Burton Albion

Burton Albion slideshow

Stoke are close to appointing Gary Rowett as their new manager after agreeing to pay the £1.8m compensation fee. Relegated Stoke have returned for Rowett, their No 1 target in January after the dismissal of Mark Hughes, and are hoping to agree a deal in the next 48 hours as they prepare for the Championship. Rowett was top of Stoke's list in the New Year, yet opted to stay at Pride Park as negotiations over a new contract were advanced, subsequently guiding Derby to the Championship play-offs. But Stoke have revived their long-term interest in the former defender and want him to lead their promotion challenge following relegation from the Premier League. It is understood the move is being driven by John Coates, Stoke's influential vice-chairman, who has admired Rowett for some time. Sources at Stoke have revealed that Rowett has been on Stoke's radar since his start at Burton Albion, with the 44-year-old also impressing in spells at Birmingham City and Derby. Rowett signed a new £1.5m a year contract in January and it is understood compensation is just under the £2m mark. Stoke parted company with Paul Lambert last Friday and are keen to bring in a new manager by the end of the week. Derby issued a statement on Monday evening. It read: "Derby County Football Club can confirm that Gary Rowett has asked for permission to speak with Stoke City regarding the vacant manager’s position at the bet365 Stadium. "The club is now in discussion with Stoke regarding the matter and will update our supporters in due course." Rowett's past achievements include leading Burton to the League Two play-offs on two occasions, while he finished sixth with Derby in his first full season in charge. Fulham lost the first leg at Pride Park but went through as winners after a 2-0 home win last Monday. Derby are set to slash their budget after missing out on promotion, with owner Mel Morris determined to lower the club's cost base. As a result, leading scorer Matej Vydra is likely to be sold to the highest bidder. Stoke, meanwhile, have the incentive of parachute payments and are making a huge attempt to seal a swift return to the top-flight. Though stars such as England goalkeeper Jack Butland, Xherdan Shaqiri and Joe Allen could be sold, Stoke are focusing on building a competitive squad capable of mounting a serious challenge. Rowett is the man they want to lead them into a new era and his appointment could even be confirmed on Tuesday.
Stoke in talks to appoint Gary Rowett of Derby as new manager
Stoke are close to appointing Gary Rowett as their new manager after agreeing to pay the £1.8m compensation fee. Relegated Stoke have returned for Rowett, their No 1 target in January after the dismissal of Mark Hughes, and are hoping to agree a deal in the next 48 hours as they prepare for the Championship. Rowett was top of Stoke's list in the New Year, yet opted to stay at Pride Park as negotiations over a new contract were advanced, subsequently guiding Derby to the Championship play-offs. But Stoke have revived their long-term interest in the former defender and want him to lead their promotion challenge following relegation from the Premier League. It is understood the move is being driven by John Coates, Stoke's influential vice-chairman, who has admired Rowett for some time. Sources at Stoke have revealed that Rowett has been on Stoke's radar since his start at Burton Albion, with the 44-year-old also impressing in spells at Birmingham City and Derby. Rowett signed a new £1.5m a year contract in January and it is understood compensation is just under the £2m mark. Stoke parted company with Paul Lambert last Friday and are keen to bring in a new manager by the end of the week. Derby issued a statement on Monday evening. It read: "Derby County Football Club can confirm that Gary Rowett has asked for permission to speak with Stoke City regarding the vacant manager’s position at the bet365 Stadium. "The club is now in discussion with Stoke regarding the matter and will update our supporters in due course." Rowett's past achievements include leading Burton to the League Two play-offs on two occasions, while he finished sixth with Derby in his first full season in charge. Fulham lost the first leg at Pride Park but went through as winners after a 2-0 home win last Monday. Derby are set to slash their budget after missing out on promotion, with owner Mel Morris determined to lower the club's cost base. As a result, leading scorer Matej Vydra is likely to be sold to the highest bidder. Stoke, meanwhile, have the incentive of parachute payments and are making a huge attempt to seal a swift return to the top-flight. Though stars such as England goalkeeper Jack Butland, Xherdan Shaqiri and Joe Allen could be sold, Stoke are focusing on building a competitive squad capable of mounting a serious challenge. Rowett is the man they want to lead them into a new era and his appointment could even be confirmed on Tuesday.
Huddersfield's battling draw with Chelsea completed a remarkable season in which every team that won promotion to English football's top leagues remain in the division. David Wagner's side earned a vital point at Stamford Bridge on Wednesday night to guarantee their Premier League safety for another season. The result meant that Huddersfield joined fellow promoted sides Brighton and Newcastle in safely avoiding a return the Championship as Stoke, West Brom and - barring a miracle - Swansea all dropped out of the top flight. For the first time since the 2001-02 season, when Fulham, Blackburn and Bolton defied the odds, every single team that earned promotion to one of English football's top four leagues avoided relegation. Alan Alger, PR manager at bookmakers Betway, said the odds on such an outcome would have been bigger than Leicester City's Premier League title triumph in 2016. Stoke City lost to Crystal Palace last weekend to end their 10-year stay in the Premier League Credit: Getty Images In the Championship, Burton Albion and Barnsley were relegated on a dramatic final day after Sunderland's fate had been sealed a week earlier. Below the top-flight, Championship new-boys Sheffield United and Millwall both enjoyed top-half finishes while Bolton Wanderers escaped the drop on the final day. In League One, Portsmouth, Plymouth Argyle, Doncaster Rovers, Blackpool all stayed well clear of the bottom four as Bury, MK Dons, Northampton Town, and Oldham Athletic were relegated to the fourth tier. League Two's Forest Green narrowly avoided an immediate return to the Vanarama National League while fellow promoted side Lincoln enjoyed a seventh-place finish, booking their place in the play-offs. Bolton Wanderers came from behind to beat Nottingham Forest on the final day and avoid an instant return to League One Credit: Getty Images In fact, the trend extends beyond the Football League, with Maidenhead United, Ebbsfleet United, Halifax Town and Fylde all securing safety after earning promotion to National League One last season. Huddersfield manager David Wagner was last night quick to praise his players for the "incredible achievement" of defying Premier League relegation. “This is an absolute over-achievement,” said Wagner. Huddersfield came up via the Championship play-offs Credit: PA “It's a bigger achievement than the promotion last season. Last year we were predicted to be relegated and we got promoted. This season we were predicted to be a team relegated by miles and I understand it. “We work under circumstances which are not even Championship circumstances. But part of our DNA, the Huddersfield Town DNA, is to try it. "To have passion, desire... how big you are doesn't count. It's about trying everything. We are humble. We are ambitious, too. We search a chance in every game. Today we were chance-less, more or less. It's an incredible achievement for us. It feels like another trophy.” Promoted teams avoid relegation | English football's top five leagues
Year of the underdog: Every single promoted team in English football's top four divisions avoids relegation
Huddersfield's battling draw with Chelsea completed a remarkable season in which every team that won promotion to English football's top leagues remain in the division. David Wagner's side earned a vital point at Stamford Bridge on Wednesday night to guarantee their Premier League safety for another season. The result meant that Huddersfield joined fellow promoted sides Brighton and Newcastle in safely avoiding a return the Championship as Stoke, West Brom and - barring a miracle - Swansea all dropped out of the top flight. For the first time since the 2001-02 season, when Fulham, Blackburn and Bolton defied the odds, every single team that earned promotion to one of English football's top four leagues avoided relegation. Alan Alger, PR manager at bookmakers Betway, said the odds on such an outcome would have been bigger than Leicester City's Premier League title triumph in 2016. Stoke City lost to Crystal Palace last weekend to end their 10-year stay in the Premier League Credit: Getty Images In the Championship, Burton Albion and Barnsley were relegated on a dramatic final day after Sunderland's fate had been sealed a week earlier. Below the top-flight, Championship new-boys Sheffield United and Millwall both enjoyed top-half finishes while Bolton Wanderers escaped the drop on the final day. In League One, Portsmouth, Plymouth Argyle, Doncaster Rovers, Blackpool all stayed well clear of the bottom four as Bury, MK Dons, Northampton Town, and Oldham Athletic were relegated to the fourth tier. League Two's Forest Green narrowly avoided an immediate return to the Vanarama National League while fellow promoted side Lincoln enjoyed a seventh-place finish, booking their place in the play-offs. Bolton Wanderers came from behind to beat Nottingham Forest on the final day and avoid an instant return to League One Credit: Getty Images In fact, the trend extends beyond the Football League, with Maidenhead United, Ebbsfleet United, Halifax Town and Fylde all securing safety after earning promotion to National League One last season. Huddersfield manager David Wagner was last night quick to praise his players for the "incredible achievement" of defying Premier League relegation. “This is an absolute over-achievement,” said Wagner. Huddersfield came up via the Championship play-offs Credit: PA “It's a bigger achievement than the promotion last season. Last year we were predicted to be relegated and we got promoted. This season we were predicted to be a team relegated by miles and I understand it. “We work under circumstances which are not even Championship circumstances. But part of our DNA, the Huddersfield Town DNA, is to try it. "To have passion, desire... how big you are doesn't count. It's about trying everything. We are humble. We are ambitious, too. We search a chance in every game. Today we were chance-less, more or less. It's an incredible achievement for us. It feels like another trophy.” Promoted teams avoid relegation | English football's top five leagues
Huddersfield's battling draw with Chelsea completed a remarkable season in which every team that won promotion to English football's top leagues remain in the division. David Wagner's side earned a vital point at Stamford Bridge on Wednesday night to guarantee their Premier League safety for another season. The result meant that Huddersfield joined fellow promoted sides Brighton and Newcastle in safely avoiding a return the Championship as Stoke, West Brom and - barring a miracle - Swansea all dropped out of the top flight. For the first time since the 2001-02 season, when Fulham, Blackburn and Bolton defied the odds, every single team that earned promotion to one of English football's top four leagues avoided relegation. Alan Alger, PR manager at bookmakers Betway, said the odds on such an outcome would have been bigger than Leicester City's Premier League title triumph in 2016. Stoke City lost to Crystal Palace last weekend to end their 10-year stay in the Premier League Credit: Getty Images In the Championship, Burton Albion and Barnsley were relegated on a dramatic final day after Sunderland's fate had been sealed a week earlier. Below the top-flight, Championship new-boys Sheffield United and Millwall both enjoyed top-half finishes while Bolton Wanderers escaped the drop on the final day. In League One, Portsmouth, Plymouth Argyle, Doncaster Rovers, Blackpool all stayed well clear of the bottom four as Bury, MK Dons, Northampton Town, and Oldham Athletic were relegated to the fourth tier. League Two's Forest Green narrowly avoided an immediate return to the Vanarama National League while fellow promoted side Lincoln enjoyed a seventh-place finish, booking their place in the play-offs. Bolton Wanderers came from behind to beat Nottingham Forest on the final day and avoid an instant return to League One Credit: Getty Images In fact, the trend extends beyond the Football League, with Maidenhead United, Ebbsfleet United, Halifax Town and Fylde all securing safety after earning promotion to National League One last season. Huddersfield manager David Wagner was last night quick to praise his players for the "incredible achievement" of defying Premier League relegation. “This is an absolute over-achievement,” said Wagner. Huddersfield came up via the Championship play-offs Credit: PA “It's a bigger achievement than the promotion last season. Last year we were predicted to be relegated and we got promoted. This season we were predicted to be a team relegated by miles and I understand it. “We work under circumstances which are not even Championship circumstances. But part of our DNA, the Huddersfield Town DNA, is to try it. "To have passion, desire... how big you are doesn't count. It's about trying everything. We are humble. We are ambitious, too. We search a chance in every game. Today we were chance-less, more or less. It's an incredible achievement for us. It feels like another trophy.” Promoted teams avoid relegation | English football's top five leagues
Year of the underdog: Every single promoted team in English football's top four divisions avoids relegation
Huddersfield's battling draw with Chelsea completed a remarkable season in which every team that won promotion to English football's top leagues remain in the division. David Wagner's side earned a vital point at Stamford Bridge on Wednesday night to guarantee their Premier League safety for another season. The result meant that Huddersfield joined fellow promoted sides Brighton and Newcastle in safely avoiding a return the Championship as Stoke, West Brom and - barring a miracle - Swansea all dropped out of the top flight. For the first time since the 2001-02 season, when Fulham, Blackburn and Bolton defied the odds, every single team that earned promotion to one of English football's top four leagues avoided relegation. Alan Alger, PR manager at bookmakers Betway, said the odds on such an outcome would have been bigger than Leicester City's Premier League title triumph in 2016. Stoke City lost to Crystal Palace last weekend to end their 10-year stay in the Premier League Credit: Getty Images In the Championship, Burton Albion and Barnsley were relegated on a dramatic final day after Sunderland's fate had been sealed a week earlier. Below the top-flight, Championship new-boys Sheffield United and Millwall both enjoyed top-half finishes while Bolton Wanderers escaped the drop on the final day. In League One, Portsmouth, Plymouth Argyle, Doncaster Rovers, Blackpool all stayed well clear of the bottom four as Bury, MK Dons, Northampton Town, and Oldham Athletic were relegated to the fourth tier. League Two's Forest Green narrowly avoided an immediate return to the Vanarama National League while fellow promoted side Lincoln enjoyed a seventh-place finish, booking their place in the play-offs. Bolton Wanderers came from behind to beat Nottingham Forest on the final day and avoid an instant return to League One Credit: Getty Images In fact, the trend extends beyond the Football League, with Maidenhead United, Ebbsfleet United, Halifax Town and Fylde all securing safety after earning promotion to National League One last season. Huddersfield manager David Wagner was last night quick to praise his players for the "incredible achievement" of defying Premier League relegation. “This is an absolute over-achievement,” said Wagner. Huddersfield came up via the Championship play-offs Credit: PA “It's a bigger achievement than the promotion last season. Last year we were predicted to be relegated and we got promoted. This season we were predicted to be a team relegated by miles and I understand it. “We work under circumstances which are not even Championship circumstances. But part of our DNA, the Huddersfield Town DNA, is to try it. "To have passion, desire... how big you are doesn't count. It's about trying everything. We are humble. We are ambitious, too. We search a chance in every game. Today we were chance-less, more or less. It's an incredible achievement for us. It feels like another trophy.” Promoted teams avoid relegation | English football's top five leagues
Huddersfield's battling draw with Chelsea completed a remarkable season in which every team that won promotion to English football's top leagues remain in the division. David Wagner's side earned a vital point at Stamford Bridge on Wednesday night to guarantee their Premier League safety for another season. The result meant that Huddersfield joined fellow promoted sides Brighton and Newcastle in safely avoiding a return the Championship as Stoke, West Brom and - barring a miracle - Swansea all dropped out of the top flight. For the first time since the 2001-02 season, when Fulham, Blackburn and Bolton defied the odds, every single team that earned promotion to one of English football's top four leagues avoided relegation. Alan Alger, PR manager at bookmakers Betway, said the odds on such an outcome would have been bigger than Leicester City's Premier League title triumph in 2016. Stoke City lost to Crystal Palace last weekend to end their 10-year stay in the Premier League Credit: Getty Images In the Championship, Burton Albion and Barnsley were relegated on a dramatic final day after Sunderland's fate had been sealed a week earlier. Below the top-flight, Championship new-boys Sheffield United and Millwall both enjoyed top-half finishes while Bolton Wanderers escaped the drop on the final day. In League One, Portsmouth, Plymouth Argyle, Doncaster Rovers, Blackpool all stayed well clear of the bottom four as Bury, MK Dons, Northampton Town, and Oldham Athletic were relegated to the fourth tier. League Two's Forest Green narrowly avoided an immediate return to the Vanarama National League while fellow promoted side Lincoln enjoyed a seventh-place finish, booking their place in the play-offs. Bolton Wanderers came from behind to beat Nottingham Forest on the final day and avoid an instant return to League One Credit: Getty Images In fact, the trend extends beyond the Football League, with Maidenhead United, Ebbsfleet United, Halifax Town and Fylde all securing safety after earning promotion to National League One last season. Huddersfield manager David Wagner was last night quick to praise his players for the "incredible achievement" of defying Premier League relegation. “This is an absolute over-achievement,” said Wagner. Huddersfield came up via the Championship play-offs Credit: PA “It's a bigger achievement than the promotion last season. Last year we were predicted to be relegated and we got promoted. This season we were predicted to be a team relegated by miles and I understand it. “We work under circumstances which are not even Championship circumstances. But part of our DNA, the Huddersfield Town DNA, is to try it. "To have passion, desire... how big you are doesn't count. It's about trying everything. We are humble. We are ambitious, too. We search a chance in every game. Today we were chance-less, more or less. It's an incredible achievement for us. It feels like another trophy.” Promoted teams avoid relegation | English football's top five leagues
Year of the underdog: Every single promoted team in English football's top four divisions avoids relegation
Huddersfield's battling draw with Chelsea completed a remarkable season in which every team that won promotion to English football's top leagues remain in the division. David Wagner's side earned a vital point at Stamford Bridge on Wednesday night to guarantee their Premier League safety for another season. The result meant that Huddersfield joined fellow promoted sides Brighton and Newcastle in safely avoiding a return the Championship as Stoke, West Brom and - barring a miracle - Swansea all dropped out of the top flight. For the first time since the 2001-02 season, when Fulham, Blackburn and Bolton defied the odds, every single team that earned promotion to one of English football's top four leagues avoided relegation. Alan Alger, PR manager at bookmakers Betway, said the odds on such an outcome would have been bigger than Leicester City's Premier League title triumph in 2016. Stoke City lost to Crystal Palace last weekend to end their 10-year stay in the Premier League Credit: Getty Images In the Championship, Burton Albion and Barnsley were relegated on a dramatic final day after Sunderland's fate had been sealed a week earlier. Below the top-flight, Championship new-boys Sheffield United and Millwall both enjoyed top-half finishes while Bolton Wanderers escaped the drop on the final day. In League One, Portsmouth, Plymouth Argyle, Doncaster Rovers, Blackpool all stayed well clear of the bottom four as Bury, MK Dons, Northampton Town, and Oldham Athletic were relegated to the fourth tier. League Two's Forest Green narrowly avoided an immediate return to the Vanarama National League while fellow promoted side Lincoln enjoyed a seventh-place finish, booking their place in the play-offs. Bolton Wanderers came from behind to beat Nottingham Forest on the final day and avoid an instant return to League One Credit: Getty Images In fact, the trend extends beyond the Football League, with Maidenhead United, Ebbsfleet United, Halifax Town and Fylde all securing safety after earning promotion to National League One last season. Huddersfield manager David Wagner was last night quick to praise his players for the "incredible achievement" of defying Premier League relegation. “This is an absolute over-achievement,” said Wagner. Huddersfield came up via the Championship play-offs Credit: PA “It's a bigger achievement than the promotion last season. Last year we were predicted to be relegated and we got promoted. This season we were predicted to be a team relegated by miles and I understand it. “We work under circumstances which are not even Championship circumstances. But part of our DNA, the Huddersfield Town DNA, is to try it. "To have passion, desire... how big you are doesn't count. It's about trying everything. We are humble. We are ambitious, too. We search a chance in every game. Today we were chance-less, more or less. It's an incredible achievement for us. It feels like another trophy.” Promoted teams avoid relegation | English football's top five leagues
Huddersfield's battling draw with Chelsea completed a remarkable season in which every team that won promotion to English football's top leagues remain in the division. David Wagner's side earned a vital point at Stamford Bridge on Wednesday night to guarantee their Premier League safety for another season. The result meant that Huddersfield joined fellow promoted sides Brighton and Newcastle in safely avoiding a return the Championship as Stoke, West Brom and - barring a miracle - Swansea all dropped out of the top flight. For the first time since the 2001-02 season, when Fulham, Blackburn and Bolton defied the odds, every single team that earned promotion to one of English football's top four leagues avoided relegation. Alan Alger, PR manager at bookmakers Betway, said the odds on such an outcome would have been bigger than Leicester City's Premier League title triumph in 2016. Stoke City lost to Crystal Palace last weekend to end their 10-year stay in the Premier League Credit: Getty Images In the Championship, Burton Albion and Barnsley were relegated on a dramatic final day after Sunderland's fate had been sealed a week earlier. Below the top-flight, Championship new-boys Sheffield United and Millwall both enjoyed top-half finishes while Bolton Wanderers escaped the drop on the final day. In League One, Portsmouth, Plymouth Argyle, Doncaster Rovers, Blackpool all stayed well clear of the bottom four as Bury, MK Dons, Northampton Town, and Oldham Athletic were relegated to the fourth tier. League Two's Forest Green narrowly avoided an immediate return to the Vanarama National League while fellow promoted side Lincoln enjoyed a seventh-place finish, booking their place in the play-offs. Bolton Wanderers came from behind to beat Nottingham Forest on the final day and avoid an instant return to League One Credit: Getty Images In fact, the trend extends beyond the Football League, with Maidenhead United, Ebbsfleet United, Halifax Town and Fylde all securing safety after earning promotion to National League One last season. Huddersfield manager David Wagner was last night quick to praise his players for the "incredible achievement" of defying Premier League relegation. “This is an absolute over-achievement,” said Wagner. Huddersfield came up via the Championship play-offs Credit: PA “It's a bigger achievement than the promotion last season. Last year we were predicted to be relegated and we got promoted. This season we were predicted to be a team relegated by miles and I understand it. “We work under circumstances which are not even Championship circumstances. But part of our DNA, the Huddersfield Town DNA, is to try it. "To have passion, desire... how big you are doesn't count. It's about trying everything. We are humble. We are ambitious, too. We search a chance in every game. Today we were chance-less, more or less. It's an incredible achievement for us. It feels like another trophy.” Promoted teams avoid relegation | English football's top five leagues
Year of the underdog: Every single promoted team in English football's top four divisions avoids relegation
Huddersfield's battling draw with Chelsea completed a remarkable season in which every team that won promotion to English football's top leagues remain in the division. David Wagner's side earned a vital point at Stamford Bridge on Wednesday night to guarantee their Premier League safety for another season. The result meant that Huddersfield joined fellow promoted sides Brighton and Newcastle in safely avoiding a return the Championship as Stoke, West Brom and - barring a miracle - Swansea all dropped out of the top flight. For the first time since the 2001-02 season, when Fulham, Blackburn and Bolton defied the odds, every single team that earned promotion to one of English football's top four leagues avoided relegation. Alan Alger, PR manager at bookmakers Betway, said the odds on such an outcome would have been bigger than Leicester City's Premier League title triumph in 2016. Stoke City lost to Crystal Palace last weekend to end their 10-year stay in the Premier League Credit: Getty Images In the Championship, Burton Albion and Barnsley were relegated on a dramatic final day after Sunderland's fate had been sealed a week earlier. Below the top-flight, Championship new-boys Sheffield United and Millwall both enjoyed top-half finishes while Bolton Wanderers escaped the drop on the final day. In League One, Portsmouth, Plymouth Argyle, Doncaster Rovers, Blackpool all stayed well clear of the bottom four as Bury, MK Dons, Northampton Town, and Oldham Athletic were relegated to the fourth tier. League Two's Forest Green narrowly avoided an immediate return to the Vanarama National League while fellow promoted side Lincoln enjoyed a seventh-place finish, booking their place in the play-offs. Bolton Wanderers came from behind to beat Nottingham Forest on the final day and avoid an instant return to League One Credit: Getty Images In fact, the trend extends beyond the Football League, with Maidenhead United, Ebbsfleet United, Halifax Town and Fylde all securing safety after earning promotion to National League One last season. Huddersfield manager David Wagner was last night quick to praise his players for the "incredible achievement" of defying Premier League relegation. “This is an absolute over-achievement,” said Wagner. Huddersfield came up via the Championship play-offs Credit: PA “It's a bigger achievement than the promotion last season. Last year we were predicted to be relegated and we got promoted. This season we were predicted to be a team relegated by miles and I understand it. “We work under circumstances which are not even Championship circumstances. But part of our DNA, the Huddersfield Town DNA, is to try it. "To have passion, desire... how big you are doesn't count. It's about trying everything. We are humble. We are ambitious, too. We search a chance in every game. Today we were chance-less, more or less. It's an incredible achievement for us. It feels like another trophy.” Promoted teams avoid relegation | English football's top five leagues
Soccer Football - UEFA European Under-17 Championship - Group D - Netherlands v Spain - Burton Albion FC Stadium, Burton-upon-Trent, Britain - May 8, 2018 Netherlands' Ryan Gravenberg celebrates his sides second goal an own goal by Spain's Arnau Tenas Action Images via Reuters/Jason Cairnduff
UEFA European Under-17 Championship - Group D - Netherlands v Spain
Soccer Football - UEFA European Under-17 Championship - Group D - Netherlands v Spain - Burton Albion FC Stadium, Burton-upon-Trent, Britain - May 8, 2018 Netherlands' Ryan Gravenberg celebrates his sides second goal an own goal by Spain's Arnau Tenas Action Images via Reuters/Jason Cairnduff
Soccer Football - UEFA European Under-17 Championship - Group D - Netherlands v Spain - Burton Albion FC Stadium, Burton-upon-Trent, Britain - May 8, 2018 Netherlands' coach Kees van Wonderen Action Images via Reuters/Jason Cairnduff
UEFA European Under-17 Championship - Group D - Netherlands v Spain
Soccer Football - UEFA European Under-17 Championship - Group D - Netherlands v Spain - Burton Albion FC Stadium, Burton-upon-Trent, Britain - May 8, 2018 Netherlands' coach Kees van Wonderen Action Images via Reuters/Jason Cairnduff
Soccer Football - UEFA European Under-17 Championship - Group D - Netherlands v Spain - Burton Albion FC Stadium, Burton-upon-Trent, Britain - May 8, 2018 Netherlands' coach Kees van Wonderen Action Images via Reuters/Jason Cairnduff
UEFA European Under-17 Championship - Group D - Netherlands v Spain
Soccer Football - UEFA European Under-17 Championship - Group D - Netherlands v Spain - Burton Albion FC Stadium, Burton-upon-Trent, Britain - May 8, 2018 Netherlands' coach Kees van Wonderen Action Images via Reuters/Jason Cairnduff
Soccer Football - UEFA European Under-17 Championship - Group D - Netherlands v Spain - Burton Albion FC Stadium, Burton-upon-Trent, Britain - May 8, 2018 Netherlands' Ryan Gravenberg in action with Spain's Victor Mollejo Carpintero Action Images via Reuters/Jason Cairnduff
UEFA European Under-17 Championship - Group D - Netherlands v Spain
Soccer Football - UEFA European Under-17 Championship - Group D - Netherlands v Spain - Burton Albion FC Stadium, Burton-upon-Trent, Britain - May 8, 2018 Netherlands' Ryan Gravenberg in action with Spain's Victor Mollejo Carpintero Action Images via Reuters/Jason Cairnduff
Soccer Football - UEFA European Under-17 Championship - Group D - Netherlands v Spain - Burton Albion FC Stadium, Burton-upon-Trent, Britain - May 8, 2018 Spain team group Action Images via Reuters/Jason Cairnduff
UEFA European Under-17 Championship - Group D - Netherlands v Spain
Soccer Football - UEFA European Under-17 Championship - Group D - Netherlands v Spain - Burton Albion FC Stadium, Burton-upon-Trent, Britain - May 8, 2018 Spain team group Action Images via Reuters/Jason Cairnduff
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Preston North End's Louis Moult on the pitch at full time Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Preston North End's Louis Moult on the pitch at full time Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's Luke Murphy reacts after conceding their second goal Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's Luke Murphy reacts after conceding their second goal Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Preston North End fans Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Preston North End fans Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion fan reacts Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion fan reacts Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Preston North End's Louis Moult scores their second goal Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Preston North End's Louis Moult scores their second goal Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's Kyle McFadzean and Tom Naylor look dejected at full time Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's Kyle McFadzean and Tom Naylor look dejected at full time Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's Kyle McFadzean and Tom Naylor look dejected at full time Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's Kyle McFadzean and Tom Naylor look dejected at full time Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's Kyle McFadzean looks dejected at full time Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's Kyle McFadzean looks dejected at full time Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's Hope Akpan looks dejected at full time Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's Hope Akpan looks dejected at full time Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's Hope Akpan looks dejected at full time Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's Hope Akpan looks dejected at full time Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's Hope Akpan looks dejected at full time Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's Hope Akpan looks dejected at full time Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's Hope Akpan looks dejected at full time Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's Hope Akpan looks dejected at full time Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Preston North End's Billy Bodin walks off the pitch after receiving his second yellow card Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Preston North End's Billy Bodin walks off the pitch after receiving his second yellow card Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Preston North End's Billy Bodin appluads the fans as he walks off the pitch after receiving his second yellow card Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Preston North End's Billy Bodin appluads the fans as he walks off the pitch after receiving his second yellow card Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Preston North End's manager Alex Neil Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Preston North End's manager Alex Neil Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's manager Nigel Clough Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's manager Nigel Clough Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's manager Nigel Clough Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's manager Nigel Clough Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Preston North End's Alan Browne in action with Burton Albion's Marvin Sordell Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Preston North End's Alan Browne in action with Burton Albion's Marvin Sordell Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's Kyle McFadzean and Kyle McFadzean in action with Preston North End's Callum Robinson Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's Kyle McFadzean and Kyle McFadzean in action with Preston North End's Callum Robinson Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Preston North End's Callum Robinson scores his sides first goal Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Preston North End's Callum Robinson scores his sides first goal Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Preston North End's Callum Robinson celebrates scoring his sides first goal Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Preston North End's Callum Robinson celebrates scoring his sides first goal Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Preston North End's Callum Robinson scores his sides first goal Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Preston North End's Callum Robinson scores his sides first goal Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Preston North End's Callum Robinson scores his sides first goal Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Preston North End's Callum Robinson scores his sides first goal Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's Luke Murphy in action with Preston North End's Callum Robins Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Preston North End vs Burton Albion - Deepdale, Preston, Britain - May 6, 2018 Burton Albion's Luke Murphy in action with Preston North End's Callum Robins Action Images/Jason Cairnduff EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland fan before the match Action Images/Lee Smith
Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland fan before the match Action Images/Lee Smith
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman Action Images/Lee Smith
Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman Action Images/Lee Smith
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith
Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith
Sunderland have sacked manager Chris Coleman following the north east side's relegation to League One ahead of the club's takeover, the club confirmed on Sunday afternoon. The 47-year-old, hired in November last year following the dismissal of Simon Grayson, watched on from the dugout as a 2-1 home defeat to Burton Albion last weekend confirmed the Black Cats' second successive demotion. Sunderland pre-Coleman this season: 0.625 points per game Sunderland with Coleman this season: 0.83...
Sunderland Part Company With Chris Coleman After Ellis Short Announces Debt-Free Sale of Club
Sunderland have sacked manager Chris Coleman following the north east side's relegation to League One ahead of the club's takeover, the club confirmed on Sunday afternoon. The 47-year-old, hired in November last year following the dismissal of Simon Grayson, watched on from the dugout as a 2-1 home defeat to Burton Albion last weekend confirmed the Black Cats' second successive demotion. Sunderland pre-Coleman this season: 0.625 points per game Sunderland with Coleman this season: 0.83...
Sunderland have sacked manager Chris Coleman following the north east side's relegation to League One ahead of the club's takeover, the club confirmed on Sunday afternoon. The 47-year-old, hired in November last year following the dismissal of Simon Grayson, watched on from the dugout as a 2-1 home defeat to Burton Albion last weekend confirmed the Black Cats' second successive demotion. Sunderland pre-Coleman this season: 0.625 points per game Sunderland with Coleman this season: 0.83...
Sunderland Part Company With Chris Coleman After Ellis Short Announces Debt-Free Sale of Club
Sunderland have sacked manager Chris Coleman following the north east side's relegation to League One ahead of the club's takeover, the club confirmed on Sunday afternoon. The 47-year-old, hired in November last year following the dismissal of Simon Grayson, watched on from the dugout as a 2-1 home defeat to Burton Albion last weekend confirmed the Black Cats' second successive demotion. Sunderland pre-Coleman this season: 0.625 points per game Sunderland with Coleman this season: 0.83...
Nigel Clough hopes Burton Albion have not timed their impressive dash for Championship safety too late. Goals from Hope Akpan and Luke Akins booked a convincing victory over Bolton Wanderers, who themselves sunk deeper into the relegation mire. Burton – who have the lowest wage budget in the second tier - have been in the bottom three since Boxing Day, and remain so on goal difference, but their pragmatic manager knows his team may still require favours on the last weekend as they travel to Preston North End. “For a team which hadn’t won in six months at one point, that wasn’t bad,” smiled Clough. “But we know we have still got a lot of work to do, and that we can’t afford to lose next week. We lose at Preston, we are down, so we go to Preston with the same sort of attitude. “It would have been nice to be out of the bottom three. But of course you only have to be out of it on the final day. Jon Flanagan and Lucas Akins battle for the ball Credit: GETTY IMAGES “The lads have got a great spirit and they are up for it. We knew what we had to do after the Hull game; win three and draw one minimum. We have got three and now we are going to try and win the game next week.” Bolton have endured a miserable time away from home this season, winning just one of their 23 games since returning to the Championship. It is little wonder with the weak defending produced in the first half as the Brewers secured a two-goal lead before half time. Hope Akpan finished off an intricate move to score his first Brewers goal on 28 minutes and it was not long before more dithering by Derik Osede and Mark Beevers allowed Lucas Akins to stab in the second just before half time. Fighting broke out among travelling supporters, a small group even trying to confront Bolton boss Phil Parkinson before stewards blocked their path. Such passion, however misguided, was in short supply among the Bolton players. Burton’s determination to hold on to their Championship status was only let down by their finishing. Liam Boyce, Marvin Sordell and Akins all spurned opportunities to make the margin of victory more extravagant. Bolton, who drop to second-bottom, now require a win against Nottingham Forest next weekend and hope other clubs around the bottom three drop points. “I can’t do anything else but apologise for that performance to our supporters,” said Parkinson. “I can understand their anger. I share it. We simply were not good enough and Burton were better than us all over the pitch. “Believe me, no-one is hurting more than me and my staff at this moment in time. “Once we had gone two goals down there was nothing to suggest we could get back into the game and that is bitterly, bitterly disappointing. “All we can do is pick ourselves up and try to get something from the game next weekend and hope it is enough.”
Hope Akpan and Lucas Akins give Burton hope of avoiding relegation as Bolton sink further into the mire
Nigel Clough hopes Burton Albion have not timed their impressive dash for Championship safety too late. Goals from Hope Akpan and Luke Akins booked a convincing victory over Bolton Wanderers, who themselves sunk deeper into the relegation mire. Burton – who have the lowest wage budget in the second tier - have been in the bottom three since Boxing Day, and remain so on goal difference, but their pragmatic manager knows his team may still require favours on the last weekend as they travel to Preston North End. “For a team which hadn’t won in six months at one point, that wasn’t bad,” smiled Clough. “But we know we have still got a lot of work to do, and that we can’t afford to lose next week. We lose at Preston, we are down, so we go to Preston with the same sort of attitude. “It would have been nice to be out of the bottom three. But of course you only have to be out of it on the final day. Jon Flanagan and Lucas Akins battle for the ball Credit: GETTY IMAGES “The lads have got a great spirit and they are up for it. We knew what we had to do after the Hull game; win three and draw one minimum. We have got three and now we are going to try and win the game next week.” Bolton have endured a miserable time away from home this season, winning just one of their 23 games since returning to the Championship. It is little wonder with the weak defending produced in the first half as the Brewers secured a two-goal lead before half time. Hope Akpan finished off an intricate move to score his first Brewers goal on 28 minutes and it was not long before more dithering by Derik Osede and Mark Beevers allowed Lucas Akins to stab in the second just before half time. Fighting broke out among travelling supporters, a small group even trying to confront Bolton boss Phil Parkinson before stewards blocked their path. Such passion, however misguided, was in short supply among the Bolton players. Burton’s determination to hold on to their Championship status was only let down by their finishing. Liam Boyce, Marvin Sordell and Akins all spurned opportunities to make the margin of victory more extravagant. Bolton, who drop to second-bottom, now require a win against Nottingham Forest next weekend and hope other clubs around the bottom three drop points. “I can’t do anything else but apologise for that performance to our supporters,” said Parkinson. “I can understand their anger. I share it. We simply were not good enough and Burton were better than us all over the pitch. “Believe me, no-one is hurting more than me and my staff at this moment in time. “Once we had gone two goals down there was nothing to suggest we could get back into the game and that is bitterly, bitterly disappointing. “All we can do is pick ourselves up and try to get something from the game next weekend and hope it is enough.”
Nigel Clough hopes Burton Albion have not timed their impressive dash for Championship safety too late. Goals from Hope Akpan and Luke Akins booked a convincing victory over Bolton Wanderers, who themselves sunk deeper into the relegation mire. Burton – who have the lowest wage budget in the second tier - have been in the bottom three since Boxing Day, and remain so on goal difference, but their pragmatic manager knows his team may still require favours on the last weekend as they travel to Preston North End. “For a team which hadn’t won in six months at one point, that wasn’t bad,” smiled Clough. “But we know we have still got a lot of work to do, and that we can’t afford to lose next week. We lose at Preston, we are down, so we go to Preston with the same sort of attitude. “It would have been nice to be out of the bottom three. But of course you only have to be out of it on the final day. Jon Flanagan and Lucas Akins battle for the ball Credit: GETTY IMAGES “The lads have got a great spirit and they are up for it. We knew what we had to do after the Hull game; win three and draw one minimum. We have got three and now we are going to try and win the game next week.” Bolton have endured a miserable time away from home this season, winning just one of their 23 games since returning to the Championship. It is little wonder with the weak defending produced in the first half as the Brewers secured a two-goal lead before half time. Hope Akpan finished off an intricate move to score his first Brewers goal on 28 minutes and it was not long before more dithering by Derik Osede and Mark Beevers allowed Lucas Akins to stab in the second just before half time. Fighting broke out among travelling supporters, a small group even trying to confront Bolton boss Phil Parkinson before stewards blocked their path. Such passion, however misguided, was in short supply among the Bolton players. Burton’s determination to hold on to their Championship status was only let down by their finishing. Liam Boyce, Marvin Sordell and Akins all spurned opportunities to make the margin of victory more extravagant. Bolton, who drop to second-bottom, now require a win against Nottingham Forest next weekend and hope other clubs around the bottom three drop points. “I can’t do anything else but apologise for that performance to our supporters,” said Parkinson. “I can understand their anger. I share it. We simply were not good enough and Burton were better than us all over the pitch. “Believe me, no-one is hurting more than me and my staff at this moment in time. “Once we had gone two goals down there was nothing to suggest we could get back into the game and that is bitterly, bitterly disappointing. “All we can do is pick ourselves up and try to get something from the game next weekend and hope it is enough.”
Hope Akpan and Lucas Akins give Burton hope of avoiding relegation as Bolton sink further into the mire
Nigel Clough hopes Burton Albion have not timed their impressive dash for Championship safety too late. Goals from Hope Akpan and Luke Akins booked a convincing victory over Bolton Wanderers, who themselves sunk deeper into the relegation mire. Burton – who have the lowest wage budget in the second tier - have been in the bottom three since Boxing Day, and remain so on goal difference, but their pragmatic manager knows his team may still require favours on the last weekend as they travel to Preston North End. “For a team which hadn’t won in six months at one point, that wasn’t bad,” smiled Clough. “But we know we have still got a lot of work to do, and that we can’t afford to lose next week. We lose at Preston, we are down, so we go to Preston with the same sort of attitude. “It would have been nice to be out of the bottom three. But of course you only have to be out of it on the final day. Jon Flanagan and Lucas Akins battle for the ball Credit: GETTY IMAGES “The lads have got a great spirit and they are up for it. We knew what we had to do after the Hull game; win three and draw one minimum. We have got three and now we are going to try and win the game next week.” Bolton have endured a miserable time away from home this season, winning just one of their 23 games since returning to the Championship. It is little wonder with the weak defending produced in the first half as the Brewers secured a two-goal lead before half time. Hope Akpan finished off an intricate move to score his first Brewers goal on 28 minutes and it was not long before more dithering by Derik Osede and Mark Beevers allowed Lucas Akins to stab in the second just before half time. Fighting broke out among travelling supporters, a small group even trying to confront Bolton boss Phil Parkinson before stewards blocked their path. Such passion, however misguided, was in short supply among the Bolton players. Burton’s determination to hold on to their Championship status was only let down by their finishing. Liam Boyce, Marvin Sordell and Akins all spurned opportunities to make the margin of victory more extravagant. Bolton, who drop to second-bottom, now require a win against Nottingham Forest next weekend and hope other clubs around the bottom three drop points. “I can’t do anything else but apologise for that performance to our supporters,” said Parkinson. “I can understand their anger. I share it. We simply were not good enough and Burton were better than us all over the pitch. “Believe me, no-one is hurting more than me and my staff at this moment in time. “Once we had gone two goals down there was nothing to suggest we could get back into the game and that is bitterly, bitterly disappointing. “All we can do is pick ourselves up and try to get something from the game next weekend and hope it is enough.”
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Kyle McFadzean and Ben Turner celebrate after the match Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Kyle McFadzean and Ben Turner celebrate after the match Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Lucas Akins celebrates after the match Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Lucas Akins celebrates after the match Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Tom Naylor in action with Bolton Wanderers' Adam Le Fondre Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Tom Naylor in action with Bolton Wanderers' Adam Le Fondre Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Tom Naylor celebrates at full time Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Tom Naylor celebrates at full time Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion manager Nigel Clough Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion manager Nigel Clough Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Lucas Akins in action with Bolton Wanderers' Darren Pratley Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Lucas Akins in action with Bolton Wanderers' Darren Pratley Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Marvin Sordell and John Brayford in action with Bolton Wanderers' Sammy Ameobi Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Marvin Sordell and John Brayford in action with Bolton Wanderers' Sammy Ameobi Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Ben Turner in action with Bolton Wanderers' Dorian Dervite Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Ben Turner in action with Bolton Wanderers' Dorian Dervite Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Bolton Wanderers' manager Phil Parkinson Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Bolton Wanderers' manager Phil Parkinson Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion manager Nigel Clough Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion manager Nigel Clough Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Bolton Wanderers' manager Phil Parkinson Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Bolton Wanderers' manager Phil Parkinson Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion manager Nigel Clough Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion manager Nigel Clough Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton AlbionÕs Lucas Akins celebrates scoring their second goal Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton AlbionÕs Lucas Akins celebrates scoring their second goal Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion’s Lucas Akins celebrates scoring their second goal Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion’s Lucas Akins celebrates scoring their second goal Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Hope Akpan celebrates scoring their first goal with team mates Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Hope Akpan celebrates scoring their first goal with team mates Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Lucas Akins celebrates scoring their second goal Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Lucas Akins celebrates scoring their second goal Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Lucas Akins celebrates scoring their second goal Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Lucas Akins celebrates scoring their second goal Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Lucas Akins scores their second goal Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Lucas Akins scores their second goal Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Hope Akpan celebrates scoring their first goal Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Hope Akpan celebrates scoring their first goal Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Hope Akpan celebrates scoring their first goal with team mates Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Hope Akpan celebrates scoring their first goal with team mates Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton AlbionÕs John Brayford in action with Bolton Wanderers' Darren Pratley Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton AlbionÕs John Brayford in action with Bolton Wanderers' Darren Pratley Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Hope Akpan scores their first goal Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Hope Akpan scores their first goal Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Hope Akpan celebrates scoring their first goal Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Hope Akpan celebrates scoring their first goal Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Hope Akpan scores their first goal Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers
Soccer Football - Championship - Burton Albion vs Bolton Wanderers - Pirelli Stadium, Burton, Britain - April 28, 2018 Burton Albion's Hope Akpan scores their first goal Action Images/Paul Burrows EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Sunderland’s dramatic late defeat to Burton Albion last Saturday condemned the Black Cats to relegation in successive seasons. Having seen their side slip down the leagues, many fans hold genuine fears about the future of their club. While back-to-back relegations are unusual, however, Sunderland’s plight is not without precedent. Here we look at how other clubs in English football history have bounced back from dropping down multiple tiers rapidly. Bristol City 1980-1982 How did they go down? City were promoted to the top flight in 1976 under long-term manager Alan Dicks and stayed up until 1980. The club’s fortunes changed, however, when promising defender Gary Collier was sold to Coventry City in controversial fashion after the freedom of contract laws were changed in 1978. In response to losing Collier for far less than he would have wished, Dicks and his fellow club executives set about signing multiple members of the squad to 10-year contracts, a situation unheard of until that point. City relied on maintaining their top flight status to keep the club stable, so when they went down in 1980, the club spiralled into financial ruin. Roy Hodgson's first managerial job in England came at Bristol City Credit: Getty Images By September 1980, City were adrift at the bottom of the Second Division and Dicks was quickly replaced by Bob Houghton, fresh from leading Malmo to the 1979 European Cup Final, and his assistant Roy Hodgson. Rumours of the extent of City’s debts began to surface as soon as they arrived and the club were relegated once again in a season clouded with uncertainty and departures. Things went from bad to worse in February 1982. As the club sat in a mid-table position in the Third Division with Hodgson now in charge, it became obvious that the Robins were heading towards folding completely, unless serious action was taken. It took eight City players, now remembered as the Ashton Gate Eight, to agree to surrender their lengthy contracts and sacrifice their careers to save the club. Things continued to fall apart on the field and City were relegated for a third successive season, but fans were more relieved about the continued existence of their club. What happened next? City spent two seasons in the Fourth Division before winning promotion under Terry Cooper in 1984. The club have shifted back and forth between the second and third tiers but have been on an upward trajectory since winning the 2015/16 League One title, their first league title since 1955. City are currently sitting in 10th in the Championship with two games remaining. Why selling Wembley makes perfect sense Wolverhampton Wanderers 1984-1986 How did they go down? Bristol City fans were not alone in watching their club succumb to severe financial mismanagement in the 1980s. After many successful decades, culminating in a UEFA Cup victory in 1972, Wolves were relegated to the Second Division in 1982 and only avoided liquidation when a consortium, led by former player Derek Dougan, swooped in to save the club. While they bounced back up the following season, star striker Andy Gray departed for Everton and a poor run of form saw Wolves finish bottom of the league. Wanderers then found themselves in the relegation zone of the Second Division by New Year and, with crowd numbers at Molineux starting to diminish, the club were demoted for the second consecutive season in 1985. Andy Gray in his Everton days after leaving Wolves Credit: David Cannon The club were still yet to reach their nadir as they embarked on their first season in the Third Division. The side, managed by Sammy Chapman, would never string together a run of positive results and the West Midlands club were subsequently relegated to the Fourth Division. What happened next? Dougan had resigned as chairman in 1985 and his business partner, the Bhatti brothers, pulled out soon after. As the team embarked on their first campaign in the fourth tier, Wolverhampton Council bought the stadium and the surrounding land. The club would bounce back with promotion that season and by 1990, was back in the familiar surroundings of the second tier. Swindon Town 1994-1995 How did they go down? Swindon fans were in dream land when their side reached the top flight of English football thanks to a memorable 4-3 victory over Leicester City in the Division One playoff final. Player-manager Glenn Hoddle, who scored the first goal in the Wembley final, had rebuilt the team following their financial struggles at the turn of the decade, but left the club in June 1993 when Chelsea came calling. Assistant John Gorman took charge, but Swindon struggled right out of the gate, failing to win any of their first 15 games. The Robins never put up a fight, becoming the first top flight side for 30 years to concede 100 goals in a season as they finished rock bottom of the table. Glenn Hoddle and John Gorman later worked together with England Credit: PA Gorman expected Swindon to bounce straight back up ahead of the 1994-95 season and they looked on course to do so after the opening months of the season, but four defeats in November saw them slide down the table. Gorman was replaced by Steve McMahon but, despite a run to the League Cup semi-finals, the former England international could not keep the Robins from falling to their second relegation in two seasons. What happened next? Swindon’s rollercoaster period continued in the 1995-96 season, as 17 league goals from Wayne Allison led the Robins to the Second Division title and brought smiles back to the County Ground. The club’s financial situation remained an issue, however, and McMahon’s side settled down in the lower half of the First Division for the next three seasons. In 2006, the club were relegated into League Two, becoming the first former Premier League club to play in the fourth tier, where they still find themselves today. Wolverhampton Wanderers 2012-2013 How did they go down? Wolves won the Championship title in 2009 with Mick McCarthy at the helm and spent three seasons battling for survival. After McCarthy was sacked in February 2012 and replaced by his assistant Terry Connor, the West Midlands club failed to win any of their remaining league games and were relegated, having accumulated just 25 points. Chairman Steve Morgan replaced Connor with Stale Solbakken ahead of the 2012-13 season. The Norwegian had enjoyed success as manager of FC Copenhagen, where he would return in 2013, but his tenure at Molineux lasted just six months. Stale Solbakken was destined to become a pub quiz answer Credit: Getty Images Dean Saunders was brought in with the team flirting with the drop-zone but was unable to save the club from demotion to the third tier for the first time since the 1988-89 season. Five defeats in their final six games saw Wolves slip to second-bottom and a final day defeat to Brighton & Hove Albion confirmed their relegation. What happened next? Saunders was sacked less than a week after the loss to Brighton and the experienced Kenny Jackett was brought in to steer the club in the right direction. The 2013-14 season would prove to be historic, as Wanderers conceded just 31 goals all season and amassed a points haul of 103, a record for the third tier, to cruise to the title. The club have been in the Championship ever since, but following a takeover in July 2016 by Chinese investment group Fosun, Wolves ended a six-year absence from the top flight by winning the title this season under new head coach Nuno Espirito Santo.
The dreaded double relegation: what comes next for Sunderland?
Sunderland’s dramatic late defeat to Burton Albion last Saturday condemned the Black Cats to relegation in successive seasons. Having seen their side slip down the leagues, many fans hold genuine fears about the future of their club. While back-to-back relegations are unusual, however, Sunderland’s plight is not without precedent. Here we look at how other clubs in English football history have bounced back from dropping down multiple tiers rapidly. Bristol City 1980-1982 How did they go down? City were promoted to the top flight in 1976 under long-term manager Alan Dicks and stayed up until 1980. The club’s fortunes changed, however, when promising defender Gary Collier was sold to Coventry City in controversial fashion after the freedom of contract laws were changed in 1978. In response to losing Collier for far less than he would have wished, Dicks and his fellow club executives set about signing multiple members of the squad to 10-year contracts, a situation unheard of until that point. City relied on maintaining their top flight status to keep the club stable, so when they went down in 1980, the club spiralled into financial ruin. Roy Hodgson's first managerial job in England came at Bristol City Credit: Getty Images By September 1980, City were adrift at the bottom of the Second Division and Dicks was quickly replaced by Bob Houghton, fresh from leading Malmo to the 1979 European Cup Final, and his assistant Roy Hodgson. Rumours of the extent of City’s debts began to surface as soon as they arrived and the club were relegated once again in a season clouded with uncertainty and departures. Things went from bad to worse in February 1982. As the club sat in a mid-table position in the Third Division with Hodgson now in charge, it became obvious that the Robins were heading towards folding completely, unless serious action was taken. It took eight City players, now remembered as the Ashton Gate Eight, to agree to surrender their lengthy contracts and sacrifice their careers to save the club. Things continued to fall apart on the field and City were relegated for a third successive season, but fans were more relieved about the continued existence of their club. What happened next? City spent two seasons in the Fourth Division before winning promotion under Terry Cooper in 1984. The club have shifted back and forth between the second and third tiers but have been on an upward trajectory since winning the 2015/16 League One title, their first league title since 1955. City are currently sitting in 10th in the Championship with two games remaining. Why selling Wembley makes perfect sense Wolverhampton Wanderers 1984-1986 How did they go down? Bristol City fans were not alone in watching their club succumb to severe financial mismanagement in the 1980s. After many successful decades, culminating in a UEFA Cup victory in 1972, Wolves were relegated to the Second Division in 1982 and only avoided liquidation when a consortium, led by former player Derek Dougan, swooped in to save the club. While they bounced back up the following season, star striker Andy Gray departed for Everton and a poor run of form saw Wolves finish bottom of the league. Wanderers then found themselves in the relegation zone of the Second Division by New Year and, with crowd numbers at Molineux starting to diminish, the club were demoted for the second consecutive season in 1985. Andy Gray in his Everton days after leaving Wolves Credit: David Cannon The club were still yet to reach their nadir as they embarked on their first season in the Third Division. The side, managed by Sammy Chapman, would never string together a run of positive results and the West Midlands club were subsequently relegated to the Fourth Division. What happened next? Dougan had resigned as chairman in 1985 and his business partner, the Bhatti brothers, pulled out soon after. As the team embarked on their first campaign in the fourth tier, Wolverhampton Council bought the stadium and the surrounding land. The club would bounce back with promotion that season and by 1990, was back in the familiar surroundings of the second tier. Swindon Town 1994-1995 How did they go down? Swindon fans were in dream land when their side reached the top flight of English football thanks to a memorable 4-3 victory over Leicester City in the Division One playoff final. Player-manager Glenn Hoddle, who scored the first goal in the Wembley final, had rebuilt the team following their financial struggles at the turn of the decade, but left the club in June 1993 when Chelsea came calling. Assistant John Gorman took charge, but Swindon struggled right out of the gate, failing to win any of their first 15 games. The Robins never put up a fight, becoming the first top flight side for 30 years to concede 100 goals in a season as they finished rock bottom of the table. Glenn Hoddle and John Gorman later worked together with England Credit: PA Gorman expected Swindon to bounce straight back up ahead of the 1994-95 season and they looked on course to do so after the opening months of the season, but four defeats in November saw them slide down the table. Gorman was replaced by Steve McMahon but, despite a run to the League Cup semi-finals, the former England international could not keep the Robins from falling to their second relegation in two seasons. What happened next? Swindon’s rollercoaster period continued in the 1995-96 season, as 17 league goals from Wayne Allison led the Robins to the Second Division title and brought smiles back to the County Ground. The club’s financial situation remained an issue, however, and McMahon’s side settled down in the lower half of the First Division for the next three seasons. In 2006, the club were relegated into League Two, becoming the first former Premier League club to play in the fourth tier, where they still find themselves today. Wolverhampton Wanderers 2012-2013 How did they go down? Wolves won the Championship title in 2009 with Mick McCarthy at the helm and spent three seasons battling for survival. After McCarthy was sacked in February 2012 and replaced by his assistant Terry Connor, the West Midlands club failed to win any of their remaining league games and were relegated, having accumulated just 25 points. Chairman Steve Morgan replaced Connor with Stale Solbakken ahead of the 2012-13 season. The Norwegian had enjoyed success as manager of FC Copenhagen, where he would return in 2013, but his tenure at Molineux lasted just six months. Stale Solbakken was destined to become a pub quiz answer Credit: Getty Images Dean Saunders was brought in with the team flirting with the drop-zone but was unable to save the club from demotion to the third tier for the first time since the 1988-89 season. Five defeats in their final six games saw Wolves slip to second-bottom and a final day defeat to Brighton & Hove Albion confirmed their relegation. What happened next? Saunders was sacked less than a week after the loss to Brighton and the experienced Kenny Jackett was brought in to steer the club in the right direction. The 2013-14 season would prove to be historic, as Wanderers conceded just 31 goals all season and amassed a points haul of 103, a record for the third tier, to cruise to the title. The club have been in the Championship ever since, but following a takeover in July 2016 by Chinese investment group Fosun, Wolves ended a six-year absence from the top flight by winning the title this season under new head coach Nuno Espirito Santo.
Sunderland’s dramatic late defeat to Burton Albion last Saturday condemned the Black Cats to relegation in successive seasons. Having seen their side slip down the leagues, many fans hold genuine fears about the future of their club. While back-to-back relegations are unusual, however, Sunderland’s plight is not without precedent. Here we look at how other clubs in English football history have bounced back from dropping down multiple tiers rapidly. Bristol City 1980-1982 How did they go down? City were promoted to the top flight in 1976 under long-term manager Alan Dicks and stayed up until 1980. The club’s fortunes changed, however, when promising defender Gary Collier was sold to Coventry City in controversial fashion after the freedom of contract laws were changed in 1978. In response to losing Collier for far less than he would have wished, Dicks and his fellow club executives set about signing multiple members of the squad to 10-year contracts, a situation unheard of until that point. City relied on maintaining their top flight status to keep the club stable, so when they went down in 1980, the club spiralled into financial ruin. Roy Hodgson's first managerial job in England came at Bristol City Credit: Getty Images By September 1980, City were adrift at the bottom of the Second Division and Dicks was quickly replaced by Bob Houghton, fresh from leading Malmo to the 1979 European Cup Final, and his assistant Roy Hodgson. Rumours of the extent of City’s debts began to surface as soon as they arrived and the club were relegated once again in a season clouded with uncertainty and departures. Things went from bad to worse in February 1982. As the club sat in a mid-table position in the Third Division with Hodgson now in charge, it became obvious that the Robins were heading towards folding completely, unless serious action was taken. It took eight City players, now remembered as the Ashton Gate Eight, to agree to surrender their lengthy contracts and sacrifice their careers to save the club. Things continued to fall apart on the field and City were relegated for a third successive season, but fans were more relieved about the continued existence of their club. What happened next? City spent two seasons in the Fourth Division before winning promotion under Terry Cooper in 1984. The club have shifted back and forth between the second and third tiers but have been on an upward trajectory since winning the 2015/16 League One title, their first league title since 1955. City are currently sitting in 10th in the Championship with two games remaining. Why selling Wembley makes perfect sense Wolverhampton Wanderers 1984-1986 How did they go down? Bristol City fans were not alone in watching their club succumb to severe financial mismanagement in the 1980s. After many successful decades, culminating in a UEFA Cup victory in 1972, Wolves were relegated to the Second Division in 1982 and only avoided liquidation when a consortium, led by former player Derek Dougan, swooped in to save the club. While they bounced back up the following season, star striker Andy Gray departed for Everton and a poor run of form saw Wolves finish bottom of the league. Wanderers then found themselves in the relegation zone of the Second Division by New Year and, with crowd numbers at Molineux starting to diminish, the club were demoted for the second consecutive season in 1985. Andy Gray in his Everton days after leaving Wolves Credit: David Cannon The club were still yet to reach their nadir as they embarked on their first season in the Third Division. The side, managed by Sammy Chapman, would never string together a run of positive results and the West Midlands club were subsequently relegated to the Fourth Division. What happened next? Dougan had resigned as chairman in 1985 and his business partner, the Bhatti brothers, pulled out soon after. As the team embarked on their first campaign in the fourth tier, Wolverhampton Council bought the stadium and the surrounding land. The club would bounce back with promotion that season and by 1990, was back in the familiar surroundings of the second tier. Swindon Town 1994-1995 How did they go down? Swindon fans were in dream land when their side reached the top flight of English football thanks to a memorable 4-3 victory over Leicester City in the Division One playoff final. Player-manager Glenn Hoddle, who scored the first goal in the Wembley final, had rebuilt the team following their financial struggles at the turn of the decade, but left the club in June 1993 when Chelsea came calling. Assistant John Gorman took charge, but Swindon struggled right out of the gate, failing to win any of their first 15 games. The Robins never put up a fight, becoming the first top flight side for 30 years to concede 100 goals in a season as they finished rock bottom of the table. Glenn Hoddle and John Gorman later worked together with England Credit: PA Gorman expected Swindon to bounce straight back up ahead of the 1994-95 season and they looked on course to do so after the opening months of the season, but four defeats in November saw them slide down the table. Gorman was replaced by Steve McMahon but, despite a run to the League Cup semi-finals, the former England international could not keep the Robins from falling to their second relegation in two seasons. What happened next? Swindon’s rollercoaster period continued in the 1995-96 season, as 17 league goals from Wayne Allison led the Robins to the Second Division title and brought smiles back to the County Ground. The club’s financial situation remained an issue, however, and McMahon’s side settled down in the lower half of the First Division for the next three seasons. In 2006, the club were relegated into League Two, becoming the first former Premier League club to play in the fourth tier, where they still find themselves today. Wolverhampton Wanderers 2012-2013 How did they go down? Wolves won the Championship title in 2009 with Mick McCarthy at the helm and spent three seasons battling for survival. After McCarthy was sacked in February 2012 and replaced by his assistant Terry Connor, the West Midlands club failed to win any of their remaining league games and were relegated, having accumulated just 25 points. Chairman Steve Morgan replaced Connor with Stale Solbakken ahead of the 2012-13 season. The Norwegian had enjoyed success as manager of FC Copenhagen, where he would return in 2013, but his tenure at Molineux lasted just six months. Stale Solbakken was destined to become a pub quiz answer Credit: Getty Images Dean Saunders was brought in with the team flirting with the drop-zone but was unable to save the club from demotion to the third tier for the first time since the 1988-89 season. Five defeats in their final six games saw Wolves slip to second-bottom and a final day defeat to Brighton & Hove Albion confirmed their relegation. What happened next? Saunders was sacked less than a week after the loss to Brighton and the experienced Kenny Jackett was brought in to steer the club in the right direction. The 2013-14 season would prove to be historic, as Wanderers conceded just 31 goals all season and amassed a points haul of 103, a record for the third tier, to cruise to the title. The club have been in the Championship ever since, but following a takeover in July 2016 by Chinese investment group Fosun, Wolves ended a six-year absence from the top flight by winning the title this season under new head coach Nuno Espirito Santo.
The dreaded double relegation: what comes next for Sunderland?
Sunderland’s dramatic late defeat to Burton Albion last Saturday condemned the Black Cats to relegation in successive seasons. Having seen their side slip down the leagues, many fans hold genuine fears about the future of their club. While back-to-back relegations are unusual, however, Sunderland’s plight is not without precedent. Here we look at how other clubs in English football history have bounced back from dropping down multiple tiers rapidly. Bristol City 1980-1982 How did they go down? City were promoted to the top flight in 1976 under long-term manager Alan Dicks and stayed up until 1980. The club’s fortunes changed, however, when promising defender Gary Collier was sold to Coventry City in controversial fashion after the freedom of contract laws were changed in 1978. In response to losing Collier for far less than he would have wished, Dicks and his fellow club executives set about signing multiple members of the squad to 10-year contracts, a situation unheard of until that point. City relied on maintaining their top flight status to keep the club stable, so when they went down in 1980, the club spiralled into financial ruin. Roy Hodgson's first managerial job in England came at Bristol City Credit: Getty Images By September 1980, City were adrift at the bottom of the Second Division and Dicks was quickly replaced by Bob Houghton, fresh from leading Malmo to the 1979 European Cup Final, and his assistant Roy Hodgson. Rumours of the extent of City’s debts began to surface as soon as they arrived and the club were relegated once again in a season clouded with uncertainty and departures. Things went from bad to worse in February 1982. As the club sat in a mid-table position in the Third Division with Hodgson now in charge, it became obvious that the Robins were heading towards folding completely, unless serious action was taken. It took eight City players, now remembered as the Ashton Gate Eight, to agree to surrender their lengthy contracts and sacrifice their careers to save the club. Things continued to fall apart on the field and City were relegated for a third successive season, but fans were more relieved about the continued existence of their club. What happened next? City spent two seasons in the Fourth Division before winning promotion under Terry Cooper in 1984. The club have shifted back and forth between the second and third tiers but have been on an upward trajectory since winning the 2015/16 League One title, their first league title since 1955. City are currently sitting in 10th in the Championship with two games remaining. Why selling Wembley makes perfect sense Wolverhampton Wanderers 1984-1986 How did they go down? Bristol City fans were not alone in watching their club succumb to severe financial mismanagement in the 1980s. After many successful decades, culminating in a UEFA Cup victory in 1972, Wolves were relegated to the Second Division in 1982 and only avoided liquidation when a consortium, led by former player Derek Dougan, swooped in to save the club. While they bounced back up the following season, star striker Andy Gray departed for Everton and a poor run of form saw Wolves finish bottom of the league. Wanderers then found themselves in the relegation zone of the Second Division by New Year and, with crowd numbers at Molineux starting to diminish, the club were demoted for the second consecutive season in 1985. Andy Gray in his Everton days after leaving Wolves Credit: David Cannon The club were still yet to reach their nadir as they embarked on their first season in the Third Division. The side, managed by Sammy Chapman, would never string together a run of positive results and the West Midlands club were subsequently relegated to the Fourth Division. What happened next? Dougan had resigned as chairman in 1985 and his business partner, the Bhatti brothers, pulled out soon after. As the team embarked on their first campaign in the fourth tier, Wolverhampton Council bought the stadium and the surrounding land. The club would bounce back with promotion that season and by 1990, was back in the familiar surroundings of the second tier. Swindon Town 1994-1995 How did they go down? Swindon fans were in dream land when their side reached the top flight of English football thanks to a memorable 4-3 victory over Leicester City in the Division One playoff final. Player-manager Glenn Hoddle, who scored the first goal in the Wembley final, had rebuilt the team following their financial struggles at the turn of the decade, but left the club in June 1993 when Chelsea came calling. Assistant John Gorman took charge, but Swindon struggled right out of the gate, failing to win any of their first 15 games. The Robins never put up a fight, becoming the first top flight side for 30 years to concede 100 goals in a season as they finished rock bottom of the table. Glenn Hoddle and John Gorman later worked together with England Credit: PA Gorman expected Swindon to bounce straight back up ahead of the 1994-95 season and they looked on course to do so after the opening months of the season, but four defeats in November saw them slide down the table. Gorman was replaced by Steve McMahon but, despite a run to the League Cup semi-finals, the former England international could not keep the Robins from falling to their second relegation in two seasons. What happened next? Swindon’s rollercoaster period continued in the 1995-96 season, as 17 league goals from Wayne Allison led the Robins to the Second Division title and brought smiles back to the County Ground. The club’s financial situation remained an issue, however, and McMahon’s side settled down in the lower half of the First Division for the next three seasons. In 2006, the club were relegated into League Two, becoming the first former Premier League club to play in the fourth tier, where they still find themselves today. Wolverhampton Wanderers 2012-2013 How did they go down? Wolves won the Championship title in 2009 with Mick McCarthy at the helm and spent three seasons battling for survival. After McCarthy was sacked in February 2012 and replaced by his assistant Terry Connor, the West Midlands club failed to win any of their remaining league games and were relegated, having accumulated just 25 points. Chairman Steve Morgan replaced Connor with Stale Solbakken ahead of the 2012-13 season. The Norwegian had enjoyed success as manager of FC Copenhagen, where he would return in 2013, but his tenure at Molineux lasted just six months. Stale Solbakken was destined to become a pub quiz answer Credit: Getty Images Dean Saunders was brought in with the team flirting with the drop-zone but was unable to save the club from demotion to the third tier for the first time since the 1988-89 season. Five defeats in their final six games saw Wolves slip to second-bottom and a final day defeat to Brighton & Hove Albion confirmed their relegation. What happened next? Saunders was sacked less than a week after the loss to Brighton and the experienced Kenny Jackett was brought in to steer the club in the right direction. The 2013-14 season would prove to be historic, as Wanderers conceded just 31 goals all season and amassed a points haul of 103, a record for the third tier, to cruise to the title. The club have been in the Championship ever since, but following a takeover in July 2016 by Chinese investment group Fosun, Wolves ended a six-year absence from the top flight by winning the title this season under new head coach Nuno Espirito Santo.
Sunderland’s dramatic late defeat to Burton Albion last Saturday condemned the Black Cats to relegation in successive seasons. Having seen their side slip down the leagues, many fans hold genuine fears about the future of their club. While back-to-back relegations are unusual, however, Sunderland’s plight is not without precedent. Here we look at how other clubs in English football history have bounced back from dropping down multiple tiers rapidly. Bristol City 1980-1982 How did they go down? City were promoted to the top flight in 1976 under long-term manager Alan Dicks and stayed up until 1980. The club’s fortunes changed, however, when promising defender Gary Collier was sold to Coventry City in controversial fashion after the freedom of contract laws were changed in 1978. In response to losing Collier for far less than he would have wished, Dicks and his fellow club executives set about signing multiple members of the squad to 10-year contracts, a situation unheard of until that point. City relied on maintaining their top flight status to keep the club stable, so when they went down in 1980, the club spiralled into financial ruin. Roy Hodgson's first managerial job in England came at Bristol City Credit: Getty Images By September 1980, City were adrift at the bottom of the Second Division and Dicks was quickly replaced by Bob Houghton, fresh from leading Malmo to the 1979 European Cup Final, and his assistant Roy Hodgson. Rumours of the extent of City’s debts began to surface as soon as they arrived and the club were relegated once again in a season clouded with uncertainty and departures. Things went from bad to worse in February 1982. As the club sat in a mid-table position in the Third Division with Hodgson now in charge, it became obvious that the Robins were heading towards folding completely, unless serious action was taken. It took eight City players, now remembered as the Ashton Gate Eight, to agree to surrender their lengthy contracts and sacrifice their careers to save the club. Things continued to fall apart on the field and City were relegated for a third successive season, but fans were more relieved about the continued existence of their club. What happened next? City spent two seasons in the Fourth Division before winning promotion under Terry Cooper in 1984. The club have shifted back and forth between the second and third tiers but have been on an upward trajectory since winning the 2015/16 League One title, their first league title since 1955. City are currently sitting in 10th in the Championship with two games remaining. Why selling Wembley makes perfect sense Wolverhampton Wanderers 1984-1986 How did they go down? Bristol City fans were not alone in watching their club succumb to severe financial mismanagement in the 1980s. After many successful decades, culminating in a UEFA Cup victory in 1972, Wolves were relegated to the Second Division in 1982 and only avoided liquidation when a consortium, led by former player Derek Dougan, swooped in to save the club. While they bounced back up the following season, star striker Andy Gray departed for Everton and a poor run of form saw Wolves finish bottom of the league. Wanderers then found themselves in the relegation zone of the Second Division by New Year and, with crowd numbers at Molineux starting to diminish, the club were demoted for the second consecutive season in 1985. Andy Gray in his Everton days after leaving Wolves Credit: David Cannon The club were still yet to reach their nadir as they embarked on their first season in the Third Division. The side, managed by Sammy Chapman, would never string together a run of positive results and the West Midlands club were subsequently relegated to the Fourth Division. What happened next? Dougan had resigned as chairman in 1985 and his business partner, the Bhatti brothers, pulled out soon after. As the team embarked on their first campaign in the fourth tier, Wolverhampton Council bought the stadium and the surrounding land. The club would bounce back with promotion that season and by 1990, was back in the familiar surroundings of the second tier. Swindon Town 1994-1995 How did they go down? Swindon fans were in dream land when their side reached the top flight of English football thanks to a memorable 4-3 victory over Leicester City in the Division One playoff final. Player-manager Glenn Hoddle, who scored the first goal in the Wembley final, had rebuilt the team following their financial struggles at the turn of the decade, but left the club in June 1993 when Chelsea came calling. Assistant John Gorman took charge, but Swindon struggled right out of the gate, failing to win any of their first 15 games. The Robins never put up a fight, becoming the first top flight side for 30 years to concede 100 goals in a season as they finished rock bottom of the table. Glenn Hoddle and John Gorman later worked together with England Credit: PA Gorman expected Swindon to bounce straight back up ahead of the 1994-95 season and they looked on course to do so after the opening months of the season, but four defeats in November saw them slide down the table. Gorman was replaced by Steve McMahon but, despite a run to the League Cup semi-finals, the former England international could not keep the Robins from falling to their second relegation in two seasons. What happened next? Swindon’s rollercoaster period continued in the 1995-96 season, as 17 league goals from Wayne Allison led the Robins to the Second Division title and brought smiles back to the County Ground. The club’s financial situation remained an issue, however, and McMahon’s side settled down in the lower half of the First Division for the next three seasons. In 2006, the club were relegated into League Two, becoming the first former Premier League club to play in the fourth tier, where they still find themselves today. Wolverhampton Wanderers 2012-2013 How did they go down? Wolves won the Championship title in 2009 with Mick McCarthy at the helm and spent three seasons battling for survival. After McCarthy was sacked in February 2012 and replaced by his assistant Terry Connor, the West Midlands club failed to win any of their remaining league games and were relegated, having accumulated just 25 points. Chairman Steve Morgan replaced Connor with Stale Solbakken ahead of the 2012-13 season. The Norwegian had enjoyed success as manager of FC Copenhagen, where he would return in 2013, but his tenure at Molineux lasted just six months. Stale Solbakken was destined to become a pub quiz answer Credit: Getty Images Dean Saunders was brought in with the team flirting with the drop-zone but was unable to save the club from demotion to the third tier for the first time since the 1988-89 season. Five defeats in their final six games saw Wolves slip to second-bottom and a final day defeat to Brighton & Hove Albion confirmed their relegation. What happened next? Saunders was sacked less than a week after the loss to Brighton and the experienced Kenny Jackett was brought in to steer the club in the right direction. The 2013-14 season would prove to be historic, as Wanderers conceded just 31 goals all season and amassed a points haul of 103, a record for the third tier, to cruise to the title. The club have been in the Championship ever since, but following a takeover in July 2016 by Chinese investment group Fosun, Wolves ended a six-year absence from the top flight by winning the title this season under new head coach Nuno Espirito Santo.
The dreaded double relegation: what comes next for Sunderland?
Sunderland’s dramatic late defeat to Burton Albion last Saturday condemned the Black Cats to relegation in successive seasons. Having seen their side slip down the leagues, many fans hold genuine fears about the future of their club. While back-to-back relegations are unusual, however, Sunderland’s plight is not without precedent. Here we look at how other clubs in English football history have bounced back from dropping down multiple tiers rapidly. Bristol City 1980-1982 How did they go down? City were promoted to the top flight in 1976 under long-term manager Alan Dicks and stayed up until 1980. The club’s fortunes changed, however, when promising defender Gary Collier was sold to Coventry City in controversial fashion after the freedom of contract laws were changed in 1978. In response to losing Collier for far less than he would have wished, Dicks and his fellow club executives set about signing multiple members of the squad to 10-year contracts, a situation unheard of until that point. City relied on maintaining their top flight status to keep the club stable, so when they went down in 1980, the club spiralled into financial ruin. Roy Hodgson's first managerial job in England came at Bristol City Credit: Getty Images By September 1980, City were adrift at the bottom of the Second Division and Dicks was quickly replaced by Bob Houghton, fresh from leading Malmo to the 1979 European Cup Final, and his assistant Roy Hodgson. Rumours of the extent of City’s debts began to surface as soon as they arrived and the club were relegated once again in a season clouded with uncertainty and departures. Things went from bad to worse in February 1982. As the club sat in a mid-table position in the Third Division with Hodgson now in charge, it became obvious that the Robins were heading towards folding completely, unless serious action was taken. It took eight City players, now remembered as the Ashton Gate Eight, to agree to surrender their lengthy contracts and sacrifice their careers to save the club. Things continued to fall apart on the field and City were relegated for a third successive season, but fans were more relieved about the continued existence of their club. What happened next? City spent two seasons in the Fourth Division before winning promotion under Terry Cooper in 1984. The club have shifted back and forth between the second and third tiers but have been on an upward trajectory since winning the 2015/16 League One title, their first league title since 1955. City are currently sitting in 10th in the Championship with two games remaining. Why selling Wembley makes perfect sense Wolverhampton Wanderers 1984-1986 How did they go down? Bristol City fans were not alone in watching their club succumb to severe financial mismanagement in the 1980s. After many successful decades, culminating in a UEFA Cup victory in 1972, Wolves were relegated to the Second Division in 1982 and only avoided liquidation when a consortium, led by former player Derek Dougan, swooped in to save the club. While they bounced back up the following season, star striker Andy Gray departed for Everton and a poor run of form saw Wolves finish bottom of the league. Wanderers then found themselves in the relegation zone of the Second Division by New Year and, with crowd numbers at Molineux starting to diminish, the club were demoted for the second consecutive season in 1985. Andy Gray in his Everton days after leaving Wolves Credit: David Cannon The club were still yet to reach their nadir as they embarked on their first season in the Third Division. The side, managed by Sammy Chapman, would never string together a run of positive results and the West Midlands club were subsequently relegated to the Fourth Division. What happened next? Dougan had resigned as chairman in 1985 and his business partner, the Bhatti brothers, pulled out soon after. As the team embarked on their first campaign in the fourth tier, Wolverhampton Council bought the stadium and the surrounding land. The club would bounce back with promotion that season and by 1990, was back in the familiar surroundings of the second tier. Swindon Town 1994-1995 How did they go down? Swindon fans were in dream land when their side reached the top flight of English football thanks to a memorable 4-3 victory over Leicester City in the Division One playoff final. Player-manager Glenn Hoddle, who scored the first goal in the Wembley final, had rebuilt the team following their financial struggles at the turn of the decade, but left the club in June 1993 when Chelsea came calling. Assistant John Gorman took charge, but Swindon struggled right out of the gate, failing to win any of their first 15 games. The Robins never put up a fight, becoming the first top flight side for 30 years to concede 100 goals in a season as they finished rock bottom of the table. Glenn Hoddle and John Gorman later worked together with England Credit: PA Gorman expected Swindon to bounce straight back up ahead of the 1994-95 season and they looked on course to do so after the opening months of the season, but four defeats in November saw them slide down the table. Gorman was replaced by Steve McMahon but, despite a run to the League Cup semi-finals, the former England international could not keep the Robins from falling to their second relegation in two seasons. What happened next? Swindon’s rollercoaster period continued in the 1995-96 season, as 17 league goals from Wayne Allison led the Robins to the Second Division title and brought smiles back to the County Ground. The club’s financial situation remained an issue, however, and McMahon’s side settled down in the lower half of the First Division for the next three seasons. In 2006, the club were relegated into League Two, becoming the first former Premier League club to play in the fourth tier, where they still find themselves today. Wolverhampton Wanderers 2012-2013 How did they go down? Wolves won the Championship title in 2009 with Mick McCarthy at the helm and spent three seasons battling for survival. After McCarthy was sacked in February 2012 and replaced by his assistant Terry Connor, the West Midlands club failed to win any of their remaining league games and were relegated, having accumulated just 25 points. Chairman Steve Morgan replaced Connor with Stale Solbakken ahead of the 2012-13 season. The Norwegian had enjoyed success as manager of FC Copenhagen, where he would return in 2013, but his tenure at Molineux lasted just six months. Stale Solbakken was destined to become a pub quiz answer Credit: Getty Images Dean Saunders was brought in with the team flirting with the drop-zone but was unable to save the club from demotion to the third tier for the first time since the 1988-89 season. Five defeats in their final six games saw Wolves slip to second-bottom and a final day defeat to Brighton & Hove Albion confirmed their relegation. What happened next? Saunders was sacked less than a week after the loss to Brighton and the experienced Kenny Jackett was brought in to steer the club in the right direction. The 2013-14 season would prove to be historic, as Wanderers conceded just 31 goals all season and amassed a points haul of 103, a record for the third tier, to cruise to the title. The club have been in the Championship ever since, but following a takeover in July 2016 by Chinese investment group Fosun, Wolves ended a six-year absence from the top flight by winning the title this season under new head coach Nuno Espirito Santo.
Sunderland’s dramatic late defeat to Burton Albion last Saturday condemned the Black Cats to relegation in successive seasons. Having seen their side slip down the leagues, many fans hold genuine fears about the future of their club. While back-to-back relegations are unusual, however, Sunderland’s plight is not without precedent. Here we look at how other clubs in English football history have bounced back from dropping down multiple tiers rapidly. Bristol City 1980-1982 How did they go down? City were promoted to the top flight in 1976 under long-term manager Alan Dicks and stayed up until 1980. The club’s fortunes changed, however, when promising defender Gary Collier was sold to Coventry City in controversial fashion after the freedom of contract laws were changed in 1978. In response to losing Collier for far less than he would have wished, Dicks and his fellow club executives set about signing multiple members of the squad to 10-year contracts, a situation unheard of until that point. City relied on maintaining their top flight status to keep the club stable, so when they went down in 1980, the club spiralled into financial ruin. Roy Hodgson's first managerial job in England came at Bristol City Credit: Getty Images By September 1980, City were adrift at the bottom of the Second Division and Dicks was quickly replaced by Bob Houghton, fresh from leading Malmo to the 1979 European Cup Final, and his assistant Roy Hodgson. Rumours of the extent of City’s debts began to surface as soon as they arrived and the club were relegated once again in a season clouded with uncertainty and departures. Things went from bad to worse in February 1982. As the club sat in a mid-table position in the Third Division with Hodgson now in charge, it became obvious that the Robins were heading towards folding completely, unless serious action was taken. It took eight City players, now remembered as the Ashton Gate Eight, to agree to surrender their lengthy contracts and sacrifice their careers to save the club. Things continued to fall apart on the field and City were relegated for a third successive season, but fans were more relieved about the continued existence of their club. What happened next? City spent two seasons in the Fourth Division before winning promotion under Terry Cooper in 1984. The club have shifted back and forth between the second and third tiers but have been on an upward trajectory since winning the 2015/16 League One title, their first league title since 1955. City are currently sitting in 10th in the Championship with two games remaining. Why selling Wembley makes perfect sense Wolverhampton Wanderers 1984-1986 How did they go down? Bristol City fans were not alone in watching their club succumb to severe financial mismanagement in the 1980s. After many successful decades, culminating in a UEFA Cup victory in 1972, Wolves were relegated to the Second Division in 1982 and only avoided liquidation when a consortium, led by former player Derek Dougan, swooped in to save the club. While they bounced back up the following season, star striker Andy Gray departed for Everton and a poor run of form saw Wolves finish bottom of the league. Wanderers then found themselves in the relegation zone of the Second Division by New Year and, with crowd numbers at Molineux starting to diminish, the club were demoted for the second consecutive season in 1985. Andy Gray in his Everton days after leaving Wolves Credit: David Cannon The club were still yet to reach their nadir as they embarked on their first season in the Third Division. The side, managed by Sammy Chapman, would never string together a run of positive results and the West Midlands club were subsequently relegated to the Fourth Division. What happened next? Dougan had resigned as chairman in 1985 and his business partner, the Bhatti brothers, pulled out soon after. As the team embarked on their first campaign in the fourth tier, Wolverhampton Council bought the stadium and the surrounding land. The club would bounce back with promotion that season and by 1990, was back in the familiar surroundings of the second tier. Swindon Town 1994-1995 How did they go down? Swindon fans were in dream land when their side reached the top flight of English football thanks to a memorable 4-3 victory over Leicester City in the Division One playoff final. Player-manager Glenn Hoddle, who scored the first goal in the Wembley final, had rebuilt the team following their financial struggles at the turn of the decade, but left the club in June 1993 when Chelsea came calling. Assistant John Gorman took charge, but Swindon struggled right out of the gate, failing to win any of their first 15 games. The Robins never put up a fight, becoming the first top flight side for 30 years to concede 100 goals in a season as they finished rock bottom of the table. Glenn Hoddle and John Gorman later worked together with England Credit: PA Gorman expected Swindon to bounce straight back up ahead of the 1994-95 season and they looked on course to do so after the opening months of the season, but four defeats in November saw them slide down the table. Gorman was replaced by Steve McMahon but, despite a run to the League Cup semi-finals, the former England international could not keep the Robins from falling to their second relegation in two seasons. What happened next? Swindon’s rollercoaster period continued in the 1995-96 season, as 17 league goals from Wayne Allison led the Robins to the Second Division title and brought smiles back to the County Ground. The club’s financial situation remained an issue, however, and McMahon’s side settled down in the lower half of the First Division for the next three seasons. In 2006, the club were relegated into League Two, becoming the first former Premier League club to play in the fourth tier, where they still find themselves today. Wolverhampton Wanderers 2012-2013 How did they go down? Wolves won the Championship title in 2009 with Mick McCarthy at the helm and spent three seasons battling for survival. After McCarthy was sacked in February 2012 and replaced by his assistant Terry Connor, the West Midlands club failed to win any of their remaining league games and were relegated, having accumulated just 25 points. Chairman Steve Morgan replaced Connor with Stale Solbakken ahead of the 2012-13 season. The Norwegian had enjoyed success as manager of FC Copenhagen, where he would return in 2013, but his tenure at Molineux lasted just six months. Stale Solbakken was destined to become a pub quiz answer Credit: Getty Images Dean Saunders was brought in with the team flirting with the drop-zone but was unable to save the club from demotion to the third tier for the first time since the 1988-89 season. Five defeats in their final six games saw Wolves slip to second-bottom and a final day defeat to Brighton & Hove Albion confirmed their relegation. What happened next? Saunders was sacked less than a week after the loss to Brighton and the experienced Kenny Jackett was brought in to steer the club in the right direction. The 2013-14 season would prove to be historic, as Wanderers conceded just 31 goals all season and amassed a points haul of 103, a record for the third tier, to cruise to the title. The club have been in the Championship ever since, but following a takeover in July 2016 by Chinese investment group Fosun, Wolves ended a six-year absence from the top flight by winning the title this season under new head coach Nuno Espirito Santo.
The dreaded double relegation: what comes next for Sunderland?
Sunderland’s dramatic late defeat to Burton Albion last Saturday condemned the Black Cats to relegation in successive seasons. Having seen their side slip down the leagues, many fans hold genuine fears about the future of their club. While back-to-back relegations are unusual, however, Sunderland’s plight is not without precedent. Here we look at how other clubs in English football history have bounced back from dropping down multiple tiers rapidly. Bristol City 1980-1982 How did they go down? City were promoted to the top flight in 1976 under long-term manager Alan Dicks and stayed up until 1980. The club’s fortunes changed, however, when promising defender Gary Collier was sold to Coventry City in controversial fashion after the freedom of contract laws were changed in 1978. In response to losing Collier for far less than he would have wished, Dicks and his fellow club executives set about signing multiple members of the squad to 10-year contracts, a situation unheard of until that point. City relied on maintaining their top flight status to keep the club stable, so when they went down in 1980, the club spiralled into financial ruin. Roy Hodgson's first managerial job in England came at Bristol City Credit: Getty Images By September 1980, City were adrift at the bottom of the Second Division and Dicks was quickly replaced by Bob Houghton, fresh from leading Malmo to the 1979 European Cup Final, and his assistant Roy Hodgson. Rumours of the extent of City’s debts began to surface as soon as they arrived and the club were relegated once again in a season clouded with uncertainty and departures. Things went from bad to worse in February 1982. As the club sat in a mid-table position in the Third Division with Hodgson now in charge, it became obvious that the Robins were heading towards folding completely, unless serious action was taken. It took eight City players, now remembered as the Ashton Gate Eight, to agree to surrender their lengthy contracts and sacrifice their careers to save the club. Things continued to fall apart on the field and City were relegated for a third successive season, but fans were more relieved about the continued existence of their club. What happened next? City spent two seasons in the Fourth Division before winning promotion under Terry Cooper in 1984. The club have shifted back and forth between the second and third tiers but have been on an upward trajectory since winning the 2015/16 League One title, their first league title since 1955. City are currently sitting in 10th in the Championship with two games remaining. Why selling Wembley makes perfect sense Wolverhampton Wanderers 1984-1986 How did they go down? Bristol City fans were not alone in watching their club succumb to severe financial mismanagement in the 1980s. After many successful decades, culminating in a UEFA Cup victory in 1972, Wolves were relegated to the Second Division in 1982 and only avoided liquidation when a consortium, led by former player Derek Dougan, swooped in to save the club. While they bounced back up the following season, star striker Andy Gray departed for Everton and a poor run of form saw Wolves finish bottom of the league. Wanderers then found themselves in the relegation zone of the Second Division by New Year and, with crowd numbers at Molineux starting to diminish, the club were demoted for the second consecutive season in 1985. Andy Gray in his Everton days after leaving Wolves Credit: David Cannon The club were still yet to reach their nadir as they embarked on their first season in the Third Division. The side, managed by Sammy Chapman, would never string together a run of positive results and the West Midlands club were subsequently relegated to the Fourth Division. What happened next? Dougan had resigned as chairman in 1985 and his business partner, the Bhatti brothers, pulled out soon after. As the team embarked on their first campaign in the fourth tier, Wolverhampton Council bought the stadium and the surrounding land. The club would bounce back with promotion that season and by 1990, was back in the familiar surroundings of the second tier. Swindon Town 1994-1995 How did they go down? Swindon fans were in dream land when their side reached the top flight of English football thanks to a memorable 4-3 victory over Leicester City in the Division One playoff final. Player-manager Glenn Hoddle, who scored the first goal in the Wembley final, had rebuilt the team following their financial struggles at the turn of the decade, but left the club in June 1993 when Chelsea came calling. Assistant John Gorman took charge, but Swindon struggled right out of the gate, failing to win any of their first 15 games. The Robins never put up a fight, becoming the first top flight side for 30 years to concede 100 goals in a season as they finished rock bottom of the table. Glenn Hoddle and John Gorman later worked together with England Credit: PA Gorman expected Swindon to bounce straight back up ahead of the 1994-95 season and they looked on course to do so after the opening months of the season, but four defeats in November saw them slide down the table. Gorman was replaced by Steve McMahon but, despite a run to the League Cup semi-finals, the former England international could not keep the Robins from falling to their second relegation in two seasons. What happened next? Swindon’s rollercoaster period continued in the 1995-96 season, as 17 league goals from Wayne Allison led the Robins to the Second Division title and brought smiles back to the County Ground. The club’s financial situation remained an issue, however, and McMahon’s side settled down in the lower half of the First Division for the next three seasons. In 2006, the club were relegated into League Two, becoming the first former Premier League club to play in the fourth tier, where they still find themselves today. Wolverhampton Wanderers 2012-2013 How did they go down? Wolves won the Championship title in 2009 with Mick McCarthy at the helm and spent three seasons battling for survival. After McCarthy was sacked in February 2012 and replaced by his assistant Terry Connor, the West Midlands club failed to win any of their remaining league games and were relegated, having accumulated just 25 points. Chairman Steve Morgan replaced Connor with Stale Solbakken ahead of the 2012-13 season. The Norwegian had enjoyed success as manager of FC Copenhagen, where he would return in 2013, but his tenure at Molineux lasted just six months. Stale Solbakken was destined to become a pub quiz answer Credit: Getty Images Dean Saunders was brought in with the team flirting with the drop-zone but was unable to save the club from demotion to the third tier for the first time since the 1988-89 season. Five defeats in their final six games saw Wolves slip to second-bottom and a final day defeat to Brighton & Hove Albion confirmed their relegation. What happened next? Saunders was sacked less than a week after the loss to Brighton and the experienced Kenny Jackett was brought in to steer the club in the right direction. The 2013-14 season would prove to be historic, as Wanderers conceded just 31 goals all season and amassed a points haul of 103, a record for the third tier, to cruise to the title. The club have been in the Championship ever since, but following a takeover in July 2016 by Chinese investment group Fosun, Wolves ended a six-year absence from the top flight by winning the title this season under new head coach Nuno Espirito Santo.
Sunderland’s dramatic late defeat to Burton Albion last Saturday condemned the Black Cats to relegation in successive seasons. Having seen their side slip down the leagues, many fans hold genuine fears about the future of their club. While back-to-back relegations are unusual, however, Sunderland’s plight is not without precedent. Here we look at how other clubs in English football history have bounced back from dropping down multiple tiers rapidly. Bristol City 1980-1982 How did they go down? City were promoted to the top flight in 1976 under long-term manager Alan Dicks and stayed up until 1980. The club’s fortunes changed, however, when promising defender Gary Collier was sold to Coventry City in controversial fashion after the freedom of contract laws were changed in 1978. In response to losing Collier for far less than he would have wished, Dicks and his fellow club executives set about signing multiple members of the squad to 10-year contracts, a situation unheard of until that point. City relied on maintaining their top flight status to keep the club stable, so when they went down in 1980, the club spiralled into financial ruin. Roy Hodgson's first managerial job in England came at Bristol City Credit: Getty Images By September 1980, City were adrift at the bottom of the Second Division and Dicks was quickly replaced by Bob Houghton, fresh from leading Malmo to the 1979 European Cup Final, and his assistant Roy Hodgson. Rumours of the extent of City’s debts began to surface as soon as they arrived and the club were relegated once again in a season clouded with uncertainty and departures. Things went from bad to worse in February 1982. As the club sat in a mid-table position in the Third Division with Hodgson now in charge, it became obvious that the Robins were heading towards folding completely, unless serious action was taken. It took eight City players, now remembered as the Ashton Gate Eight, to agree to surrender their lengthy contracts and sacrifice their careers to save the club. Things continued to fall apart on the field and City were relegated for a third successive season, but fans were more relieved about the continued existence of their club. What happened next? City spent two seasons in the Fourth Division before winning promotion under Terry Cooper in 1984. The club have shifted back and forth between the second and third tiers but have been on an upward trajectory since winning the 2015/16 League One title, their first league title since 1955. City are currently sitting in 10th in the Championship with two games remaining. Why selling Wembley makes perfect sense Wolverhampton Wanderers 1984-1986 How did they go down? Bristol City fans were not alone in watching their club succumb to severe financial mismanagement in the 1980s. After many successful decades, culminating in a UEFA Cup victory in 1972, Wolves were relegated to the Second Division in 1982 and only avoided liquidation when a consortium, led by former player Derek Dougan, swooped in to save the club. While they bounced back up the following season, star striker Andy Gray departed for Everton and a poor run of form saw Wolves finish bottom of the league. Wanderers then found themselves in the relegation zone of the Second Division by New Year and, with crowd numbers at Molineux starting to diminish, the club were demoted for the second consecutive season in 1985. Andy Gray in his Everton days after leaving Wolves Credit: David Cannon The club were still yet to reach their nadir as they embarked on their first season in the Third Division. The side, managed by Sammy Chapman, would never string together a run of positive results and the West Midlands club were subsequently relegated to the Fourth Division. What happened next? Dougan had resigned as chairman in 1985 and his business partner, the Bhatti brothers, pulled out soon after. As the team embarked on their first campaign in the fourth tier, Wolverhampton Council bought the stadium and the surrounding land. The club would bounce back with promotion that season and by 1990, was back in the familiar surroundings of the second tier. Swindon Town 1994-1995 How did they go down? Swindon fans were in dream land when their side reached the top flight of English football thanks to a memorable 4-3 victory over Leicester City in the Division One playoff final. Player-manager Glenn Hoddle, who scored the first goal in the Wembley final, had rebuilt the team following their financial struggles at the turn of the decade, but left the club in June 1993 when Chelsea came calling. Assistant John Gorman took charge, but Swindon struggled right out of the gate, failing to win any of their first 15 games. The Robins never put up a fight, becoming the first top flight side for 30 years to concede 100 goals in a season as they finished rock bottom of the table. Glenn Hoddle and John Gorman later worked together with England Credit: PA Gorman expected Swindon to bounce straight back up ahead of the 1994-95 season and they looked on course to do so after the opening months of the season, but four defeats in November saw them slide down the table. Gorman was replaced by Steve McMahon but, despite a run to the League Cup semi-finals, the former England international could not keep the Robins from falling to their second relegation in two seasons. What happened next? Swindon’s rollercoaster period continued in the 1995-96 season, as 17 league goals from Wayne Allison led the Robins to the Second Division title and brought smiles back to the County Ground. The club’s financial situation remained an issue, however, and McMahon’s side settled down in the lower half of the First Division for the next three seasons. In 2006, the club were relegated into League Two, becoming the first former Premier League club to play in the fourth tier, where they still find themselves today. Wolverhampton Wanderers 2012-2013 How did they go down? Wolves won the Championship title in 2009 with Mick McCarthy at the helm and spent three seasons battling for survival. After McCarthy was sacked in February 2012 and replaced by his assistant Terry Connor, the West Midlands club failed to win any of their remaining league games and were relegated, having accumulated just 25 points. Chairman Steve Morgan replaced Connor with Stale Solbakken ahead of the 2012-13 season. The Norwegian had enjoyed success as manager of FC Copenhagen, where he would return in 2013, but his tenure at Molineux lasted just six months. Stale Solbakken was destined to become a pub quiz answer Credit: Getty Images Dean Saunders was brought in with the team flirting with the drop-zone but was unable to save the club from demotion to the third tier for the first time since the 1988-89 season. Five defeats in their final six games saw Wolves slip to second-bottom and a final day defeat to Brighton & Hove Albion confirmed their relegation. What happened next? Saunders was sacked less than a week after the loss to Brighton and the experienced Kenny Jackett was brought in to steer the club in the right direction. The 2013-14 season would prove to be historic, as Wanderers conceded just 31 goals all season and amassed a points haul of 103, a record for the third tier, to cruise to the title. The club have been in the Championship ever since, but following a takeover in July 2016 by Chinese investment group Fosun, Wolves ended a six-year absence from the top flight by winning the title this season under new head coach Nuno Espirito Santo.
The dreaded double relegation: what comes next for Sunderland?
Sunderland’s dramatic late defeat to Burton Albion last Saturday condemned the Black Cats to relegation in successive seasons. Having seen their side slip down the leagues, many fans hold genuine fears about the future of their club. While back-to-back relegations are unusual, however, Sunderland’s plight is not without precedent. Here we look at how other clubs in English football history have bounced back from dropping down multiple tiers rapidly. Bristol City 1980-1982 How did they go down? City were promoted to the top flight in 1976 under long-term manager Alan Dicks and stayed up until 1980. The club’s fortunes changed, however, when promising defender Gary Collier was sold to Coventry City in controversial fashion after the freedom of contract laws were changed in 1978. In response to losing Collier for far less than he would have wished, Dicks and his fellow club executives set about signing multiple members of the squad to 10-year contracts, a situation unheard of until that point. City relied on maintaining their top flight status to keep the club stable, so when they went down in 1980, the club spiralled into financial ruin. Roy Hodgson's first managerial job in England came at Bristol City Credit: Getty Images By September 1980, City were adrift at the bottom of the Second Division and Dicks was quickly replaced by Bob Houghton, fresh from leading Malmo to the 1979 European Cup Final, and his assistant Roy Hodgson. Rumours of the extent of City’s debts began to surface as soon as they arrived and the club were relegated once again in a season clouded with uncertainty and departures. Things went from bad to worse in February 1982. As the club sat in a mid-table position in the Third Division with Hodgson now in charge, it became obvious that the Robins were heading towards folding completely, unless serious action was taken. It took eight City players, now remembered as the Ashton Gate Eight, to agree to surrender their lengthy contracts and sacrifice their careers to save the club. Things continued to fall apart on the field and City were relegated for a third successive season, but fans were more relieved about the continued existence of their club. What happened next? City spent two seasons in the Fourth Division before winning promotion under Terry Cooper in 1984. The club have shifted back and forth between the second and third tiers but have been on an upward trajectory since winning the 2015/16 League One title, their first league title since 1955. City are currently sitting in 10th in the Championship with two games remaining. Why selling Wembley makes perfect sense Wolverhampton Wanderers 1984-1986 How did they go down? Bristol City fans were not alone in watching their club succumb to severe financial mismanagement in the 1980s. After many successful decades, culminating in a UEFA Cup victory in 1972, Wolves were relegated to the Second Division in 1982 and only avoided liquidation when a consortium, led by former player Derek Dougan, swooped in to save the club. While they bounced back up the following season, star striker Andy Gray departed for Everton and a poor run of form saw Wolves finish bottom of the league. Wanderers then found themselves in the relegation zone of the Second Division by New Year and, with crowd numbers at Molineux starting to diminish, the club were demoted for the second consecutive season in 1985. Andy Gray in his Everton days after leaving Wolves Credit: David Cannon The club were still yet to reach their nadir as they embarked on their first season in the Third Division. The side, managed by Sammy Chapman, would never string together a run of positive results and the West Midlands club were subsequently relegated to the Fourth Division. What happened next? Dougan had resigned as chairman in 1985 and his business partner, the Bhatti brothers, pulled out soon after. As the team embarked on their first campaign in the fourth tier, Wolverhampton Council bought the stadium and the surrounding land. The club would bounce back with promotion that season and by 1990, was back in the familiar surroundings of the second tier. Swindon Town 1994-1995 How did they go down? Swindon fans were in dream land when their side reached the top flight of English football thanks to a memorable 4-3 victory over Leicester City in the Division One playoff final. Player-manager Glenn Hoddle, who scored the first goal in the Wembley final, had rebuilt the team following their financial struggles at the turn of the decade, but left the club in June 1993 when Chelsea came calling. Assistant John Gorman took charge, but Swindon struggled right out of the gate, failing to win any of their first 15 games. The Robins never put up a fight, becoming the first top flight side for 30 years to concede 100 goals in a season as they finished rock bottom of the table. Glenn Hoddle and John Gorman later worked together with England Credit: PA Gorman expected Swindon to bounce straight back up ahead of the 1994-95 season and they looked on course to do so after the opening months of the season, but four defeats in November saw them slide down the table. Gorman was replaced by Steve McMahon but, despite a run to the League Cup semi-finals, the former England international could not keep the Robins from falling to their second relegation in two seasons. What happened next? Swindon’s rollercoaster period continued in the 1995-96 season, as 17 league goals from Wayne Allison led the Robins to the Second Division title and brought smiles back to the County Ground. The club’s financial situation remained an issue, however, and McMahon’s side settled down in the lower half of the First Division for the next three seasons. In 2006, the club were relegated into League Two, becoming the first former Premier League club to play in the fourth tier, where they still find themselves today. Wolverhampton Wanderers 2012-2013 How did they go down? Wolves won the Championship title in 2009 with Mick McCarthy at the helm and spent three seasons battling for survival. After McCarthy was sacked in February 2012 and replaced by his assistant Terry Connor, the West Midlands club failed to win any of their remaining league games and were relegated, having accumulated just 25 points. Chairman Steve Morgan replaced Connor with Stale Solbakken ahead of the 2012-13 season. The Norwegian had enjoyed success as manager of FC Copenhagen, where he would return in 2013, but his tenure at Molineux lasted just six months. Stale Solbakken was destined to become a pub quiz answer Credit: Getty Images Dean Saunders was brought in with the team flirting with the drop-zone but was unable to save the club from demotion to the third tier for the first time since the 1988-89 season. Five defeats in their final six games saw Wolves slip to second-bottom and a final day defeat to Brighton & Hove Albion confirmed their relegation. What happened next? Saunders was sacked less than a week after the loss to Brighton and the experienced Kenny Jackett was brought in to steer the club in the right direction. The 2013-14 season would prove to be historic, as Wanderers conceded just 31 goals all season and amassed a points haul of 103, a record for the third tier, to cruise to the title. The club have been in the Championship ever since, but following a takeover in July 2016 by Chinese investment group Fosun, Wolves ended a six-year absence from the top flight by winning the title this season under new head coach Nuno Espirito Santo.
Burton Albion fighting for 'even bigger miracle' with great escape sequel
Burton Albion fighting for 'even bigger miracle' with great escape sequel
Burton Albion fighting for 'even bigger miracle' with great escape sequel
Burton Albion fighting for 'even bigger miracle' with great escape sequel
Burton Albion fighting for 'even bigger miracle' with great escape sequel
Burton Albion fighting for 'even bigger miracle' with great escape sequel
Burton Albion fighting for 'even bigger miracle' with great escape sequel
Burton Albion fighting for 'even bigger miracle' with great escape sequel
Burton Albion fighting for 'even bigger miracle' with great escape sequel
The Great Escape II is on. Nigel Clough loves nothing more than reading a good thriller when he spends time away from Burton Albion, yet the final weeks of his latest relegation fight are proving an unbearably tense sequel to the original. Last season he defied the odds by guiding the Brewers to Championship safety with a game to spare but this survival mission is going right to the wire, ahead of a do-or-die encounter with Bolton Wanderers on Saturday. Clough’s strugglers face Bolton with the huge incentive of knowing that a victory could take them above their opponents and out of the bottom three, provided Barnsley fail to beat Brentford. The fact Clough even has a slim chance of survival is remarkable; Burton operate on a modest £8.5m wage bill, their record signing, Liam Boyce, cost £500,000 and has missed most of the season with injury, while their average gate at the Pirelli Stadium is just under 4,600. But optimism is building after last weekend’s heroics at Sunderland that another escapology act is on the way. “Last season it was a miracle to stay up, it will be an even bigger miracle if we do it again this year,” Ben Robinson, Burton’s chairman, told Telegraph Sport. Championship | What can still happen? “It’s David vs Goliath stuff for us every week but the dream is still alive. We’ve got a big chance of playing Championship football again next season, when we looked dead and buried just two games ago.” Burton’s dramatic 2-1 victory at the Stadium of Light last weekend, with Boyce heading the winner two minutes into added time, relegated the stricken Black Cats to set up their monumental meeting with Bolton. Clough’s old club, Nottingham Forest, then did him a favour on Tuesday night by thrashing Barnsley to raise hopes of a memorable finish to a difficult campaign. Forest, who approached Clough last year, also face Bolton on the final day. Nigel Clough encourages his players at Cardiff Credit: Athena Pictures/Getty Images Yet Clough’s hopes of success arguably depend on beating Bolton at home, with the 52-year-old battling valiantly this week to ease the pressure on his players. “If we lose, we’re down at 5pm on Saturday. But we’re very pleased to be in this position and our intention is to take it to the last day, as it has always been,” he says. “We wanted to improve and get better this season, it hasn’t worked out like that, we’re disappointed in an awful lot of ways but we’re still in with a chance. Of course, it's a massive game. “What would staying up again mean? It would be exactly the same next season, trying to finish fourth from bottom, there’s no sugar daddy here, the chairman gives us everything he can.” Liam Boyce celebrates scoring the goal that has kept Burton's survival hopes alive Credit: Dave Howarth/PA Clough has found this season even tougher than last year, the chasm growing ever wider between Burton and the majority of the Championship’s other 23 clubs. Earlier this month they played Middlesbrough, relegated from the top-flight last year, with a £15 million striker on the bench [Britt Assombalonga] and wage bill topping £30m. "Wolves have won the league and rightly so but they've got a £15m midfielder [Ruben Neves] who has played in the Champions League. It's a different world,” says Clough. “We're Burton Albion in the Championship. It's not so long ago we were in the Unibond League playing against Marine and Droylsden [Burton won the title in 2002 to reach the Conference]. “It puts it all into perspective and whatever league we're in next season it’s still an incredible achievement.” Chairman Ben Robinson, second left, and Clough, second right, toast their FA Cup tie against Manchester United back in 2006 Credit: DAVE THOMPSON/AP Robinson, who has been Burton’s chairman since 1995, released a statement earlier this month to remind supporters of their humble resources, in what he called a “reality check” following criticism of Clough on social media. Yet the Burton manager admits the continual fighting against bigger clubs, and the annual battle as the underdog, can take its toll. “It’s certainly demoralising at times when you go into games like Wolves knowing deep down you can’t compete. “The players aren’t daft either, when they look at the quality of players they come across at times. “Whether it’s Burton Albion or anywhere else, you ask any manager at this stage of this season, they will say they're tired. “But for us, competing at this level is very, very difficult so it's probably a bit more increased. At this stage of the season you're certainly looking forward to your holidays.” By 5pm on Saturday Clough will know if the final game of the season at Preston has any significance. But as his late father Brian once famously said, “I hope anybody’s not stupid enough to write us off…”
Burton Albion fighting for 'even bigger miracle' with great escape sequel
The Great Escape II is on. Nigel Clough loves nothing more than reading a good thriller when he spends time away from Burton Albion, yet the final weeks of his latest relegation fight are proving an unbearably tense sequel to the original. Last season he defied the odds by guiding the Brewers to Championship safety with a game to spare but this survival mission is going right to the wire, ahead of a do-or-die encounter with Bolton Wanderers on Saturday. Clough’s strugglers face Bolton with the huge incentive of knowing that a victory could take them above their opponents and out of the bottom three, provided Barnsley fail to beat Brentford. The fact Clough even has a slim chance of survival is remarkable; Burton operate on a modest £8.5m wage bill, their record signing, Liam Boyce, cost £500,000 and has missed most of the season with injury, while their average gate at the Pirelli Stadium is just under 4,600. But optimism is building after last weekend’s heroics at Sunderland that another escapology act is on the way. “Last season it was a miracle to stay up, it will be an even bigger miracle if we do it again this year,” Ben Robinson, Burton’s chairman, told Telegraph Sport. Championship | What can still happen? “It’s David vs Goliath stuff for us every week but the dream is still alive. We’ve got a big chance of playing Championship football again next season, when we looked dead and buried just two games ago.” Burton’s dramatic 2-1 victory at the Stadium of Light last weekend, with Boyce heading the winner two minutes into added time, relegated the stricken Black Cats to set up their monumental meeting with Bolton. Clough’s old club, Nottingham Forest, then did him a favour on Tuesday night by thrashing Barnsley to raise hopes of a memorable finish to a difficult campaign. Forest, who approached Clough last year, also face Bolton on the final day. Nigel Clough encourages his players at Cardiff Credit: Athena Pictures/Getty Images Yet Clough’s hopes of success arguably depend on beating Bolton at home, with the 52-year-old battling valiantly this week to ease the pressure on his players. “If we lose, we’re down at 5pm on Saturday. But we’re very pleased to be in this position and our intention is to take it to the last day, as it has always been,” he says. “We wanted to improve and get better this season, it hasn’t worked out like that, we’re disappointed in an awful lot of ways but we’re still in with a chance. Of course, it's a massive game. “What would staying up again mean? It would be exactly the same next season, trying to finish fourth from bottom, there’s no sugar daddy here, the chairman gives us everything he can.” Liam Boyce celebrates scoring the goal that has kept Burton's survival hopes alive Credit: Dave Howarth/PA Clough has found this season even tougher than last year, the chasm growing ever wider between Burton and the majority of the Championship’s other 23 clubs. Earlier this month they played Middlesbrough, relegated from the top-flight last year, with a £15 million striker on the bench [Britt Assombalonga] and wage bill topping £30m. "Wolves have won the league and rightly so but they've got a £15m midfielder [Ruben Neves] who has played in the Champions League. It's a different world,” says Clough. “We're Burton Albion in the Championship. It's not so long ago we were in the Unibond League playing against Marine and Droylsden [Burton won the title in 2002 to reach the Conference]. “It puts it all into perspective and whatever league we're in next season it’s still an incredible achievement.” Chairman Ben Robinson, second left, and Clough, second right, toast their FA Cup tie against Manchester United back in 2006 Credit: DAVE THOMPSON/AP Robinson, who has been Burton’s chairman since 1995, released a statement earlier this month to remind supporters of their humble resources, in what he called a “reality check” following criticism of Clough on social media. Yet the Burton manager admits the continual fighting against bigger clubs, and the annual battle as the underdog, can take its toll. “It’s certainly demoralising at times when you go into games like Wolves knowing deep down you can’t compete. “The players aren’t daft either, when they look at the quality of players they come across at times. “Whether it’s Burton Albion or anywhere else, you ask any manager at this stage of this season, they will say they're tired. “But for us, competing at this level is very, very difficult so it's probably a bit more increased. At this stage of the season you're certainly looking forward to your holidays.” By 5pm on Saturday Clough will know if the final game of the season at Preston has any significance. But as his late father Brian once famously said, “I hope anybody’s not stupid enough to write us off…”
The Great Escape II is on. Nigel Clough loves nothing more than reading a good thriller when he spends time away from Burton Albion, yet the final weeks of his latest relegation fight are proving an unbearably tense sequel to the original. Last season he defied the odds by guiding the Brewers to Championship safety with a game to spare but this survival mission is going right to the wire, ahead of a do-or-die encounter with Bolton Wanderers on Saturday. Clough’s strugglers face Bolton with the huge incentive of knowing that a victory could take them above their opponents and out of the bottom three, provided Barnsley fail to beat Brentford. The fact Clough even has a slim chance of survival is remarkable; Burton operate on a modest £8.5m wage bill, their record signing, Liam Boyce, cost £500,000 and has missed most of the season with injury, while their average gate at the Pirelli Stadium is just under 4,600. But optimism is building after last weekend’s heroics at Sunderland that another escapology act is on the way. “Last season it was a miracle to stay up, it will be an even bigger miracle if we do it again this year,” Ben Robinson, Burton’s chairman, told Telegraph Sport. Championship | What can still happen? “It’s David vs Goliath stuff for us every week but the dream is still alive. We’ve got a big chance of playing Championship football again next season, when we looked dead and buried just two games ago.” Burton’s dramatic 2-1 victory at the Stadium of Light last weekend, with Boyce heading the winner two minutes into added time, relegated the stricken Black Cats to set up their monumental meeting with Bolton. Clough’s old club, Nottingham Forest, then did him a favour on Tuesday night by thrashing Barnsley to raise hopes of a memorable finish to a difficult campaign. Forest, who approached Clough last year, also face Bolton on the final day. Nigel Clough encourages his players at Cardiff Credit: Athena Pictures/Getty Images Yet Clough’s hopes of success arguably depend on beating Bolton at home, with the 52-year-old battling valiantly this week to ease the pressure on his players. “If we lose, we’re down at 5pm on Saturday. But we’re very pleased to be in this position and our intention is to take it to the last day, as it has always been,” he says. “We wanted to improve and get better this season, it hasn’t worked out like that, we’re disappointed in an awful lot of ways but we’re still in with a chance. Of course, it's a massive game. “What would staying up again mean? It would be exactly the same next season, trying to finish fourth from bottom, there’s no sugar daddy here, the chairman gives us everything he can.” Liam Boyce celebrates scoring the goal that has kept Burton's survival hopes alive Credit: Dave Howarth/PA Clough has found this season even tougher than last year, the chasm growing ever wider between Burton and the majority of the Championship’s other 23 clubs. Earlier this month they played Middlesbrough, relegated from the top-flight last year, with a £15 million striker on the bench [Britt Assombalonga] and wage bill topping £30m. "Wolves have won the league and rightly so but they've got a £15m midfielder [Ruben Neves] who has played in the Champions League. It's a different world,” says Clough. “We're Burton Albion in the Championship. It's not so long ago we were in the Unibond League playing against Marine and Droylsden [Burton won the title in 2002 to reach the Conference]. “It puts it all into perspective and whatever league we're in next season it’s still an incredible achievement.” Chairman Ben Robinson, second left, and Clough, second right, toast their FA Cup tie against Manchester United back in 2006 Credit: DAVE THOMPSON/AP Robinson, who has been Burton’s chairman since 1995, released a statement earlier this month to remind supporters of their humble resources, in what he called a “reality check” following criticism of Clough on social media. Yet the Burton manager admits the continual fighting against bigger clubs, and the annual battle as the underdog, can take its toll. “It’s certainly demoralising at times when you go into games like Wolves knowing deep down you can’t compete. “The players aren’t daft either, when they look at the quality of players they come across at times. “Whether it’s Burton Albion or anywhere else, you ask any manager at this stage of this season, they will say they're tired. “But for us, competing at this level is very, very difficult so it's probably a bit more increased. At this stage of the season you're certainly looking forward to your holidays.” By 5pm on Saturday Clough will know if the final game of the season at Preston has any significance. But as his late father Brian once famously said, “I hope anybody’s not stupid enough to write us off…”
Burton Albion fighting for 'even bigger miracle' with great escape sequel
The Great Escape II is on. Nigel Clough loves nothing more than reading a good thriller when he spends time away from Burton Albion, yet the final weeks of his latest relegation fight are proving an unbearably tense sequel to the original. Last season he defied the odds by guiding the Brewers to Championship safety with a game to spare but this survival mission is going right to the wire, ahead of a do-or-die encounter with Bolton Wanderers on Saturday. Clough’s strugglers face Bolton with the huge incentive of knowing that a victory could take them above their opponents and out of the bottom three, provided Barnsley fail to beat Brentford. The fact Clough even has a slim chance of survival is remarkable; Burton operate on a modest £8.5m wage bill, their record signing, Liam Boyce, cost £500,000 and has missed most of the season with injury, while their average gate at the Pirelli Stadium is just under 4,600. But optimism is building after last weekend’s heroics at Sunderland that another escapology act is on the way. “Last season it was a miracle to stay up, it will be an even bigger miracle if we do it again this year,” Ben Robinson, Burton’s chairman, told Telegraph Sport. Championship | What can still happen? “It’s David vs Goliath stuff for us every week but the dream is still alive. We’ve got a big chance of playing Championship football again next season, when we looked dead and buried just two games ago.” Burton’s dramatic 2-1 victory at the Stadium of Light last weekend, with Boyce heading the winner two minutes into added time, relegated the stricken Black Cats to set up their monumental meeting with Bolton. Clough’s old club, Nottingham Forest, then did him a favour on Tuesday night by thrashing Barnsley to raise hopes of a memorable finish to a difficult campaign. Forest, who approached Clough last year, also face Bolton on the final day. Nigel Clough encourages his players at Cardiff Credit: Athena Pictures/Getty Images Yet Clough’s hopes of success arguably depend on beating Bolton at home, with the 52-year-old battling valiantly this week to ease the pressure on his players. “If we lose, we’re down at 5pm on Saturday. But we’re very pleased to be in this position and our intention is to take it to the last day, as it has always been,” he says. “We wanted to improve and get better this season, it hasn’t worked out like that, we’re disappointed in an awful lot of ways but we’re still in with a chance. Of course, it's a massive game. “What would staying up again mean? It would be exactly the same next season, trying to finish fourth from bottom, there’s no sugar daddy here, the chairman gives us everything he can.” Liam Boyce celebrates scoring the goal that has kept Burton's survival hopes alive Credit: Dave Howarth/PA Clough has found this season even tougher than last year, the chasm growing ever wider between Burton and the majority of the Championship’s other 23 clubs. Earlier this month they played Middlesbrough, relegated from the top-flight last year, with a £15 million striker on the bench [Britt Assombalonga] and wage bill topping £30m. "Wolves have won the league and rightly so but they've got a £15m midfielder [Ruben Neves] who has played in the Champions League. It's a different world,” says Clough. “We're Burton Albion in the Championship. It's not so long ago we were in the Unibond League playing against Marine and Droylsden [Burton won the title in 2002 to reach the Conference]. “It puts it all into perspective and whatever league we're in next season it’s still an incredible achievement.” Chairman Ben Robinson, second left, and Clough, second right, toast their FA Cup tie against Manchester United back in 2006 Credit: DAVE THOMPSON/AP Robinson, who has been Burton’s chairman since 1995, released a statement earlier this month to remind supporters of their humble resources, in what he called a “reality check” following criticism of Clough on social media. Yet the Burton manager admits the continual fighting against bigger clubs, and the annual battle as the underdog, can take its toll. “It’s certainly demoralising at times when you go into games like Wolves knowing deep down you can’t compete. “The players aren’t daft either, when they look at the quality of players they come across at times. “Whether it’s Burton Albion or anywhere else, you ask any manager at this stage of this season, they will say they're tired. “But for us, competing at this level is very, very difficult so it's probably a bit more increased. At this stage of the season you're certainly looking forward to your holidays.” By 5pm on Saturday Clough will know if the final game of the season at Preston has any significance. But as his late father Brian once famously said, “I hope anybody’s not stupid enough to write us off…”
The Great Escape II is on. Nigel Clough loves nothing more than reading a good thriller when he spends time away from Burton Albion, yet the final weeks of his latest relegation fight are proving an unbearably tense sequel to the original. Last season he defied the odds by guiding the Brewers to Championship safety with a game to spare but this survival mission is going right to the wire, ahead of a do-or-die encounter with Bolton Wanderers on Saturday. Clough’s strugglers face Bolton with the huge incentive of knowing that a victory could take them above their opponents and out of the bottom three, provided Barnsley fail to beat Brentford. The fact Clough even has a slim chance of survival is remarkable; Burton operate on a modest £8.5m wage bill, their record signing, Liam Boyce, cost £500,000 and has missed most of the season with injury, while their average gate at the Pirelli Stadium is just under 4,600. But optimism is building after last weekend’s heroics at Sunderland that another escapology act is on the way. “Last season it was a miracle to stay up, it will be an even bigger miracle if we do it again this year,” Ben Robinson, Burton’s chairman, told Telegraph Sport. Championship | What can still happen? “It’s David vs Goliath stuff for us every week but the dream is still alive. We’ve got a big chance of playing Championship football again next season, when we looked dead and buried just two games ago.” Burton’s dramatic 2-1 victory at the Stadium of Light last weekend, with Boyce heading the winner two minutes into added time, relegated the stricken Black Cats to set up their monumental meeting with Bolton. Clough’s old club, Nottingham Forest, then did him a favour on Tuesday night by thrashing Barnsley to raise hopes of a memorable finish to a difficult campaign. Forest, who approached Clough last year, also face Bolton on the final day. Nigel Clough encourages his players at Cardiff Credit: Athena Pictures/Getty Images Yet Clough’s hopes of success arguably depend on beating Bolton at home, with the 52-year-old battling valiantly this week to ease the pressure on his players. “If we lose, we’re down at 5pm on Saturday. But we’re very pleased to be in this position and our intention is to take it to the last day, as it has always been,” he says. “We wanted to improve and get better this season, it hasn’t worked out like that, we’re disappointed in an awful lot of ways but we’re still in with a chance. Of course, it's a massive game. “What would staying up again mean? It would be exactly the same next season, trying to finish fourth from bottom, there’s no sugar daddy here, the chairman gives us everything he can.” Liam Boyce celebrates scoring the goal that has kept Burton's survival hopes alive Credit: Dave Howarth/PA Clough has found this season even tougher than last year, the chasm growing ever wider between Burton and the majority of the Championship’s other 23 clubs. Earlier this month they played Middlesbrough, relegated from the top-flight last year, with a £15 million striker on the bench [Britt Assombalonga] and wage bill topping £30m. "Wolves have won the league and rightly so but they've got a £15m midfielder [Ruben Neves] who has played in the Champions League. It's a different world,” says Clough. “We're Burton Albion in the Championship. It's not so long ago we were in the Unibond League playing against Marine and Droylsden [Burton won the title in 2002 to reach the Conference]. “It puts it all into perspective and whatever league we're in next season it’s still an incredible achievement.” Chairman Ben Robinson, second left, and Clough, second right, toast their FA Cup tie against Manchester United back in 2006 Credit: DAVE THOMPSON/AP Robinson, who has been Burton’s chairman since 1995, released a statement earlier this month to remind supporters of their humble resources, in what he called a “reality check” following criticism of Clough on social media. Yet the Burton manager admits the continual fighting against bigger clubs, and the annual battle as the underdog, can take its toll. “It’s certainly demoralising at times when you go into games like Wolves knowing deep down you can’t compete. “The players aren’t daft either, when they look at the quality of players they come across at times. “Whether it’s Burton Albion or anywhere else, you ask any manager at this stage of this season, they will say they're tired. “But for us, competing at this level is very, very difficult so it's probably a bit more increased. At this stage of the season you're certainly looking forward to your holidays.” By 5pm on Saturday Clough will know if the final game of the season at Preston has any significance. But as his late father Brian once famously said, “I hope anybody’s not stupid enough to write us off…”
Burton Albion fighting for 'even bigger miracle' with great escape sequel
The Great Escape II is on. Nigel Clough loves nothing more than reading a good thriller when he spends time away from Burton Albion, yet the final weeks of his latest relegation fight are proving an unbearably tense sequel to the original. Last season he defied the odds by guiding the Brewers to Championship safety with a game to spare but this survival mission is going right to the wire, ahead of a do-or-die encounter with Bolton Wanderers on Saturday. Clough’s strugglers face Bolton with the huge incentive of knowing that a victory could take them above their opponents and out of the bottom three, provided Barnsley fail to beat Brentford. The fact Clough even has a slim chance of survival is remarkable; Burton operate on a modest £8.5m wage bill, their record signing, Liam Boyce, cost £500,000 and has missed most of the season with injury, while their average gate at the Pirelli Stadium is just under 4,600. But optimism is building after last weekend’s heroics at Sunderland that another escapology act is on the way. “Last season it was a miracle to stay up, it will be an even bigger miracle if we do it again this year,” Ben Robinson, Burton’s chairman, told Telegraph Sport. Championship | What can still happen? “It’s David vs Goliath stuff for us every week but the dream is still alive. We’ve got a big chance of playing Championship football again next season, when we looked dead and buried just two games ago.” Burton’s dramatic 2-1 victory at the Stadium of Light last weekend, with Boyce heading the winner two minutes into added time, relegated the stricken Black Cats to set up their monumental meeting with Bolton. Clough’s old club, Nottingham Forest, then did him a favour on Tuesday night by thrashing Barnsley to raise hopes of a memorable finish to a difficult campaign. Forest, who approached Clough last year, also face Bolton on the final day. Nigel Clough encourages his players at Cardiff Credit: Athena Pictures/Getty Images Yet Clough’s hopes of success arguably depend on beating Bolton at home, with the 52-year-old battling valiantly this week to ease the pressure on his players. “If we lose, we’re down at 5pm on Saturday. But we’re very pleased to be in this position and our intention is to take it to the last day, as it has always been,” he says. “We wanted to improve and get better this season, it hasn’t worked out like that, we’re disappointed in an awful lot of ways but we’re still in with a chance. Of course, it's a massive game. “What would staying up again mean? It would be exactly the same next season, trying to finish fourth from bottom, there’s no sugar daddy here, the chairman gives us everything he can.” Liam Boyce celebrates scoring the goal that has kept Burton's survival hopes alive Credit: Dave Howarth/PA Clough has found this season even tougher than last year, the chasm growing ever wider between Burton and the majority of the Championship’s other 23 clubs. Earlier this month they played Middlesbrough, relegated from the top-flight last year, with a £15 million striker on the bench [Britt Assombalonga] and wage bill topping £30m. "Wolves have won the league and rightly so but they've got a £15m midfielder [Ruben Neves] who has played in the Champions League. It's a different world,” says Clough. “We're Burton Albion in the Championship. It's not so long ago we were in the Unibond League playing against Marine and Droylsden [Burton won the title in 2002 to reach the Conference]. “It puts it all into perspective and whatever league we're in next season it’s still an incredible achievement.” Chairman Ben Robinson, second left, and Clough, second right, toast their FA Cup tie against Manchester United back in 2006 Credit: DAVE THOMPSON/AP Robinson, who has been Burton’s chairman since 1995, released a statement earlier this month to remind supporters of their humble resources, in what he called a “reality check” following criticism of Clough on social media. Yet the Burton manager admits the continual fighting against bigger clubs, and the annual battle as the underdog, can take its toll. “It’s certainly demoralising at times when you go into games like Wolves knowing deep down you can’t compete. “The players aren’t daft either, when they look at the quality of players they come across at times. “Whether it’s Burton Albion or anywhere else, you ask any manager at this stage of this season, they will say they're tired. “But for us, competing at this level is very, very difficult so it's probably a bit more increased. At this stage of the season you're certainly looking forward to your holidays.” By 5pm on Saturday Clough will know if the final game of the season at Preston has any significance. But as his late father Brian once famously said, “I hope anybody’s not stupid enough to write us off…”
The Great Escape II is on. Nigel Clough loves nothing more than reading a good thriller when he spends time away from Burton Albion, yet the final weeks of his latest relegation fight are proving an unbearably tense sequel to the original. Last season he defied the odds by guiding the Brewers to Championship safety with a game to spare but this survival mission is going right to the wire, ahead of a do-or-die encounter with Bolton Wanderers on Saturday. Clough’s strugglers face Bolton with the huge incentive of knowing that a victory could take them above their opponents and out of the bottom three, provided Barnsley fail to beat Brentford. The fact Clough even has a slim chance of survival is remarkable; Burton operate on a modest £8.5m wage bill, their record signing, Liam Boyce, cost £500,000 and has missed most of the season with injury, while their average gate at the Pirelli Stadium is just under 4,600. But optimism is building after last weekend’s heroics at Sunderland that another escapology act is on the way. “Last season it was a miracle to stay up, it will be an even bigger miracle if we do it again this year,” Ben Robinson, Burton’s chairman, told Telegraph Sport. Championship | What can still happen? “It’s David vs Goliath stuff for us every week but the dream is still alive. We’ve got a big chance of playing Championship football again next season, when we looked dead and buried just two games ago.” Burton’s dramatic 2-1 victory at the Stadium of Light last weekend, with Boyce heading the winner two minutes into added time, relegated the stricken Black Cats to set up their monumental meeting with Bolton. Clough’s old club, Nottingham Forest, then did him a favour on Tuesday night by thrashing Barnsley to raise hopes of a memorable finish to a difficult campaign. Forest, who approached Clough last year, also face Bolton on the final day. Nigel Clough encourages his players at Cardiff Credit: Athena Pictures/Getty Images Yet Clough’s hopes of success arguably depend on beating Bolton at home, with the 52-year-old battling valiantly this week to ease the pressure on his players. “If we lose, we’re down at 5pm on Saturday. But we’re very pleased to be in this position and our intention is to take it to the last day, as it has always been,” he says. “We wanted to improve and get better this season, it hasn’t worked out like that, we’re disappointed in an awful lot of ways but we’re still in with a chance. Of course, it's a massive game. “What would staying up again mean? It would be exactly the same next season, trying to finish fourth from bottom, there’s no sugar daddy here, the chairman gives us everything he can.” Liam Boyce celebrates scoring the goal that has kept Burton's survival hopes alive Credit: Dave Howarth/PA Clough has found this season even tougher than last year, the chasm growing ever wider between Burton and the majority of the Championship’s other 23 clubs. Earlier this month they played Middlesbrough, relegated from the top-flight last year, with a £15 million striker on the bench [Britt Assombalonga] and wage bill topping £30m. "Wolves have won the league and rightly so but they've got a £15m midfielder [Ruben Neves] who has played in the Champions League. It's a different world,” says Clough. “We're Burton Albion in the Championship. It's not so long ago we were in the Unibond League playing against Marine and Droylsden [Burton won the title in 2002 to reach the Conference]. “It puts it all into perspective and whatever league we're in next season it’s still an incredible achievement.” Chairman Ben Robinson, second left, and Clough, second right, toast their FA Cup tie against Manchester United back in 2006 Credit: DAVE THOMPSON/AP Robinson, who has been Burton’s chairman since 1995, released a statement earlier this month to remind supporters of their humble resources, in what he called a “reality check” following criticism of Clough on social media. Yet the Burton manager admits the continual fighting against bigger clubs, and the annual battle as the underdog, can take its toll. “It’s certainly demoralising at times when you go into games like Wolves knowing deep down you can’t compete. “The players aren’t daft either, when they look at the quality of players they come across at times. “Whether it’s Burton Albion or anywhere else, you ask any manager at this stage of this season, they will say they're tired. “But for us, competing at this level is very, very difficult so it's probably a bit more increased. At this stage of the season you're certainly looking forward to your holidays.” By 5pm on Saturday Clough will know if the final game of the season at Preston has any significance. But as his late father Brian once famously said, “I hope anybody’s not stupid enough to write us off…”
Burton Albion fighting for 'even bigger miracle' with great escape sequel
The Great Escape II is on. Nigel Clough loves nothing more than reading a good thriller when he spends time away from Burton Albion, yet the final weeks of his latest relegation fight are proving an unbearably tense sequel to the original. Last season he defied the odds by guiding the Brewers to Championship safety with a game to spare but this survival mission is going right to the wire, ahead of a do-or-die encounter with Bolton Wanderers on Saturday. Clough’s strugglers face Bolton with the huge incentive of knowing that a victory could take them above their opponents and out of the bottom three, provided Barnsley fail to beat Brentford. The fact Clough even has a slim chance of survival is remarkable; Burton operate on a modest £8.5m wage bill, their record signing, Liam Boyce, cost £500,000 and has missed most of the season with injury, while their average gate at the Pirelli Stadium is just under 4,600. But optimism is building after last weekend’s heroics at Sunderland that another escapology act is on the way. “Last season it was a miracle to stay up, it will be an even bigger miracle if we do it again this year,” Ben Robinson, Burton’s chairman, told Telegraph Sport. Championship | What can still happen? “It’s David vs Goliath stuff for us every week but the dream is still alive. We’ve got a big chance of playing Championship football again next season, when we looked dead and buried just two games ago.” Burton’s dramatic 2-1 victory at the Stadium of Light last weekend, with Boyce heading the winner two minutes into added time, relegated the stricken Black Cats to set up their monumental meeting with Bolton. Clough’s old club, Nottingham Forest, then did him a favour on Tuesday night by thrashing Barnsley to raise hopes of a memorable finish to a difficult campaign. Forest, who approached Clough last year, also face Bolton on the final day. Nigel Clough encourages his players at Cardiff Credit: Athena Pictures/Getty Images Yet Clough’s hopes of success arguably depend on beating Bolton at home, with the 52-year-old battling valiantly this week to ease the pressure on his players. “If we lose, we’re down at 5pm on Saturday. But we’re very pleased to be in this position and our intention is to take it to the last day, as it has always been,” he says. “We wanted to improve and get better this season, it hasn’t worked out like that, we’re disappointed in an awful lot of ways but we’re still in with a chance. Of course, it's a massive game. “What would staying up again mean? It would be exactly the same next season, trying to finish fourth from bottom, there’s no sugar daddy here, the chairman gives us everything he can.” Liam Boyce celebrates scoring the goal that has kept Burton's survival hopes alive Credit: Dave Howarth/PA Clough has found this season even tougher than last year, the chasm growing ever wider between Burton and the majority of the Championship’s other 23 clubs. Earlier this month they played Middlesbrough, relegated from the top-flight last year, with a £15 million striker on the bench [Britt Assombalonga] and wage bill topping £30m. "Wolves have won the league and rightly so but they've got a £15m midfielder [Ruben Neves] who has played in the Champions League. It's a different world,” says Clough. “We're Burton Albion in the Championship. It's not so long ago we were in the Unibond League playing against Marine and Droylsden [Burton won the title in 2002 to reach the Conference]. “It puts it all into perspective and whatever league we're in next season it’s still an incredible achievement.” Chairman Ben Robinson, second left, and Clough, second right, toast their FA Cup tie against Manchester United back in 2006 Credit: DAVE THOMPSON/AP Robinson, who has been Burton’s chairman since 1995, released a statement earlier this month to remind supporters of their humble resources, in what he called a “reality check” following criticism of Clough on social media. Yet the Burton manager admits the continual fighting against bigger clubs, and the annual battle as the underdog, can take its toll. “It’s certainly demoralising at times when you go into games like Wolves knowing deep down you can’t compete. “The players aren’t daft either, when they look at the quality of players they come across at times. “Whether it’s Burton Albion or anywhere else, you ask any manager at this stage of this season, they will say they're tired. “But for us, competing at this level is very, very difficult so it's probably a bit more increased. At this stage of the season you're certainly looking forward to your holidays.” By 5pm on Saturday Clough will know if the final game of the season at Preston has any significance. But as his late father Brian once famously said, “I hope anybody’s not stupid enough to write us off…”
Chris Coleman has described Sunderland as a club in “complete darkness” as it comes to terms with relegation to League One and the continued failure of owner Ellis Short to find a buyer. Short has been trying to sell the club for almost two years, but having failed to find anyone suitable when the Black Cats were in the Premier League, he has found it even more difficult as they followed relegation from the top flight by crashing out of the Championship last week following a home defeat to Burton Albion. Coleman has not spoken to Short since he replaced Simon Grayson as manager back in November. The former Wales manager answers to chief executive Martin Bain, who has also been heavily criticised in recent weeks as Sunderland made it two relegations in 12 months under his watch. Bain reassured supporters this week that, while Short has no interest in the day-to-day running of the club and is still searching for a buyer, he will not put the business into administration and will cover external debts. Coleman, though, knows a new owner is needed and painted a bleak picture of the future without one. Sunderland are facing up to life in League One Credit: Getty Images “The unthinkable has happened,” said Coleman, who has won just five games as Black Cats boss. “The club needs a lot of change, which is obvious. “Because of the uncertainty, it’s open season or criticism. A club like Sunderland, it’s almost floating aimlessly in the dark. We can’t start working yet because we haven’t got anyone telling us what we can or can’t do. “The sooner we know who it is that’s going to be here [as owner] and what the plan is, then at least we can get on with things and start moving forward. But at the minute, it’s complete darkness. It’s unnerving and unsettling. “There’s still been no conversation with Ellis. There’s nothing I can do about that. My conversations are with Martin, who has been here for a bit longer than me, and this season has almost been the front man, taking all the criticism. “He works his socks off. There’s not a lot he can do about it. He’s got a menu and he has to stick with that and get on with it.” Coleman is adamant he wants to stay to try and lead Sunderland back to the Championship, but he could not resist taking a swipe at one of the players who has come to symbolise the extraordinary waste of money that has put the club in such turmoil. Jack Rodwell has not played a first team game since September Credit: Reuters Jack Rodwell was signed from Manchester City for £10m in August 2014 but has rarely played in that time because of a catalogue of minor injuries. The former England international claimed all he wanted to do is play football in an interview earlier this season, but is understood to have turned down a loan move to another Championship club in January. As a result, the 27-year-old, who earns £70,000-a-week on Wearside has not played a first team game since September and has been banished to train with the Under 23 squad by an exasperated Coleman. “I don't even know where Jack is [physically or mentally] to be honest,” Coleman explained. “He won't be involved [this weekend] and I'm sure if there was a sniff of a first team appearance, I'm not sure he would be 100 per cent fit for it. “I’m quite sure we've gone down the legal route of that situation, and we're stuck with a player that doesn't want to play for Sunderland Football Club and wants to leave. "But then where's he going to leave and go to? There's the conundrum. He's here and he's got one more year on his contract. He doesn't want to play for us, so fine, go and play for somebody else. But the stumbling block is the contract. "But we'll see, it's the end of this season now. I know Jack did that big article (and said) he wanted to play for England again, so to do that, he's going to have to go and play football somewhere. The proof is always in the pudding." Although Rodwell will take a 40 per cent pay cut if he stays at Sunderland when they are in League One, he will still be the highest paid player in the division’s history if he refuses to leave again over the summer.
Sunderland are a club 'in complete darkness', says Chris Coleman
Chris Coleman has described Sunderland as a club in “complete darkness” as it comes to terms with relegation to League One and the continued failure of owner Ellis Short to find a buyer. Short has been trying to sell the club for almost two years, but having failed to find anyone suitable when the Black Cats were in the Premier League, he has found it even more difficult as they followed relegation from the top flight by crashing out of the Championship last week following a home defeat to Burton Albion. Coleman has not spoken to Short since he replaced Simon Grayson as manager back in November. The former Wales manager answers to chief executive Martin Bain, who has also been heavily criticised in recent weeks as Sunderland made it two relegations in 12 months under his watch. Bain reassured supporters this week that, while Short has no interest in the day-to-day running of the club and is still searching for a buyer, he will not put the business into administration and will cover external debts. Coleman, though, knows a new owner is needed and painted a bleak picture of the future without one. Sunderland are facing up to life in League One Credit: Getty Images “The unthinkable has happened,” said Coleman, who has won just five games as Black Cats boss. “The club needs a lot of change, which is obvious. “Because of the uncertainty, it’s open season or criticism. A club like Sunderland, it’s almost floating aimlessly in the dark. We can’t start working yet because we haven’t got anyone telling us what we can or can’t do. “The sooner we know who it is that’s going to be here [as owner] and what the plan is, then at least we can get on with things and start moving forward. But at the minute, it’s complete darkness. It’s unnerving and unsettling. “There’s still been no conversation with Ellis. There’s nothing I can do about that. My conversations are with Martin, who has been here for a bit longer than me, and this season has almost been the front man, taking all the criticism. “He works his socks off. There’s not a lot he can do about it. He’s got a menu and he has to stick with that and get on with it.” Coleman is adamant he wants to stay to try and lead Sunderland back to the Championship, but he could not resist taking a swipe at one of the players who has come to symbolise the extraordinary waste of money that has put the club in such turmoil. Jack Rodwell has not played a first team game since September Credit: Reuters Jack Rodwell was signed from Manchester City for £10m in August 2014 but has rarely played in that time because of a catalogue of minor injuries. The former England international claimed all he wanted to do is play football in an interview earlier this season, but is understood to have turned down a loan move to another Championship club in January. As a result, the 27-year-old, who earns £70,000-a-week on Wearside has not played a first team game since September and has been banished to train with the Under 23 squad by an exasperated Coleman. “I don't even know where Jack is [physically or mentally] to be honest,” Coleman explained. “He won't be involved [this weekend] and I'm sure if there was a sniff of a first team appearance, I'm not sure he would be 100 per cent fit for it. “I’m quite sure we've gone down the legal route of that situation, and we're stuck with a player that doesn't want to play for Sunderland Football Club and wants to leave. "But then where's he going to leave and go to? There's the conundrum. He's here and he's got one more year on his contract. He doesn't want to play for us, so fine, go and play for somebody else. But the stumbling block is the contract. "But we'll see, it's the end of this season now. I know Jack did that big article (and said) he wanted to play for England again, so to do that, he's going to have to go and play football somewhere. The proof is always in the pudding." Although Rodwell will take a 40 per cent pay cut if he stays at Sunderland when they are in League One, he will still be the highest paid player in the division’s history if he refuses to leave again over the summer.
Chris Coleman has described Sunderland as a club in “complete darkness” as it comes to terms with relegation to League One and the continued failure of owner Ellis Short to find a buyer. Short has been trying to sell the club for almost two years, but having failed to find anyone suitable when the Black Cats were in the Premier League, he has found it even more difficult as they followed relegation from the top flight by crashing out of the Championship last week following a home defeat to Burton Albion. Coleman has not spoken to Short since he replaced Simon Grayson as manager back in November. The former Wales manager answers to chief executive Martin Bain, who has also been heavily criticised in recent weeks as Sunderland made it two relegations in 12 months under his watch. Bain reassured supporters this week that, while Short has no interest in the day-to-day running of the club and is still searching for a buyer, he will not put the business into administration and will cover external debts. Coleman, though, knows a new owner is needed and painted a bleak picture of the future without one. Sunderland are facing up to life in League One Credit: Getty Images “The unthinkable has happened,” said Coleman, who has won just five games as Black Cats boss. “The club needs a lot of change, which is obvious. “Because of the uncertainty, it’s open season or criticism. A club like Sunderland, it’s almost floating aimlessly in the dark. We can’t start working yet because we haven’t got anyone telling us what we can or can’t do. “The sooner we know who it is that’s going to be here [as owner] and what the plan is, then at least we can get on with things and start moving forward. But at the minute, it’s complete darkness. It’s unnerving and unsettling. “There’s still been no conversation with Ellis. There’s nothing I can do about that. My conversations are with Martin, who has been here for a bit longer than me, and this season has almost been the front man, taking all the criticism. “He works his socks off. There’s not a lot he can do about it. He’s got a menu and he has to stick with that and get on with it.” Coleman is adamant he wants to stay to try and lead Sunderland back to the Championship, but he could not resist taking a swipe at one of the players who has come to symbolise the extraordinary waste of money that has put the club in such turmoil. Jack Rodwell has not played a first team game since September Credit: Reuters Jack Rodwell was signed from Manchester City for £10m in August 2014 but has rarely played in that time because of a catalogue of minor injuries. The former England international claimed all he wanted to do is play football in an interview earlier this season, but is understood to have turned down a loan move to another Championship club in January. As a result, the 27-year-old, who earns £70,000-a-week on Wearside has not played a first team game since September and has been banished to train with the Under 23 squad by an exasperated Coleman. “I don't even know where Jack is [physically or mentally] to be honest,” Coleman explained. “He won't be involved [this weekend] and I'm sure if there was a sniff of a first team appearance, I'm not sure he would be 100 per cent fit for it. “I’m quite sure we've gone down the legal route of that situation, and we're stuck with a player that doesn't want to play for Sunderland Football Club and wants to leave. "But then where's he going to leave and go to? There's the conundrum. He's here and he's got one more year on his contract. He doesn't want to play for us, so fine, go and play for somebody else. But the stumbling block is the contract. "But we'll see, it's the end of this season now. I know Jack did that big article (and said) he wanted to play for England again, so to do that, he's going to have to go and play football somewhere. The proof is always in the pudding." Although Rodwell will take a 40 per cent pay cut if he stays at Sunderland when they are in League One, he will still be the highest paid player in the division’s history if he refuses to leave again over the summer.
Sunderland are a club 'in complete darkness', says Chris Coleman
Chris Coleman has described Sunderland as a club in “complete darkness” as it comes to terms with relegation to League One and the continued failure of owner Ellis Short to find a buyer. Short has been trying to sell the club for almost two years, but having failed to find anyone suitable when the Black Cats were in the Premier League, he has found it even more difficult as they followed relegation from the top flight by crashing out of the Championship last week following a home defeat to Burton Albion. Coleman has not spoken to Short since he replaced Simon Grayson as manager back in November. The former Wales manager answers to chief executive Martin Bain, who has also been heavily criticised in recent weeks as Sunderland made it two relegations in 12 months under his watch. Bain reassured supporters this week that, while Short has no interest in the day-to-day running of the club and is still searching for a buyer, he will not put the business into administration and will cover external debts. Coleman, though, knows a new owner is needed and painted a bleak picture of the future without one. Sunderland are facing up to life in League One Credit: Getty Images “The unthinkable has happened,” said Coleman, who has won just five games as Black Cats boss. “The club needs a lot of change, which is obvious. “Because of the uncertainty, it’s open season or criticism. A club like Sunderland, it’s almost floating aimlessly in the dark. We can’t start working yet because we haven’t got anyone telling us what we can or can’t do. “The sooner we know who it is that’s going to be here [as owner] and what the plan is, then at least we can get on with things and start moving forward. But at the minute, it’s complete darkness. It’s unnerving and unsettling. “There’s still been no conversation with Ellis. There’s nothing I can do about that. My conversations are with Martin, who has been here for a bit longer than me, and this season has almost been the front man, taking all the criticism. “He works his socks off. There’s not a lot he can do about it. He’s got a menu and he has to stick with that and get on with it.” Coleman is adamant he wants to stay to try and lead Sunderland back to the Championship, but he could not resist taking a swipe at one of the players who has come to symbolise the extraordinary waste of money that has put the club in such turmoil. Jack Rodwell has not played a first team game since September Credit: Reuters Jack Rodwell was signed from Manchester City for £10m in August 2014 but has rarely played in that time because of a catalogue of minor injuries. The former England international claimed all he wanted to do is play football in an interview earlier this season, but is understood to have turned down a loan move to another Championship club in January. As a result, the 27-year-old, who earns £70,000-a-week on Wearside has not played a first team game since September and has been banished to train with the Under 23 squad by an exasperated Coleman. “I don't even know where Jack is [physically or mentally] to be honest,” Coleman explained. “He won't be involved [this weekend] and I'm sure if there was a sniff of a first team appearance, I'm not sure he would be 100 per cent fit for it. “I’m quite sure we've gone down the legal route of that situation, and we're stuck with a player that doesn't want to play for Sunderland Football Club and wants to leave. "But then where's he going to leave and go to? There's the conundrum. He's here and he's got one more year on his contract. He doesn't want to play for us, so fine, go and play for somebody else. But the stumbling block is the contract. "But we'll see, it's the end of this season now. I know Jack did that big article (and said) he wanted to play for England again, so to do that, he's going to have to go and play football somewhere. The proof is always in the pudding." Although Rodwell will take a 40 per cent pay cut if he stays at Sunderland when they are in League One, he will still be the highest paid player in the division’s history if he refuses to leave again over the summer.
Chris Coleman has described Sunderland as a club in “complete darkness” as it comes to terms with relegation to League One and the continued failure of owner Ellis Short to find a buyer. Short has been trying to sell the club for almost two years, but having failed to find anyone suitable when the Black Cats were in the Premier League, he has found it even more difficult as they followed relegation from the top flight by crashing out of the Championship last week following a home defeat to Burton Albion. Coleman has not spoken to Short since he replaced Simon Grayson as manager back in November. The former Wales manager answers to chief executive Martin Bain, who has also been heavily criticised in recent weeks as Sunderland made it two relegations in 12 months under his watch. Bain reassured supporters this week that, while Short has no interest in the day-to-day running of the club and is still searching for a buyer, he will not put the business into administration and will cover external debts. Coleman, though, knows a new owner is needed and painted a bleak picture of the future without one. Sunderland are facing up to life in League One Credit: Getty Images “The unthinkable has happened,” said Coleman, who has won just five games as Black Cats boss. “The club needs a lot of change, which is obvious. “Because of the uncertainty, it’s open season or criticism. A club like Sunderland, it’s almost floating aimlessly in the dark. We can’t start working yet because we haven’t got anyone telling us what we can or can’t do. “The sooner we know who it is that’s going to be here [as owner] and what the plan is, then at least we can get on with things and start moving forward. But at the minute, it’s complete darkness. It’s unnerving and unsettling. “There’s still been no conversation with Ellis. There’s nothing I can do about that. My conversations are with Martin, who has been here for a bit longer than me, and this season has almost been the front man, taking all the criticism. “He works his socks off. There’s not a lot he can do about it. He’s got a menu and he has to stick with that and get on with it.” Coleman is adamant he wants to stay to try and lead Sunderland back to the Championship, but he could not resist taking a swipe at one of the players who has come to symbolise the extraordinary waste of money that has put the club in such turmoil. Jack Rodwell has not played a first team game since September Credit: Reuters Jack Rodwell was signed from Manchester City for £10m in August 2014 but has rarely played in that time because of a catalogue of minor injuries. The former England international claimed all he wanted to do is play football in an interview earlier this season, but is understood to have turned down a loan move to another Championship club in January. As a result, the 27-year-old, who earns £70,000-a-week on Wearside has not played a first team game since September and has been banished to train with the Under 23 squad by an exasperated Coleman. “I don't even know where Jack is [physically or mentally] to be honest,” Coleman explained. “He won't be involved [this weekend] and I'm sure if there was a sniff of a first team appearance, I'm not sure he would be 100 per cent fit for it. “I’m quite sure we've gone down the legal route of that situation, and we're stuck with a player that doesn't want to play for Sunderland Football Club and wants to leave. "But then where's he going to leave and go to? There's the conundrum. He's here and he's got one more year on his contract. He doesn't want to play for us, so fine, go and play for somebody else. But the stumbling block is the contract. "But we'll see, it's the end of this season now. I know Jack did that big article (and said) he wanted to play for England again, so to do that, he's going to have to go and play football somewhere. The proof is always in the pudding." Although Rodwell will take a 40 per cent pay cut if he stays at Sunderland when they are in League One, he will still be the highest paid player in the division’s history if he refuses to leave again over the summer.
Sunderland are a club 'in complete darkness', says Chris Coleman
Chris Coleman has described Sunderland as a club in “complete darkness” as it comes to terms with relegation to League One and the continued failure of owner Ellis Short to find a buyer. Short has been trying to sell the club for almost two years, but having failed to find anyone suitable when the Black Cats were in the Premier League, he has found it even more difficult as they followed relegation from the top flight by crashing out of the Championship last week following a home defeat to Burton Albion. Coleman has not spoken to Short since he replaced Simon Grayson as manager back in November. The former Wales manager answers to chief executive Martin Bain, who has also been heavily criticised in recent weeks as Sunderland made it two relegations in 12 months under his watch. Bain reassured supporters this week that, while Short has no interest in the day-to-day running of the club and is still searching for a buyer, he will not put the business into administration and will cover external debts. Coleman, though, knows a new owner is needed and painted a bleak picture of the future without one. Sunderland are facing up to life in League One Credit: Getty Images “The unthinkable has happened,” said Coleman, who has won just five games as Black Cats boss. “The club needs a lot of change, which is obvious. “Because of the uncertainty, it’s open season or criticism. A club like Sunderland, it’s almost floating aimlessly in the dark. We can’t start working yet because we haven’t got anyone telling us what we can or can’t do. “The sooner we know who it is that’s going to be here [as owner] and what the plan is, then at least we can get on with things and start moving forward. But at the minute, it’s complete darkness. It’s unnerving and unsettling. “There’s still been no conversation with Ellis. There’s nothing I can do about that. My conversations are with Martin, who has been here for a bit longer than me, and this season has almost been the front man, taking all the criticism. “He works his socks off. There’s not a lot he can do about it. He’s got a menu and he has to stick with that and get on with it.” Coleman is adamant he wants to stay to try and lead Sunderland back to the Championship, but he could not resist taking a swipe at one of the players who has come to symbolise the extraordinary waste of money that has put the club in such turmoil. Jack Rodwell has not played a first team game since September Credit: Reuters Jack Rodwell was signed from Manchester City for £10m in August 2014 but has rarely played in that time because of a catalogue of minor injuries. The former England international claimed all he wanted to do is play football in an interview earlier this season, but is understood to have turned down a loan move to another Championship club in January. As a result, the 27-year-old, who earns £70,000-a-week on Wearside has not played a first team game since September and has been banished to train with the Under 23 squad by an exasperated Coleman. “I don't even know where Jack is [physically or mentally] to be honest,” Coleman explained. “He won't be involved [this weekend] and I'm sure if there was a sniff of a first team appearance, I'm not sure he would be 100 per cent fit for it. “I’m quite sure we've gone down the legal route of that situation, and we're stuck with a player that doesn't want to play for Sunderland Football Club and wants to leave. "But then where's he going to leave and go to? There's the conundrum. He's here and he's got one more year on his contract. He doesn't want to play for us, so fine, go and play for somebody else. But the stumbling block is the contract. "But we'll see, it's the end of this season now. I know Jack did that big article (and said) he wanted to play for England again, so to do that, he's going to have to go and play football somewhere. The proof is always in the pudding." Although Rodwell will take a 40 per cent pay cut if he stays at Sunderland when they are in League One, he will still be the highest paid player in the division’s history if he refuses to leave again over the summer.
A couple of Sunderland supporters react to the club’s relegation from the Championship following their 2-1 defeat to Burton Albion at the Stadium of Light on Saturday.
Sunderland’s feckless decline was coming. At least fans have a parrot
A couple of Sunderland supporters react to the club’s relegation from the Championship following their 2-1 defeat to Burton Albion at the Stadium of Light on Saturday.
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Burton Albion's Liam Boyce celebrates scoring their second goal Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Burton Albion's Liam Boyce celebrates scoring their second goal Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 General view during the game Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 General view during the game Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 General view of the big screen during the game Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 General view of the big screen during the game Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland manager Chris Coleman reacts Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland's Paddy McNair reacts after his goal is disallowed Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland's Paddy McNair reacts after his goal is disallowed Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland players speaks with linesman after a goal is disallowed Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland players speaks with linesman after a goal is disallowed Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Burton Albion's John Brayford celebrates Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Burton Albion's John Brayford celebrates Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland's Paddy McNair scores a goal that is later disallowed Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Sunderland's Paddy McNair scores a goal that is later disallowed Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Burton Albion's Darren Bent speaks with match officials after the match Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion
Soccer Football - Championship - Sunderland v Burton Albion - Stadium of Light, Sunderland, Britain - April 21, 2018 Burton Albion's Darren Bent speaks with match officials after the match Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.

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