainly a chastening experience. It leaves you feeling very inadequate. I’ve been in the game for 25 years. You think - institutionally, the game has let these people down. Really let them down.” Greg Clarke on ... | The World Cup, the Premier League and more  

West Ham's surprise match-winner Diafra Sakho back in Slaven Bilic's plans: 'we did not want to let him go'

At 3.20pm on the final day of August, Diafra Sakho was nowhere to be seen at West Ham training. Instead, after attempting to force a move away from the club, he was at Chelmsford races with his agent. At 3.20pm on the final day of September, Sakho sat on the West Ham bench at the London Stadium. From there, he would have heard the boos of the home fans as his toiling team-mates found the going hard against an obdurate Swansea. Those jeers intensified when Sakho was introduced to the fray in favour of Javier Hernandez, but they soon turned to cheers when the striker became the surprise match-winner in the final minute. It made for quite the turnaround, and also provided vindication for his manager Slaven Bilic. Firstly for the substitution and secondly for refusing to let Sakho depart for Rennes in the summer. Asked how close Sakho was to leaving the club, Bilic joked that the 27-year-old was “on the horse” but said “we did not want to let him go”. Sakho fitter, sharper and quicker than before, according to his manager Credit:  Getty Images Europe After an injury-plagued campaign last year, Sakho is now firmly back in his manager’s plans. “There have been stories about him, in the transfer window and all that,” said Bilic. “He stayed and balanced his head here. “He is fitter, he is training better, he is sharper, he is quicker. You can see that he is injury-free and he is doing well in training.” Sakho’s intervention relieves some of the pressure on Bilic after a difficult start to the season, but West Ham’s total lack of creativity on their own patch will remain a major concern. Bilic has essentially been under pressure for a year. That is largely due to soulless performances like this, at West Ham’s grand new home. Rafael Benitez has been linked with the West Ham job, while there were even reports that Carlo Ancelotti could be tempted by a move to east London. Bilic remains calm despite continued questions marks over his West Ham future Credit: Getty Images Europe “It does not affect me,” Bilic said. “If it affected me I would be dead by now. It is not about the last few days, it is almost a year now. Do I enjoy this situation? No. But does it affect me? No, I am trying to do my job.” The international break will allow players such as Manuel Lanzini and Michail Antonio, neither of whom were fully fit yesterday, to work on getting back into top condition.  West Ham now have a welcoming run of fixtures, but BIlic knows they must improve. “I am the first one to say we have to play better and we can be better,” he said. Block. Tackle. Defy. Repeat. 35:44 For Swansea, their struggles continue in front of goal. Paul Clement paired Tammy Abraham with Wilfried Bony in attack, but neither posed a serious threat. Swansea have scored just three goals all season. “They are not playing to their potential,” said Clement of his attackers. On Abraham, the 19-year-old striker on loan from Chelsea who has scored plenty of goals in the Championship and at junior international levels, Clement said: “This is the biggest step for him. “In the Championship [for Bristol City], he scored a really good amount of goals. But this is the Premier League. The difference is big. Now he has to work towards closing the gap. “He is not the only one out there. Everyone needs to raise their standard.”

West Ham's surprise match-winner Diafra Sakho back in Slaven Bilic's plans: 'we did not want to let him go'

At 3.20pm on the final day of August, Diafra Sakho was nowhere to be seen at West Ham training. Instead, after attempting to force a move away from the club, he was at Chelmsford races with his agent. At 3.20pm on the final day of September, Sakho sat on the West Ham bench at the London Stadium. From there, he would have heard the boos of the home fans as his toiling team-mates found the going hard against an obdurate Swansea. Those jeers intensified when Sakho was introduced to the fray in favour of Javier Hernandez, but they soon turned to cheers when the striker became the surprise match-winner in the final minute. It made for quite the turnaround, and also provided vindication for his manager Slaven Bilic. Firstly for the substitution and secondly for refusing to let Sakho depart for Rennes in the summer. Asked how close Sakho was to leaving the club, Bilic joked that the 27-year-old was “on the horse” but said “we did not want to let him go”. Sakho fitter, sharper and quicker than before, according to his manager Credit:  Getty Images Europe After an injury-plagued campaign last year, Sakho is now firmly back in his manager’s plans. “There have been stories about him, in the transfer window and all that,” said Bilic. “He stayed and balanced his head here. “He is fitter, he is training better, he is sharper, he is quicker. You can see that he is injury-free and he is doing well in training.” Sakho’s intervention relieves some of the pressure on Bilic after a difficult start to the season, but West Ham’s total lack of creativity on their own patch will remain a major concern. Bilic has essentially been under pressure for a year. That is largely due to soulless performances like this, at West Ham’s grand new home. Rafael Benitez has been linked with the West Ham job, while there were even reports that Carlo Ancelotti could be tempted by a move to east London. Bilic remains calm despite continued questions marks over his West Ham future Credit: Getty Images Europe “It does not affect me,” Bilic said. “If it affected me I would be dead by now. It is not about the last few days, it is almost a year now. Do I enjoy this situation? No. But does it affect me? No, I am trying to do my job.” The international break will allow players such as Manuel Lanzini and Michail Antonio, neither of whom were fully fit yesterday, to work on getting back into top condition.  West Ham now have a welcoming run of fixtures, but BIlic knows they must improve. “I am the first one to say we have to play better and we can be better,” he said. Block. Tackle. Defy. Repeat. 35:44 For Swansea, their struggles continue in front of goal. Paul Clement paired Tammy Abraham with Wilfried Bony in attack, but neither posed a serious threat. Swansea have scored just three goals all season. “They are not playing to their potential,” said Clement of his attackers. On Abraham, the 19-year-old striker on loan from Chelsea who has scored plenty of goals in the Championship and at junior international levels, Clement said: “This is the biggest step for him. “In the Championship [for Bristol City], he scored a really good amount of goals. But this is the Premier League. The difference is big. Now he has to work towards closing the gap. “He is not the only one out there. Everyone needs to raise their standard.”

West Ham's surprise match-winner Diafra Sakho back in Slaven Bilic's plans: 'we did not want to let him go'

At 3.20pm on the final day of August, Diafra Sakho was nowhere to be seen at West Ham training. Instead, after attempting to force a move away from the club, he was at Chelmsford races with his agent. At 3.20pm on the final day of September, Sakho sat on the West Ham bench at the London Stadium. From there, he would have heard the boos of the home fans as his toiling team-mates found the going hard against an obdurate Swansea. Those jeers intensified when Sakho was introduced to the fray in favour of Javier Hernandez, but they soon turned to cheers when the striker became the surprise match-winner in the final minute. It made for quite the turnaround, and also provided vindication for his manager Slaven Bilic. Firstly for the substitution and secondly for refusing to let Sakho depart for Rennes in the summer. Asked how close Sakho was to leaving the club, Bilic joked that the 27-year-old was “on the horse” but said “we did not want to let him go”. Sakho fitter, sharper and quicker than before, according to his manager Credit:  Getty Images Europe After an injury-plagued campaign last year, Sakho is now firmly back in his manager’s plans. “There have been stories about him, in the transfer window and all that,” said Bilic. “He stayed and balanced his head here. “He is fitter, he is training better, he is sharper, he is quicker. You can see that he is injury-free and he is doing well in training.” Sakho’s intervention relieves some of the pressure on Bilic after a difficult start to the season, but West Ham’s total lack of creativity on their own patch will remain a major concern. Bilic has essentially been under pressure for a year. That is largely due to soulless performances like this, at West Ham’s grand new home. Rafael Benitez has been linked with the West Ham job, while there were even reports that Carlo Ancelotti could be tempted by a move to east London. Bilic remains calm despite continued questions marks over his West Ham future Credit: Getty Images Europe “It does not affect me,” Bilic said. “If it affected me I would be dead by now. It is not about the last few days, it is almost a year now. Do I enjoy this situation? No. But does it affect me? No, I am trying to do my job.” The international break will allow players such as Manuel Lanzini and Michail Antonio, neither of whom were fully fit yesterday, to work on getting back into top condition.  West Ham now have a welcoming run of fixtures, but BIlic knows they must improve. “I am the first one to say we have to play better and we can be better,” he said. Block. Tackle. Defy. Repeat. 35:44 For Swansea, their struggles continue in front of goal. Paul Clement paired Tammy Abraham with Wilfried Bony in attack, but neither posed a serious threat. Swansea have scored just three goals all season. “They are not playing to their potential,” said Clement of his attackers. On Abraham, the 19-year-old striker on loan from Chelsea who has scored plenty of goals in the Championship and at junior international levels, Clement said: “This is the biggest step for him. “In the Championship [for Bristol City], he scored a really good amount of goals. But this is the Premier League. The difference is big. Now he has to work towards closing the gap. “He is not the only one out there. Everyone needs to raise their standard.”

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Aden Flint’s new Bristol City goal GIF is possibly the club’s best effort yet

Flint has scored a decent number of goals so far this season for a defender.

Aden Flint’s new Bristol City goal GIF is possibly the club’s best effort yet

Flint has scored a decent number of goals so far this season for a defender.

Crystal Palace suffer major blow with Christian Benteke ruled out for minimum six weeks

Crystal Palace have suffered a significant blow in their battle to avoid relegation, with striker Christian Benteke ruled out for at least six weeks with a knee injury. The Belgium international underwent a scan on Monday after suffering the ligament damage in Saturday’s 5-0 defeat at Manchester City. There are fears that he could be out for longer than six weeks but that is the time frame being put on the injury at present following the scan. Benteke’s absence will hurt Palace, who are already without Connor Wickham, who has not played for almost a year due to injury, and let Fraizer Campbell and Loic Remy leave the club in the summer. Palace did try to sign Oumar Niasse from Everton, but a deal for the 27-year-old Senegal striker fell through. Niasse came off the bench to score the two goals to beat Bournemouth last Saturday for Everton. It means Palace may have to look at any free agents who are available to try and bolster their squad. Palace can sign a free agent outside the transfer window and have left one space in their 25‑man Premier League squad to allow them to register any potential new arrival. Roy Hodgson knows he faces an enormous task to keep Palace up Credit: reuters Rickie Lambert is a player who is available and who new Palace manager Roy Hodgson knows well from England duty. Lambert has been without a club since he left Cardiff over the summer, but there would be doubts over the fitness of the 35-year-old. Palace have played winger Bakary Sako as a central striker and may have to do so again with the forthcoming fixtures against Manchester United, before the international break, and Chelsea immediately after it. After that Palace face Newcastle United away and then Bristol City away in the Carabao Cup, before a home fixture against West Ham United and then Tottenham Hotspur away. It has been an unforgiving start to the season for Palace, who have yet to score a goal or gain a point in the Premier League.

Crystal Palace suffer major blow with Christian Benteke ruled out for minimum six weeks

Crystal Palace have suffered a significant blow in their battle to avoid relegation, with striker Christian Benteke ruled out for at least six weeks with a knee injury. The Belgium international underwent a scan on Monday after suffering the ligament damage in Saturday’s 5-0 defeat at Manchester City. There are fears that he could be out for longer than six weeks but that is the time frame being put on the injury at present following the scan. Benteke’s absence will hurt Palace, who are already without Connor Wickham, who has not played for almost a year due to injury, and let Fraizer Campbell and Loic Remy leave the club in the summer. Palace did try to sign Oumar Niasse from Everton, but a deal for the 27-year-old Senegal striker fell through. Niasse came off the bench to score the two goals to beat Bournemouth last Saturday for Everton. It means Palace may have to look at any free agents who are available to try and bolster their squad. Palace can sign a free agent outside the transfer window and have left one space in their 25‑man Premier League squad to allow them to register any potential new arrival. Roy Hodgson knows he faces an enormous task to keep Palace up Credit: reuters Rickie Lambert is a player who is available and who new Palace manager Roy Hodgson knows well from England duty. Lambert has been without a club since he left Cardiff over the summer, but there would be doubts over the fitness of the 35-year-old. Palace have played winger Bakary Sako as a central striker and may have to do so again with the forthcoming fixtures against Manchester United, before the international break, and Chelsea immediately after it. After that Palace face Newcastle United away and then Bristol City away in the Carabao Cup, before a home fixture against West Ham United and then Tottenham Hotspur away. It has been an unforgiving start to the season for Palace, who have yet to score a goal or gain a point in the Premier League.

Chelsea crush Bristol City on opening weekend of WSL as Arsenal leave it late for 3-2 Birmingham win

Chelsea crush Bristol City on opening weekend of WSL as Arsenal leave it late for 3-2 Birmingham win

Pep Guardiola: League Cup is a 'waste of energy'

Manchester City manager Pep Guardiola believes English clubs might be better without the "wasted energy" of a League Cup campaign. The Spaniard echoed the view expressed by United counterpart Jose Mourinho on Wednesday, when the Portuguese suggested the domestic game could perhaps "survive or even be better without this competition", which United won last season. Guardiola, like most managers, made major changes for the midweek cup win over West Brom and is poised to switch back to a first-choice XI for the visit of Crystal Palace in the Premier League on Saturday. There were eight alterations to the team sheet for the game against the Baggies compared to the team which thrashed Watford last weekend, with City facing a hectic schedule which includes games against Shakhtar Donetsk and Chelsea before the end of the month. "Business is business, but we have a lot of games," Guardiola said at a press conference on Friday ahead of the Palace match. City lost Ilkay Gundogan to injury on Wednesday Credit: Reuters "If you have to play the competition you have to play the competition, but it is a title that when you win it is okay, but after that people don't give too much credit. "You don't promote to go to international competitions. The prize is good when you win another one, but you waste a lot of energy. "You can't imagine going to play Tony Pulis teams at West Bromwich Albion, play 90 minutes there in those conditions, and then after three or four hours - bus, come back, three days later Crystal Palace, three days later Shakhtar Donetsk, three or four days later Stamford Bridge. "For the managers it is a lot of wasted energy, but we knew that before, so it is not a complaint in those terms. If we have to play we have to play." Which Premier League captains were born closest to their club? However, the League Cup remains "very important" for teams like Stoke, according to their manager Mark Hughes. The Potters boss made six changes to his team for the trip to Bristol City and lost 2-0 to the Sky Bet Championship club. Hughes, though, feels the competition is still a worthwhile one to those teams outside of the very biggest Premier League teamse. "I think (Mourinho) is just talking in terms of their ambitions," Hughes said. Mark Hughes would love to still be in the League Cup Credit: PA "Obviously, their priority is the Champions League, because it is huge for them, and the Premier League. So I am sure they view the League Cup as a hindrance, but we certainly don't. "We would love to be involved still, but unfortunately we are going to have to wait another year. "I think he is just talking in terms of his group of players, his club and their priorities, and I can see why he said it, but for the rest of us, it is an opportunity to win a trophy, and that is very important."

Pep Guardiola: League Cup is a 'waste of energy'

Manchester City manager Pep Guardiola believes English clubs might be better without the "wasted energy" of a League Cup campaign. The Spaniard echoed the view expressed by United counterpart Jose Mourinho on Wednesday, when the Portuguese suggested the domestic game could perhaps "survive or even be better without this competition", which United won last season. Guardiola, like most managers, made major changes for the midweek cup win over West Brom and is poised to switch back to a first-choice XI for the visit of Crystal Palace in the Premier League on Saturday. There were eight alterations to the team sheet for the game against the Baggies compared to the team which thrashed Watford last weekend, with City facing a hectic schedule which includes games against Shakhtar Donetsk and Chelsea before the end of the month. "Business is business, but we have a lot of games," Guardiola said at a press conference on Friday ahead of the Palace match. City lost Ilkay Gundogan to injury on Wednesday Credit: Reuters "If you have to play the competition you have to play the competition, but it is a title that when you win it is okay, but after that people don't give too much credit. "You don't promote to go to international competitions. The prize is good when you win another one, but you waste a lot of energy. "You can't imagine going to play Tony Pulis teams at West Bromwich Albion, play 90 minutes there in those conditions, and then after three or four hours - bus, come back, three days later Crystal Palace, three days later Shakhtar Donetsk, three or four days later Stamford Bridge. "For the managers it is a lot of wasted energy, but we knew that before, so it is not a complaint in those terms. If we have to play we have to play." Which Premier League captains were born closest to their club? However, the League Cup remains "very important" for teams like Stoke, according to their manager Mark Hughes. The Potters boss made six changes to his team for the trip to Bristol City and lost 2-0 to the Sky Bet Championship club. Hughes, though, feels the competition is still a worthwhile one to those teams outside of the very biggest Premier League teamse. "I think (Mourinho) is just talking in terms of their ambitions," Hughes said. Mark Hughes would love to still be in the League Cup Credit: PA "Obviously, their priority is the Champions League, because it is huge for them, and the Premier League. So I am sure they view the League Cup as a hindrance, but we certainly don't. "We would love to be involved still, but unfortunately we are going to have to wait another year. "I think he is just talking in terms of his group of players, his club and their priorities, and I can see why he said it, but for the rest of us, it is an opportunity to win a trophy, and that is very important."

Pep Guardiola: League Cup is a 'waste of energy'

Manchester City manager Pep Guardiola believes English clubs might be better without the "wasted energy" of a League Cup campaign. The Spaniard echoed the view expressed by United counterpart Jose Mourinho on Wednesday, when the Portuguese suggested the domestic game could perhaps "survive or even be better without this competition", which United won last season. Guardiola, like most managers, made major changes for the midweek cup win over West Brom and is poised to switch back to a first-choice XI for the visit of Crystal Palace in the Premier League on Saturday. There were eight alterations to the team sheet for the game against the Baggies compared to the team which thrashed Watford last weekend, with City facing a hectic schedule which includes games against Shakhtar Donetsk and Chelsea before the end of the month. "Business is business, but we have a lot of games," Guardiola said at a press conference on Friday ahead of the Palace match. City lost Ilkay Gundogan to injury on Wednesday Credit: Reuters "If you have to play the competition you have to play the competition, but it is a title that when you win it is okay, but after that people don't give too much credit. "You don't promote to go to international competitions. The prize is good when you win another one, but you waste a lot of energy. "You can't imagine going to play Tony Pulis teams at West Bromwich Albion, play 90 minutes there in those conditions, and then after three or four hours - bus, come back, three days later Crystal Palace, three days later Shakhtar Donetsk, three or four days later Stamford Bridge. "For the managers it is a lot of wasted energy, but we knew that before, so it is not a complaint in those terms. If we have to play we have to play." Which Premier League captains were born closest to their club? However, the League Cup remains "very important" for teams like Stoke, according to their manager Mark Hughes. The Potters boss made six changes to his team for the trip to Bristol City and lost 2-0 to the Sky Bet Championship club. Hughes, though, feels the competition is still a worthwhile one to those teams outside of the very biggest Premier League teamse. "I think (Mourinho) is just talking in terms of their ambitions," Hughes said. Mark Hughes would love to still be in the League Cup Credit: PA "Obviously, their priority is the Champions League, because it is huge for them, and the Premier League. So I am sure they view the League Cup as a hindrance, but we certainly don't. "We would love to be involved still, but unfortunately we are going to have to wait another year. "I think he is just talking in terms of his group of players, his club and their priorities, and I can see why he said it, but for the rest of us, it is an opportunity to win a trophy, and that is very important."

Furious Bristol college demands answers from FA over Mark Sampson sacking

There is dismay at the Bristol ­college where Mark Sampson made his name over the Football Association’s failure to give any warning it was to sack the England Women head coach over there being any evidence of inappropriate relationships with some of the Bristol players, The Telegraph understands.  The South Gloucestershire and Stroud (SGS) College at which Sampson worked while he was head coach of Bristol Academy, in the Women’s Super League, feels it has been hung out to dry by the FA over his shock sacking on Wednesday. It is understood that the FA gave no indication to SGS College that it was to revisit a safeguarding investigation into the former England Women head coach. Sampson was initially cleared of being a safeguarding risk by an FA probe. The Telegraph also reveals that SGS responded to rumours about Sampson’s conduct in 2012 and conducted its own investigation into the then head coach, which found no evidence of wrongdoing. Since the FA announced Sampson’s sacking, SGS College has been in the process of checking its records to ensure that there were no formal complaints made about the coach’s behaviour beyond that it investigated in 2012.  He was originally a coach at the Bristol Academy centre of excellence and was appointed first-team head coach in September 2010. The college has privately asked the FA to clear its reputation, or at least share some detail as to the ­nature of Sampson’s alleged misconduct so that the college could also investigate. The college has been eager to reassure students and parents it is a safe environment for girls and women to play football. Martin Glenn took the decision to sack Mark Sampson yesterday because of concerns raised in a 2015 report Credit: PAUL ELLIS/AFP The team is now Bristol City Women’s football club, under the auspices of the professional men’s club that plays in the Championship, even though they were not in control when his alleged misconduct took place. It still has its training ground and academy facilities on the site of SGS college, which has 15,500 full-time and part-time students. On Thursday the entrance to the training ground was shut and guarded, and all players had been told not to speak to the media about Sampson and his time at the club. Bristol City took over running of the team last year and are now coordinating the response to the sacking of Sampson. Like SGS College, Bristol City were told nothing in the aftermath of Sampson’s sacking on Wednesday and have since been trying to contact former players to investigate that period. The 10 leading candidates to replace Mark Sampson as England women's manager Until this week, Sampson was still regarded as something of a hero in Bristol women’s football, having led the team during a period of unprecedented success, including a second-place finish in the Women’s Super League in 2013 and two FA Cup finals. He was voted FA Women’s coach of the year in 2013 and left the club with its fortunes transformed. It was that year Bristol City first took an interest – which began with a sponsorship deal before they eventually took over. The current Bristol City women’s team begin their top-flight FA Women’s Super League One campaign at home on Sunday against Chelsea. Their affiliation with SGS College remains strong, however, and the programme is so highly rated that England Women Under-19s coach Mo Marley is understood to recommend the college to young players. They have internationals such as the Belgian Julie Biesmans and Danique Kerkdijk, of Holland, as well as a number of junior internationals in their academy. The goalkeeper Sophie Baggaley has been called up to the England squad by Sampson but is uncapped.

Manchester United visit Swansea, Chelsea host Everton and Arsenal take on Norwich as Carabao Cup fourth-round draw proceeds coherently

Manchester United, the League Cup holders, will travel to Swansea City in the fourth round of the Carabao Cup. Jose Mourinho's side beat Championship Burton 4-1 at Old Trafford on Wednesday night to secure their place in the draw. Chelsea, 5-1 winners against Nottingham Forest, will welcome Everton - who beat Sunderland 3-0 - to Stamford Bridge. Tottenham host London rivals West Ham at Wembley and Manchester City entertain Championship Wolves. Arsenal will also welcome Championship opposition to the Emirates in the shape of Norwich. Crystal Palace will be wary of an upset when they travel to Bristol City, Leicester host Leeds and Bournemouth face Middlesbrough at home. Carabao Cup draws always spark a talking point Credit: GETTY IMAGES The fourth-round draw took place on familiar turf - and at a reasonable hour - in the Sky Sports studios in west London, rather than its controversial trip to Bangkok or the bizarre decision to hold it in Beijing in the early hours of the morning. Mercifully, Charlie Nicholas and Phil Thompson also avoided any John Salako-like confusion over who was playing at home or away as they drew out the balls. The ties will take place during the week commencing October 23. Spurs v West Ham Bristol City v Crystal Palace Swansea v Man Utd Arsenal v Norwich City Chelsea v Everton Man City v Wolves Leicester v Leeds United Bournemouth v Middlesbrough 10:23PM We're five weeks away from the last 16 The ties will be played on October 24 and 25 and are as follows: Tottenham v West Ham Bristol City v Crystal Palace Swansea City v Manchester United Arsenal v Norwich City Chelsea v Everton Manchester City v Wolverhampton Wanderers Leicester City v Leeds United Bournemouth v Middlesbrough Not one of those ties sparks any specific League Cup memories. Chelsea played Everton in the semis in 2011, Leicester beat Leeds in 1998 a month after Martin O'Neill turned down the Leeds job and Wolves beat Man City in the final 43 years ago but I have no memory of that. Kenny Hibbitt scored. I preferred his brother, Terry.    10:10PM The tie of the round  Will be Chelsea v Everton. Phil Neville thinks it's a real 'mouthwatering tie'. Tottenham v West Ham will be lively at Wembley, Leicester City v Leeds United should be worth a watch and someone will be televising (and liveblogging) Swansea v Manchester United 10:08PM And finally Bournemouth v Middlesbrough 10:07PM Leicester next up Leicester v Leeds United 10:07PM Sixth tie Man City v Wolves 10:06PM Chelsea next Chelsea v Everton 10:06PM Arsenal out Arsenal v Norwich City 10:06PM United drawn Swansea v Man Utd 10:06PM Second Bristol City v Crystal Palace 10:05PM First up Spurs v West Ham 10:05PM Here we go It's Charlie Nicholas drawing the home teams and Phil Thompson the away 10:02PM Here are your 16 teams in the 'hat'* * There is no hat Arsenal  Bournemouth Bristol City Chelsea  Crystal Palace Everton  Leeds United Leicester City Man City  Man Utd  Middlesbrough Norwich City Swansea City Tottenham Hotspur West Ham United Wolverhampton Wanderers 10:00PM Hello  Rob Bagchi here, straight from the Manchester United v Burton blog. The draw, presided over by the EFL's Shaun Harvey, could literally feature anything. Any kind of mishap is possible, almost certainly self-inflicted. But at least it's being broadcast by a competent company and, wonder of wonders, is taking place in our time zone. It could be the Tiller Girls arm-wrestling Mogwai for alternate picks  in downtown Vientiane at 5.45am for the quarter-final draw so we should be grateful for small mercies.  9:42PM Carabao Cup fourth round vitals What is it? It's the fourth-round draw of the League Cup, now known as the Carabao Cup, and, since it's rebranding, has already had its fare share of controversy, most of which centres around the draws. First, John Salako managed to draw home balls away and away balls home in the second-round draw. Then it all kicked off in the third round when the EFL announced that the draw would be made at 4.15am BST... in China! Under a TV blackout! Bonkers! When is it? Tonight (Wednesday, September 20) once the last of the third-round matches have been played. Where is it? Fortunately a little closer to home than the last one - Sky Sports studios in west London. What time is it? Good news, it's not at some ungodly hour in the morning, it's at the slightly more reasonable 9.55pm BST. What TV channel is it on? Sky Sports Football and Sky Sports Main Event will have the draw after showing tonight's live TV match - Man Utd vs Burton. What are tonight's fixtures? Arsenal v Doncaster  (7.45pm) Chelsea v Nottm Forest  (7.45pm) Everton v Sunderland  (7.45pm) Man Utd v Burton Albion (8pm)  West Brom v Man City (8pm)  Which teams are already into the fourth round? Bournemouth Middlesbrough Norwich City Bristol City Leeds United Crystal Palace Leicester City Swansea City West Ham United Wolverhampton Wanderers Tottenham Hotspur When will the fourth-round matches take place? The last-16 action will get underway on the week commencing October 23. Best-priced accumulators | New customer offers  

Manchester United visit Swansea, Chelsea host Everton and Arsenal take on Norwich as Carabao Cup fourth-round draw proceeds coherently

Manchester United, the League Cup holders, will travel to Swansea City in the fourth round of the Carabao Cup. Jose Mourinho's side beat Championship Burton 4-1 at Old Trafford on Wednesday night to secure their place in the draw. Chelsea, 5-1 winners against Nottingham Forest, will welcome Everton - who beat Sunderland 3-0 - to Stamford Bridge. Tottenham host London rivals West Ham at Wembley and Manchester City entertain Championship Wolves. Arsenal will also welcome Championship opposition to the Emirates in the shape of Norwich. Crystal Palace will be wary of an upset when they travel to Bristol City, Leicester host Leeds and Bournemouth face Middlesbrough at home. The fourth-round draw took place on familiar turf - and at a reasonable hour - in the Sky Sports studios in west London, rather than its controversial trip to Bangkok or the bizarre decision to hold it in Beijing in the early hours of the morning. Mercifully, Charlie Nicholas and Phil Thompson also avoided any John Salako-like confusion over who was playing at home or away as they drew out the balls. The ties will take place during the week commencing October 23. Spurs v West Ham Bristol City v Crystal Palace Swansea v Man Utd Arsenal v Norwich City Chelsea v Everton Man City v Wolves Leicester v Leeds United Bournemouth v Middlesbrough 10:23PM We're five weeks away from the last 16 The ties will be played on October 24 and 25 and are as follows: Tottenham v West Ham Bristol City v Crystal Palace Swansea City v Manchester United Arsenal v Norwich City Chelsea v Everton Manchester City v Wolverhampton Wanderers Leicester City v Leeds United Bournemouth v Middlesbrough Not one of those ties sparks any specific League Cup memories. Chelsea played Everton in the semis in 2011, Leicester beat Leeds in 1998 a month after Martin O'Neill turned down the Leeds job and Wolves beat Man City in the final 43 years ago but I have no memory of that. Kenny Hibbitt scored. I preferred his brother, Terry.    10:10PM The tie of the round  Will be Chelsea v Everton. Phil Neville thinks it's a real 'mouthwatering tie'. Tottenham v West Ham will be lively at Wembley, Leicester City v Leeds United should be worth a watch and someone will be televising (and liveblogging) Swansea v Manchester United 10:08PM And finally Bournemouth v Middlesbrough 10:07PM Leicester next up Leicester v Leeds United 10:07PM Sixth tie Man City v Wolves 10:06PM Chelsea next Chelsea v Everton 10:06PM Arsenal out Arsenal v Norwich City 10:06PM United drawn Swansea v Man Utd 10:06PM Second Bristol City v Crystal Palace 10:05PM First up Spurs v West Ham 10:05PM Here we go It's Charlie Nicholas drawing the home teams and Phil Thompson the away 10:02PM Here are your 16 teams in the 'hat'* * There is no hat Arsenal  Bournemouth Bristol City Chelsea  Crystal Palace Everton  Leeds United Leicester City Man City  Man Utd  Middlesbrough Norwich City Swansea City Tottenham Hotspur West Ham United Wolverhampton Wanderers 10:00PM Hello  Rob Bagchi here, straight from the Manchester United v Burton blog. The draw, presided over by the EFL's Shaun Harvey, could literally feature anything. Any kind of mishap is possible, almost certainly self-inflicted. But at least it's being broadcast by a competent company and, wonder of wonders, is taking place in our time zone. It could be the Tiller Girls arm-wrestling Mogwai for alternate picks  in downtown Vientiane at 5.45am for the quarter-final draw so we should be grateful for small mercies.  9:42PM Carabao Cup fourth round vitals What is it? It's the fourth-round draw of the League Cup, now known as the Carabao Cup, and, since it's rebranding, has already had its fare share of controversy, most of which centres around the draws. First, John Salako managed to draw home balls away and away balls home in the second-round draw. Then it all kicked off in the third round when the EFL announced that the draw would be made at 4.15am BST... in China! Under a TV blackout! Bonkers! When is it? Tonight (Wednesday, September 20) once the last of the third-round matches have been played. Where is it? Fortunately a little closer to home than the last one - Sky Sports studios in west London. What time is it? Good news, it's not at some ungodly hour in the morning, it's at the slightly more reasonable 9.55pm BST. What TV channel is it on? Sky Sports Football and Sky Sports Main Event will have the draw after showing tonight's live TV match - Man Utd vs Burton. What are tonight's fixtures? Arsenal v Doncaster  (7.45pm) Chelsea v Nottm Forest  (7.45pm) Everton v Sunderland  (7.45pm) Man Utd v Burton Albion (8pm)  West Brom v Man City (8pm)  Which teams are already into the fourth round? Bournemouth Middlesbrough Norwich City Bristol City Leeds United Crystal Palace Leicester City Swansea City West Ham United Wolverhampton Wanderers Tottenham Hotspur When will the fourth-round matches take place? The last-16 action will get underway on the week commencing October 23. 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Manchester United visit Swansea, Chelsea host Everton and Arsenal take on Norwich as Carabao Cup fourth-round draw proceeds coherently

Manchester United, the League Cup holders, will travel to Swansea City in the fourth round of the Carabao Cup. Jose Mourinho's side beat Championship Burton 4-1 at Old Trafford on Wednesday night to secure their place in the draw. Chelsea, 5-1 winners against Nottingham Forest, will welcome Everton - who beat Sunderland 3-0 - to Stamford Bridge. Tottenham host London rivals West Ham at Wembley and Manchester City entertain Championship Wolves. Arsenal will also welcome Championship opposition to the Emirates in the shape of Norwich. Crystal Palace will be wary of an upset when they travel to Bristol City, Leicester host Leeds and Bournemouth face Middlesbrough at home. Carabao Cup draws always spark a talking point Credit: GETTY IMAGES The fourth-round draw took place on familiar turf - and at a reasonable hour - in the Sky Sports studios in west London, rather than its controversial trip to Bangkok or the bizarre decision to hold it in Beijing in the early hours of the morning. Mercifully, Charlie Nicholas and Phil Thompson also avoided any John Salako-like confusion over who was playing at home or away as they drew out the balls. The ties will take place during the week commencing October 23. Spurs v West Ham Bristol City v Crystal Palace Swansea v Man Utd Arsenal v Norwich City Chelsea v Everton Man City v Wolves Leicester v Leeds United Bournemouth v Middlesbrough 10:23PM We're five weeks away from the last 16 The ties will be played on October 24 and 25 and are as follows: Tottenham v West Ham Bristol City v Crystal Palace Swansea City v Manchester United Arsenal v Norwich City Chelsea v Everton Manchester City v Wolverhampton Wanderers Leicester City v Leeds United Bournemouth v Middlesbrough Not one of those ties sparks any specific League Cup memories. Chelsea played Everton in the semis in 2011, Leicester beat Leeds in 1998 a month after Martin O'Neill turned down the Leeds job and Wolves beat Man City in the final 43 years ago but I have no memory of that. Kenny Hibbitt scored. I preferred his brother, Terry.    10:10PM The tie of the round  Will be Chelsea v Everton. Phil Neville thinks it's a real 'mouthwatering tie'. Tottenham v West Ham will be lively at Wembley, Leicester City v Leeds United should be worth a watch and someone will be televising (and liveblogging) Swansea v Manchester United 10:08PM And finally Bournemouth v Middlesbrough 10:07PM Leicester next up Leicester v Leeds United 10:07PM Sixth tie Man City v Wolves 10:06PM Chelsea next Chelsea v Everton 10:06PM Arsenal out Arsenal v Norwich City 10:06PM United drawn Swansea v Man Utd 10:06PM Second Bristol City v Crystal Palace 10:05PM First up Spurs v West Ham 10:05PM Here we go It's Charlie Nicholas drawing the home teams and Phil Thompson the away 10:02PM Here are your 16 teams in the 'hat'* * There is no hat Arsenal  Bournemouth Bristol City Chelsea  Crystal Palace Everton  Leeds United Leicester City Man City  Man Utd  Middlesbrough Norwich City Swansea City Tottenham Hotspur West Ham United Wolverhampton Wanderers 10:00PM Hello  Rob Bagchi here, straight from the Manchester United v Burton blog. The draw, presided over by the EFL's Shaun Harvey, could literally feature anything. Any kind of mishap is possible, almost certainly self-inflicted. But at least it's being broadcast by a competent company and, wonder of wonders, is taking place in our time zone. It could be the Tiller Girls arm-wrestling Mogwai for alternate picks  in downtown Vientiane at 5.45am for the quarter-final draw so we should be grateful for small mercies.  9:42PM Carabao Cup fourth round vitals What is it? It's the fourth-round draw of the League Cup, now known as the Carabao Cup, and, since it's rebranding, has already had its fare share of controversy, most of which centres around the draws. First, John Salako managed to draw home balls away and away balls home in the second-round draw. Then it all kicked off in the third round when the EFL announced that the draw would be made at 4.15am BST... in China! Under a TV blackout! Bonkers! When is it? Tonight (Wednesday, September 20) once the last of the third-round matches have been played. Where is it? Fortunately a little closer to home than the last one - Sky Sports studios in west London. What time is it? Good news, it's not at some ungodly hour in the morning, it's at the slightly more reasonable 9.55pm BST. What TV channel is it on? Sky Sports Football and Sky Sports Main Event will have the draw after showing tonight's live TV match - Man Utd vs Burton. What are tonight's fixtures? Arsenal v Doncaster  (7.45pm) Chelsea v Nottm Forest  (7.45pm) Everton v Sunderland  (7.45pm) Man Utd v Burton Albion (8pm)  West Brom v Man City (8pm)  Which teams are already into the fourth round? Bournemouth Middlesbrough Norwich City Bristol City Leeds United Crystal Palace Leicester City Swansea City West Ham United Wolverhampton Wanderers Tottenham Hotspur When will the fourth-round matches take place? The last-16 action will get underway on the week commencing October 23. 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Mark Sampson sacked as England women's manager amid new conduct allegations

The Football Association came under severe criticism on Wednesday for missing the detail of a 2014 report into the conduct of England Women manager Mark Sampson, who was finally sacked for “overstepping the professional boundaries between player and coach”. FA chief executive Martin Glenn called Sampson to Wembley the morning after his team’s 6-0 World Cup qualifying win over Russia to tell him his conduct while in his previous job at Bristol Academy was “was not what we want from an FA employee”. The minister for sport, Tracey Crouch, branded the situation a “mess”. She added that “it raises very serious questions about whether the historic processes that the FA had in place around the recruitment of coaches were appropriate, for something like this to have been missed. The FA is right to have taken action but reassurance is needed to make sure this does not happen again at any level of coaching”. In a statement on Sampson’s sacking, the FA said the “safeguarding assessment was that he did not pose a risk working in the game”. The statement continued: “It is our judgement that it [the safeguarding report] revealed clear evidence of inappropriate and unacceptable behaviour by a coach. It is on this basis that we have acted quickly to agree a termination of Mark’s contract. Speaking at a briefing at Wembley, Glenn said: “Why has he gone? It’s about Mark’s conduct during his time at Bristol. We believe he breached his professional boundaries.” We can confirm that Mark Sampson has left his position as head coach of the @England Women's team. Full statement: https://t.co/iNL1lSW74j— The FA (@FA) September 20, 2017 The FA refused to disclose the details of Sampson’s misconduct but later made clear it was about “boundaries between coach and players”. Glenn described the case as “the most awkward and complicated issue I have ever dealt with”. He said: “We know that coaches are in a potential position of power and that position mustn’t be abused. That’s been true across all sports and is true in football as well. We have to be really clear and I think we are at the FA about what we stand for in that respect. He is not deemed a safeguarding risk in football but to us it’s a conduct issue. The standards we set in the FA would not be compatible. A club [considering employing Sampson] would have to make their own mind up.” Sampson, 34, was sacked amid allegations of racial discrimination by former England international Eniola Aluko against him. He was previously cleared of any wrongdoing in that regard by an independent FA investigation by the barrister Katharine Newton. That investigation, separate to his dismissal, is poised to be re-opened in the light of Aluko’s Chelsea team-mate, Drew Spence, coming forward to corroborate her claims. Eni Aluko made the initial allegations against Sampson Credit: Getty images The original concerns about Sampson’s behaviour during his time at what is now Bristol City Women’s Football Club were passed on anonymously to the FA in March 2014, four months after he took the England manager’s job. The FA confirmed on Wednesday it had conducted a safeguarding investigation into Sampson which concluded in March 2015 that, in the FA’s words, “he did not pose a risk working in the game”. Sampson’s first job at Bristol in 2009 was at the centre of excellence and he moved up the age groups to coach the first team from 2011 before he moved to the FA in December 2013. It was not until October 2015 that Glenn learned of the existence of the FA’s safeguarding investigation into Sampson when he was told that the coach had completed a “development and mentoring programme” recommended by the probe. Glenn said that it was common practice for the safeguarding investigation team at the FA to present their evidence confidentially to a panel who then gave a simple ruling on whether or not the individual was cleared to work in football. Glenn said it was a source of regret that he did not request to see the details and that the “bureaucratic mindset” of the FA at that time dictated that no-one thought to flag up wider concerns. Tracey Crouch described the situation as 'a mess' Credit: Getty images With the Aluko case generating public scrutiny, the FA was again contacted by outside sources last week who suggested it should revisit the Sampson investigation. The head of the legal and human resources departments recommended Glenn have full sight of the report and having read it last Wednesday, he and the FA chairman Greg Clarke both told the FA board that Sampson should be sacked. That decision was approved by the board unanimously on Monday. Glenn said: “No law was broken … we felt during his time at Bristol, Mark had overstepped the professional boundaries between player and coach. When I first read the report I absorbed it and took Greg through it and we both agreed that Mark’s position was untenable and we shared it with the board over the weekend.” The England coach was unaware the report had been revisited until Wednesday morning following his side’s victory at Prenton Park the previous night. Sampson took England to third place at the World Cup finals in Canada in July 2015, their best-ever performance at that tournament. He had a contract until 2019. Glenn said the coach was “upset” when told of his sacking over the phone. England's players celebrate with Mark Sampson after Nikita Parris's opening goal during the Fifa Women's World Cup Qualifier between England and Russia on Tuesday Credit: Alex Livesey/Getty Images The FA said there were no concerns about Sampson being in charge on Tuesday night because it was not a safeguarding issue. The delay until Wednesday was because those who had been interviewed in the original investigation had to be contacted before the decision was made public. Glenn said that it was “technically” Sir Trevor Brooking who “was the guy in charge at St George’s Park at the time, on the hiring panel” when Sampson was appointed. Glenn said: “We are not going to apologise for wanting to drive higher standards. Let’s look at safeguarding in sport and football, the whole culture has been ignore it, don’t deal with it, hide it, put it under the carpet because bad things will happen. We know we can’t do that. There are plenty of people in the game who have got an unblemished record to provide a great pool for us to continue to recruit great coaches from. I am not worried about us having high standards and putting people off.” Sampson was dropped as a patron for the charity Women in Sport late on Wednesday. A statement on its website read: "Following today’s announcement by the Football Association, Women in Sport can confirm that Mark Sampson is no longer a Patron of the Charity. "The Charity hopes that media attention will now return to the women’s football team performance on the pitch, and that women and girls up and down the country will continue to be inspired by the Lionesses’ World Cup campaign." The women’s team play their next game, a friendly against France in Valenciennes on Oct 20, and the FA is yet to appoint a successor to Sampson. The main players in the Mark Sampson scandal | by Luke Edwards

Mark Sampson sacked as England women's manager amid new conduct allegations

The Football Association came under severe criticism on Wednesday for missing the detail of a 2014 report into the conduct of England Women manager Mark Sampson, who was finally sacked for “overstepping the professional boundaries between player and coach”. FA chief executive Martin Glenn called Sampson to Wembley the morning after his team’s 6-0 World Cup qualifying win over Russia to tell him his conduct while in his previous job at Bristol Academy was “was not what we want from an FA employee”. The minister for sport, Tracey Crouch, branded the situation a “mess”. She added that “it raises very serious questions about whether the historic processes that the FA had in place around the recruitment of coaches were appropriate, for something like this to have been missed. The FA is right to have taken action but reassurance is needed to make sure this does not happen again at any level of coaching”. In a statement on Sampson’s sacking, the FA said the “safeguarding assessment was that he did not pose a risk working in the game”. The statement continued: “It is our judgement that it [the safeguarding report] revealed clear evidence of inappropriate and unacceptable behaviour by a coach. It is on this basis that we have acted quickly to agree a termination of Mark’s contract. Speaking at a briefing at Wembley, Glenn said: “Why has he gone? It’s about Mark’s conduct during his time at Bristol. We believe he breached his professional boundaries.” We can confirm that Mark Sampson has left his position as head coach of the @England Women's team. Full statement: https://t.co/iNL1lSW74j— The FA (@FA) September 20, 2017 The FA refused to disclose the details of Sampson’s misconduct but later made clear it was about “boundaries between coach and players”. Glenn described the case as “the most awkward and complicated issue I have ever dealt with”. He said: “We know that coaches are in a potential position of power and that position mustn’t be abused. That’s been true across all sports and is true in football as well. We have to be really clear and I think we are at the FA about what we stand for in that respect. He is not deemed a safeguarding risk in football but to us it’s a conduct issue. The standards we set in the FA would not be compatible. A club [considering employing Sampson] would have to make their own mind up.” Sampson, 34, was sacked amid allegations of racial discrimination by former England international Eniola Aluko against him. He was previously cleared of any wrongdoing in that regard by an independent FA investigation by the barrister Katharine Newton. That investigation, separate to his dismissal, is poised to be re-opened in the light of Aluko’s Chelsea team-mate, Drew Spence, coming forward to corroborate her claims. Eni Aluko made the initial allegations against Sampson Credit: Getty images The original concerns about Sampson’s behaviour during his time at what is now Bristol City Women’s Football Club were passed on anonymously to the FA in March 2014, four months after he took the England manager’s job. The FA confirmed on Wednesday it had conducted a safeguarding investigation into Sampson which concluded in March 2015 that, in the FA’s words, “he did not pose a risk working in the game”. Sampson’s first job at Bristol in 2009 was at the centre of excellence and he moved up the age groups to coach the first team from 2011 before he moved to the FA in December 2013. It was not until October 2015 that Glenn learned of the existence of the FA’s safeguarding investigation into Sampson when he was told that the coach had completed a “development and mentoring programme” recommended by the probe. Glenn said that it was common practice for the safeguarding investigation team at the FA to present their evidence confidentially to a panel who then gave a simple ruling on whether or not the individual was cleared to work in football. Glenn said it was a source of regret that he did not request to see the details and that the “bureaucratic mindset” of the FA at that time dictated that no-one thought to flag up wider concerns. Tracey Crouch described the situation as 'a mess' Credit: Getty images With the Aluko case generating public scrutiny, the FA was again contacted by outside sources last week who suggested it should revisit the Sampson investigation. The head of the legal and human resources departments recommended Glenn have full sight of the report and having read it last Wednesday, he and the FA chairman Greg Clarke both told the FA board that Sampson should be sacked. That decision was approved by the board unanimously on Monday. Glenn said: “No law was broken … we felt during his time at Bristol, Mark had overstepped the professional boundaries between player and coach. When I first read the report I absorbed it and took Greg through it and we both agreed that Mark’s position was untenable and we shared it with the board over the weekend.” The England coach was unaware the report had been revisited until Wednesday morning following his side’s victory at Prenton Park the previous night. Sampson took England to third place at the World Cup finals in Canada in July 2015, their best-ever performance at that tournament. He had a contract until 2019. Glenn said the coach was “upset” when told of his sacking over the phone. England's players celebrate with Mark Sampson after Nikita Parris's opening goal during the Fifa Women's World Cup Qualifier between England and Russia on Tuesday Credit: Alex Livesey/Getty Images The FA said there were no concerns about Sampson being in charge on Tuesday night because it was not a safeguarding issue. The delay until Wednesday was because those who had been interviewed in the original investigation had to be contacted before the decision was made public. Glenn said that it was “technically” Sir Trevor Brooking who “was the guy in charge at St George’s Park at the time, on the hiring panel” when Sampson was appointed. Glenn said: “We are not going to apologise for wanting to drive higher standards. Let’s look at safeguarding in sport and football, the whole culture has been ignore it, don’t deal with it, hide it, put it under the carpet because bad things will happen. We know we can’t do that. There are plenty of people in the game who have got an unblemished record to provide a great pool for us to continue to recruit great coaches from. I am not worried about us having high standards and putting people off.” Sampson was dropped as a patron for the charity Women in Sport late on Wednesday. A statement on its website read: "Following today’s announcement by the Football Association, Women in Sport can confirm that Mark Sampson is no longer a Patron of the Charity. "The Charity hopes that media attention will now return to the women’s football team performance on the pitch, and that women and girls up and down the country will continue to be inspired by the Lionesses’ World Cup campaign." The women’s team play their next game, a friendly against France in Valenciennes on Oct 20, and the FA is yet to appoint a successor to Sampson. The main players in the Mark Sampson scandal | by Luke Edwards

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