Bundesliga

Bundesliga slideshow

19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
19-year-old wunderkind Christian Pulisic talks being the savior of American soccer, playing in Bundesliga, and his love of candy
The battle between the fan, the money and creating a league atmosphere which is responsible for the supply-line of the reigning world champions is being played out very interestingly in Germany.
The German Bundesliga Leads the Way With Fan Loyalty
The battle between the fan, the money and creating a league atmosphere which is responsible for the supply-line of the reigning world champions is being played out very interestingly in Germany.
The battle between the fan, the money and creating a league atmosphere which is responsible for the supply-line of the reigning world champions is being played out very interestingly in Germany.
The German Bundesliga Leads the Way With Fan Loyalty
The battle between the fan, the money and creating a league atmosphere which is responsible for the supply-line of the reigning world champions is being played out very interestingly in Germany.
Gelsenkirchen (Germany), 25/05/2018.- Fans watch the German Darts Masters at the Veltins Arena in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, 25 May 2018. About 20000 spectators have set a new darts attendance world record in the arena of Bundesliga soccer club Schalke 04 in Gelsenkirchen breaking the old record from 1939, when more than 14000 fans came to a tournament in London, Britain. (Londres, Alemania) EFE/EPA/FRIEDEMANN VOGEL EPA-EFE/FRIEDEMANN VOGEL
Gelsenkirchen (Germany), 25/05/2018.- Fans watch the German Darts Masters at the Veltins Arena in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, 25 May 2018. About 20000 spectators have set a new darts attendance world record in the arena of Bundesliga soccer club Schalke 04 in Gelsenkirchen breaking the old record from 1939, when more than 14000 fans came to a tournament in London, Britain. (Londres, Alemania) EFE/EPA/FRIEDEMANN VOGEL EPA-EFE/FRIEDEMANN VOGEL
Gelsenkirchen (Germany), 25/05/2018.- Fans watch the German Darts Masters at the Veltins Arena in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, 25 May 2018. About 20000 spectators have set a new darts attendance world record in the arena of Bundesliga soccer club Schalke 04 in Gelsenkirchen breaking the old record from 1939, when more than 14000 fans came to a tournament in London, Britain. (Londres, Alemania) EFE/EPA/FRIEDEMANN VOGEL EPA-EFE/FRIEDEMANN VOGEL
Gelsenkirchen (Germany), 25/05/2018.- Fans watch the German Darts Masters at the Veltins Arena in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, 25 May 2018. About 20000 spectators have set a new darts attendance world record in the arena of Bundesliga soccer club Schalke 04 in Gelsenkirchen breaking the old record from 1939, when more than 14000 fans came to a tournament in London, Britain. (Londres, Alemania) EFE/EPA/FRIEDEMANN VOGEL
Gelsenkirchen (Germany), 25/05/2018.- Fans watch the German Darts Masters at the Veltins Arena in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, 25 May 2018. About 20000 spectators have set a new darts attendance world record in the arena of Bundesliga soccer club Schalke 04 in Gelsenkirchen breaking the old record from 1939, when more than 14000 fans came to a tournament in London, Britain. (Londres, Alemania) EFE/EPA/FRIEDEMANN VOGEL
Gelsenkirchen (Germany), 25/05/2018.- Fans watch the German Darts Masters at the Veltins Arena in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, 25 May 2018. About 20000 spectators have set a new darts attendance world record in the arena of Bundesliga soccer club Schalke 04 in Gelsenkirchen breaking the old record from 1939, when more than 14000 fans came to a tournament in London, Britain. (Londres, Alemania) EFE/EPA/FRIEDEMANN VOGEL
Gelsenkirchen (Germany), 25/05/2018.- Fans watch the German Darts Masters at the Veltins Arena in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, 25 May 2018. About 20000 spectators have set a new darts attendance world record in the arena of Bundesliga soccer club Schalke 04 in Gelsenkirchen breaking the old record from 1939, when more than 14000 fans came to a tournament in London, Britain.
Gelsenkirchen (Germany), 25/05/2018.- Fans watch the German Darts Masters at the Veltins Arena in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, 25 May 2018. About 20000 spectators have set a new darts attendance world record in the arena of Bundesliga soccer club Schalke 04 in Gelsenkirchen breaking the old record from 1939, when more than 14000 fans came to a tournament in London, Britain.
Gelsenkirchen (Germany), 25/05/2018.- Fans watch the German Darts Masters at the Veltins Arena in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, 25 May 2018. About 20000 spectators have set a new darts attendance world record in the arena of Bundesliga soccer club Schalke 04 in Gelsenkirchen breaking the old record from 1939, when more than 14000 fans came to a tournament in London, Britain.
Gelsenkirchen (Germany), 25/05/2018.- Fans watch the German Darts Masters at the Veltins Arena in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, 25 May 2018. About 20000 spectators have set a new darts attendance world record in the arena of Bundesliga soccer club Schalke 04 in Gelsenkirchen breaking the old record from 1939, when more than 14000 fans came to a tournament in London, Britain.
Gelsenkirchen (Germany), 25/05/2018.- Fans watch the German Darts Masters at the Veltins Arena in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, 25 May 2018. About 20000 spectators have set a new darts attendance world record in the arena of Bundesliga soccer club Schalke 04 in Gelsenkirchen breaking the old record from 1939, when more than 14000 fans came to a tournament in London, Britain.
Gelsenkirchen (Germany), 25/05/2018.- Fans watch the German Darts Masters at the Veltins Arena in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, 25 May 2018. About 20000 spectators have set a new darts attendance world record in the arena of Bundesliga soccer club Schalke 04 in Gelsenkirchen breaking the old record from 1939, when more than 14000 fans came to a tournament in London, Britain.
He has a maiden World Cup campaign to get through first, but the German winger already has reason to be excited about the new Bundesliga season
'He's the best I've ever had' - Reus thrilled by Favre reunion at Borussia Dortmund
He has a maiden World Cup campaign to get through first, but the German winger already has reason to be excited about the new Bundesliga season
He has a maiden World Cup campaign to get through first, but the German winger already has reason to be excited about the new Bundesliga season
'He's the best I've ever had' - Reus thrilled by Favre reunion at Borussia Dortmund
He has a maiden World Cup campaign to get through first, but the German winger already has reason to be excited about the new Bundesliga season
Mwene was born in Vienna, Australia and holds dual citizenship of Kenya and Austria
Kenyan defender Phillipp Mwene signs for Bundesliga side Mainz
Mwene was born in Vienna, Australia and holds dual citizenship of Kenya and Austria
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
One thousand stranded Liverpool fans’ hopes of reaching Saturday’s Champions League final in Kiev were unresolved on Thursday night after the city’s mayor Joe Anderson attempted to broker landing slots for two of the three supporters’ charter flights cancelled at the last minute. Anderson tweeted that he and Kiev mayor Vitaly Klitschko, the brother of former heavyweight world champion Wladimir, and himself a former heavyweight champion, were “working closely” and “close to a solution” after a day of chaos for those who had booked charter flights. By late Thursday night, Anderson tweeted that he had secured two fresh landing slots for the charter planes at Kiev’s Borispyl airport but that the operator in question, World Choice Sports, had chosen to take only one. Anderson challenged World Choice Sports to organise the planes to make use of the landing times he had negotiated saying he was “amazed it’s not been sorted”. Earlier in the day the club had confirmed that around 1,000 fans had been left without any way of reaching Saturday’s final against Real Madrid after the Widnes-based travel operator World Choice Sports said it was left with no option but to cancel flights. In a statement, World Choice Sports said that it had been forced to cancel three charter flights into Kiev’s Borispyl airport after it failed to secure the landing slots, blaming the cancellations on the destination airport. In a statement of their own, Liverpool football club said that it was trying to work with “stakeholders” over resolving the problem. Working closely with @Vitaliy_Klychko to get the Kiev flights sorted - thank you for your help & support. Close to solution now and more details will follow soon.— Joe Anderson (@mayor_anderson) May 24, 2018 Liverpool blamed a “dispute” between World Choice Sports and Borispyl airport “over the size of the aircraft” for the cancellation of the flights from Liverpool John Lennon airport. The club said that it had worked with the city council, Uefa and the authorities in Kiev, “endeavouring to resolve the issue since it first came to light and will continue to do so until all avenues have been exhausted.” In Kiev, the first Liverpool supporters who had managed to make the final began arriving on Thursday. Jon Hemphill, 64, a retired pharmaceutical company director from Liverpool, said that he had booked his hotel last May, even before his team had made it through their qualifying tie with Hoffenheim to reach the group stages. He and friends had taken a flight from Stansted to Warsaw and then an overnight train journey to Kiev lasting 16 hours. “The train could have been better, it was definitely Soviet era,” he said. “But it was on time, it came into the station bang on 11.02.” A veteran of Liverpool’s European Cup finals at Wembley in 1978, Paris in 1981 and Istanbul in 2005, as well as the Europa League final in 2016, he said that the flights and accommodation had cost between £600 and £700. Plenty of Liverpool fans have already made it to Kiev Credit: AFP Sam Furniss, 31, from Liverpool, who works in logistics, had come on three flights from Manchester to Berlin to Vilnius in Lithuania and on to Kiev. He said that he believed Madrid reaching the final a day earlier than Liverpool had meant they were able to book the aircraft slots at the Kiev airports for planes flying in from Spain. “Why put it in a city that can’t cope?” he asked. Stuart Gee, 42, an engineer from Liverpool who lives in Perth, Western Australia, had spent around £3,600 on flying from Perth via Doha in Qatar, a cost that he conceded was “ridiculously expensive”. He said that his flight from Doha had been at least half occupied by Liverpool fans coming to the Ukrainian capital for the final. He said that the difficulty in getting to Kiev was frustrating but made the final, and being there in person, “something special”. Gillis Green, 54, a lawyer from Baltimore in the United States had brought his son Russell, 22, to see the final in Kiev as a graduation present. Gillis said: “I am embarrassed to admit we paid about $7,000 [£5,220] for the tickets and another $1,000 [$750] for the Airbnb [accommodation] and I am not going to say how much we paid for the tickets.” The two of them had become Liverpool fans watching the team in the US Premier League coverage. Mo Salah touches down in Kiev Credit: Getty images Andy Clifford, 49, from Scunthorpe, had travelled in a group of 11 from Birmingham to Warsaw, staying a night in Poland, and then on to Kiev. He and his friends had decided to book the flights after Liverpool’s first leg semi-final win over Roma at Anfield on April 25, hedging their position by also placing a bet on Roma to go through. They had since twice had Kiev accommodation cancelled and were staying in a hostel – “no stars, if anything it has minus stars” – that ordinarily cost £8 a night per person but had raised its rates to £50 per night. Walking through the city’s botanical gardens, Christian Klein-Heinz and his three friends cut an unusual sight. All four were dressed in German lederhosen and Bayern Munich shirts. They had booked their trip to Kiev in December with a mixture of hope and belief that Bayern would be in the final. “We do it every year,” said the 53-year-old IT company director. “We hope that Bayern make it and if we don’t we just go anyway and make a weekend of it. We have been to Milan and Cardiff as well in recent years. This time we are Liverpool fans. Jurgen Klopp is a good trainer. In the Bundesliga and in the final at Wembley in 2013 he always made it difficult for Bayern.”
The truth behind Liverpool fans' costly nightmare following their team to Kiev
One thousand stranded Liverpool fans’ hopes of reaching Saturday’s Champions League final in Kiev were unresolved on Thursday night after the city’s mayor Joe Anderson attempted to broker landing slots for two of the three supporters’ charter flights cancelled at the last minute. Anderson tweeted that he and Kiev mayor Vitaly Klitschko, the brother of former heavyweight world champion Wladimir, and himself a former heavyweight champion, were “working closely” and “close to a solution” after a day of chaos for those who had booked charter flights. By late Thursday night, Anderson tweeted that he had secured two fresh landing slots for the charter planes at Kiev’s Borispyl airport but that the operator in question, World Choice Sports, had chosen to take only one. Anderson challenged World Choice Sports to organise the planes to make use of the landing times he had negotiated saying he was “amazed it’s not been sorted”. Earlier in the day the club had confirmed that around 1,000 fans had been left without any way of reaching Saturday’s final against Real Madrid after the Widnes-based travel operator World Choice Sports said it was left with no option but to cancel flights. In a statement, World Choice Sports said that it had been forced to cancel three charter flights into Kiev’s Borispyl airport after it failed to secure the landing slots, blaming the cancellations on the destination airport. In a statement of their own, Liverpool football club said that it was trying to work with “stakeholders” over resolving the problem. Working closely with @Vitaliy_Klychko to get the Kiev flights sorted - thank you for your help & support. Close to solution now and more details will follow soon.— Joe Anderson (@mayor_anderson) May 24, 2018 Liverpool blamed a “dispute” between World Choice Sports and Borispyl airport “over the size of the aircraft” for the cancellation of the flights from Liverpool John Lennon airport. The club said that it had worked with the city council, Uefa and the authorities in Kiev, “endeavouring to resolve the issue since it first came to light and will continue to do so until all avenues have been exhausted.” In Kiev, the first Liverpool supporters who had managed to make the final began arriving on Thursday. Jon Hemphill, 64, a retired pharmaceutical company director from Liverpool, said that he had booked his hotel last May, even before his team had made it through their qualifying tie with Hoffenheim to reach the group stages. He and friends had taken a flight from Stansted to Warsaw and then an overnight train journey to Kiev lasting 16 hours. “The train could have been better, it was definitely Soviet era,” he said. “But it was on time, it came into the station bang on 11.02.” A veteran of Liverpool’s European Cup finals at Wembley in 1978, Paris in 1981 and Istanbul in 2005, as well as the Europa League final in 2016, he said that the flights and accommodation had cost between £600 and £700. Plenty of Liverpool fans have already made it to Kiev Credit: AFP Sam Furniss, 31, from Liverpool, who works in logistics, had come on three flights from Manchester to Berlin to Vilnius in Lithuania and on to Kiev. He said that he believed Madrid reaching the final a day earlier than Liverpool had meant they were able to book the aircraft slots at the Kiev airports for planes flying in from Spain. “Why put it in a city that can’t cope?” he asked. Stuart Gee, 42, an engineer from Liverpool who lives in Perth, Western Australia, had spent around £3,600 on flying from Perth via Doha in Qatar, a cost that he conceded was “ridiculously expensive”. He said that his flight from Doha had been at least half occupied by Liverpool fans coming to the Ukrainian capital for the final. He said that the difficulty in getting to Kiev was frustrating but made the final, and being there in person, “something special”. Gillis Green, 54, a lawyer from Baltimore in the United States had brought his son Russell, 22, to see the final in Kiev as a graduation present. Gillis said: “I am embarrassed to admit we paid about $7,000 [£5,220] for the tickets and another $1,000 [$750] for the Airbnb [accommodation] and I am not going to say how much we paid for the tickets.” The two of them had become Liverpool fans watching the team in the US Premier League coverage. Mo Salah touches down in Kiev Credit: Getty images Andy Clifford, 49, from Scunthorpe, had travelled in a group of 11 from Birmingham to Warsaw, staying a night in Poland, and then on to Kiev. He and his friends had decided to book the flights after Liverpool’s first leg semi-final win over Roma at Anfield on April 25, hedging their position by also placing a bet on Roma to go through. They had since twice had Kiev accommodation cancelled and were staying in a hostel – “no stars, if anything it has minus stars” – that ordinarily cost £8 a night per person but had raised its rates to £50 per night. Walking through the city’s botanical gardens, Christian Klein-Heinz and his three friends cut an unusual sight. All four were dressed in German lederhosen and Bayern Munich shirts. They had booked their trip to Kiev in December with a mixture of hope and belief that Bayern would be in the final. “We do it every year,” said the 53-year-old IT company director. “We hope that Bayern make it and if we don’t we just go anyway and make a weekend of it. We have been to Milan and Cardiff as well in recent years. This time we are Liverpool fans. Jurgen Klopp is a good trainer. In the Bundesliga and in the final at Wembley in 2013 he always made it difficult for Bayern.”
One thousand stranded Liverpool fans’ hopes of reaching Saturday’s Champions League final in Kiev were unresolved on Thursday night after the city’s mayor Joe Anderson attempted to broker landing slots for two of the three supporters’ charter flights cancelled at the last minute. Anderson tweeted that he and Kiev mayor Vitaly Klitschko, the brother of former heavyweight world champion Wladimir, and himself a former heavyweight champion, were “working closely” and “close to a solution” after a day of chaos for those who had booked charter flights. By late Thursday night, Anderson tweeted that he had secured two fresh landing slots for the charter planes at Kiev’s Borispyl airport but that the operator in question, World Choice Sports, had chosen to take only one. Anderson challenged World Choice Sports to organise the planes to make use of the landing times he had negotiated saying he was “amazed it’s not been sorted”. Earlier in the day the club had confirmed that around 1,000 fans had been left without any way of reaching Saturday’s final against Real Madrid after the Widnes-based travel operator World Choice Sports said it was left with no option but to cancel flights. In a statement, World Choice Sports said that it had been forced to cancel three charter flights into Kiev’s Borispyl airport after it failed to secure the landing slots, blaming the cancellations on the destination airport. In a statement of their own, Liverpool football club said that it was trying to work with “stakeholders” over resolving the problem. Working closely with @Vitaliy_Klychko to get the Kiev flights sorted - thank you for your help & support. Close to solution now and more details will follow soon.— Joe Anderson (@mayor_anderson) May 24, 2018 Liverpool blamed a “dispute” between World Choice Sports and Borispyl airport “over the size of the aircraft” for the cancellation of the flights from Liverpool John Lennon airport. The club said that it had worked with the city council, Uefa and the authorities in Kiev, “endeavouring to resolve the issue since it first came to light and will continue to do so until all avenues have been exhausted.” In Kiev, the first Liverpool supporters who had managed to make the final began arriving on Thursday. Jon Hemphill, 64, a retired pharmaceutical company director from Liverpool, said that he had booked his hotel last May, even before his team had made it through their qualifying tie with Hoffenheim to reach the group stages. He and friends had taken a flight from Stansted to Warsaw and then an overnight train journey to Kiev lasting 16 hours. “The train could have been better, it was definitely Soviet era,” he said. “But it was on time, it came into the station bang on 11.02.” A veteran of Liverpool’s European Cup finals at Wembley in 1978, Paris in 1981 and Istanbul in 2005, as well as the Europa League final in 2016, he said that the flights and accommodation had cost between £600 and £700. Plenty of Liverpool fans have already made it to Kiev Credit: AFP Sam Furniss, 31, from Liverpool, who works in logistics, had come on three flights from Manchester to Berlin to Vilnius in Lithuania and on to Kiev. He said that he believed Madrid reaching the final a day earlier than Liverpool had meant they were able to book the aircraft slots at the Kiev airports for planes flying in from Spain. “Why put it in a city that can’t cope?” he asked. Stuart Gee, 42, an engineer from Liverpool who lives in Perth, Western Australia, had spent around £3,600 on flying from Perth via Doha in Qatar, a cost that he conceded was “ridiculously expensive”. He said that his flight from Doha had been at least half occupied by Liverpool fans coming to the Ukrainian capital for the final. He said that the difficulty in getting to Kiev was frustrating but made the final, and being there in person, “something special”. Gillis Green, 54, a lawyer from Baltimore in the United States had brought his son Russell, 22, to see the final in Kiev as a graduation present. Gillis said: “I am embarrassed to admit we paid about $7,000 [£5,220] for the tickets and another $1,000 [$750] for the Airbnb [accommodation] and I am not going to say how much we paid for the tickets.” The two of them had become Liverpool fans watching the team in the US Premier League coverage. Mo Salah touches down in Kiev Credit: Getty images Andy Clifford, 49, from Scunthorpe, had travelled in a group of 11 from Birmingham to Warsaw, staying a night in Poland, and then on to Kiev. He and his friends had decided to book the flights after Liverpool’s first leg semi-final win over Roma at Anfield on April 25, hedging their position by also placing a bet on Roma to go through. They had since twice had Kiev accommodation cancelled and were staying in a hostel – “no stars, if anything it has minus stars” – that ordinarily cost £8 a night per person but had raised its rates to £50 per night. Walking through the city’s botanical gardens, Christian Klein-Heinz and his three friends cut an unusual sight. All four were dressed in German lederhosen and Bayern Munich shirts. They had booked their trip to Kiev in December with a mixture of hope and belief that Bayern would be in the final. “We do it every year,” said the 53-year-old IT company director. “We hope that Bayern make it and if we don’t we just go anyway and make a weekend of it. We have been to Milan and Cardiff as well in recent years. This time we are Liverpool fans. Jurgen Klopp is a good trainer. In the Bundesliga and in the final at Wembley in 2013 he always made it difficult for Bayern.”
The truth behind Liverpool fans' costly nightmare following their team to Kiev
One thousand stranded Liverpool fans’ hopes of reaching Saturday’s Champions League final in Kiev were unresolved on Thursday night after the city’s mayor Joe Anderson attempted to broker landing slots for two of the three supporters’ charter flights cancelled at the last minute. Anderson tweeted that he and Kiev mayor Vitaly Klitschko, the brother of former heavyweight world champion Wladimir, and himself a former heavyweight champion, were “working closely” and “close to a solution” after a day of chaos for those who had booked charter flights. By late Thursday night, Anderson tweeted that he had secured two fresh landing slots for the charter planes at Kiev’s Borispyl airport but that the operator in question, World Choice Sports, had chosen to take only one. Anderson challenged World Choice Sports to organise the planes to make use of the landing times he had negotiated saying he was “amazed it’s not been sorted”. Earlier in the day the club had confirmed that around 1,000 fans had been left without any way of reaching Saturday’s final against Real Madrid after the Widnes-based travel operator World Choice Sports said it was left with no option but to cancel flights. In a statement, World Choice Sports said that it had been forced to cancel three charter flights into Kiev’s Borispyl airport after it failed to secure the landing slots, blaming the cancellations on the destination airport. In a statement of their own, Liverpool football club said that it was trying to work with “stakeholders” over resolving the problem. Working closely with @Vitaliy_Klychko to get the Kiev flights sorted - thank you for your help & support. Close to solution now and more details will follow soon.— Joe Anderson (@mayor_anderson) May 24, 2018 Liverpool blamed a “dispute” between World Choice Sports and Borispyl airport “over the size of the aircraft” for the cancellation of the flights from Liverpool John Lennon airport. The club said that it had worked with the city council, Uefa and the authorities in Kiev, “endeavouring to resolve the issue since it first came to light and will continue to do so until all avenues have been exhausted.” In Kiev, the first Liverpool supporters who had managed to make the final began arriving on Thursday. Jon Hemphill, 64, a retired pharmaceutical company director from Liverpool, said that he had booked his hotel last May, even before his team had made it through their qualifying tie with Hoffenheim to reach the group stages. He and friends had taken a flight from Stansted to Warsaw and then an overnight train journey to Kiev lasting 16 hours. “The train could have been better, it was definitely Soviet era,” he said. “But it was on time, it came into the station bang on 11.02.” A veteran of Liverpool’s European Cup finals at Wembley in 1978, Paris in 1981 and Istanbul in 2005, as well as the Europa League final in 2016, he said that the flights and accommodation had cost between £600 and £700. Plenty of Liverpool fans have already made it to Kiev Credit: AFP Sam Furniss, 31, from Liverpool, who works in logistics, had come on three flights from Manchester to Berlin to Vilnius in Lithuania and on to Kiev. He said that he believed Madrid reaching the final a day earlier than Liverpool had meant they were able to book the aircraft slots at the Kiev airports for planes flying in from Spain. “Why put it in a city that can’t cope?” he asked. Stuart Gee, 42, an engineer from Liverpool who lives in Perth, Western Australia, had spent around £3,600 on flying from Perth via Doha in Qatar, a cost that he conceded was “ridiculously expensive”. He said that his flight from Doha had been at least half occupied by Liverpool fans coming to the Ukrainian capital for the final. He said that the difficulty in getting to Kiev was frustrating but made the final, and being there in person, “something special”. Gillis Green, 54, a lawyer from Baltimore in the United States had brought his son Russell, 22, to see the final in Kiev as a graduation present. Gillis said: “I am embarrassed to admit we paid about $7,000 [£5,220] for the tickets and another $1,000 [$750] for the Airbnb [accommodation] and I am not going to say how much we paid for the tickets.” The two of them had become Liverpool fans watching the team in the US Premier League coverage. Mo Salah touches down in Kiev Credit: Getty images Andy Clifford, 49, from Scunthorpe, had travelled in a group of 11 from Birmingham to Warsaw, staying a night in Poland, and then on to Kiev. He and his friends had decided to book the flights after Liverpool’s first leg semi-final win over Roma at Anfield on April 25, hedging their position by also placing a bet on Roma to go through. They had since twice had Kiev accommodation cancelled and were staying in a hostel – “no stars, if anything it has minus stars” – that ordinarily cost £8 a night per person but had raised its rates to £50 per night. Walking through the city’s botanical gardens, Christian Klein-Heinz and his three friends cut an unusual sight. All four were dressed in German lederhosen and Bayern Munich shirts. They had booked their trip to Kiev in December with a mixture of hope and belief that Bayern would be in the final. “We do it every year,” said the 53-year-old IT company director. “We hope that Bayern make it and if we don’t we just go anyway and make a weekend of it. We have been to Milan and Cardiff as well in recent years. This time we are Liverpool fans. Jurgen Klopp is a good trainer. In the Bundesliga and in the final at Wembley in 2013 he always made it difficult for Bayern.”
One thousand stranded Liverpool fans’ hopes of reaching Saturday’s Champions League final in Kiev were unresolved on Thursday night after the city’s mayor Joe Anderson attempted to broker landing slots for two of the three supporters’ charter flights cancelled at the last minute. Anderson tweeted that he and Kiev mayor Vitaly Klitschko, the brother of former heavyweight world champion Wladimir, and himself a former heavyweight champion, were “working closely” and “close to a solution” after a day of chaos for those who had booked charter flights. By late Thursday night, Anderson tweeted that he had secured two fresh landing slots for the charter planes at Kiev’s Borispyl airport but that the operator in question, World Choice Sports, had chosen to take only one. Anderson challenged World Choice Sports to organise the planes to make use of the landing times he had negotiated saying he was “amazed it’s not been sorted”. Earlier in the day the club had confirmed that around 1,000 fans had been left without any way of reaching Saturday’s final against Real Madrid after the Widnes-based travel operator World Choice Sports said it was left with no option but to cancel flights. In a statement, World Choice Sports said that it had been forced to cancel three charter flights into Kiev’s Borispyl airport after it failed to secure the landing slots, blaming the cancellations on the destination airport. In a statement of their own, Liverpool football club said that it was trying to work with “stakeholders” over resolving the problem. Working closely with @Vitaliy_Klychko to get the Kiev flights sorted - thank you for your help & support. Close to solution now and more details will follow soon.— Joe Anderson (@mayor_anderson) May 24, 2018 Liverpool blamed a “dispute” between World Choice Sports and Borispyl airport “over the size of the aircraft” for the cancellation of the flights from Liverpool John Lennon airport. The club said that it had worked with the city council, Uefa and the authorities in Kiev, “endeavouring to resolve the issue since it first came to light and will continue to do so until all avenues have been exhausted.” In Kiev, the first Liverpool supporters who had managed to make the final began arriving on Thursday. Jon Hemphill, 64, a retired pharmaceutical company director from Liverpool, said that he had booked his hotel last May, even before his team had made it through their qualifying tie with Hoffenheim to reach the group stages. He and friends had taken a flight from Stansted to Warsaw and then an overnight train journey to Kiev lasting 16 hours. “The train could have been better, it was definitely Soviet era,” he said. “But it was on time, it came into the station bang on 11.02.” A veteran of Liverpool’s European Cup finals at Wembley in 1978, Paris in 1981 and Istanbul in 2005, as well as the Europa League final in 2016, he said that the flights and accommodation had cost between £600 and £700. Plenty of Liverpool fans have already made it to Kiev Credit: AFP Sam Furniss, 31, from Liverpool, who works in logistics, had come on three flights from Manchester to Berlin to Vilnius in Lithuania and on to Kiev. He said that he believed Madrid reaching the final a day earlier than Liverpool had meant they were able to book the aircraft slots at the Kiev airports for planes flying in from Spain. “Why put it in a city that can’t cope?” he asked. Stuart Gee, 42, an engineer from Liverpool who lives in Perth, Western Australia, had spent around £3,600 on flying from Perth via Doha in Qatar, a cost that he conceded was “ridiculously expensive”. He said that his flight from Doha had been at least half occupied by Liverpool fans coming to the Ukrainian capital for the final. He said that the difficulty in getting to Kiev was frustrating but made the final, and being there in person, “something special”. Gillis Green, 54, a lawyer from Baltimore in the United States had brought his son Russell, 22, to see the final in Kiev as a graduation present. Gillis said: “I am embarrassed to admit we paid about $7,000 [£5,220] for the tickets and another $1,000 [$750] for the Airbnb [accommodation] and I am not going to say how much we paid for the tickets.” The two of them had become Liverpool fans watching the team in the US Premier League coverage. Mo Salah touches down in Kiev Credit: Getty images Andy Clifford, 49, from Scunthorpe, had travelled in a group of 11 from Birmingham to Warsaw, staying a night in Poland, and then on to Kiev. He and his friends had decided to book the flights after Liverpool’s first leg semi-final win over Roma at Anfield on April 25, hedging their position by also placing a bet on Roma to go through. They had since twice had Kiev accommodation cancelled and were staying in a hostel – “no stars, if anything it has minus stars” – that ordinarily cost £8 a night per person but had raised its rates to £50 per night. Walking through the city’s botanical gardens, Christian Klein-Heinz and his three friends cut an unusual sight. All four were dressed in German lederhosen and Bayern Munich shirts. They had booked their trip to Kiev in December with a mixture of hope and belief that Bayern would be in the final. “We do it every year,” said the 53-year-old IT company director. “We hope that Bayern make it and if we don’t we just go anyway and make a weekend of it. We have been to Milan and Cardiff as well in recent years. This time we are Liverpool fans. Jurgen Klopp is a good trainer. In the Bundesliga and in the final at Wembley in 2013 he always made it difficult for Bayern.”
The truth behind Liverpool fans' costly nightmare following their team to Kiev
One thousand stranded Liverpool fans’ hopes of reaching Saturday’s Champions League final in Kiev were unresolved on Thursday night after the city’s mayor Joe Anderson attempted to broker landing slots for two of the three supporters’ charter flights cancelled at the last minute. Anderson tweeted that he and Kiev mayor Vitaly Klitschko, the brother of former heavyweight world champion Wladimir, and himself a former heavyweight champion, were “working closely” and “close to a solution” after a day of chaos for those who had booked charter flights. By late Thursday night, Anderson tweeted that he had secured two fresh landing slots for the charter planes at Kiev’s Borispyl airport but that the operator in question, World Choice Sports, had chosen to take only one. Anderson challenged World Choice Sports to organise the planes to make use of the landing times he had negotiated saying he was “amazed it’s not been sorted”. Earlier in the day the club had confirmed that around 1,000 fans had been left without any way of reaching Saturday’s final against Real Madrid after the Widnes-based travel operator World Choice Sports said it was left with no option but to cancel flights. In a statement, World Choice Sports said that it had been forced to cancel three charter flights into Kiev’s Borispyl airport after it failed to secure the landing slots, blaming the cancellations on the destination airport. In a statement of their own, Liverpool football club said that it was trying to work with “stakeholders” over resolving the problem. Working closely with @Vitaliy_Klychko to get the Kiev flights sorted - thank you for your help & support. Close to solution now and more details will follow soon.— Joe Anderson (@mayor_anderson) May 24, 2018 Liverpool blamed a “dispute” between World Choice Sports and Borispyl airport “over the size of the aircraft” for the cancellation of the flights from Liverpool John Lennon airport. The club said that it had worked with the city council, Uefa and the authorities in Kiev, “endeavouring to resolve the issue since it first came to light and will continue to do so until all avenues have been exhausted.” In Kiev, the first Liverpool supporters who had managed to make the final began arriving on Thursday. Jon Hemphill, 64, a retired pharmaceutical company director from Liverpool, said that he had booked his hotel last May, even before his team had made it through their qualifying tie with Hoffenheim to reach the group stages. He and friends had taken a flight from Stansted to Warsaw and then an overnight train journey to Kiev lasting 16 hours. “The train could have been better, it was definitely Soviet era,” he said. “But it was on time, it came into the station bang on 11.02.” A veteran of Liverpool’s European Cup finals at Wembley in 1978, Paris in 1981 and Istanbul in 2005, as well as the Europa League final in 2016, he said that the flights and accommodation had cost between £600 and £700. Plenty of Liverpool fans have already made it to Kiev Credit: AFP Sam Furniss, 31, from Liverpool, who works in logistics, had come on three flights from Manchester to Berlin to Vilnius in Lithuania and on to Kiev. He said that he believed Madrid reaching the final a day earlier than Liverpool had meant they were able to book the aircraft slots at the Kiev airports for planes flying in from Spain. “Why put it in a city that can’t cope?” he asked. Stuart Gee, 42, an engineer from Liverpool who lives in Perth, Western Australia, had spent around £3,600 on flying from Perth via Doha in Qatar, a cost that he conceded was “ridiculously expensive”. He said that his flight from Doha had been at least half occupied by Liverpool fans coming to the Ukrainian capital for the final. He said that the difficulty in getting to Kiev was frustrating but made the final, and being there in person, “something special”. Gillis Green, 54, a lawyer from Baltimore in the United States had brought his son Russell, 22, to see the final in Kiev as a graduation present. Gillis said: “I am embarrassed to admit we paid about $7,000 [£5,220] for the tickets and another $1,000 [$750] for the Airbnb [accommodation] and I am not going to say how much we paid for the tickets.” The two of them had become Liverpool fans watching the team in the US Premier League coverage. Mo Salah touches down in Kiev Credit: Getty images Andy Clifford, 49, from Scunthorpe, had travelled in a group of 11 from Birmingham to Warsaw, staying a night in Poland, and then on to Kiev. He and his friends had decided to book the flights after Liverpool’s first leg semi-final win over Roma at Anfield on April 25, hedging their position by also placing a bet on Roma to go through. They had since twice had Kiev accommodation cancelled and were staying in a hostel – “no stars, if anything it has minus stars” – that ordinarily cost £8 a night per person but had raised its rates to £50 per night. Walking through the city’s botanical gardens, Christian Klein-Heinz and his three friends cut an unusual sight. All four were dressed in German lederhosen and Bayern Munich shirts. They had booked their trip to Kiev in December with a mixture of hope and belief that Bayern would be in the final. “We do it every year,” said the 53-year-old IT company director. “We hope that Bayern make it and if we don’t we just go anyway and make a weekend of it. We have been to Milan and Cardiff as well in recent years. This time we are Liverpool fans. Jurgen Klopp is a good trainer. In the Bundesliga and in the final at Wembley in 2013 he always made it difficult for Bayern.”
Soccer Football - Bundesliga - FC Augsburg vs Borussia Dortmund - Augsburg Arena, Augsburg, Germany - September 30, 2017 Borussia Dortmund’s Shinji Kagawa celebrates scoring their second goal REUTERS/Michaela Rehle
Bundesliga - FC Augsburg v Borussia Dortmund
Soccer Football - Bundesliga - FC Augsburg vs Borussia Dortmund - Augsburg Arena, Augsburg, Germany - September 30, 2017 Borussia Dortmund’s Shinji Kagawa celebrates scoring their second goal REUTERS/Michaela Rehle
Soccer Football - Bundesliga - FC Cologne vs Bayern Munich - RheinEnergieStadion, Cologne, Germany - May 5, 2018 Bayern Munich's Robert Lewandowski celebrates scoring their second goal REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay
Bundesliga - FC Cologne vs Bayern Munich
Soccer Football - Bundesliga - FC Cologne vs Bayern Munich - RheinEnergieStadion, Cologne, Germany - May 5, 2018 Bayern Munich's Robert Lewandowski celebrates scoring their second goal REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay
FILE - In this April 15, 2017 fiel photo Bayern head coach Carlo Ancelotti arrives to the German Bundesliga soccer match between Bayer Leverkusen and Bayern Munich in Leverkusen, Germany. Napoli's president has thanked coach Maurizio Sarri for his contributions after the Serie A club reportedly reached a deal to hire Carlo Ancelotti as his replacement. Napoli have not announced Sarri's departure, but a messaged posted on Twitter by president Aurelio De Laurentiis on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 and retweeted by the club's official account, seemed to confirm he is leaving. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File)
Napoli hires Ancelotti as coach, replacing Sarri
FILE - In this April 15, 2017 fiel photo Bayern head coach Carlo Ancelotti arrives to the German Bundesliga soccer match between Bayer Leverkusen and Bayern Munich in Leverkusen, Germany. Napoli's president has thanked coach Maurizio Sarri for his contributions after the Serie A club reportedly reached a deal to hire Carlo Ancelotti as his replacement. Napoli have not announced Sarri's departure, but a messaged posted on Twitter by president Aurelio De Laurentiis on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 and retweeted by the club's official account, seemed to confirm he is leaving. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File)
FILE - In this April 15, 2017 fiel photo Bayern head coach Carlo Ancelotti arrives to the German Bundesliga soccer match between Bayer Leverkusen and Bayern Munich in Leverkusen, Germany. Napoli's president has thanked coach Maurizio Sarri for his contributions after the Serie A club reportedly reached a deal to hire Carlo Ancelotti as his replacement. Napoli have not announced Sarri's departure, but a messaged posted on Twitter by president Aurelio De Laurentiis on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 and retweeted by the club's official account, seemed to confirm he is leaving. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File)
FILE - In this April 15, 2017 fiel photo Bayern head coach Carlo Ancelotti arrives to the German Bundesliga soccer match between Bayer Leverkusen and Bayern Munich in Leverkusen, Germany. Napoli's president has thanked coach Maurizio Sarri for his contributions after the Serie A club reportedly reached a deal to hire Carlo Ancelotti as his replacement. Napoli have not announced Sarri's departure, but a messaged posted on Twitter by president Aurelio De Laurentiis on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 and retweeted by the club's official account, seemed to confirm he is leaving. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File)
FILE - In this April 15, 2017 fiel photo Bayern head coach Carlo Ancelotti arrives to the German Bundesliga soccer match between Bayer Leverkusen and Bayern Munich in Leverkusen, Germany. Napoli's president has thanked coach Maurizio Sarri for his contributions after the Serie A club reportedly reached a deal to hire Carlo Ancelotti as his replacement. Napoli have not announced Sarri's departure, but a messaged posted on Twitter by president Aurelio De Laurentiis on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 and retweeted by the club's official account, seemed to confirm he is leaving. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File)
The striker scored twice in the DFB-Pokal final as the Bundesliga champions were stunned by a 3-1 defeat
Frankfurt hero Rebic hints at Bayern move: It's hard to say no!
The striker scored twice in the DFB-Pokal final as the Bundesliga champions were stunned by a 3-1 defeat
​Bayern Munich legend Lothar Matthaus has come out and hinted that the club should be looking to move Thiago Alcantara along this summer. The 57-year-old has claimed that the Spaniard has not been up to standard over recent weeks, and doesn't look like a Bayern player. Thiago arrived at the Allianz Arena alongside Pep Guardiola back in 2013. Since then, the midfielder has gone on to help his side lift five ​Bundesliga titles, putting in impressive performances along the way. So much so that he...
'Not a Bayern Player': Lothar Matthaus Pulls No Punches in Criticism of Munich Playmaker
​Bayern Munich legend Lothar Matthaus has come out and hinted that the club should be looking to move Thiago Alcantara along this summer. The 57-year-old has claimed that the Spaniard has not been up to standard over recent weeks, and doesn't look like a Bayern player. Thiago arrived at the Allianz Arena alongside Pep Guardiola back in 2013. Since then, the midfielder has gone on to help his side lift five ​Bundesliga titles, putting in impressive performances along the way. So much so that he...
​Bayern Munich legend Lothar Matthaus has come out and hinted that the club should be looking to move Thiago Alcantara along this summer. The 57-year-old has claimed that the Spaniard has not been up to standard over recent weeks, and doesn't look like a Bayern player. Thiago arrived at the Allianz Arena alongside Pep Guardiola back in 2013. Since then, the midfielder has gone on to help his side lift five ​Bundesliga titles, putting in impressive performances along the way. So much so that he...
'Not a Bayern Player': Lothar Matthaus Pulls No Punches in Criticism of Munich Playmaker
​Bayern Munich legend Lothar Matthaus has come out and hinted that the club should be looking to move Thiago Alcantara along this summer. The 57-year-old has claimed that the Spaniard has not been up to standard over recent weeks, and doesn't look like a Bayern player. Thiago arrived at the Allianz Arena alongside Pep Guardiola back in 2013. Since then, the midfielder has gone on to help his side lift five ​Bundesliga titles, putting in impressive performances along the way. So much so that he...
​Bayern Munich legend Lothar Matthaus has come out and hinted that the club should be looking to move Thiago Alcantara along this summer. The 57-year-old has claimed that the Spaniard has not been up to standard over recent weeks, and doesn't look like a Bayern player. Thiago arrived at the Allianz Arena alongside Pep Guardiola back in 2013. Since then, the midfielder has gone on to help his side lift five ​Bundesliga titles, putting in impressive performances along the way. So much so that he...
'Not a Bayern Player': Lothar Matthaus Pulls No Punches in Criticism of Munich Playmaker
​Bayern Munich legend Lothar Matthaus has come out and hinted that the club should be looking to move Thiago Alcantara along this summer. The 57-year-old has claimed that the Spaniard has not been up to standard over recent weeks, and doesn't look like a Bayern player. Thiago arrived at the Allianz Arena alongside Pep Guardiola back in 2013. Since then, the midfielder has gone on to help his side lift five ​Bundesliga titles, putting in impressive performances along the way. So much so that he...
Cologne's Claudio Pizarro in action with Mainz's Leon Balogun REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay
Bundesliga - FC Cologne vs 1.FSV Mainz 05
Cologne's Claudio Pizarro in action with Mainz's Leon Balogun REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay
Football Soccer - FSV Mainz 05 - German Bundesliga - Opel Arena- Mainz, Germany - 14/07/17 - FSV Mainz 05's player Leon Balogun. REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski
Football Soccer - FSV Mainz 05 - German Bundesliga
Football Soccer - FSV Mainz 05 - German Bundesliga - Opel Arena- Mainz, Germany - 14/07/17 - FSV Mainz 05's player Leon Balogun. REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski
Unai Emery is set to be appointed as Arsène Wenger's successor at Arsenal, after the latter's 22-year term at the club came to an end last month. Despite Wenger having officially left the club a few weeks ago, rumours surrounding who will replace him have been swirling for months. There were plenty of names in the mix: legendary former players like Patrick Viera and Thierry Henry; big-name managers like Carlo Ancelotti and Max Allegri; and young coaches, like Mikel Arteta, unproven in managerial roles. According to odds from Betfair, Arteta had emerged as the comfortable favourite, overtaking the likes Allegri and Thomas Tuchel, who previously led the betting. However, former PSG manager Emery jumped into contention after an apparent change of heart from Arsenal over the appointment of Arteta. The chart below shows how the race unfolded. Who's winning the race to replace Wenger? The men who missed out Mikel Arteta Pros:The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons:No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons: The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. Massimiliano Allegri Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons:Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Luis Enrique Pros:Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons:A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Julian Nagelsmann Pros: A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Eddie Howe Pros:See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Leonardo Jardim Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Joachim Löw Pros:He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Patrick Viera Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager?
Next Arsenal manager odds: how Unai Emery emerged from the pack to eclipse Mikel Arteta
Unai Emery is set to be appointed as Arsène Wenger's successor at Arsenal, after the latter's 22-year term at the club came to an end last month. Despite Wenger having officially left the club a few weeks ago, rumours surrounding who will replace him have been swirling for months. There were plenty of names in the mix: legendary former players like Patrick Viera and Thierry Henry; big-name managers like Carlo Ancelotti and Max Allegri; and young coaches, like Mikel Arteta, unproven in managerial roles. According to odds from Betfair, Arteta had emerged as the comfortable favourite, overtaking the likes Allegri and Thomas Tuchel, who previously led the betting. However, former PSG manager Emery jumped into contention after an apparent change of heart from Arsenal over the appointment of Arteta. The chart below shows how the race unfolded. Who's winning the race to replace Wenger? The men who missed out Mikel Arteta Pros:The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons:No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons: The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. Massimiliano Allegri Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons:Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Luis Enrique Pros:Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons:A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Julian Nagelsmann Pros: A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Eddie Howe Pros:See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Leonardo Jardim Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Joachim Löw Pros:He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Patrick Viera Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager?
Unai Emery is set to be appointed as Arsène Wenger's successor at Arsenal, after the latter's 22-year term at the club came to an end last month. Despite Wenger having officially left the club a few weeks ago, rumours surrounding who will replace him have been swirling for months. There were plenty of names in the mix: legendary former players like Patrick Viera and Thierry Henry; big-name managers like Carlo Ancelotti and Max Allegri; and young coaches, like Mikel Arteta, unproven in managerial roles. According to odds from Betfair, Arteta had emerged as the comfortable favourite, overtaking the likes Allegri and Thomas Tuchel, who previously led the betting. However, former PSG manager Emery jumped into contention after an apparent change of heart from Arsenal over the appointment of Arteta. The chart below shows how the race unfolded. Who's winning the race to replace Wenger? The men who missed out Mikel Arteta Pros:The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons:No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons: The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. Massimiliano Allegri Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons:Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Luis Enrique Pros:Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons:A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Julian Nagelsmann Pros: A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Eddie Howe Pros:See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Leonardo Jardim Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Joachim Löw Pros:He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Patrick Viera Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager?
Next Arsenal manager odds: how Unai Emery emerged from the pack to eclipse Mikel Arteta
Unai Emery is set to be appointed as Arsène Wenger's successor at Arsenal, after the latter's 22-year term at the club came to an end last month. Despite Wenger having officially left the club a few weeks ago, rumours surrounding who will replace him have been swirling for months. There were plenty of names in the mix: legendary former players like Patrick Viera and Thierry Henry; big-name managers like Carlo Ancelotti and Max Allegri; and young coaches, like Mikel Arteta, unproven in managerial roles. According to odds from Betfair, Arteta had emerged as the comfortable favourite, overtaking the likes Allegri and Thomas Tuchel, who previously led the betting. However, former PSG manager Emery jumped into contention after an apparent change of heart from Arsenal over the appointment of Arteta. The chart below shows how the race unfolded. Who's winning the race to replace Wenger? The men who missed out Mikel Arteta Pros:The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons:No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons: The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. Massimiliano Allegri Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons:Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Luis Enrique Pros:Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons:A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Julian Nagelsmann Pros: A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Eddie Howe Pros:See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Leonardo Jardim Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Joachim Löw Pros:He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Patrick Viera Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager?
Bundesliga giants Borussia Dortmund on Tuesday named Lucien Favre as their new head coach, poaching the 60-year-old Swiss from French Ligue 1 club Nice with a two-year contract.
Borussia Dortmund Appoint Lucien Favre as New Head Coach
Bundesliga giants Borussia Dortmund on Tuesday named Lucien Favre as their new head coach, poaching the 60-year-old Swiss from French Ligue 1 club Nice with a two-year contract.
FILE - In this Thursday, Oct 20, 2016 file photo, Nice head coach Lucien Favre shouts to his players during the Europa League group I soccer match between Salzburg and Nice in Salzburg, Austria. Borussia Dortmund has signed Lucien Favre as coach from French side Nice. The Bundesliga club says Tuesday, May 22, 2018 the 60-year-old Favre, who previously coached league rivals Borussia Moenchengladbach and Hertha Berlin, has signed a deal through June 2020. (AP Photo/Kerstin Joensson, File)
Borussia Dortmund appoints Lucien Favre as coach
FILE - In this Thursday, Oct 20, 2016 file photo, Nice head coach Lucien Favre shouts to his players during the Europa League group I soccer match between Salzburg and Nice in Salzburg, Austria. Borussia Dortmund has signed Lucien Favre as coach from French side Nice. The Bundesliga club says Tuesday, May 22, 2018 the 60-year-old Favre, who previously coached league rivals Borussia Moenchengladbach and Hertha Berlin, has signed a deal through June 2020. (AP Photo/Kerstin Joensson, File)
FILE - In this Feb. 22, 2018 file photo Nice's head coach Lucien Favre watches the Europa League Round of 32 second leg soccer match between Lokomotiv Moscow and Nice in Moscow, Russia. Borussia Dortmund has signed Lucien Favre as coach from French side Nice. The Bundesliga club says Tuesday, May 22, 2018 the 60-year-old Favre, who previously coached league rivals Borussia Moenchengladbach and Hertha Berlin, has signed a deal through June 2020. (AP Photo/Denis Tyrin.file)
Borussia Dortmund appoints Lucien Favre as coach
FILE - In this Feb. 22, 2018 file photo Nice's head coach Lucien Favre watches the Europa League Round of 32 second leg soccer match between Lokomotiv Moscow and Nice in Moscow, Russia. Borussia Dortmund has signed Lucien Favre as coach from French side Nice. The Bundesliga club says Tuesday, May 22, 2018 the 60-year-old Favre, who previously coached league rivals Borussia Moenchengladbach and Hertha Berlin, has signed a deal through June 2020. (AP Photo/Denis Tyrin.file)
FILE - In this Oct. 20, 2016 file photo then Nice's head coach Lucien Favre looks on during the Europa League group I soccer match between Salzburg and Nice in Salzburg, Austria. Borussia Dortmund has signed Lucien Favre as coach from French side Nice. The Bundesliga club says Tuesday, May 22, 2018 the 60-year-old Favre, who previously coached league rivals Borussia Moenchengladbach and Hertha Berlin, has signed a deal through June 2020. (AP Photo/Kerstin Joensson,file)
Borussia Dortmund appoints Lucien Favre as coach
FILE - In this Oct. 20, 2016 file photo then Nice's head coach Lucien Favre looks on during the Europa League group I soccer match between Salzburg and Nice in Salzburg, Austria. Borussia Dortmund has signed Lucien Favre as coach from French side Nice. The Bundesliga club says Tuesday, May 22, 2018 the 60-year-old Favre, who previously coached league rivals Borussia Moenchengladbach and Hertha Berlin, has signed a deal through June 2020. (AP Photo/Kerstin Joensson,file)
FILE - In this Feb. 22, 2018 file photo Nice's head coach Lucien Favre watches the Europa League Round of 32 second leg soccer match between Lokomotiv Moscow and Nice in Moscow, Russia. Borussia Dortmund has signed Lucien Favre as coach from French side Nice. The Bundesliga club says Tuesday, May 22, 2018 the 60-year-old Favre, who previously coached league rivals Borussia Moenchengladbach and Hertha Berlin, has signed a deal through June 2020. (AP Photo/Denis Tyrin.file)
FILE - In this Feb. 22, 2018 file photo Nice's head coach Lucien Favre watches the Europa League Round of 32 second leg soccer match between Lokomotiv Moscow and Nice in Moscow, Russia. Borussia Dortmund has signed Lucien Favre as coach from French side Nice. The Bundesliga club says Tuesday, May 22, 2018 the 60-year-old Favre, who previously coached league rivals Borussia Moenchengladbach and Hertha Berlin, has signed a deal through June 2020. (AP Photo/Denis Tyrin.file)
FILE - In this Feb. 22, 2018 file photo Nice's head coach Lucien Favre watches the Europa League Round of 32 second leg soccer match between Lokomotiv Moscow and Nice in Moscow, Russia. Borussia Dortmund has signed Lucien Favre as coach from French side Nice. The Bundesliga club says Tuesday, May 22, 2018 the 60-year-old Favre, who previously coached league rivals Borussia Moenchengladbach and Hertha Berlin, has signed a deal through June 2020. (AP Photo/Denis Tyrin.file)
FILE - In this Oct. 20, 2016 file photo then Nice's head coach Lucien Favre looks on during the Europa League group I soccer match between Salzburg and Nice in Salzburg, Austria. Borussia Dortmund has signed Lucien Favre as coach from French side Nice. The Bundesliga club says Tuesday, May 22, 2018 the 60-year-old Favre, who previously coached league rivals Borussia Moenchengladbach and Hertha Berlin, has signed a deal through June 2020. (AP Photo/Kerstin Joensson,file)
FILE - In this Oct. 20, 2016 file photo then Nice's head coach Lucien Favre looks on during the Europa League group I soccer match between Salzburg and Nice in Salzburg, Austria. Borussia Dortmund has signed Lucien Favre as coach from French side Nice. The Bundesliga club says Tuesday, May 22, 2018 the 60-year-old Favre, who previously coached league rivals Borussia Moenchengladbach and Hertha Berlin, has signed a deal through June 2020. (AP Photo/Kerstin Joensson,file)
FILE - In this Oct. 20, 2016 file photo then Nice's head coach Lucien Favre looks on during the Europa League group I soccer match between Salzburg and Nice in Salzburg, Austria. Borussia Dortmund has signed Lucien Favre as coach from French side Nice. The Bundesliga club says Tuesday, May 22, 2018 the 60-year-old Favre, who previously coached league rivals Borussia Moenchengladbach and Hertha Berlin, has signed a deal through June 2020. (AP Photo/Kerstin Joensson,file)
FILE - In this Thursday, Oct 20, 2016 file photo, Nice head coach Lucien Favre shouts to his players during the Europa League group I soccer match between Salzburg and Nice in Salzburg, Austria. Borussia Dortmund has signed Lucien Favre as coach from French side Nice. The Bundesliga club says Tuesday, May 22, 2018 the 60-year-old Favre, who previously coached league rivals Borussia Moenchengladbach and Hertha Berlin, has signed a deal through June 2020. (AP Photo/Kerstin Joensson, File)
FILE - In this Thursday, Oct 20, 2016 file photo, Nice head coach Lucien Favre shouts to his players during the Europa League group I soccer match between Salzburg and Nice in Salzburg, Austria. Borussia Dortmund has signed Lucien Favre as coach from French side Nice. The Bundesliga club says Tuesday, May 22, 2018 the 60-year-old Favre, who previously coached league rivals Borussia Moenchengladbach and Hertha Berlin, has signed a deal through June 2020. (AP Photo/Kerstin Joensson, File)
FILE - In this Thursday, Oct 20, 2016 file photo, Nice head coach Lucien Favre shouts to his players during the Europa League group I soccer match between Salzburg and Nice in Salzburg, Austria. Borussia Dortmund has signed Lucien Favre as coach from French side Nice. The Bundesliga club says Tuesday, May 22, 2018 the 60-year-old Favre, who previously coached league rivals Borussia Moenchengladbach and Hertha Berlin, has signed a deal through June 2020. (AP Photo/Kerstin Joensson, File)
Favre will replace Peter Stoeger, who had been in charge Dortmund since December last year, but whose contract was not extended due to disappointing results.
Bundesliga: Borussia Dortmund appoint Lucien Favre as manager on two-year contract
Favre will replace Peter Stoeger, who had been in charge Dortmund since December last year, but whose contract was not extended due to disappointing results.
Wolfsburg maintained their Bundesliga status with Monday's 1-0 win over Holstein Kiel to seal a 4-1 aggregate triumph.
Wolfsburg preserve Bundesliga status after play-off win over Kiel
Wolfsburg maintained their Bundesliga status with Monday's 1-0 win over Holstein Kiel to seal a 4-1 aggregate triumph.
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg coach Bruno Labbadia celebrates after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg coach Bruno Labbadia celebrates after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's William and Josuha Guilavogui applaud fans after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's William and Josuha Guilavogui applaud fans after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg coach Bruno Labbadia celebrates after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg coach Bruno Labbadia celebrates after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg coach Bruno Labbadia applauds fans after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg coach Bruno Labbadia applauds fans after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg fans celebrate after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg fans celebrate after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's William and Josuha Guilavogui applaud fans after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's William and Josuha Guilavogui applaud fans after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg coach Bruno Labbadia celebrates after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg coach Bruno Labbadia celebrates after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg coach Bruno Labbadia celebrates after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg coach Bruno Labbadia celebrates after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Holstein Kiel’s Dominik Schmidt and Kingsley Schindler look dejected after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Holstein Kiel’s Dominik Schmidt and Kingsley Schindler look dejected after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Police after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Police after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg fans celebrate after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg fans celebrate after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg fans celebrate after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg fans celebrate after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's Josip Brekalo in action with Holstein Kiel’s Dominik Schmidt REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's Josip Brekalo in action with Holstein Kiel’s Dominik Schmidt REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg fans celebrate after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg fans celebrate after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's Robin Knoche celebrates scoring their first goal REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's Robin Knoche celebrates scoring their first goal REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's players celebrate with fans after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's players celebrate with fans after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's Yunus Malli in action with Holstein Kiel’s David Kinsombi REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's Yunus Malli in action with Holstein Kiel’s David Kinsombi REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg coach Bruno Labbadia acknowledges fans after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg coach Bruno Labbadia acknowledges fans after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg coach Bruno Labbadia applauds fans after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg coach Bruno Labbadia applauds fans after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's players celebrate with fans after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's players celebrate with fans after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's Robin Knoche celebrates with fans after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's Robin Knoche celebrates with fans after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's players celebrate with fans after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's players celebrate with fans after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's Yunus Malli celebrates with fans after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's Yunus Malli celebrates with fans after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg fans celebrate after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg fans celebrate after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg coach Bruno Labbadia applauds fans after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg coach Bruno Labbadia applauds fans after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg coach Bruno Labbadia celebrates with Ignacio Camacho after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg coach Bruno Labbadia celebrates with Ignacio Camacho after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Police after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Police after the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Chelsea will push on with ambitious summer transfer plans despite the crisis that threatens to engulf owner Roman Abramovich, with the club making Bayern Munich striker Robert Lewandowski their No 1 target. Abramovich’s visa application has been delayed, with the Government set to ask the Russian oligarch how he acquired his wealth if it is to be renewed. There is also huge uncertainty over the future of Antonio Conte, with both the manager and the club hopeful of a parting of the ways but Chelsea unprepared to pay the kind of compensation – at least £10 million – that it would cost to get rid of the Italian and his nine staff. Despite that upheaval, Chelsea are still trying to advance with a deal for Lewandowski, who they believe is ready for a move away from the German club and could cost in excess of £100 million. If Chelsea were successful in their pursuit of Lewandowski his fee would likely be offset by the sale of club-record signing Alvaro Morata, with the Spaniard struggling after he moved to Stamford Bridge for £68 million last summer. Roman Abramovich's uncertain future will not affect Chelsea's transfer plans Credit: Getty Images The 25-year-old did not even make the 23-man Spain squad named for the World Cup finals by Julien Lopetegui on Monday, having scored just three goals since the turn of the year. Shortly after the squad was announced, Morata tweeted: “Good luck at the World Cup! I will be supporting you and encouraging you right to the end, as always!” The striker’s club-mates Cesc Fabregas and Marcos Alonso were also left out by Lopetegui, as was Arsenal full-back Hector Bellerin. Although Lewandowski’s age is not ideal for the kind of hefty price Chelsea would have to pay – he turns 30 in August – he does fit the bill for a proven European goal-scorer and his arrival would also be a crucial way of persuading Eden Hazard, and Thibaut Courtois that Chelsea are serious about challenging again for the Premier League and the Champions League after a disappointing fifth-place finish. Both players are holding off on their contract renewals until they see firm evidence that the club are prepared to compete with rivals for the best players, although Hazard yesterday gave his strongest hint yet that he was looking to the future at Stamford Bridge. “We have a lot of top players who are used to winning trophies. We’ll be ready next season,” Hazard told The London Evening Standard. “I think all of the players and the club want one thing and that’s to win the title. Of course, we will see if we can bring in some new players. But we will be focused on winning the title.” FA Cup final reaction and analysis | How Chelsea held their nerve against United Lewandowski was the subject of a public reminder last June from Bayern that he had a contract until 2021, with the club clearly suggesting that they were aware a market was being created for the striker. Real Madrid have always been considered the first in the queue for the highly-rated Poland international but in the past two years the Champions League finalists have had to sell players in order to stay in profit and it is likely that they would have to do the same again to buy Lewandowski. Morata is now represented by Pini Zahavi, the Israeli agent who was such a key player in the acquisition of Roman Abramovich’s first Premier League-winning Chelsea team in the midpoint of the last decade. Bayern were robust in seeing off interest in the player last summer and he finished top of the Bundesliga goalscorers with 29 goals – almost twice as many as any other player in the league. The stand-off with Conte and his assistants continues this week with the compensation bill expected to top £10 million if Chelsea wish to move on the Italian and his sizeable entourage form the last year of his contract. As well as his brother Gianluca, Conte has built up an extensive group of coaches assistants, analysts and nutritionists.
Exclusive: Chelsea make Robert Lewandowski main summer target as they plan spending spree
Chelsea will push on with ambitious summer transfer plans despite the crisis that threatens to engulf owner Roman Abramovich, with the club making Bayern Munich striker Robert Lewandowski their No 1 target. Abramovich’s visa application has been delayed, with the Government set to ask the Russian oligarch how he acquired his wealth if it is to be renewed. There is also huge uncertainty over the future of Antonio Conte, with both the manager and the club hopeful of a parting of the ways but Chelsea unprepared to pay the kind of compensation – at least £10 million – that it would cost to get rid of the Italian and his nine staff. Despite that upheaval, Chelsea are still trying to advance with a deal for Lewandowski, who they believe is ready for a move away from the German club and could cost in excess of £100 million. If Chelsea were successful in their pursuit of Lewandowski his fee would likely be offset by the sale of club-record signing Alvaro Morata, with the Spaniard struggling after he moved to Stamford Bridge for £68 million last summer. Roman Abramovich's uncertain future will not affect Chelsea's transfer plans Credit: Getty Images The 25-year-old did not even make the 23-man Spain squad named for the World Cup finals by Julien Lopetegui on Monday, having scored just three goals since the turn of the year. Shortly after the squad was announced, Morata tweeted: “Good luck at the World Cup! I will be supporting you and encouraging you right to the end, as always!” The striker’s club-mates Cesc Fabregas and Marcos Alonso were also left out by Lopetegui, as was Arsenal full-back Hector Bellerin. Although Lewandowski’s age is not ideal for the kind of hefty price Chelsea would have to pay – he turns 30 in August – he does fit the bill for a proven European goal-scorer and his arrival would also be a crucial way of persuading Eden Hazard, and Thibaut Courtois that Chelsea are serious about challenging again for the Premier League and the Champions League after a disappointing fifth-place finish. Both players are holding off on their contract renewals until they see firm evidence that the club are prepared to compete with rivals for the best players, although Hazard yesterday gave his strongest hint yet that he was looking to the future at Stamford Bridge. “We have a lot of top players who are used to winning trophies. We’ll be ready next season,” Hazard told The London Evening Standard. “I think all of the players and the club want one thing and that’s to win the title. Of course, we will see if we can bring in some new players. But we will be focused on winning the title.” FA Cup final reaction and analysis | How Chelsea held their nerve against United Lewandowski was the subject of a public reminder last June from Bayern that he had a contract until 2021, with the club clearly suggesting that they were aware a market was being created for the striker. Real Madrid have always been considered the first in the queue for the highly-rated Poland international but in the past two years the Champions League finalists have had to sell players in order to stay in profit and it is likely that they would have to do the same again to buy Lewandowski. Morata is now represented by Pini Zahavi, the Israeli agent who was such a key player in the acquisition of Roman Abramovich’s first Premier League-winning Chelsea team in the midpoint of the last decade. Bayern were robust in seeing off interest in the player last summer and he finished top of the Bundesliga goalscorers with 29 goals – almost twice as many as any other player in the league. The stand-off with Conte and his assistants continues this week with the compensation bill expected to top £10 million if Chelsea wish to move on the Italian and his sizeable entourage form the last year of his contract. As well as his brother Gianluca, Conte has built up an extensive group of coaches assistants, analysts and nutritionists.
Chelsea will push on with ambitious summer transfer plans despite the crisis that threatens to engulf owner Roman Abramovich, with the club making Bayern Munich striker Robert Lewandowski their No 1 target. Abramovich’s visa application has been delayed, with the Government set to ask the Russian oligarch how he acquired his wealth if it is to be renewed. There is also huge uncertainty over the future of Antonio Conte, with both the manager and the club hopeful of a parting of the ways but Chelsea unprepared to pay the kind of compensation – at least £10 million – that it would cost to get rid of the Italian and his nine staff. Despite that upheaval, Chelsea are still trying to advance with a deal for Lewandowski, who they believe is ready for a move away from the German club and could cost in excess of £100 million. If Chelsea were successful in their pursuit of Lewandowski his fee would likely be offset by the sale of club-record signing Alvaro Morata, with the Spaniard struggling after he moved to Stamford Bridge for £68 million last summer. Roman Abramovich's uncertain future will not affect Chelsea's transfer plans Credit: Getty Images The 25-year-old did not even make the 23-man Spain squad named for the World Cup finals by Julien Lopetegui on Monday, having scored just three goals since the turn of the year. Shortly after the squad was announced, Morata tweeted: “Good luck at the World Cup! I will be supporting you and encouraging you right to the end, as always!” The striker’s club-mates Cesc Fabregas and Marcos Alonso were also left out by Lopetegui, as was Arsenal full-back Hector Bellerin. Although Lewandowski’s age is not ideal for the kind of hefty price Chelsea would have to pay – he turns 30 in August – he does fit the bill for a proven European goal-scorer and his arrival would also be a crucial way of persuading Eden Hazard, and Thibaut Courtois that Chelsea are serious about challenging again for the Premier League and the Champions League after a disappointing fifth-place finish. Both players are holding off on their contract renewals until they see firm evidence that the club are prepared to compete with rivals for the best players, although Hazard yesterday gave his strongest hint yet that he was looking to the future at Stamford Bridge. “We have a lot of top players who are used to winning trophies. We’ll be ready next season,” Hazard told The London Evening Standard. “I think all of the players and the club want one thing and that’s to win the title. Of course, we will see if we can bring in some new players. But we will be focused on winning the title.” FA Cup final reaction and analysis | How Chelsea held their nerve against United Lewandowski was the subject of a public reminder last June from Bayern that he had a contract until 2021, with the club clearly suggesting that they were aware a market was being created for the striker. Real Madrid have always been considered the first in the queue for the highly-rated Poland international but in the past two years the Champions League finalists have had to sell players in order to stay in profit and it is likely that they would have to do the same again to buy Lewandowski. Morata is now represented by Pini Zahavi, the Israeli agent who was such a key player in the acquisition of Roman Abramovich’s first Premier League-winning Chelsea team in the midpoint of the last decade. Bayern were robust in seeing off interest in the player last summer and he finished top of the Bundesliga goalscorers with 29 goals – almost twice as many as any other player in the league. The stand-off with Conte and his assistants continues this week with the compensation bill expected to top £10 million if Chelsea wish to move on the Italian and his sizeable entourage form the last year of his contract. As well as his brother Gianluca, Conte has built up an extensive group of coaches assistants, analysts and nutritionists.
Exclusive: Chelsea make Robert Lewandowski main summer target as they plan spending spree
Chelsea will push on with ambitious summer transfer plans despite the crisis that threatens to engulf owner Roman Abramovich, with the club making Bayern Munich striker Robert Lewandowski their No 1 target. Abramovich’s visa application has been delayed, with the Government set to ask the Russian oligarch how he acquired his wealth if it is to be renewed. There is also huge uncertainty over the future of Antonio Conte, with both the manager and the club hopeful of a parting of the ways but Chelsea unprepared to pay the kind of compensation – at least £10 million – that it would cost to get rid of the Italian and his nine staff. Despite that upheaval, Chelsea are still trying to advance with a deal for Lewandowski, who they believe is ready for a move away from the German club and could cost in excess of £100 million. If Chelsea were successful in their pursuit of Lewandowski his fee would likely be offset by the sale of club-record signing Alvaro Morata, with the Spaniard struggling after he moved to Stamford Bridge for £68 million last summer. Roman Abramovich's uncertain future will not affect Chelsea's transfer plans Credit: Getty Images The 25-year-old did not even make the 23-man Spain squad named for the World Cup finals by Julien Lopetegui on Monday, having scored just three goals since the turn of the year. Shortly after the squad was announced, Morata tweeted: “Good luck at the World Cup! I will be supporting you and encouraging you right to the end, as always!” The striker’s club-mates Cesc Fabregas and Marcos Alonso were also left out by Lopetegui, as was Arsenal full-back Hector Bellerin. Although Lewandowski’s age is not ideal for the kind of hefty price Chelsea would have to pay – he turns 30 in August – he does fit the bill for a proven European goal-scorer and his arrival would also be a crucial way of persuading Eden Hazard, and Thibaut Courtois that Chelsea are serious about challenging again for the Premier League and the Champions League after a disappointing fifth-place finish. Both players are holding off on their contract renewals until they see firm evidence that the club are prepared to compete with rivals for the best players, although Hazard yesterday gave his strongest hint yet that he was looking to the future at Stamford Bridge. “We have a lot of top players who are used to winning trophies. We’ll be ready next season,” Hazard told The London Evening Standard. “I think all of the players and the club want one thing and that’s to win the title. Of course, we will see if we can bring in some new players. But we will be focused on winning the title.” FA Cup final reaction and analysis | How Chelsea held their nerve against United Lewandowski was the subject of a public reminder last June from Bayern that he had a contract until 2021, with the club clearly suggesting that they were aware a market was being created for the striker. Real Madrid have always been considered the first in the queue for the highly-rated Poland international but in the past two years the Champions League finalists have had to sell players in order to stay in profit and it is likely that they would have to do the same again to buy Lewandowski. Morata is now represented by Pini Zahavi, the Israeli agent who was such a key player in the acquisition of Roman Abramovich’s first Premier League-winning Chelsea team in the midpoint of the last decade. Bayern were robust in seeing off interest in the player last summer and he finished top of the Bundesliga goalscorers with 29 goals – almost twice as many as any other player in the league. The stand-off with Conte and his assistants continues this week with the compensation bill expected to top £10 million if Chelsea wish to move on the Italian and his sizeable entourage form the last year of his contract. As well as his brother Gianluca, Conte has built up an extensive group of coaches assistants, analysts and nutritionists.
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's Robin Knoche celebrates scoring their first goal REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's Robin Knoche celebrates scoring their first goal REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's Robin Knoche scores their first goal REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's Robin Knoche scores their first goal REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's Josip Brekalo in action with Holstein Kiel’s Dominik Schmidt REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's Josip Brekalo in action with Holstein Kiel’s Dominik Schmidt REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's Divock Origi in action with Holstein Kiel’s Rafael Czichos REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's Divock Origi in action with Holstein Kiel’s Rafael Czichos REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's Yunus Malli in action with Holstein Kiel’s David Kinsombi REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's Yunus Malli in action with Holstein Kiel’s David Kinsombi REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Holstein Kiel coach Markus Anfang REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Holstein Kiel coach Markus Anfang REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Holstein Kiel’s Tom Weilandt in action with Wolfsburg's Felix Uduokhai REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Holstein Kiel’s Tom Weilandt in action with Wolfsburg's Felix Uduokhai REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's Maximilian Arnold in action with Holstein Kiel's Tom Weilandt REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg's Maximilian Arnold in action with Holstein Kiel's Tom Weilandt REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Holstein Kiel fans light flares REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Holstein Kiel fans light flares REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg coach Bruno Labbadia REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Wolfsburg coach Bruno Labbadia REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Holstein Kiel fans light flares before the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Holstein Kiel fans light flares before the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Holstein Kiel fans light flares before the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 Holstein Kiel fans light flares before the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 VfL Wolfsburg fans before the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg
Soccer Football - Bundesliga Promotion/Relegation Playoff Second Leg - Holstein Kiel vs VfL Wolfsburg - Holstein-Stadion, Kiel, Germany - May 21, 2018 VfL Wolfsburg fans before the match REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer DFL RULES TO LIMIT THE ONLINE USAGE DURING MATCH TIME TO 15 PICTURES PER GAME. IMAGE SEQUENCES TO SIMULATE VIDEO IS NOT ALLOWED AT ANY TIME. FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE CONTACT DFL DIRECTLY AT + 49 69 650050
​​West Ham United youngster Reece Oxford has confirmed his return to East London on social media, after a segmented season-long spell away from the club in Germany with Bundesliga side Borussia Monchengladbach. The 19-year-old defender was initially sent out on loan by former Hammers boss Slaven Bilic last summer, after failing to build on the progress he had made since being promoted from the club's youth academy in 2014. On Monday however, Oxford confirmed his return to West Ham having...
West Ham Loanee Confirms Return to Club in Social Media Post After Season-Long Loan in Bundesliga
​​West Ham United youngster Reece Oxford has confirmed his return to East London on social media, after a segmented season-long spell away from the club in Germany with Bundesliga side Borussia Monchengladbach. The 19-year-old defender was initially sent out on loan by former Hammers boss Slaven Bilic last summer, after failing to build on the progress he had made since being promoted from the club's youth academy in 2014. On Monday however, Oxford confirmed his return to West Ham having...
​​West Ham United youngster Reece Oxford has confirmed his return to East London on social media, after a segmented season-long spell away from the club in Germany with Bundesliga side Borussia Monchengladbach. The 19-year-old defender was initially sent out on loan by former Hammers boss Slaven Bilic last summer, after failing to build on the progress he had made since being promoted from the club's youth academy in 2014. On Monday however, Oxford confirmed his return to West Ham having...
West Ham Loanee Confirms Return to Club in Social Media Post After Season-Long Loan in Bundesliga
​​West Ham United youngster Reece Oxford has confirmed his return to East London on social media, after a segmented season-long spell away from the club in Germany with Bundesliga side Borussia Monchengladbach. The 19-year-old defender was initially sent out on loan by former Hammers boss Slaven Bilic last summer, after failing to build on the progress he had made since being promoted from the club's youth academy in 2014. On Monday however, Oxford confirmed his return to West Ham having...
​​West Ham United youngster Reece Oxford has confirmed his return to East London on social media, after a segmented season-long spell away from the club in Germany with Bundesliga side Borussia Monchengladbach. The 19-year-old defender was initially sent out on loan by former Hammers boss Slaven Bilic last summer, after failing to build on the progress he had made since being promoted from the club's youth academy in 2014. On Monday however, Oxford confirmed his return to West Ham having...
West Ham Loanee Confirms Return to Club in Social Media Post After Season-Long Loan in Bundesliga
​​West Ham United youngster Reece Oxford has confirmed his return to East London on social media, after a segmented season-long spell away from the club in Germany with Bundesliga side Borussia Monchengladbach. The 19-year-old defender was initially sent out on loan by former Hammers boss Slaven Bilic last summer, after failing to build on the progress he had made since being promoted from the club's youth academy in 2014. On Monday however, Oxford confirmed his return to West Ham having...
​​West Ham United youngster Reece Oxford has confirmed his return to East London on social media, after a segmented season-long spell away from the club in Germany with Bundesliga side Borussia Monchengladbach. The 19-year-old defender was initially sent out on loan by former Hammers boss Slaven Bilic last summer, after failing to build on the progress he had made since being promoted from the club's youth academy in 2014. On Monday however, Oxford confirmed his return to West Ham having...
West Ham Loanee Confirms Return to Club in Social Media Post After Season-Long Loan in Bundesliga
​​West Ham United youngster Reece Oxford has confirmed his return to East London on social media, after a segmented season-long spell away from the club in Germany with Bundesliga side Borussia Monchengladbach. The 19-year-old defender was initially sent out on loan by former Hammers boss Slaven Bilic last summer, after failing to build on the progress he had made since being promoted from the club's youth academy in 2014. On Monday however, Oxford confirmed his return to West Ham having...
​​West Ham United youngster Reece Oxford has confirmed his return to East London on social media, after a segmented season-long spell away from the club in Germany with Bundesliga side Borussia Monchengladbach. The 19-year-old defender was initially sent out on loan by former Hammers boss Slaven Bilic last summer, after failing to build on the progress he had made since being promoted from the club's youth academy in 2014. On Monday however, Oxford confirmed his return to West Ham having...
West Ham Loanee Confirms Return to Club in Social Media Post After Season-Long Loan in Bundesliga
​​West Ham United youngster Reece Oxford has confirmed his return to East London on social media, after a segmented season-long spell away from the club in Germany with Bundesliga side Borussia Monchengladbach. The 19-year-old defender was initially sent out on loan by former Hammers boss Slaven Bilic last summer, after failing to build on the progress he had made since being promoted from the club's youth academy in 2014. On Monday however, Oxford confirmed his return to West Ham having...
​Liverpool are interested in signing German international midfielder Julian Brandt and the ​Merseyside club are prepared to offer Bayern Leverkusen ​€60m for the services of the 22-year-old attacker. According to reports made by ​Calcio Insider, ​the Reds have been tracking the German youngster for quite a while now and the Bundesliga club were determined to keep him, as Brandt agreed to a new deal last month. However, a Leverkusen source (via ​Calcio Insider) has confirmed that the club only...
Report Claims Liverpool Are Preparing €60m Move for Bundesliga Playmaker and Germany International
​Liverpool are interested in signing German international midfielder Julian Brandt and the ​Merseyside club are prepared to offer Bayern Leverkusen ​€60m for the services of the 22-year-old attacker. According to reports made by ​Calcio Insider, ​the Reds have been tracking the German youngster for quite a while now and the Bundesliga club were determined to keep him, as Brandt agreed to a new deal last month. However, a Leverkusen source (via ​Calcio Insider) has confirmed that the club only...
​Liverpool are interested in signing German international midfielder Julian Brandt and the ​Merseyside club are prepared to offer Bayern Leverkusen ​€60m for the services of the 22-year-old attacker. According to reports made by ​Calcio Insider, ​the Reds have been tracking the German youngster for quite a while now and the ​Bundesliga club were determined to keep him, as Brandt agreed to a new deal last month. However, a Leverkusen source (via ​Calcio Insider) has confirmed that the club...
Report Claims Liverpool Are Preparing €60m Move for Bundesliga Playmaker and Germany International
​Liverpool are interested in signing German international midfielder Julian Brandt and the ​Merseyside club are prepared to offer Bayern Leverkusen ​€60m for the services of the 22-year-old attacker. According to reports made by ​Calcio Insider, ​the Reds have been tracking the German youngster for quite a while now and the ​Bundesliga club were determined to keep him, as Brandt agreed to a new deal last month. However, a Leverkusen source (via ​Calcio Insider) has confirmed that the club...
​Liverpool are interested in signing German international midfielder Julian Brandt and the ​Merseyside club are prepared to offer Bayern Leverkusen ​€60m for the services of the 22-year-old attacker. According to reports made by ​Calcio Insider, ​the Reds have been tracking the German youngster for quite a while now and the ​Bundesliga club were determined to keep him, as Brandt agreed to a new deal last month. However, a Leverkusen source (via ​Calcio Insider) has confirmed that the club...
Report Claims Liverpool Are Preparing €60m Move for Bundesliga Playmaker and Germany International
​Liverpool are interested in signing German international midfielder Julian Brandt and the ​Merseyside club are prepared to offer Bayern Leverkusen ​€60m for the services of the 22-year-old attacker. According to reports made by ​Calcio Insider, ​the Reds have been tracking the German youngster for quite a while now and the ​Bundesliga club were determined to keep him, as Brandt agreed to a new deal last month. However, a Leverkusen source (via ​Calcio Insider) has confirmed that the club...

What to read next