Charlton Athletic

Charlton Athletic slideshow

Charlton fans demand answers from Richard Murray as takeover talks derail Addicks' January plans

Charlton fans demand answers from Richard Murray as takeover talks derail Addicks' January plans

Charlton fans demand answers from Richard Murray as takeover talks derail Addicks' January plans

Charlton fans demand answers from Richard Murray as takeover talks derail Addicks' January plans

Charlton midfielder Ricky Holmes to complete £400,000 Sheffield United switch

Charlton midfielder Ricky Holmes to complete £400,000 Sheffield United switch

CCTV Shows Courier Roughly Tossing Package Containing Camera

A homeowner’s security camera captured a courier roughly tossing a package into a doorway rather than walking up a set of stairs. The delivery attempt was filmed on January 12 from the homeowner’s Cranebook, New South Wales, residence.

The woman who uploaded the footage, ‎Charlton Camilleri‎, said the package contained another camera for her security system and it was broken when she opened the package. She told Storyful she complained to the courier company, CouriersPlease, “but their customer service is appalling.” Credit: Facebook/‎Charlton Camilleri via Storyful‎

CCTV Shows Courier Roughly Tossing Package Containing Camera

A homeowner’s security camera captured a courier roughly tossing a package into a doorway rather than walking up a set of stairs. The delivery attempt was filmed on January 12 from the homeowner’s Cranebook, New South Wales, residence.

The woman who uploaded the footage, ‎Charlton Camilleri‎, said the package contained another camera for her security system and it was broken when she opened the package. She told Storyful she complained to the courier company, CouriersPlease, “but their customer service is appalling.” Credit: Facebook/‎Charlton Camilleri via Storyful‎

CCTV Shows Courier Roughly Tossing Package Containing Camera

A homeowner’s security camera captured a courier roughly tossing a package into a doorway rather than walking up a set of stairs. The delivery attempt was filmed on January 12 from the homeowner’s Cranebook, New South Wales, residence.

The woman who uploaded the footage, ‎Charlton Camilleri‎, said the package contained another camera for her security system and it was broken when she opened the package. She told Storyful she complained to the courier company, CouriersPlease, “but their customer service is appalling.” Credit: Facebook/‎Charlton Camilleri via Storyful‎

Safer, fairer, better: 10 ways travel needs to change in 2018

Wherever possible, travel should, of course, be about positives. Even when things go wrong, we want to have a good time and make the most of our hard-earned holidays. So when we can, we generally make the best of any hiccups along the way. But sometimes things get serious. After all, travellers have always been sitting targets, vulnerable to rip-offs and confidence tricks. And there isn’t always much we can do about our vulnerability. Before we even leave home, we have already made a huge investment up front – probably our biggest extravagance of the year – and put our trust in the tour operator, cruise or villa company, relying on them to meet our expectations and deliver on their promise.  Then, when we arrive at our destination, we are hardly in any stronger position. Relaxed, excited, trusting, we are once again sitting targets – dealing with unfamiliar customs, costs and currencies, prey to the unscrupulous, the unexpected and sometimes the downright dangerous. We are sitting targets, vulnerable to rip-offs Most often, of course, our expectations are met. We are welcomed, charmed and delighted by what we find. But not always. And when things go wrong, they tend to get expensive, and the stress of trying to sort them out can be enough to ruin an entire holiday. We know this because so many of you report back to Telegraph Travel on your frustrations, problems and disputes. Where we can, we try to help, and in our regular advice columns suggest ways of avoiding the issues that we know are causing you the most problems. We also put pressure on industry and government to make changes – as a result of our campaigns, significant progress has been made in improving the misleading way that car hire is sold – though, as we point out here, more still needs to be done. And, late last year, the Government finally commissioned a review into the lack of financial protection for passengers on scheduled airlines – an issue we have campaigning on for many years. In 2018 Telegraph Travel is taking a new approach. At the end of last year, we reviewed all your key concerns and identified 10 areas where we think the travel industry – and in some cases, the Government – needs to make important changes to protect and improve the experiences of all travellers and holidaymakers. Here, we summarise them – from the confusing and often downright misleading pricing and sales techniques rife in the industry, to the unfair imposition of single supplements and rip-off charges for amending tiny spelling mistakes on airline tickets. As the year progresses, we will be investigating each of these issues more fully, setting the agenda for a better deal for British travellers. Sally Peck’s report on child safety on page 8 represents the first of these investigations. She exposes a major concern about the general lack of information on accidents and injuries to British children abroad, sets out what needs to be done to address this, and, critically, she advises on what individuals can best do to minimise the risks to their own children. It’s a sobering issue, and a vital one, and it will form a key part of Telegraph Travel’s agenda in 2018. Our mission is to inspire you to discover new destinations, excellent value, the best places to stay and the best companies to book with. But we want also to make travel safer, fairer, and better – and our campaign starts here. 1. An end to the car hire scandal Despite attempts by both the EU – and the industry itself – to improve the way that holiday hire cars are sold, this is still one of the areas that Telegraph Travel readers complain about most. Some improvements have been made as a result of our interventions, but fundamental changes are still needed. The key issue is the way cars are priced. To attract bookings, many cars are offered at unsustainably low rates. To cover their costs, local franchises (most of the biggest names in car hire use a franchise system) depend on applying high insurance excesses and selling expensive premiums to waive them. Buying such a waiver can more than double the cost the customer was expecting to pay. And if they don’t buy the policy, they may be liable for up to £2,000 for any damage. Some franchises are very aggressive both in the way that these policies are sold when the car is collected, and in the way they look – and charge – for even the smallest amounts of damage when you return the car. You then have no control over the charge made for this. There are other issues too – see our detailed guide to avoiding problems. Too many holidays are bookended by stressful car hire experiences Credit: THOMAS BARWICK 2. Better financial protection for air passengers The collapse of Monarch last October – which threatened to leave more than 100,000 passengers stranded overseas – thrust this issue back into the news. Only because the Government stepped in to extend Atol protection was a more serious crisis averted. The Atol scheme normally only covers flights bought as part of a tour operator’s package, but in this case those who had booked independently were also brought home without charge. In a more straightforward scheduled airline failure, they could have expected to be stranded and forced to buy their own return flight. Instead the Monarch rescue was subsidised with £60 million from the Atol fund. We’ve been campaigning for more systematic protection for air passengers for years and finally a Government review is under way. Whether it will recommend new bankruptcy arrangements allowing airlines to continue flying temporarily rather than collapse overnight, or an extension of the Atol scheme, remains to be seen. We would prefer the latter. The final report isn’t expected until the end of next year. We will apply pressure where we can. The biggest airline failures of all time – where does Monarch rank? 3. The air tax rip-off Travellers have always been sitting ducks for the taxman, and we get hit every time we fly. The worst is Air Passenger Duty [APD]. The cheapest economy-class rates of £13 for a short-haul flight and £75 (rising to £78 in April) for long-haul (more than 2,000 miles) are higher than in any other European country and among the highest in the world. If you fly in a higher class of cabin, you pay double these rates. Meanwhile, Scottish government plans to radically cut APD in 2018 – which might have put downward pressure on the rate of tax in England – have been put on hold as devolution of the tax has been delayed. We will continue to campaign for a meaningful reduction. And we will also continue to report on other areas where a captive market of passengers is being forced to pay through the nose at airports – such as drop-off and parking charges, high rail fares, the high cost of buying foreign currency and airport development fees. At a glance | How Air Passenger Duty has soared 4. No more price confusion One of the most wearing aspects of booking a holiday or travel arrangements is filtering out all the claims of offers, deals and discounts and trying to work out the real cost of your trip and whether it represents good value. The problem is made worse by so-called flexible pricing – adjusting rates and fares according to demand – which is now used across the industry, from airlines and hotels, to cruise lines and tour operators. But the real issue is the way that elements that used to be considered an expected part of a package now very often attract disproportionately high additional charges. It’s not unusual, for example, to have to pay more for your suitcase to go into the hold than you paid for your own air fare. The extra charge for breakfast in a hotel can add 25 per cent to the rate. And now, when you fly Ryanair, there is a real risk that if you don’t pay an extra fee to reserve specific seats, you won’t end up sitting next to your travelling companion on the flight. Play things right and you can, of course, find some excellent deals, but too often overpriced “extras” are being used to make fares seem attractive, when the real cost nearly always ends up much higher than it first seemed.  When you fly Ryanair there is a real risk that if you don’t pay an extra fee to reserve a seat, you’ll be split up from your travelling companion Credit: GETTY 5. Better access in hotels Access is not only an issue that affects wheelchair users. Anyone who occasionally walks with a stick, struggles with a long flight of stairs or faces other difficulties with mobility, sight or hearing knows how challenging travel can sometimes be. Hotels are a particular problem. Even when they ostensibly offer “accessible” rooms, these are often over-medicalised and joyless, with inferior views or none at all. Many don’t have step-free access all the way from street level, and there can be basic problems with simple things such as lighting, affecting those with poor sight. And as well as physical design problems, there are issues with staff training – evidenced by a lack of understanding and sympathy for guests with special needs. So this year we will again be reporting on these issues, and, as a major plank of our campaign for improvements, we will be supporting the Bespoke Access Awards – an international competition founded by hotel owner Robin Sheppard to improve the design of buildings and the education and attitude of staff (access.bespokehotels.com, entries close Feb 27).  Contact us | Fairness in travel – your experiences 6. No more unfair single supplements As the number of solo travellers increases exponentially year on year, why does the mainstream travel industry continue to base its business model on people who travel in twos?  A hotelier may not be happy to hand out double rooms for single occupancy in high season, but tour operators should be pushing for a lot more no-supplement deals at quieter times of the year. Even more insidious is the practice of charging a single supplement for what turns out to be a single bed in a box room and a shower in a cupboard. This happens regularly on coach touring holidays that attract a high proportion of single customers, especially in places such as the Italian lakes. This should be outlawed and companies fined for non-compliance. Cruising has a similarly poor reputation for overcharging customers travelling alone. It’s good to see single cabins on newer ships but there should be more on older ones. It is also encouraging to find tour operators increasingly offering single occupancy deals on some departures, notably on river cruises. But there are still too many ships asking solo cruisers for more than double that paid by a couple, as happened to a Telegraph reader trying to book a Tui cruise package to the Canary Islands last autumn. We don’t buy the argument that there’s a revenue loss in the bar and on excursions. A solo traveller is more likely to be sociable, so don’t penalise them before they even step on board. Solo holidays are on the rise – so why are we still punished for travelling alone? Credit: ©rh2010 - stock.adobe.com 7. Free correction of mistakes Most airline bookings are now keyed into systems online by customers themselves and one of the most frequent problems we hear about from readers is the cost of correcting minor errors – a spelling mistake in a name is the most common. The way the system should work is that if the mistake is small – usually involving fewer than three characters – airlines will usually agree to add what’s called a “check-in remark” for no extra charge so that the discrepancy with the passport does not cause a problem at boarding. But some agents continue to argue, wrongly, that this can’t be done and make passengers pay for an entirely new ticket (without refunding the original) simply to correct what is clearly a genuine typing error. For more serious mistakes – where a customer has used an abbreviated first name or forgotten that a child has a different surname to their own on their passport – most airlines will also insist that a new ticket is purchased.  Airlines and their agents claim this stance is to do with security. It’s not. It’s about making money. Aviation bodies such as IATA and the CAA should take a firm stand on this and insist that airlines and their agents find a way to correct or accept all genuine mistakes in passenger names – even if they insist on charging an administration fee for the service.  The 20 destinations you must visit in 2018 8. Improved customer service for online bookings The internet is a great labour-saving device for travel companies and can mean lower prices for customers but, when things go wrong, their understaffed customer service departments can fail miserably. For example, just before Christmas, snow at Heathrow affected my return flight from Rome. At Rome airport, the rebooking of my British Airways flight was handled with efficiency and courtesy by BA staff and a voucher issued for an overnight stay at the Sheraton. But when the replacement flight was also cancelled, things fell apart. A BA message told me to book another flight online but, when I tried, the online booking manager wouldn’t let me. A message asked me to contact a call centre. When I tried this, my call could not be taken and a message told me to rebook online. To be sure that I could fly that day, I had to buy a new flight – which BA is now refunding me for. If airlines and online travel companies are going to operate with skeleton staff as a cost-saving measure, they should at least have computer systems that can cope with straightforward flight schedule changes – the most common post-sales issue. Meanwhile, one of the biggest bugbears raised by Telegraph readers is the inability of call centre staff to make electronic notes under the customer’s booking reference so that if a follow-up call is necessary you don’t have to explain the problem all over again. Expedia is one offender often mentioned. We want to see online travel companies start working towards better post-sales service.  9. Less plastic in hotels  The last thing we want is to feel guilty on holiday, but it’s becoming harder to ignore the impact we, as travellers, can have on the environment. A good example is the way that waste plastics are affecting the health of marine life – a problem that is becoming more and more understood and which is in urgent need of a solution. We probably use more plastic products when on holiday than in everyday life, especially in hotels – those little bottles of shower gel, the cold drinks you buy when you’re out, the mineral water left by your bed. It all adds up to a huge amount of waste, and that’s not taking into account what’s used behind the scenes – in kitchens, for example, where produce often comes in single-use plastic containers. So it’s heartening to see that some travel brands are beginning to tackle this and other environmental issues. Six Senses, a luxury hotel and spa brand, pledged this month to be plastic-free by 2020, and Alila’s Bali hotels say they are well on the way to being plastic-free and re-using or recycling 100 per cent of their waste. The 1 Hotel group has eliminated plastic bottles by installing filtered-water taps in every bedroom. In the UK, the Pig hotels grow their own fruit and vegetables (so no packaging needed). This year, we shall investigate what these steps mean, what effect they have and what more practical steps can be made to reduce tourism’s impact on the environment.  Six Senses has pledged to be plastic-free by 2020 10. Safer holidays for children   We start the year with Sally Peck’s special investigation. One last thing... | Other travel niggles that need ironing out Additional reporting by Gill Charlton and Francisca Kellett

Safer, fairer, better: 10 ways travel needs to change in 2018

Wherever possible, travel should, of course, be about positives. Even when things go wrong, we want to have a good time and make the most of our hard-earned holidays. So when we can, we generally make the best of any hiccups along the way. But sometimes things get serious. After all, travellers have always been sitting targets, vulnerable to rip-offs and confidence tricks. And there isn’t always much we can do about our vulnerability. Before we even leave home, we have already made a huge investment up front – probably our biggest extravagance of the year – and put our trust in the tour operator, cruise or villa company, relying on them to meet our expectations and deliver on their promise.  Then, when we arrive at our destination, we are hardly in any stronger position. Relaxed, excited, trusting, we are once again sitting targets – dealing with unfamiliar customs, costs and currencies, prey to the unscrupulous, the unexpected and sometimes the downright dangerous. We are sitting targets, vulnerable to rip-offs Most often, of course, our expectations are met. We are welcomed, charmed and delighted by what we find. But not always. And when things go wrong, they tend to get expensive, and the stress of trying to sort them out can be enough to ruin an entire holiday. We know this because so many of you report back to Telegraph Travel on your frustrations, problems and disputes. Where we can, we try to help, and in our regular advice columns suggest ways of avoiding the issues that we know are causing you the most problems. We also put pressure on industry and government to make changes – as a result of our campaigns, significant progress has been made in improving the misleading way that car hire is sold – though, as we point out here, more still needs to be done. And, late last year, the Government finally commissioned a review into the lack of financial protection for passengers on scheduled airlines – an issue we have campaigning on for many years. In 2018 Telegraph Travel is taking a new approach. At the end of last year, we reviewed all your key concerns and identified 10 areas where we think the travel industry – and in some cases, the Government – needs to make important changes to protect and improve the experiences of all travellers and holidaymakers. Here, we summarise them – from the confusing and often downright misleading pricing and sales techniques rife in the industry, to the unfair imposition of single supplements and rip-off charges for amending tiny spelling mistakes on airline tickets. As the year progresses, we will be investigating each of these issues more fully, setting the agenda for a better deal for British travellers. Sally Peck’s report on child safety on page 8 represents the first of these investigations. She exposes a major concern about the general lack of information on accidents and injuries to British children abroad, sets out what needs to be done to address this, and, critically, she advises on what individuals can best do to minimise the risks to their own children. It’s a sobering issue, and a vital one, and it will form a key part of Telegraph Travel’s agenda in 2018. Our mission is to inspire you to discover new destinations, excellent value, the best places to stay and the best companies to book with. But we want also to make travel safer, fairer, and better – and our campaign starts here. 1. An end to the car hire scandal Despite attempts by both the EU – and the industry itself – to improve the way that holiday hire cars are sold, this is still one of the areas that Telegraph Travel readers complain about most. Some improvements have been made as a result of our interventions, but fundamental changes are still needed. The key issue is the way cars are priced. To attract bookings, many cars are offered at unsustainably low rates. To cover their costs, local franchises (most of the biggest names in car hire use a franchise system) depend on applying high insurance excesses and selling expensive premiums to waive them. Buying such a waiver can more than double the cost the customer was expecting to pay. And if they don’t buy the policy, they may be liable for up to £2,000 for any damage. Some franchises are very aggressive both in the way that these policies are sold when the car is collected, and in the way they look – and charge – for even the smallest amounts of damage when you return the car. You then have no control over the charge made for this. There are other issues too – see our detailed guide to avoiding problems. Too many holidays are bookended by stressful car hire experiences Credit: THOMAS BARWICK 2. Better financial protection for air passengers The collapse of Monarch last October – which threatened to leave more than 100,000 passengers stranded overseas – thrust this issue back into the news. Only because the Government stepped in to extend Atol protection was a more serious crisis averted. The Atol scheme normally only covers flights bought as part of a tour operator’s package, but in this case those who had booked independently were also brought home without charge. In a more straightforward scheduled airline failure, they could have expected to be stranded and forced to buy their own return flight. Instead the Monarch rescue was subsidised with £60 million from the Atol fund. We’ve been campaigning for more systematic protection for air passengers for years and finally a Government review is under way. Whether it will recommend new bankruptcy arrangements allowing airlines to continue flying temporarily rather than collapse overnight, or an extension of the Atol scheme, remains to be seen. We would prefer the latter. The final report isn’t expected until the end of next year. We will apply pressure where we can. The biggest airline failures of all time – where does Monarch rank? 3. The air tax rip-off Travellers have always been sitting ducks for the taxman, and we get hit every time we fly. The worst is Air Passenger Duty [APD]. The cheapest economy-class rates of £13 for a short-haul flight and £75 (rising to £78 in April) for long-haul (more than 2,000 miles) are higher than in any other European country and among the highest in the world. If you fly in a higher class of cabin, you pay double these rates. Meanwhile, Scottish government plans to radically cut APD in 2018 – which might have put downward pressure on the rate of tax in England – have been put on hold as devolution of the tax has been delayed. We will continue to campaign for a meaningful reduction. And we will also continue to report on other areas where a captive market of passengers is being forced to pay through the nose at airports – such as drop-off and parking charges, high rail fares, the high cost of buying foreign currency and airport development fees. At a glance | How Air Passenger Duty has soared 4. No more price confusion One of the most wearing aspects of booking a holiday or travel arrangements is filtering out all the claims of offers, deals and discounts and trying to work out the real cost of your trip and whether it represents good value. The problem is made worse by so-called flexible pricing – adjusting rates and fares according to demand – which is now used across the industry, from airlines and hotels, to cruise lines and tour operators. But the real issue is the way that elements that used to be considered an expected part of a package now very often attract disproportionately high additional charges. It’s not unusual, for example, to have to pay more for your suitcase to go into the hold than you paid for your own air fare. The extra charge for breakfast in a hotel can add 25 per cent to the rate. And now, when you fly Ryanair, there is a real risk that if you don’t pay an extra fee to reserve specific seats, you won’t end up sitting next to your travelling companion on the flight. Play things right and you can, of course, find some excellent deals, but too often overpriced “extras” are being used to make fares seem attractive, when the real cost nearly always ends up much higher than it first seemed.  When you fly Ryanair there is a real risk that if you don’t pay an extra fee to reserve a seat, you’ll be split up from your travelling companion Credit: GETTY 5. Better access in hotels Access is not only an issue that affects wheelchair users. Anyone who occasionally walks with a stick, struggles with a long flight of stairs or faces other difficulties with mobility, sight or hearing knows how challenging travel can sometimes be. Hotels are a particular problem. Even when they ostensibly offer “accessible” rooms, these are often over-medicalised and joyless, with inferior views or none at all. Many don’t have step-free access all the way from street level, and there can be basic problems with simple things such as lighting, affecting those with poor sight. And as well as physical design problems, there are issues with staff training – evidenced by a lack of understanding and sympathy for guests with special needs. So this year we will again be reporting on these issues, and, as a major plank of our campaign for improvements, we will be supporting the Bespoke Access Awards – an international competition founded by hotel owner Robin Sheppard to improve the design of buildings and the education and attitude of staff (access.bespokehotels.com, entries close Feb 27).  Contact us | Fairness in travel – your experiences 6. No more unfair single supplements As the number of solo travellers increases exponentially year on year, why does the mainstream travel industry continue to base its business model on people who travel in twos?  A hotelier may not be happy to hand out double rooms for single occupancy in high season, but tour operators should be pushing for a lot more no-supplement deals at quieter times of the year. Even more insidious is the practice of charging a single supplement for what turns out to be a single bed in a box room and a shower in a cupboard. This happens regularly on coach touring holidays that attract a high proportion of single customers, especially in places such as the Italian lakes. This should be outlawed and companies fined for non-compliance. Cruising has a similarly poor reputation for overcharging customers travelling alone. It’s good to see single cabins on newer ships but there should be more on older ones. It is also encouraging to find tour operators increasingly offering single occupancy deals on some departures, notably on river cruises. But there are still too many ships asking solo cruisers for more than double that paid by a couple, as happened to a Telegraph reader trying to book a Tui cruise package to the Canary Islands last autumn. We don’t buy the argument that there’s a revenue loss in the bar and on excursions. A solo traveller is more likely to be sociable, so don’t penalise them before they even step on board. Solo holidays are on the rise – so why are we still punished for travelling alone? Credit: ©rh2010 - stock.adobe.com 7. Free correction of mistakes Most airline bookings are now keyed into systems online by customers themselves and one of the most frequent problems we hear about from readers is the cost of correcting minor errors – a spelling mistake in a name is the most common. The way the system should work is that if the mistake is small – usually involving fewer than three characters – airlines will usually agree to add what’s called a “check-in remark” for no extra charge so that the discrepancy with the passport does not cause a problem at boarding. But some agents continue to argue, wrongly, that this can’t be done and make passengers pay for an entirely new ticket (without refunding the original) simply to correct what is clearly a genuine typing error. For more serious mistakes – where a customer has used an abbreviated first name or forgotten that a child has a different surname to their own on their passport – most airlines will also insist that a new ticket is purchased.  Airlines and their agents claim this stance is to do with security. It’s not. It’s about making money. Aviation bodies such as IATA and the CAA should take a firm stand on this and insist that airlines and their agents find a way to correct or accept all genuine mistakes in passenger names – even if they insist on charging an administration fee for the service.  The 20 destinations you must visit in 2018 8. Improved customer service for online bookings The internet is a great labour-saving device for travel companies and can mean lower prices for customers but, when things go wrong, their understaffed customer service departments can fail miserably. For example, just before Christmas, snow at Heathrow affected my return flight from Rome. At Rome airport, the rebooking of my British Airways flight was handled with efficiency and courtesy by BA staff and a voucher issued for an overnight stay at the Sheraton. But when the replacement flight was also cancelled, things fell apart. A BA message told me to book another flight online but, when I tried, the online booking manager wouldn’t let me. A message asked me to contact a call centre. When I tried this, my call could not be taken and a message told me to rebook online. To be sure that I could fly that day, I had to buy a new flight – which BA is now refunding me for. If airlines and online travel companies are going to operate with skeleton staff as a cost-saving measure, they should at least have computer systems that can cope with straightforward flight schedule changes – the most common post-sales issue. Meanwhile, one of the biggest bugbears raised by Telegraph readers is the inability of call centre staff to make electronic notes under the customer’s booking reference so that if a follow-up call is necessary you don’t have to explain the problem all over again. Expedia is one offender often mentioned. We want to see online travel companies start working towards better post-sales service.  9. Less plastic in hotels  The last thing we want is to feel guilty on holiday, but it’s becoming harder to ignore the impact we, as travellers, can have on the environment. A good example is the way that waste plastics are affecting the health of marine life – a problem that is becoming more and more understood and which is in urgent need of a solution. We probably use more plastic products when on holiday than in everyday life, especially in hotels – those little bottles of shower gel, the cold drinks you buy when you’re out, the mineral water left by your bed. It all adds up to a huge amount of waste, and that’s not taking into account what’s used behind the scenes – in kitchens, for example, where produce often comes in single-use plastic containers. So it’s heartening to see that some travel brands are beginning to tackle this and other environmental issues. Six Senses, a luxury hotel and spa brand, pledged this month to be plastic-free by 2020, and Alila’s Bali hotels say they are well on the way to being plastic-free and re-using or recycling 100 per cent of their waste. The 1 Hotel group has eliminated plastic bottles by installing filtered-water taps in every bedroom. In the UK, the Pig hotels grow their own fruit and vegetables (so no packaging needed). This year, we shall investigate what these steps mean, what effect they have and what more practical steps can be made to reduce tourism’s impact on the environment.  Six Senses has pledged to be plastic-free by 2020 10. Safer holidays for children   We start the year with Sally Peck’s special investigation. One last thing... | Other travel niggles that need ironing out Additional reporting by Gill Charlton and Francisca Kellett

Safer, fairer, better: 10 ways travel needs to change in 2018

Wherever possible, travel should, of course, be about positives. Even when things go wrong, we want to have a good time and make the most of our hard-earned holidays. So when we can, we generally make the best of any hiccups along the way. But sometimes things get serious. After all, travellers have always been sitting targets, vulnerable to rip-offs and confidence tricks. And there isn’t always much we can do about our vulnerability. Before we even leave home, we have already made a huge investment up front – probably our biggest extravagance of the year – and put our trust in the tour operator, cruise or villa company, relying on them to meet our expectations and deliver on their promise.  Then, when we arrive at our destination, we are hardly in any stronger position. Relaxed, excited, trusting, we are once again sitting targets – dealing with unfamiliar customs, costs and currencies, prey to the unscrupulous, the unexpected and sometimes the downright dangerous. We are sitting targets, vulnerable to rip-offs Most often, of course, our expectations are met. We are welcomed, charmed and delighted by what we find. But not always. And when things go wrong, they tend to get expensive, and the stress of trying to sort them out can be enough to ruin an entire holiday. We know this because so many of you report back to Telegraph Travel on your frustrations, problems and disputes. Where we can, we try to help, and in our regular advice columns suggest ways of avoiding the issues that we know are causing you the most problems. We also put pressure on industry and government to make changes – as a result of our campaigns, significant progress has been made in improving the misleading way that car hire is sold – though, as we point out here, more still needs to be done. And, late last year, the Government finally commissioned a review into the lack of financial protection for passengers on scheduled airlines – an issue we have campaigning on for many years. In 2018 Telegraph Travel is taking a new approach. At the end of last year, we reviewed all your key concerns and identified 10 areas where we think the travel industry – and in some cases, the Government – needs to make important changes to protect and improve the experiences of all travellers and holidaymakers. Here, we summarise them – from the confusing and often downright misleading pricing and sales techniques rife in the industry, to the unfair imposition of single supplements and rip-off charges for amending tiny spelling mistakes on airline tickets. As the year progresses, we will be investigating each of these issues more fully, setting the agenda for a better deal for British travellers. Sally Peck’s report on child safety on page 8 represents the first of these investigations. She exposes a major concern about the general lack of information on accidents and injuries to British children abroad, sets out what needs to be done to address this, and, critically, she advises on what individuals can best do to minimise the risks to their own children. It’s a sobering issue, and a vital one, and it will form a key part of Telegraph Travel’s agenda in 2018. Our mission is to inspire you to discover new destinations, excellent value, the best places to stay and the best companies to book with. But we want also to make travel safer, fairer, and better – and our campaign starts here. 1. An end to the car hire scandal Despite attempts by both the EU – and the industry itself – to improve the way that holiday hire cars are sold, this is still one of the areas that Telegraph Travel readers complain about most. Some improvements have been made as a result of our interventions, but fundamental changes are still needed. The key issue is the way cars are priced. To attract bookings, many cars are offered at unsustainably low rates. To cover their costs, local franchises (most of the biggest names in car hire use a franchise system) depend on applying high insurance excesses and selling expensive premiums to waive them. Buying such a waiver can more than double the cost the customer was expecting to pay. And if they don’t buy the policy, they may be liable for up to £2,000 for any damage. Some franchises are very aggressive both in the way that these policies are sold when the car is collected, and in the way they look – and charge – for even the smallest amounts of damage when you return the car. You then have no control over the charge made for this. There are other issues too – see our detailed guide to avoiding problems. Too many holidays are bookended by stressful car hire experiences Credit: THOMAS BARWICK 2. Better financial protection for air passengers The collapse of Monarch last October – which threatened to leave more than 100,000 passengers stranded overseas – thrust this issue back into the news. Only because the Government stepped in to extend Atol protection was a more serious crisis averted. The Atol scheme normally only covers flights bought as part of a tour operator’s package, but in this case those who had booked independently were also brought home without charge. In a more straightforward scheduled airline failure, they could have expected to be stranded and forced to buy their own return flight. Instead the Monarch rescue was subsidised with £60 million from the Atol fund. We’ve been campaigning for more systematic protection for air passengers for years and finally a Government review is under way. Whether it will recommend new bankruptcy arrangements allowing airlines to continue flying temporarily rather than collapse overnight, or an extension of the Atol scheme, remains to be seen. We would prefer the latter. The final report isn’t expected until the end of next year. We will apply pressure where we can. The biggest airline failures of all time – where does Monarch rank? 3. The air tax rip-off Travellers have always been sitting ducks for the taxman, and we get hit every time we fly. The worst is Air Passenger Duty [APD]. The cheapest economy-class rates of £13 for a short-haul flight and £75 (rising to £78 in April) for long-haul (more than 2,000 miles) are higher than in any other European country and among the highest in the world. If you fly in a higher class of cabin, you pay double these rates. Meanwhile, Scottish government plans to radically cut APD in 2018 – which might have put downward pressure on the rate of tax in England – have been put on hold as devolution of the tax has been delayed. We will continue to campaign for a meaningful reduction. And we will also continue to report on other areas where a captive market of passengers is being forced to pay through the nose at airports – such as drop-off and parking charges, high rail fares, the high cost of buying foreign currency and airport development fees. At a glance | How Air Passenger Duty has soared 4. No more price confusion One of the most wearing aspects of booking a holiday or travel arrangements is filtering out all the claims of offers, deals and discounts and trying to work out the real cost of your trip and whether it represents good value. The problem is made worse by so-called flexible pricing – adjusting rates and fares according to demand – which is now used across the industry, from airlines and hotels, to cruise lines and tour operators. But the real issue is the way that elements that used to be considered an expected part of a package now very often attract disproportionately high additional charges. It’s not unusual, for example, to have to pay more for your suitcase to go into the hold than you paid for your own air fare. The extra charge for breakfast in a hotel can add 25 per cent to the rate. And now, when you fly Ryanair, there is a real risk that if you don’t pay an extra fee to reserve specific seats, you won’t end up sitting next to your travelling companion on the flight. Play things right and you can, of course, find some excellent deals, but too often overpriced “extras” are being used to make fares seem attractive, when the real cost nearly always ends up much higher than it first seemed.  When you fly Ryanair there is a real risk that if you don’t pay an extra fee to reserve a seat, you’ll be split up from your travelling companion Credit: GETTY 5. Better access in hotels Access is not only an issue that affects wheelchair users. Anyone who occasionally walks with a stick, struggles with a long flight of stairs or faces other difficulties with mobility, sight or hearing knows how challenging travel can sometimes be. Hotels are a particular problem. Even when they ostensibly offer “accessible” rooms, these are often over-medicalised and joyless, with inferior views or none at all. Many don’t have step-free access all the way from street level, and there can be basic problems with simple things such as lighting, affecting those with poor sight. And as well as physical design problems, there are issues with staff training – evidenced by a lack of understanding and sympathy for guests with special needs. So this year we will again be reporting on these issues, and, as a major plank of our campaign for improvements, we will be supporting the Bespoke Access Awards – an international competition founded by hotel owner Robin Sheppard to improve the design of buildings and the education and attitude of staff (access.bespokehotels.com, entries close Feb 27).  Contact us | Fairness in travel – your experiences 6. No more unfair single supplements As the number of solo travellers increases exponentially year on year, why does the mainstream travel industry continue to base its business model on people who travel in twos?  A hotelier may not be happy to hand out double rooms for single occupancy in high season, but tour operators should be pushing for a lot more no-supplement deals at quieter times of the year. Even more insidious is the practice of charging a single supplement for what turns out to be a single bed in a box room and a shower in a cupboard. This happens regularly on coach touring holidays that attract a high proportion of single customers, especially in places such as the Italian lakes. This should be outlawed and companies fined for non-compliance. Cruising has a similarly poor reputation for overcharging customers travelling alone. It’s good to see single cabins on newer ships but there should be more on older ones. It is also encouraging to find tour operators increasingly offering single occupancy deals on some departures, notably on river cruises. But there are still too many ships asking solo cruisers for more than double that paid by a couple, as happened to a Telegraph reader trying to book a Tui cruise package to the Canary Islands last autumn. We don’t buy the argument that there’s a revenue loss in the bar and on excursions. A solo traveller is more likely to be sociable, so don’t penalise them before they even step on board. Solo holidays are on the rise – so why are we still punished for travelling alone? Credit: ©rh2010 - stock.adobe.com 7. Free correction of mistakes Most airline bookings are now keyed into systems online by customers themselves and one of the most frequent problems we hear about from readers is the cost of correcting minor errors – a spelling mistake in a name is the most common. The way the system should work is that if the mistake is small – usually involving fewer than three characters – airlines will usually agree to add what’s called a “check-in remark” for no extra charge so that the discrepancy with the passport does not cause a problem at boarding. But some agents continue to argue, wrongly, that this can’t be done and make passengers pay for an entirely new ticket (without refunding the original) simply to correct what is clearly a genuine typing error. For more serious mistakes – where a customer has used an abbreviated first name or forgotten that a child has a different surname to their own on their passport – most airlines will also insist that a new ticket is purchased.  Airlines and their agents claim this stance is to do with security. It’s not. It’s about making money. Aviation bodies such as IATA and the CAA should take a firm stand on this and insist that airlines and their agents find a way to correct or accept all genuine mistakes in passenger names – even if they insist on charging an administration fee for the service.  The 20 destinations you must visit in 2018 8. Improved customer service for online bookings The internet is a great labour-saving device for travel companies and can mean lower prices for customers but, when things go wrong, their understaffed customer service departments can fail miserably. For example, just before Christmas, snow at Heathrow affected my return flight from Rome. At Rome airport, the rebooking of my British Airways flight was handled with efficiency and courtesy by BA staff and a voucher issued for an overnight stay at the Sheraton. But when the replacement flight was also cancelled, things fell apart. A BA message told me to book another flight online but, when I tried, the online booking manager wouldn’t let me. A message asked me to contact a call centre. When I tried this, my call could not be taken and a message told me to rebook online. To be sure that I could fly that day, I had to buy a new flight – which BA is now refunding me for. If airlines and online travel companies are going to operate with skeleton staff as a cost-saving measure, they should at least have computer systems that can cope with straightforward flight schedule changes – the most common post-sales issue. Meanwhile, one of the biggest bugbears raised by Telegraph readers is the inability of call centre staff to make electronic notes under the customer’s booking reference so that if a follow-up call is necessary you don’t have to explain the problem all over again. Expedia is one offender often mentioned. We want to see online travel companies start working towards better post-sales service.  9. Less plastic in hotels  The last thing we want is to feel guilty on holiday, but it’s becoming harder to ignore the impact we, as travellers, can have on the environment. A good example is the way that waste plastics are affecting the health of marine life – a problem that is becoming more and more understood and which is in urgent need of a solution. We probably use more plastic products when on holiday than in everyday life, especially in hotels – those little bottles of shower gel, the cold drinks you buy when you’re out, the mineral water left by your bed. It all adds up to a huge amount of waste, and that’s not taking into account what’s used behind the scenes – in kitchens, for example, where produce often comes in single-use plastic containers. So it’s heartening to see that some travel brands are beginning to tackle this and other environmental issues. Six Senses, a luxury hotel and spa brand, pledged this month to be plastic-free by 2020, and Alila’s Bali hotels say they are well on the way to being plastic-free and re-using or recycling 100 per cent of their waste. The 1 Hotel group has eliminated plastic bottles by installing filtered-water taps in every bedroom. In the UK, the Pig hotels grow their own fruit and vegetables (so no packaging needed). This year, we shall investigate what these steps mean, what effect they have and what more practical steps can be made to reduce tourism’s impact on the environment.  Six Senses has pledged to be plastic-free by 2020 10. Safer holidays for children   We start the year with Sally Peck’s special investigation. One last thing... | Other travel niggles that need ironing out Additional reporting by Gill Charlton and Francisca Kellett

Safer, fairer, better: 10 ways travel needs to change in 2018

Wherever possible, travel should, of course, be about positives. Even when things go wrong, we want to have a good time and make the most of our hard-earned holidays. So when we can, we generally make the best of any hiccups along the way. But sometimes things get serious. After all, travellers have always been sitting targets, vulnerable to rip-offs and confidence tricks. And there isn’t always much we can do about our vulnerability. Before we even leave home, we have already made a huge investment up front – probably our biggest extravagance of the year – and put our trust in the tour operator, cruise or villa company, relying on them to meet our expectations and deliver on their promise.  Then, when we arrive at our destination, we are hardly in any stronger position. Relaxed, excited, trusting, we are once again sitting targets – dealing with unfamiliar customs, costs and currencies, prey to the unscrupulous, the unexpected and sometimes the downright dangerous. We are sitting targets, vulnerable to rip-offs Most often, of course, our expectations are met. We are welcomed, charmed and delighted by what we find. But not always. And when things go wrong, they tend to get expensive, and the stress of trying to sort them out can be enough to ruin an entire holiday. We know this because so many of you report back to Telegraph Travel on your frustrations, problems and disputes. Where we can, we try to help, and in our regular advice columns suggest ways of avoiding the issues that we know are causing you the most problems. We also put pressure on industry and government to make changes – as a result of our campaigns, significant progress has been made in improving the misleading way that car hire is sold – though, as we point out here, more still needs to be done. And, late last year, the Government finally commissioned a review into the lack of financial protection for passengers on scheduled airlines – an issue we have campaigning on for many years. In 2018 Telegraph Travel is taking a new approach. At the end of last year, we reviewed all your key concerns and identified 10 areas where we think the travel industry – and in some cases, the Government – needs to make important changes to protect and improve the experiences of all travellers and holidaymakers. Here, we summarise them – from the confusing and often downright misleading pricing and sales techniques rife in the industry, to the unfair imposition of single supplements and rip-off charges for amending tiny spelling mistakes on airline tickets. As the year progresses, we will be investigating each of these issues more fully, setting the agenda for a better deal for British travellers. Sally Peck’s report on child safety on page 8 represents the first of these investigations. She exposes a major concern about the general lack of information on accidents and injuries to British children abroad, sets out what needs to be done to address this, and, critically, she advises on what individuals can best do to minimise the risks to their own children. It’s a sobering issue, and a vital one, and it will form a key part of Telegraph Travel’s agenda in 2018. Our mission is to inspire you to discover new destinations, excellent value, the best places to stay and the best companies to book with. But we want also to make travel safer, fairer, and better – and our campaign starts here. 1. An end to the car hire scandal Despite attempts by both the EU – and the industry itself – to improve the way that holiday hire cars are sold, this is still one of the areas that Telegraph Travel readers complain about most. Some improvements have been made as a result of our interventions, but fundamental changes are still needed. The key issue is the way cars are priced. To attract bookings, many cars are offered at unsustainably low rates. To cover their costs, local franchises (most of the biggest names in car hire use a franchise system) depend on applying high insurance excesses and selling expensive premiums to waive them. Buying such a waiver can more than double the cost the customer was expecting to pay. And if they don’t buy the policy, they may be liable for up to £2,000 for any damage. Some franchises are very aggressive both in the way that these policies are sold when the car is collected, and in the way they look – and charge – for even the smallest amounts of damage when you return the car. You then have no control over the charge made for this. There are other issues too – see our detailed guide to avoiding problems. Too many holidays are bookended by stressful car hire experiences Credit: THOMAS BARWICK 2. Better financial protection for air passengers The collapse of Monarch last October – which threatened to leave more than 100,000 passengers stranded overseas – thrust this issue back into the news. Only because the Government stepped in to extend Atol protection was a more serious crisis averted. The Atol scheme normally only covers flights bought as part of a tour operator’s package, but in this case those who had booked independently were also brought home without charge. In a more straightforward scheduled airline failure, they could have expected to be stranded and forced to buy their own return flight. Instead the Monarch rescue was subsidised with £60 million from the Atol fund. We’ve been campaigning for more systematic protection for air passengers for years and finally a Government review is under way. Whether it will recommend new bankruptcy arrangements allowing airlines to continue flying temporarily rather than collapse overnight, or an extension of the Atol scheme, remains to be seen. We would prefer the latter. The final report isn’t expected until the end of next year. We will apply pressure where we can. The biggest airline failures of all time – where does Monarch rank? 3. The air tax rip-off Travellers have always been sitting ducks for the taxman, and we get hit every time we fly. The worst is Air Passenger Duty [APD]. The cheapest economy-class rates of £13 for a short-haul flight and £75 (rising to £78 in April) for long-haul (more than 2,000 miles) are higher than in any other European country and among the highest in the world. If you fly in a higher class of cabin, you pay double these rates. Meanwhile, Scottish government plans to radically cut APD in 2018 – which might have put downward pressure on the rate of tax in England – have been put on hold as devolution of the tax has been delayed. We will continue to campaign for a meaningful reduction. And we will also continue to report on other areas where a captive market of passengers is being forced to pay through the nose at airports – such as drop-off and parking charges, high rail fares, the high cost of buying foreign currency and airport development fees. At a glance | How Air Passenger Duty has soared 4. No more price confusion One of the most wearing aspects of booking a holiday or travel arrangements is filtering out all the claims of offers, deals and discounts and trying to work out the real cost of your trip and whether it represents good value. The problem is made worse by so-called flexible pricing – adjusting rates and fares according to demand – which is now used across the industry, from airlines and hotels, to cruise lines and tour operators. But the real issue is the way that elements that used to be considered an expected part of a package now very often attract disproportionately high additional charges. It’s not unusual, for example, to have to pay more for your suitcase to go into the hold than you paid for your own air fare. The extra charge for breakfast in a hotel can add 25 per cent to the rate. And now, when you fly Ryanair, there is a real risk that if you don’t pay an extra fee to reserve specific seats, you won’t end up sitting next to your travelling companion on the flight. Play things right and you can, of course, find some excellent deals, but too often overpriced “extras” are being used to make fares seem attractive, when the real cost nearly always ends up much higher than it first seemed.  When you fly Ryanair there is a real risk that if you don’t pay an extra fee to reserve a seat, you’ll be split up from your travelling companion Credit: GETTY 5. Better access in hotels Access is not only an issue that affects wheelchair users. Anyone who occasionally walks with a stick, struggles with a long flight of stairs or faces other difficulties with mobility, sight or hearing knows how challenging travel can sometimes be. Hotels are a particular problem. Even when they ostensibly offer “accessible” rooms, these are often over-medicalised and joyless, with inferior views or none at all. Many don’t have step-free access all the way from street level, and there can be basic problems with simple things such as lighting, affecting those with poor sight. And as well as physical design problems, there are issues with staff training – evidenced by a lack of understanding and sympathy for guests with special needs. So this year we will again be reporting on these issues, and, as a major plank of our campaign for improvements, we will be supporting the Bespoke Access Awards – an international competition founded by hotel owner Robin Sheppard to improve the design of buildings and the education and attitude of staff (access.bespokehotels.com, entries close Feb 27).  Contact us | Fairness in travel – your experiences 6. No more unfair single supplements As the number of solo travellers increases exponentially year on year, why does the mainstream travel industry continue to base its business model on people who travel in twos?  A hotelier may not be happy to hand out double rooms for single occupancy in high season, but tour operators should be pushing for a lot more no-supplement deals at quieter times of the year. Even more insidious is the practice of charging a single supplement for what turns out to be a single bed in a box room and a shower in a cupboard. This happens regularly on coach touring holidays that attract a high proportion of single customers, especially in places such as the Italian lakes. This should be outlawed and companies fined for non-compliance. Cruising has a similarly poor reputation for overcharging customers travelling alone. It’s good to see single cabins on newer ships but there should be more on older ones. It is also encouraging to find tour operators increasingly offering single occupancy deals on some departures, notably on river cruises. But there are still too many ships asking solo cruisers for more than double that paid by a couple, as happened to a Telegraph reader trying to book a Tui cruise package to the Canary Islands last autumn. We don’t buy the argument that there’s a revenue loss in the bar and on excursions. A solo traveller is more likely to be sociable, so don’t penalise them before they even step on board. Solo holidays are on the rise – so why are we still punished for travelling alone? Credit: ©rh2010 - stock.adobe.com 7. Free correction of mistakes Most airline bookings are now keyed into systems online by customers themselves and one of the most frequent problems we hear about from readers is the cost of correcting minor errors – a spelling mistake in a name is the most common. The way the system should work is that if the mistake is small – usually involving fewer than three characters – airlines will usually agree to add what’s called a “check-in remark” for no extra charge so that the discrepancy with the passport does not cause a problem at boarding. But some agents continue to argue, wrongly, that this can’t be done and make passengers pay for an entirely new ticket (without refunding the original) simply to correct what is clearly a genuine typing error. For more serious mistakes – where a customer has used an abbreviated first name or forgotten that a child has a different surname to their own on their passport – most airlines will also insist that a new ticket is purchased.  Airlines and their agents claim this stance is to do with security. It’s not. It’s about making money. Aviation bodies such as IATA and the CAA should take a firm stand on this and insist that airlines and their agents find a way to correct or accept all genuine mistakes in passenger names – even if they insist on charging an administration fee for the service.  The 20 destinations you must visit in 2018 8. Improved customer service for online bookings The internet is a great labour-saving device for travel companies and can mean lower prices for customers but, when things go wrong, their understaffed customer service departments can fail miserably. For example, just before Christmas, snow at Heathrow affected my return flight from Rome. At Rome airport, the rebooking of my British Airways flight was handled with efficiency and courtesy by BA staff and a voucher issued for an overnight stay at the Sheraton. But when the replacement flight was also cancelled, things fell apart. A BA message told me to book another flight online but, when I tried, the online booking manager wouldn’t let me. A message asked me to contact a call centre. When I tried this, my call could not be taken and a message told me to rebook online. To be sure that I could fly that day, I had to buy a new flight – which BA is now refunding me for. If airlines and online travel companies are going to operate with skeleton staff as a cost-saving measure, they should at least have computer systems that can cope with straightforward flight schedule changes – the most common post-sales issue. Meanwhile, one of the biggest bugbears raised by Telegraph readers is the inability of call centre staff to make electronic notes under the customer’s booking reference so that if a follow-up call is necessary you don’t have to explain the problem all over again. Expedia is one offender often mentioned. We want to see online travel companies start working towards better post-sales service.  9. Less plastic in hotels  The last thing we want is to feel guilty on holiday, but it’s becoming harder to ignore the impact we, as travellers, can have on the environment. A good example is the way that waste plastics are affecting the health of marine life – a problem that is becoming more and more understood and which is in urgent need of a solution. We probably use more plastic products when on holiday than in everyday life, especially in hotels – those little bottles of shower gel, the cold drinks you buy when you’re out, the mineral water left by your bed. It all adds up to a huge amount of waste, and that’s not taking into account what’s used behind the scenes – in kitchens, for example, where produce often comes in single-use plastic containers. So it’s heartening to see that some travel brands are beginning to tackle this and other environmental issues. Six Senses, a luxury hotel and spa brand, pledged this month to be plastic-free by 2020, and Alila’s Bali hotels say they are well on the way to being plastic-free and re-using or recycling 100 per cent of their waste. The 1 Hotel group has eliminated plastic bottles by installing filtered-water taps in every bedroom. In the UK, the Pig hotels grow their own fruit and vegetables (so no packaging needed). This year, we shall investigate what these steps mean, what effect they have and what more practical steps can be made to reduce tourism’s impact on the environment.  Six Senses has pledged to be plastic-free by 2020 10. Safer holidays for children   We start the year with Sally Peck’s special investigation. One last thing... | Other travel niggles that need ironing out Additional reporting by Gill Charlton and Francisca Kellett

Charlton manager Karl Robinson vows not to quit club amid takeover talk

Charlton manager Karl Robinson vows not to quit club amid takeover talk

Luton manager Nathan Jones hoping his Spanish experience will help see off Rafael Benitez's Newcastle

So beguiling, perhaps, is the reputation of Rafael Benitez, that it plays tricks on the minds of the young and ambitious. Nathan Jones, 44, the articulate manager of high-flying, high-scoring League Two Luton Town, played in Spain in the mid-nineties, and is convinced he came up against the Newcastle manager, against whom he pits his wits in the FA Cup third round tomorrow. He is one of the most talked about managers in the lower leagues which is why, on the eve of this encounter, Luton have got out the news he has just signed a new four-year deal. He is also unashamedly ambitious, wanting to measure himself against the best – and a meeting with Benitez, given his coaching achievements, is something for him to savour. “It’s where you want to be, as a manager, you want to be pitting yourselves some of the best in the business, Rafa has got a wonderful track record,” Jones says. “I have come up against him actually once in my career, when he was the manager of (Spanish club) Extremadura and I was (a player) at Badajoz, and they got promoted (to La Liga) instead of us by one goal. He won’t remember me; I will guarantee that.” The mind plays tricks. Jones was, indeed, at Badajoz in 1995-96, a remarkable move for a young Welsh left-back who left Luton for Spain, but Benitez was not at Extremadura then.  He joined later, in 1997-98, after they had been relegated back to the second division, but again gaining promotion and launching his own stellar managerial career. ✍️SIGNING ON! Nathan Jones puts pen to paper on a new four-year contract to secure his future as Luton Town manager ahead of his second anniversary in charge ➡️ https://t.co/hkYJIOMD6v#COYHpic.twitter.com/56mvx8ToIO— Luton Town FC (@LutonTown) January 4, 2018 Memories may be blurred but Spain made a big impression on Jones, who admitted to being homesick in Bedfordshire, as he struggled in Luton – after being signed by manager David Pleat – but was willing to give it a go overseas under the influence of Colin Addison, the former Atletico Madrid coach and something of a mentor. “He went back out there with Badajoz, and I got a call asking if I would be interested in going out, and I was not initially. But when I went out there I saw it was a good move, and as it turns out it was a very good footballing move but in terms of lifestyle and learning the language. It has helped me in my second career,” Jones says. “It is amazing - when you consider I was homesick in Luton - to then swap it for going out there. “I have made no secret of the fact that I am a born-again Christian, and I trust God’s will in lots of things. It just felt right when I went out there and it was a great two seasons, and I taught myself Spanish so I was fluent when I came back. That stood me in good stead in my career and obviously going back to Brighton as Oscar Garcia’s assistant, so it all worked out. Luton are scoring freely in League Two Credit: Getty images “I learned a lot about lifestyle, and like sleeping in the afternoon, which may seem a bit of a joke, but that probably helped me prolong my career because I was able to play until I was 39,” he says. “Sleeping in the afternoon is a massive thing. I still do it – I have got a couch in the office. When you go out there with an open mind, which is what I did, you are always going to learn something.” The priority for Luton is promotion. Jones has worked his way up after starting his coaching career at Yeovil Town, then at Charlton Athletic’s academy under Paul Hart (now his assistant) before Brighton and taking over at Luton in Jan 2016, guiding them to safety. “It’s going to be brilliant,” he says of facing Newcastle and Benitez. “I didn’t actually remember him until I looked back years later,” he adds. The mind, though, does play tricks even if Jones has been shaped by his time in Spain and the path Benitez has taken. “The club is in a real good place, we want that feel-good factor,” Jones says. “This is just a bonus but we are focused.”

Luton manager Nathan Jones hoping his Spanish experience will help see off Rafael Benitez's Newcastle

So beguiling, perhaps, is the reputation of Rafael Benitez, that it plays tricks on the minds of the young and ambitious. Nathan Jones, 44, the articulate manager of high-flying, high-scoring League Two Luton Town, played in Spain in the mid-nineties, and is convinced he came up against the Newcastle manager, against whom he pits his wits in the FA Cup third round tomorrow. He is one of the most talked about managers in the lower leagues which is why, on the eve of this encounter, Luton have got out the news he has just signed a new four-year deal. He is also unashamedly ambitious, wanting to measure himself against the best – and a meeting with Benitez, given his coaching achievements, is something for him to savour. “It’s where you want to be, as a manager, you want to be pitting yourselves some of the best in the business, Rafa has got a wonderful track record,” Jones says. “I have come up against him actually once in my career, when he was the manager of (Spanish club) Extremadura and I was (a player) at Badajoz, and they got promoted (to La Liga) instead of us by one goal. He won’t remember me; I will guarantee that.” The mind plays tricks. Jones was, indeed, at Badajoz in 1995-96, a remarkable move for a young Welsh left-back who left Luton for Spain, but Benitez was not at Extremadura then.  He joined later, in 1997-98, after they had been relegated back to the second division, but again gaining promotion and launching his own stellar managerial career. ✍️SIGNING ON! Nathan Jones puts pen to paper on a new four-year contract to secure his future as Luton Town manager ahead of his second anniversary in charge ➡️ https://t.co/hkYJIOMD6v#COYHpic.twitter.com/56mvx8ToIO— Luton Town FC (@LutonTown) January 4, 2018 Memories may be blurred but Spain made a big impression on Jones, who admitted to being homesick in Bedfordshire, as he struggled in Luton – after being signed by manager David Pleat – but was willing to give it a go overseas under the influence of Colin Addison, the former Atletico Madrid coach and something of a mentor. “He went back out there with Badajoz, and I got a call asking if I would be interested in going out, and I was not initially. But when I went out there I saw it was a good move, and as it turns out it was a very good footballing move but in terms of lifestyle and learning the language. It has helped me in my second career,” Jones says. “It is amazing - when you consider I was homesick in Luton - to then swap it for going out there. “I have made no secret of the fact that I am a born-again Christian, and I trust God’s will in lots of things. It just felt right when I went out there and it was a great two seasons, and I taught myself Spanish so I was fluent when I came back. That stood me in good stead in my career and obviously going back to Brighton as Oscar Garcia’s assistant, so it all worked out. Luton are scoring freely in League Two Credit: Getty images “I learned a lot about lifestyle, and like sleeping in the afternoon, which may seem a bit of a joke, but that probably helped me prolong my career because I was able to play until I was 39,” he says. “Sleeping in the afternoon is a massive thing. I still do it – I have got a couch in the office. When you go out there with an open mind, which is what I did, you are always going to learn something.” The priority for Luton is promotion. Jones has worked his way up after starting his coaching career at Yeovil Town, then at Charlton Athletic’s academy under Paul Hart (now his assistant) before Brighton and taking over at Luton in Jan 2016, guiding them to safety. “It’s going to be brilliant,” he says of facing Newcastle and Benitez. “I didn’t actually remember him until I looked back years later,” he adds. The mind, though, does play tricks even if Jones has been shaped by his time in Spain and the path Benitez has taken. “The club is in a real good place, we want that feel-good factor,” Jones says. “This is just a bonus but we are focused.”

Rob Lee: 'It's a dream come true for my boys to play Newcastle'

At 7am on Saturday 40 members of the Lee family will pile onto a bus outside Rob Lee’s home in Hornchurch, Essex, and make the near 300-mile trek north to St James’s Park to watch Luton Town take on Newcastle United in the Third Round of the FA Cup. It will be an emotional, and joyous, journey for them all. For years, the evocative stadium was a second home, Rob having spent a decade at Newcastle – he still calls them “us” – and a key midfield performer for the “Entertainers” who came so close to winning the Premier League under Kevin Keegan in 1996. But, this time, they will be rooting for Luton and Lee’s two sons – Olly and Elliot – who are now important performers for the team who have been out-scored only by Manchester City in English football this season. Luton are, in fact, the Entertainers of League Two, which they lead. “It will be crazy,” says Durham-born Elliot, a striker and, at 23, the younger of the brothers by three years. “A busload are going up… I do remember going to St James’ Park watching him [Rob], although we were usually in the box causing carnage. We all have fond memories of there.” Lee shared an executive box with Alan Shearer, still one of his best friends, and has called in as many favours as he can to get enough tickets for this tie. “It’s a dream come true for the boys to go back there,” he says, sitting next to his sons at Luton’s training ground. “It’s the next best thing to pulling on a black-and-white shirt.” Rob Lee spent a decade at Newcastle Credit: Action images Also on the bus will be Lee’s wife, Anna, her father Colin, and his own father, Reg, and the Lee brothers grin as the involvement of the former businessman – who was also a turnstile operator at Rob’s first club, Charlton Athletic – is discussed. “He [Rob] is not much of a shouter,” Olly says of his father’s style when watching his sons play together. “He leaves that to my granddad. When I play at Kenilworth Road, I can hear him shouting in the crowd. Dad’s quieter, takes everything in, has a word after the game.” “My dad couldn’t play football,” Rob says, laughing. “But he’s got an opinion on it! They are the worst people! He’s old-school. He will say exactly what he thinks, whether it’s right or wrong, he just comes out and says it. He swears a lot. But he supported me. When I was a kid, we had no manager, so he took over. He was president of a shipping company, so he knows how to handle people.” For Rob, the tie is an opportunity to reminisce and the memories of the England international’s playing days at Newcastle, whom he joined from Charlton in 1992, with Keegan having convinced him it was nearer to London than Middlesbrough – who also wanted him – come thick and fast. “People ask ‘do you regret not winning the league?’ and I genuinely say to them the five years I had with Keegan I would not trade for a league winner’s medal,” he states. “He played the kind of football I dreamed of as a kid. I played for Charlton under Lennie Lawrence and Alan Curbishley and it was all very structured. Keegan said to me once ‘I just buy good players and let them play’. I just wish he had won the league, then no one could question him, and maybe the whole structure of coaching would have changed. “He didn’t really like buying defenders. He wanted to buy players who wanted to entertain. At one time, we had Ginola, Asprilla, Ferdinand, Beardsley, Shearer all playing. I had to play holding midfield. He called me and Dave Batty his dogs. I used to score goals. There I had to sit in. “I remember when I went, I asked ‘who is taking free-kicks’? He just said ‘if you are playing well take one’. But there was such a long queue to take one. So, I never took one. I was there 10 years. Even when we were injured, we went to watch. We always scored goals. I was asked the other day how many 0-0s we had. I can remember one. Keegan went home at half-time. He did not like that at all. Everybody wanted to watch us play. I think we have lost a little bit of that. Maybe it’s the money in the Premier League, teams are scared of falling out of it. But people want to be entertained.” Elliot Lee celebrates scoring for Luton Credit: Rex Features It is something that Lee feels passionately about, not least with the opportunities – or lack of them – given to his two sons, who were both products of the academy at West Ham United before being let go and dropping through the divisions. “I’m proud of them and, if I’m being honest, I think both of them are suited to a higher league,” Rob says. “I might be a little bit biased, but I’ve been in the game for a long time and I know when people can play football. I’m looking forward to Luton getting promotion and seeing how they get on in a higher division.” Those skills started back in Newcastle. “They were playing against my mates who were all professional players – Alan Shearer, Gary Speed, Warren Barton, Shay Given,” Lee says. “They used to come round during the season and we had five-a-sides with all the kids. I don’t know if it was allowed. I don’t think the physio was very happy about it. But he used to join in as well.” Olly Lee in action against Blackpool Credit: Getty images Elliot joined Olly, an attacking midfielder, last summer after being released by Barnsley. “When the opportunity came up for Elliot, we had to weigh it up: When one of them is playing and the other isn’t, sometimes it’s difficult. But it’s much easier to see them play when they are both in the same place!” Rob says. It has worked, with Olly adding: “I don’t know if it’s telepathy but we just enjoy playing with each other. Obviously, we used to play in the garden with our mates together and it’s always been the case that in training we tend to try and pass the ball to each other. Playing with your brother, you have to make the most of it because you don’t know how long it’s going to last.” That includes relishing such a prestigious FA Cup tie. “We’re a confident bunch, we’ve got the players to take the game to anyone, so what better stage to do it than in front of 50,000 people at St James’ Park? It’s what the Cup is all about,” Olly says. The Lees will all be there.

Rob Lee: 'It's a dream come true for my boys to play Newcastle'

At 7am on Saturday 40 members of the Lee family will pile onto a bus outside Rob Lee’s home in Hornchurch, Essex, and make the near 300-mile trek north to St James’s Park to watch Luton Town take on Newcastle United in the Third Round of the FA Cup. It will be an emotional, and joyous, journey for them all. For years, the evocative stadium was a second home, Rob having spent a decade at Newcastle – he still calls them “us” – and a key midfield performer for the “Entertainers” who came so close to winning the Premier League under Kevin Keegan in 1996. But, this time, they will be rooting for Luton and Lee’s two sons – Olly and Elliot – who are now important performers for the team who have been out-scored only by Manchester City in English football this season. Luton are, in fact, the Entertainers of League Two, which they lead. “It will be crazy,” says Durham-born Elliot, a striker and, at 23, the younger of the brothers by three years. “A busload are going up… I do remember going to St James’ Park watching him [Rob], although we were usually in the box causing carnage. We all have fond memories of there.” Lee shared an executive box with Alan Shearer, still one of his best friends, and has called in as many favours as he can to get enough tickets for this tie. “It’s a dream come true for the boys to go back there,” he says, sitting next to his sons at Luton’s training ground. “It’s the next best thing to pulling on a black-and-white shirt.” Rob Lee spent a decade at Newcastle Credit: Action images Also on the bus will be Lee’s wife, Anna, her father Colin, and his own father, Reg, and the Lee brothers grin as the involvement of the former businessman – who was also a turnstile operator at Rob’s first club, Charlton Athletic – is discussed. “He [Rob] is not much of a shouter,” Olly says of his father’s style when watching his sons play together. “He leaves that to my granddad. When I play at Kenilworth Road, I can hear him shouting in the crowd. Dad’s quieter, takes everything in, has a word after the game.” “My dad couldn’t play football,” Rob says, laughing. “But he’s got an opinion on it! They are the worst people! He’s old-school. He will say exactly what he thinks, whether it’s right or wrong, he just comes out and says it. He swears a lot. But he supported me. When I was a kid, we had no manager, so he took over. He was president of a shipping company, so he knows how to handle people.” For Rob, the tie is an opportunity to reminisce and the memories of the England international’s playing days at Newcastle, whom he joined from Charlton in 1992, with Keegan having convinced him it was nearer to London than Middlesbrough – who also wanted him – come thick and fast. “People ask ‘do you regret not winning the league?’ and I genuinely say to them the five years I had with Keegan I would not trade for a league winner’s medal,” he states. “He played the kind of football I dreamed of as a kid. I played for Charlton under Lennie Lawrence and Alan Curbishley and it was all very structured. Keegan said to me once ‘I just buy good players and let them play’. I just wish he had won the league, then no one could question him, and maybe the whole structure of coaching would have changed. “He didn’t really like buying defenders. He wanted to buy players who wanted to entertain. At one time, we had Ginola, Asprilla, Ferdinand, Beardsley, Shearer all playing. I had to play holding midfield. He called me and Dave Batty his dogs. I used to score goals. There I had to sit in. “I remember when I went, I asked ‘who is taking free-kicks’? He just said ‘if you are playing well take one’. But there was such a long queue to take one. So, I never took one. I was there 10 years. Even when we were injured, we went to watch. We always scored goals. I was asked the other day how many 0-0s we had. I can remember one. Keegan went home at half-time. He did not like that at all. Everybody wanted to watch us play. I think we have lost a little bit of that. Maybe it’s the money in the Premier League, teams are scared of falling out of it. But people want to be entertained.” Elliot Lee celebrates scoring for Luton Credit: Rex Features It is something that Lee feels passionately about, not least with the opportunities – or lack of them – given to his two sons, who were both products of the academy at West Ham United before being let go and dropping through the divisions. “I’m proud of them and, if I’m being honest, I think both of them are suited to a higher league,” Rob says. “I might be a little bit biased, but I’ve been in the game for a long time and I know when people can play football. I’m looking forward to Luton getting promotion and seeing how they get on in a higher division.” Those skills started back in Newcastle. “They were playing against my mates who were all professional players – Alan Shearer, Gary Speed, Warren Barton, Shay Given,” Lee says. “They used to come round during the season and we had five-a-sides with all the kids. I don’t know if it was allowed. I don’t think the physio was very happy about it. But he used to join in as well.” Olly Lee in action against Blackpool Credit: Getty images Elliot joined Olly, an attacking midfielder, last summer after being released by Barnsley. “When the opportunity came up for Elliot, we had to weigh it up: When one of them is playing and the other isn’t, sometimes it’s difficult. But it’s much easier to see them play when they are both in the same place!” Rob says. It has worked, with Olly adding: “I don’t know if it’s telepathy but we just enjoy playing with each other. Obviously, we used to play in the garden with our mates together and it’s always been the case that in training we tend to try and pass the ball to each other. Playing with your brother, you have to make the most of it because you don’t know how long it’s going to last.” That includes relishing such a prestigious FA Cup tie. “We’re a confident bunch, we’ve got the players to take the game to anyone, so what better stage to do it than in front of 50,000 people at St James’ Park? It’s what the Cup is all about,” Olly says. The Lees will all be there.

Rob Lee: 'It's a dream come true for my boys to play Newcastle'

At 7am on Saturday 40 members of the Lee family will pile onto a bus outside Rob Lee’s home in Hornchurch, Essex, and make the near 300-mile trek north to St James’s Park to watch Luton Town take on Newcastle United in the Third Round of the FA Cup. It will be an emotional, and joyous, journey for them all. For years, the evocative stadium was a second home, Rob having spent a decade at Newcastle – he still calls them “us” – and a key midfield performer for the “Entertainers” who came so close to winning the Premier League under Kevin Keegan in 1996. But, this time, they will be rooting for Luton and Lee’s two sons – Olly and Elliot – who are now important performers for the team who have been out-scored only by Manchester City in English football this season. Luton are, in fact, the Entertainers of League Two, which they lead. “It will be crazy,” says Durham-born Elliot, a striker and, at 23, the younger of the brothers by three years. “A busload are going up… I do remember going to St James’ Park watching him [Rob], although we were usually in the box causing carnage. We all have fond memories of there.” Lee shared an executive box with Alan Shearer, still one of his best friends, and has called in as many favours as he can to get enough tickets for this tie. “It’s a dream come true for the boys to go back there,” he says, sitting next to his sons at Luton’s training ground. “It’s the next best thing to pulling on a black-and-white shirt.” Rob Lee spent a decade at Newcastle Credit: Action images Also on the bus will be Lee’s wife, Anna, her father Colin, and his own father, Reg, and the Lee brothers grin as the involvement of the former businessman – who was also a turnstile operator at Rob’s first club, Charlton Athletic – is discussed. “He [Rob] is not much of a shouter,” Olly says of his father’s style when watching his sons play together. “He leaves that to my granddad. When I play at Kenilworth Road, I can hear him shouting in the crowd. Dad’s quieter, takes everything in, has a word after the game.” “My dad couldn’t play football,” Rob says, laughing. “But he’s got an opinion on it! They are the worst people! He’s old-school. He will say exactly what he thinks, whether it’s right or wrong, he just comes out and says it. He swears a lot. But he supported me. When I was a kid, we had no manager, so he took over. He was president of a shipping company, so he knows how to handle people.” For Rob, the tie is an opportunity to reminisce and the memories of the England international’s playing days at Newcastle, whom he joined from Charlton in 1992, with Keegan having convinced him it was nearer to London than Middlesbrough – who also wanted him – come thick and fast. “People ask ‘do you regret not winning the league?’ and I genuinely say to them the five years I had with Keegan I would not trade for a league winner’s medal,” he states. “He played the kind of football I dreamed of as a kid. I played for Charlton under Lennie Lawrence and Alan Curbishley and it was all very structured. Keegan said to me once ‘I just buy good players and let them play’. I just wish he had won the league, then no one could question him, and maybe the whole structure of coaching would have changed. “He didn’t really like buying defenders. He wanted to buy players who wanted to entertain. At one time, we had Ginola, Asprilla, Ferdinand, Beardsley, Shearer all playing. I had to play holding midfield. He called me and Dave Batty his dogs. I used to score goals. There I had to sit in. “I remember when I went, I asked ‘who is taking free-kicks’? He just said ‘if you are playing well take one’. But there was such a long queue to take one. So, I never took one. I was there 10 years. Even when we were injured, we went to watch. We always scored goals. I was asked the other day how many 0-0s we had. I can remember one. Keegan went home at half-time. He did not like that at all. Everybody wanted to watch us play. I think we have lost a little bit of that. Maybe it’s the money in the Premier League, teams are scared of falling out of it. But people want to be entertained.” Elliot Lee celebrates scoring for Luton Credit: Rex Features It is something that Lee feels passionately about, not least with the opportunities – or lack of them – given to his two sons, who were both products of the academy at West Ham United before being let go and dropping through the divisions. “I’m proud of them and, if I’m being honest, I think both of them are suited to a higher league,” Rob says. “I might be a little bit biased, but I’ve been in the game for a long time and I know when people can play football. I’m looking forward to Luton getting promotion and seeing how they get on in a higher division.” Those skills started back in Newcastle. “They were playing against my mates who were all professional players – Alan Shearer, Gary Speed, Warren Barton, Shay Given,” Lee says. “They used to come round during the season and we had five-a-sides with all the kids. I don’t know if it was allowed. I don’t think the physio was very happy about it. But he used to join in as well.” Olly Lee in action against Blackpool Credit: Getty images Elliot joined Olly, an attacking midfielder, last summer after being released by Barnsley. “When the opportunity came up for Elliot, we had to weigh it up: When one of them is playing and the other isn’t, sometimes it’s difficult. But it’s much easier to see them play when they are both in the same place!” Rob says. It has worked, with Olly adding: “I don’t know if it’s telepathy but we just enjoy playing with each other. Obviously, we used to play in the garden with our mates together and it’s always been the case that in training we tend to try and pass the ball to each other. Playing with your brother, you have to make the most of it because you don’t know how long it’s going to last.” That includes relishing such a prestigious FA Cup tie. “We’re a confident bunch, we’ve got the players to take the game to anyone, so what better stage to do it than in front of 50,000 people at St James’ Park? It’s what the Cup is all about,” Olly says. The Lees will all be there.

Rob Lee: 'It's a dream come true for my boys to play Newcastle'

At 7am on Saturday 40 members of the Lee family will pile onto a bus outside Rob Lee’s home in Hornchurch, Essex, and make the near 300-mile trek north to St James’s Park to watch Luton Town take on Newcastle United in the Third Round of the FA Cup. It will be an emotional, and joyous, journey for them all. For years, the evocative stadium was a second home, Rob having spent a decade at Newcastle – he still calls them “us” – and a key midfield performer for the “Entertainers” who came so close to winning the Premier League under Kevin Keegan in 1996. But, this time, they will be rooting for Luton and Lee’s two sons – Olly and Elliot – who are now important performers for the team who have been out-scored only by Manchester City in English football this season. Luton are, in fact, the Entertainers of League Two, which they lead. “It will be crazy,” says Durham-born Elliot, a striker and, at 23, the younger of the brothers by three years. “A busload are going up… I do remember going to St James’ Park watching him [Rob], although we were usually in the box causing carnage. We all have fond memories of there.” Lee shared an executive box with Alan Shearer, still one of his best friends, and has called in as many favours as he can to get enough tickets for this tie. “It’s a dream come true for the boys to go back there,” he says, sitting next to his sons at Luton’s training ground. “It’s the next best thing to pulling on a black-and-white shirt.” Rob Lee spent a decade at Newcastle Credit: Action images Also on the bus will be Lee’s wife, Anna, her father Colin, and his own father, Reg, and the Lee brothers grin as the involvement of the former businessman – who was also a turnstile operator at Rob’s first club, Charlton Athletic – is discussed. “He [Rob] is not much of a shouter,” Olly says of his father’s style when watching his sons play together. “He leaves that to my granddad. When I play at Kenilworth Road, I can hear him shouting in the crowd. Dad’s quieter, takes everything in, has a word after the game.” “My dad couldn’t play football,” Rob says, laughing. “But he’s got an opinion on it! They are the worst people! He’s old-school. He will say exactly what he thinks, whether it’s right or wrong, he just comes out and says it. He swears a lot. But he supported me. When I was a kid, we had no manager, so he took over. He was president of a shipping company, so he knows how to handle people.” For Rob, the tie is an opportunity to reminisce and the memories of the England international’s playing days at Newcastle, whom he joined from Charlton in 1992, with Keegan having convinced him it was nearer to London than Middlesbrough – who also wanted him – come thick and fast. “People ask ‘do you regret not winning the league?’ and I genuinely say to them the five years I had with Keegan I would not trade for a league winner’s medal,” he states. “He played the kind of football I dreamed of as a kid. I played for Charlton under Lennie Lawrence and Alan Curbishley and it was all very structured. Keegan said to me once ‘I just buy good players and let them play’. I just wish he had won the league, then no one could question him, and maybe the whole structure of coaching would have changed. “He didn’t really like buying defenders. He wanted to buy players who wanted to entertain. At one time, we had Ginola, Asprilla, Ferdinand, Beardsley, Shearer all playing. I had to play holding midfield. He called me and Dave Batty his dogs. I used to score goals. There I had to sit in. “I remember when I went, I asked ‘who is taking free-kicks’? He just said ‘if you are playing well take one’. But there was such a long queue to take one. So, I never took one. I was there 10 years. Even when we were injured, we went to watch. We always scored goals. I was asked the other day how many 0-0s we had. I can remember one. Keegan went home at half-time. He did not like that at all. Everybody wanted to watch us play. I think we have lost a little bit of that. Maybe it’s the money in the Premier League, teams are scared of falling out of it. But people want to be entertained.” Elliot Lee celebrates scoring for Luton Credit: Rex Features It is something that Lee feels passionately about, not least with the opportunities – or lack of them – given to his two sons, who were both products of the academy at West Ham United before being let go and dropping through the divisions. “I’m proud of them and, if I’m being honest, I think both of them are suited to a higher league,” Rob says. “I might be a little bit biased, but I’ve been in the game for a long time and I know when people can play football. I’m looking forward to Luton getting promotion and seeing how they get on in a higher division.” Those skills started back in Newcastle. “They were playing against my mates who were all professional players – Alan Shearer, Gary Speed, Warren Barton, Shay Given,” Lee says. “They used to come round during the season and we had five-a-sides with all the kids. I don’t know if it was allowed. I don’t think the physio was very happy about it. But he used to join in as well.” Olly Lee in action against Blackpool Credit: Getty images Elliot joined Olly, an attacking midfielder, last summer after being released by Barnsley. “When the opportunity came up for Elliot, we had to weigh it up: When one of them is playing and the other isn’t, sometimes it’s difficult. But it’s much easier to see them play when they are both in the same place!” Rob says. It has worked, with Olly adding: “I don’t know if it’s telepathy but we just enjoy playing with each other. Obviously, we used to play in the garden with our mates together and it’s always been the case that in training we tend to try and pass the ball to each other. Playing with your brother, you have to make the most of it because you don’t know how long it’s going to last.” That includes relishing such a prestigious FA Cup tie. “We’re a confident bunch, we’ve got the players to take the game to anyone, so what better stage to do it than in front of 50,000 people at St James’ Park? It’s what the Cup is all about,” Olly says. The Lees will all be there.

Arsenal youngster Stephy Mavididi joins Charlton Athletic on loan

Arsenal youngster Stephy Mavididi joins Charlton Athletic on loan

January Transfer Window: Premier League ins and out

Arsenal

Ins: None.

Outs: Stephy Mavidid (Charlton, loan), Francis Coquelin (Valencia £12m), Tafari Moore (Wycombe loan), Theo Walcott (Everton, £20m)

Arsenal forward Stephy Mavididi set to join Charlton on loan

Arsenal forward Stephy Mavididi set to join Charlton on loan

Charlton Athletic in takeover talks after CEO stands down following fan backlash and protests

Charlton Athletic in takeover talks after CEO stands down following fan backlash and protests

Charlton chief executive Katrien Meire to step down amid takeover talks

Charlton chief executive Katrien Meire to step down amid takeover talks

Graeme Murty will 'give it a right good welly' after being appointed Rangers manager

When Rangers revealed the identity of their managerial successor to Pedro Caixinha, all that was missing was the sticky back plastic and someone to say “here’s one we made earlier...” A full eight weeks after jettisoning Caixinha and after being rebuffed by Aberdeen’s Derek McInnes, the Ibrox directors decided that the man for the job was the one they already had as interim boss and, moreover, who has been acting in that capacity for the second time in a year. Graeme Murty will now be in charge until the end of the season and will be active during the January transfer window. Some, including a section of the Rangers support, will regard the appointment as cheap and expedient. It is certainly remarkable that the board could not identify an irresistible candidate with pedigree willing to take the job. According to Stewart Robertson, Rangers’ managing director, however, Murty effectively worked himself into the position, despite losing 3-1 at home to St Johnstone last weekend. “There was a wide range of candidates we were looking at – and still were, post-Derek [McInnes] – but we weren’t overlooking the job that Graeme had done and is doing in the last couple of months and also in his previous stint,” Robertson said. “As time went on we were confident that he had the capability to take us forward. It wasn’t about one result. You’re looking at the body of work and the body of evidence over a period of time. “That made us confident that, while Graeme is inexperienced in management, a lot of the characteristics we were looking for were sitting right in front of us. He (Murty) is taking it that he gets one kick of the ball and he wants to give it a right good welly. Rangers are currently third in the Scottish Premiership Credit: pa “He has got a once in a lifetime opportunity to be the manager of Rangers and it says a lot about his character how he is approaching it, with his enthusiasm to take things on and get stuck in. He has got a different level of authority with the players now. “He is now the manager, not the guy who is only holding the fort until the manager comes in and it will be interesting to see if that helps. It has to help him, it has to be a positive. He doesn’t see it as a burden. If he thought he was going to see it as a burden, we wouldn’t have appointed him.” Murty was invited to extend his tenure at a meeting in Robertson’s house at 8.30pm on Thursday and did not require time to muse upon his options. “There was no way I could turn that down,” he said. Had he supposed, after last Saturday’s defeat by St Johnstone, that he had blown his chance? “As low as I got – because I was annoyed at the way we played – I didn’t think that would have any bearing on it because I didn’t think I was under consideration,” said the former Scotland defender, who played for York, Reading, Charlton and Southampton. Pedro Caixinha is a forgotten figure at Ibrox Credit: Reuters “Before, I was just preparing the team for someone else to come in, judge and take forward – and I was content with that. Now that it’s my team, there are things I would like to change, things I’d like to implement around the training ground and around our match-day protocols that I think we can be sharper on. “It wasn’t my place because I was just trying to keep them ready for someone else coming in and now I’ve got an opportunity to the end of the season to try and do things as I would like to do them.” It was a 1-1 home draw with Kilmarnock that finished Caixinha and, by grace of the fixture list, Murty has the chance to open his longer-term account against the same opponents at Rugby Park. Should Rangers prevail over Steve Clarke’s improving side in the lunchtime kick-off in the Scottish Premiership, they would be bound to gain from whatever occurs later at Parkhead, where Celtic play second-placed Aberdeen. Murty’s extended appointment was not the only news emanating from Rangers, whose chairman, Dave King, was judged in the Court of Session to have breached the 2006 Companies Act when he acted in concert with businessmen George Letham, George Taylor and Douglas Park to acquire more than 40 per cent of voting rights in the club in 2014. King must make an £11 million offer to buy stock from other investors at 20p a share, although since they are valued currently at 32p, he is unlikely to find takers. “In terms of the day-to-day running of the club and the PLC and the share issue we are looking at in the future, it has no impact whatsoever,” said Robertson.

Graeme Murty will 'give it a right good welly' after being appointed Rangers manager

When Rangers revealed the identity of their managerial successor to Pedro Caixinha, all that was missing was the sticky back plastic and someone to say “here’s one we made earlier...” A full eight weeks after jettisoning Caixinha and after being rebuffed by Aberdeen’s Derek McInnes, the Ibrox directors decided that the man for the job was the one they already had as interim boss and, moreover, who has been acting in that capacity for the second time in a year. Graeme Murty will now be in charge until the end of the season and will be active during the January transfer window. Some, including a section of the Rangers support, will regard the appointment as cheap and expedient. It is certainly remarkable that the board could not identify an irresistible candidate with pedigree willing to take the job. According to Stewart Robertson, Rangers’ managing director, however, Murty effectively worked himself into the position, despite losing 3-1 at home to St Johnstone last weekend. “There was a wide range of candidates we were looking at – and still were, post-Derek [McInnes] – but we weren’t overlooking the job that Graeme had done and is doing in the last couple of months and also in his previous stint,” Robertson said. “As time went on we were confident that he had the capability to take us forward. It wasn’t about one result. You’re looking at the body of work and the body of evidence over a period of time. “That made us confident that, while Graeme is inexperienced in management, a lot of the characteristics we were looking for were sitting right in front of us. He (Murty) is taking it that he gets one kick of the ball and he wants to give it a right good welly. Rangers are currently third in the Scottish Premiership Credit: pa “He has got a once in a lifetime opportunity to be the manager of Rangers and it says a lot about his character how he is approaching it, with his enthusiasm to take things on and get stuck in. He has got a different level of authority with the players now. “He is now the manager, not the guy who is only holding the fort until the manager comes in and it will be interesting to see if that helps. It has to help him, it has to be a positive. He doesn’t see it as a burden. If he thought he was going to see it as a burden, we wouldn’t have appointed him.” Murty was invited to extend his tenure at a meeting in Robertson’s house at 8.30pm on Thursday and did not require time to muse upon his options. “There was no way I could turn that down,” he said. Had he supposed, after last Saturday’s defeat by St Johnstone, that he had blown his chance? “As low as I got – because I was annoyed at the way we played – I didn’t think that would have any bearing on it because I didn’t think I was under consideration,” said the former Scotland defender, who played for York, Reading, Charlton and Southampton. Pedro Caixinha is a forgotten figure at Ibrox Credit: Reuters “Before, I was just preparing the team for someone else to come in, judge and take forward – and I was content with that. Now that it’s my team, there are things I would like to change, things I’d like to implement around the training ground and around our match-day protocols that I think we can be sharper on. “It wasn’t my place because I was just trying to keep them ready for someone else coming in and now I’ve got an opportunity to the end of the season to try and do things as I would like to do them.” It was a 1-1 home draw with Kilmarnock that finished Caixinha and, by grace of the fixture list, Murty has the chance to open his longer-term account against the same opponents at Rugby Park. Should Rangers prevail over Steve Clarke’s improving side in the lunchtime kick-off in the Scottish Premiership, they would be bound to gain from whatever occurs later at Parkhead, where Celtic play second-placed Aberdeen. Murty’s extended appointment was not the only news emanating from Rangers, whose chairman, Dave King, was judged in the Court of Session to have breached the 2006 Companies Act when he acted in concert with businessmen George Letham, George Taylor and Douglas Park to acquire more than 40 per cent of voting rights in the club in 2014. King must make an £11 million offer to buy stock from other investors at 20p a share, although since they are valued currently at 32p, he is unlikely to find takers. “In terms of the day-to-day running of the club and the PLC and the share issue we are looking at in the future, it has no impact whatsoever,” said Robertson.

Graeme Murty will 'give it a right good welly' after being appointed Rangers manager

When Rangers revealed the identity of their managerial successor to Pedro Caixinha, all that was missing was the sticky back plastic and someone to say “here’s one we made earlier...” A full eight weeks after jettisoning Caixinha and after being rebuffed by Aberdeen’s Derek McInnes, the Ibrox directors decided that the man for the job was the one they already had as interim boss and, moreover, who has been acting in that capacity for the second time in a year. Graeme Murty will now be in charge until the end of the season and will be active during the January transfer window. Some, including a section of the Rangers support, will regard the appointment as cheap and expedient. It is certainly remarkable that the board could not identify an irresistible candidate with pedigree willing to take the job. According to Stewart Robertson, Rangers’ managing director, however, Murty effectively worked himself into the position, despite losing 3-1 at home to St Johnstone last weekend. “There was a wide range of candidates we were looking at – and still were, post-Derek [McInnes] – but we weren’t overlooking the job that Graeme had done and is doing in the last couple of months and also in his previous stint,” Robertson said. “As time went on we were confident that he had the capability to take us forward. It wasn’t about one result. You’re looking at the body of work and the body of evidence over a period of time. “That made us confident that, while Graeme is inexperienced in management, a lot of the characteristics we were looking for were sitting right in front of us. He (Murty) is taking it that he gets one kick of the ball and he wants to give it a right good welly. Rangers are currently third in the Scottish Premiership Credit: pa “He has got a once in a lifetime opportunity to be the manager of Rangers and it says a lot about his character how he is approaching it, with his enthusiasm to take things on and get stuck in. He has got a different level of authority with the players now. “He is now the manager, not the guy who is only holding the fort until the manager comes in and it will be interesting to see if that helps. It has to help him, it has to be a positive. He doesn’t see it as a burden. If he thought he was going to see it as a burden, we wouldn’t have appointed him.” Murty was invited to extend his tenure at a meeting in Robertson’s house at 8.30pm on Thursday and did not require time to muse upon his options. “There was no way I could turn that down,” he said. Had he supposed, after last Saturday’s defeat by St Johnstone, that he had blown his chance? “As low as I got – because I was annoyed at the way we played – I didn’t think that would have any bearing on it because I didn’t think I was under consideration,” said the former Scotland defender, who played for York, Reading, Charlton and Southampton. Pedro Caixinha is a forgotten figure at Ibrox Credit: Reuters “Before, I was just preparing the team for someone else to come in, judge and take forward – and I was content with that. Now that it’s my team, there are things I would like to change, things I’d like to implement around the training ground and around our match-day protocols that I think we can be sharper on. “It wasn’t my place because I was just trying to keep them ready for someone else coming in and now I’ve got an opportunity to the end of the season to try and do things as I would like to do them.” It was a 1-1 home draw with Kilmarnock that finished Caixinha and, by grace of the fixture list, Murty has the chance to open his longer-term account against the same opponents at Rugby Park. Should Rangers prevail over Steve Clarke’s improving side in the lunchtime kick-off in the Scottish Premiership, they would be bound to gain from whatever occurs later at Parkhead, where Celtic play second-placed Aberdeen. Murty’s extended appointment was not the only news emanating from Rangers, whose chairman, Dave King, was judged in the Court of Session to have breached the 2006 Companies Act when he acted in concert with businessmen George Letham, George Taylor and Douglas Park to acquire more than 40 per cent of voting rights in the club in 2014. King must make an £11 million offer to buy stock from other investors at 20p a share, although since they are valued currently at 32p, he is unlikely to find takers. “In terms of the day-to-day running of the club and the PLC and the share issue we are looking at in the future, it has no impact whatsoever,” said Robertson.

Karl Robinson: Charlton are so short of players even Lee Bowyer fancies a game

Karl Robinson: Charlton are so short of players even Lee Bowyer fancies a game

Jose Mourinho's most humbling nights... what happens next?

Jose Mourinho doesn't lose many matches, let alone many cup games, and very few would have predicted the EFL Cup defeat to Bristol City. He therefore doesn't have much experience of responding to this kind of result: this was only his second-ever loss to lower league opposition, and the question is now, can his team bounce back against Leicester on Saturday night? Events after the most humiliating defeats of his managerial career have tended to follow one of two paths. More often than not, the result shocks his team into action, focuses his attention and provides the spark before a run that leads to silverware, as the 4-0 defeat to Chelsea did last season. The other option is rather more worrying: the defeat signals a sign of things to come, and ends up leading to the downfall of his empire. Here, we cast an eye over Mourinho's most chastening defeats, with a look at how things panned out for him afterwards. Manchester City 1 Chelsea 0 (Oct 2004) Long before the days of Sheikh Mansour, a City side including Paul Bosvelt, Jon Macken and Ben Thatcher inflicted Mourinho's first defeat at Chelsea, after Kevin Keegan took the surprising decision to use striker Nicolas Anelka to man-mark defensive midfielder Claude Makelele. What happened next: Chelsea responded to some effect, going unbeaten for the rest of the league season to win the title and also won the League Cup. Middlesbrough 3 Chelsea 0 (Feb 2006) Having already been knocked out of the League Cup by Charlton, the most embarrassing loss of Mourinho's first spell at Chelsea came at the Riverside Stadium, when the Premier League leaders went behind to a Fabio Rochemback strike after only 78 seconds and never recovered. Chelsea on their way to a 3-0 defeat at Middlesbrough Credit: Reuters What happened next: Chelsea won their next three games before losing at Fulham, but they were far enough clear at the top of the table that those defeats mattered little. They won the Premier League by eight clear points. Chelsea 1 Rosenborg 1 (Sept 2007) The result that ultimately did for Jose's first spell at Stamford Bridge. Having already lost at Aston Villa and drawn at home to Blackburn, Mourinho went into this Champions League tie against lowly Rosenborg needed the kind of performance that convinces the club's hierarchy that he had the players pulling in the same direction. Mourinho watches on as his Chelsea reign is brought to an end by Rosenborg Credit: Getty images Only 24,000 fans turned out at Stamford Bridge for a game everyone expected Chelsea to walk, but they ended up requiring an Andriy Shevchenko equaliser to scrap a point. What happened next: Mourinho left the club two days later. Inter 0 Panathanaikos 1 (Nov 2008) Inter's Champions League draw in 2008/09 was as favourable as they come: they faced Werder Bremen, Anothosis Famagusta and Panathanaikos in Group B. By the fifth round of fixtures they had dropped points at home to Werder and at Anorthosis, but they were still in top spot. Mourinho's first season in the Champions League at Inter didn't go well Credit: Reuters They went on to lose to the Greek side and surrendered first place in the group, thus forced to play Manchester United in the next round - a tie they lost.   What happened next: Inter won Serie A by 10 clear points but the season was viewed as a disappointment for their failure to improve in Europe. Inter learned from their mistakes in Europe, and won the treble a year later. Barcelona 5 Real Madrid 0 (November 2010) An embarrassing night for Mourinho but one he refused to call a "humiliation", probably because Barcelona were so frighteningly good that there was little Real or Mourinho could do to stop them. The first of many defeats to Pep Guardiola, but still the most chastening. Mourinho was thrashed by Pep's Barcelona Credit: Reuters What happened next: Real won the Copa del Rey, finished second in La Liga and reached the Champions League semi-final. Borussia Dortmund 4 Real Madrid 1 (April 2013) Mourinho's biggest failure in his time at Real Madrid was the lack of progress in the Champions League while rivals Barcelona and former club Chelsea both lifted the trophy. In his third and final season in Spain, his side was humbled by Jurgen Klopp's Dortmund in the first leg of the semi-final. They won the second leg but couldn't haul themselves back from the three-goal deficit. Robert Lewandowski tore Real apart Credit: Getty images What happened next: Real came close on three fronts, but won nothing this season, losing to Atletico in the final of the Copa del Rey. Mourinho called it "the worst season of my career". He left the club shortly after its conclusion. Chelsea 2 Bradford 4 (Jan 2015) Six weeks after defeat at Newcastle and three weeks after a 5-3 loss at Tottenham, it looked like the wheels might be coming off Mourinho's first season back in England when Chelsea threw away a two-goal home lead against third tier Bradford. They crumbled, conceding four goals to crash out of the FA Cup in circumstances Mourinho called "disgraceful". It was the first time he had ever lost to lower league opposition. Bradford inflicted what was arguably Mourinho's worst ever defeat Credit: Getty images What happened next: Chelsea bucked up their ideas. They went 16 games unbeaten in the league to win the title, and also won the League Cup, exacting revenge over Spurs with a 2-0 win in the final. Manchester City 3 Chelsea 0 (Aug 2015) Mourinho's title defence didn't go as well as in his first spell: after the fiasco with Eva Carneiro at home to Swansea on the opening day of the season, Chelsea were crushed by City at the Etihad, with John Terry substituted at half time after a nightmare first 45 minutes. What happened next: Chelsea lost at home to Crystal Palace and then away to Everyon, but a 2-0 victory over Arsenal meant everyone thought they had turned a corner... Sport tweets of 2017 Chelsea 1 Southampton 3 (Oct 2015) 1-0 up at home to Southampton, things were back to normal, right? No. No, no, no, no, no. Saints scored three goals to turn the game on its head and leave Mourinho hanging on by a thread. What happened next: Chelsea's downward spiral continues... Chelsea 0 Bournemouth 1 (Dec 2015) Funnily enough, the defeat that actually did for Mourinho was against champions-to-be Leicester, but losing 1-0 at home to newly-promoted Bournemouth was pretty embarrassing for Roman Abramovich. Mourinho didn't last much longer after this defeat Credit: PA What happened next: Mourinho is sacked 12 days later. Chelsea 4 Manchester United 0 (Oct 2016) Mourinho's Stamford Bridge return played out worse than Mourinho could have possibly imagined. United fall to eighth in the table and Mourinho is heckled by the fans that used to adore him. What happened next: United tightened up, went 25 games unbeaten in the league, and won the EFL Cup and the Europa League.

Jose Mourinho's most humbling nights... what happens next?

Jose Mourinho doesn't lose many matches, let alone many cup games, and very few would have predicted the EFL Cup defeat to Bristol City. He therefore doesn't have much experience of responding to this kind of result: this was only his second-ever loss to lower league opposition, and the question is now, can his team bounce back against Leicester on Saturday night? Events after the most humiliating defeats of his managerial career have tended to follow one of two paths. More often than not, the result shocks his team into action, focuses his attention and provides the spark before a run that leads to silverware, as the 4-0 defeat to Chelsea did last season. The other option is rather more worrying: the defeat signals a sign of things to come, and ends up leading to the downfall of his empire. Here, we cast an eye over Mourinho's most chastening defeats, with a look at how things panned out for him afterwards. Manchester City 1 Chelsea 0 (Oct 2004) Long before the days of Sheikh Mansour, a City side including Paul Bosvelt, Jon Macken and Ben Thatcher inflicted Mourinho's first defeat at Chelsea, after Kevin Keegan took the surprising decision to use striker Nicolas Anelka to man-mark defensive midfielder Claude Makelele. What happened next: Chelsea responded to some effect, going unbeaten for the rest of the league season to win the title and also won the League Cup. Middlesbrough 3 Chelsea 0 (Feb 2006) Having already been knocked out of the League Cup by Charlton, the most embarrassing loss of Mourinho's first spell at Chelsea came at the Riverside Stadium, when the Premier League leaders went behind to a Fabio Rochemback strike after only 78 seconds and never recovered. Chelsea on their way to a 3-0 defeat at Middlesbrough Credit: Reuters What happened next: Chelsea won their next three games before losing at Fulham, but they were far enough clear at the top of the table that those defeats mattered little. They won the Premier League by eight clear points. Chelsea 1 Rosenborg 1 (Sept 2007) The result that ultimately did for Jose's first spell at Stamford Bridge. Having already lost at Aston Villa and drawn at home to Blackburn, Mourinho went into this Champions League tie against lowly Rosenborg needed the kind of performance that convinces the club's hierarchy that he had the players pulling in the same direction. Mourinho watches on as his Chelsea reign is brought to an end by Rosenborg Credit: Getty images Only 24,000 fans turned out at Stamford Bridge for a game everyone expected Chelsea to walk, but they ended up requiring an Andriy Shevchenko equaliser to scrap a point. What happened next: Mourinho left the club two days later. Inter 0 Panathanaikos 1 (Nov 2008) Inter's Champions League draw in 2008/09 was as favourable as they come: they faced Werder Bremen, Anothosis Famagusta and Panathanaikos in Group B. By the fifth round of fixtures they had dropped points at home to Werder and at Anorthosis, but they were still in top spot. Mourinho's first season in the Champions League at Inter didn't go well Credit: Reuters They went on to lose to the Greek side and surrendered first place in the group, thus forced to play Manchester United in the next round - a tie they lost.   What happened next: Inter won Serie A by 10 clear points but the season was viewed as a disappointment for their failure to improve in Europe. Inter learned from their mistakes in Europe, and won the treble a year later. Barcelona 5 Real Madrid 0 (November 2010) An embarrassing night for Mourinho but one he refused to call a "humiliation", probably because Barcelona were so frighteningly good that there was little Real or Mourinho could do to stop them. The first of many defeats to Pep Guardiola, but still the most chastening. Mourinho was thrashed by Pep's Barcelona Credit: Reuters What happened next: Real won the Copa del Rey, finished second in La Liga and reached the Champions League semi-final. Borussia Dortmund 4 Real Madrid 1 (April 2013) Mourinho's biggest failure in his time at Real Madrid was the lack of progress in the Champions League while rivals Barcelona and former club Chelsea both lifted the trophy. In his third and final season in Spain, his side was humbled by Jurgen Klopp's Dortmund in the first leg of the semi-final. They won the second leg but couldn't haul themselves back from the three-goal deficit. Robert Lewandowski tore Real apart Credit: Getty images What happened next: Real came close on three fronts, but won nothing this season, losing to Atletico in the final of the Copa del Rey. Mourinho called it "the worst season of my career". He left the club shortly after its conclusion. Chelsea 2 Bradford 4 (Jan 2015) Six weeks after defeat at Newcastle and three weeks after a 5-3 loss at Tottenham, it looked like the wheels might be coming off Mourinho's first season back in England when Chelsea threw away a two-goal home lead against third tier Bradford. They crumbled, conceding four goals to crash out of the FA Cup in circumstances Mourinho called "disgraceful". It was the first time he had ever lost to lower league opposition. Bradford inflicted what was arguably Mourinho's worst ever defeat Credit: Getty images What happened next: Chelsea bucked up their ideas. They went 16 games unbeaten in the league to win the title, and also won the League Cup, exacting revenge over Spurs with a 2-0 win in the final. Manchester City 3 Chelsea 0 (Aug 2015) Mourinho's title defence didn't go as well as in his first spell: after the fiasco with Eva Carneiro at home to Swansea on the opening day of the season, Chelsea were crushed by City at the Etihad, with John Terry substituted at half time after a nightmare first 45 minutes. What happened next: Chelsea lost at home to Crystal Palace and then away to Everyon, but a 2-0 victory over Arsenal meant everyone thought they had turned a corner... Sport tweets of 2017 Chelsea 1 Southampton 3 (Oct 2015) 1-0 up at home to Southampton, things were back to normal, right? No. No, no, no, no, no. Saints scored three goals to turn the game on its head and leave Mourinho hanging on by a thread. What happened next: Chelsea's downward spiral continues... Chelsea 0 Bournemouth 1 (Dec 2015) Funnily enough, the defeat that actually did for Mourinho was against champions-to-be Leicester, but losing 1-0 at home to newly-promoted Bournemouth was pretty embarrassing for Roman Abramovich. Mourinho didn't last much longer after this defeat Credit: PA What happened next: Mourinho is sacked 12 days later. Chelsea 4 Manchester United 0 (Oct 2016) Mourinho's Stamford Bridge return played out worse than Mourinho could have possibly imagined. United fall to eighth in the table and Mourinho is heckled by the fans that used to adore him. What happened next: United tightened up, went 25 games unbeaten in the league, and won the EFL Cup and the Europa League.

Jose Mourinho's most humbling nights... what happens next?

Jose Mourinho doesn't lose many matches, let alone many cup games, and very few would have predicted the EFL Cup defeat to Bristol City. He therefore doesn't have much experience of responding to this kind of result: this was only his second-ever loss to lower league opposition, and the question is now, can his team bounce back against Leicester on Saturday night? Events after the most humiliating defeats of his managerial career have tended to follow one of two paths. More often than not, the result shocks his team into action, focuses his attention and provides the spark before a run that leads to silverware, as the 4-0 defeat to Chelsea did last season. The other option is rather more worrying: the defeat signals a sign of things to come, and ends up leading to the downfall of his empire. Here, we cast an eye over Mourinho's most chastening defeats, with a look at how things panned out for him afterwards. Manchester City 1 Chelsea 0 (Oct 2004) Long before the days of Sheikh Mansour, a City side including Paul Bosvelt, Jon Macken and Ben Thatcher inflicted Mourinho's first defeat at Chelsea, after Kevin Keegan took the surprising decision to use striker Nicolas Anelka to man-mark defensive midfielder Claude Makelele. What happened next: Chelsea responded to some effect, going unbeaten for the rest of the league season to win the title and also won the League Cup. Middlesbrough 3 Chelsea 0 (Feb 2006) Having already been knocked out of the League Cup by Charlton, the most embarrassing loss of Mourinho's first spell at Chelsea came at the Riverside Stadium, when the Premier League leaders went behind to a Fabio Rochemback strike after only 78 seconds and never recovered. Chelsea on their way to a 3-0 defeat at Middlesbrough Credit: Reuters What happened next: Chelsea won their next three games before losing at Fulham, but they were far enough clear at the top of the table that those defeats mattered little. They won the Premier League by eight clear points. Chelsea 1 Rosenborg 1 (Sept 2007) The result that ultimately did for Jose's first spell at Stamford Bridge. Having already lost at Aston Villa and drawn at home to Blackburn, Mourinho went into this Champions League tie against lowly Rosenborg needed the kind of performance that convinces the club's hierarchy that he had the players pulling in the same direction. Mourinho watches on as his Chelsea reign is brought to an end by Rosenborg Credit: Getty images Only 24,000 fans turned out at Stamford Bridge for a game everyone expected Chelsea to walk, but they ended up requiring an Andriy Shevchenko equaliser to scrap a point. What happened next: Mourinho left the club two days later. Inter 0 Panathanaikos 1 (Nov 2008) Inter's Champions League draw in 2008/09 was as favourable as they come: they faced Werder Bremen, Anothosis Famagusta and Panathanaikos in Group B. By the fifth round of fixtures they had dropped points at home to Werder and at Anorthosis, but they were still in top spot. Mourinho's first season in the Champions League at Inter didn't go well Credit: Reuters They went on to lose to the Greek side and surrendered first place in the group, thus forced to play Manchester United in the next round - a tie they lost.   What happened next: Inter won Serie A by 10 clear points but the season was viewed as a disappointment for their failure to improve in Europe. Inter learned from their mistakes in Europe, and won the treble a year later. Barcelona 5 Real Madrid 0 (November 2010) An embarrassing night for Mourinho but one he refused to call a "humiliation", probably because Barcelona were so frighteningly good that there was little Real or Mourinho could do to stop them. The first of many defeats to Pep Guardiola, but still the most chastening. Mourinho was thrashed by Pep's Barcelona Credit: Reuters What happened next: Real won the Copa del Rey, finished second in La Liga and reached the Champions League semi-final. Borussia Dortmund 4 Real Madrid 1 (April 2013) Mourinho's biggest failure in his time at Real Madrid was the lack of progress in the Champions League while rivals Barcelona and former club Chelsea both lifted the trophy. In his third and final season in Spain, his side was humbled by Jurgen Klopp's Dortmund in the first leg of the semi-final. They won the second leg but couldn't haul themselves back from the three-goal deficit. Robert Lewandowski tore Real apart Credit: Getty images What happened next: Real came close on three fronts, but won nothing this season, losing to Atletico in the final of the Copa del Rey. Mourinho called it "the worst season of my career". He left the club shortly after its conclusion. Chelsea 2 Bradford 4 (Jan 2015) Six weeks after defeat at Newcastle and three weeks after a 5-3 loss at Tottenham, it looked like the wheels might be coming off Mourinho's first season back in England when Chelsea threw away a two-goal home lead against third tier Bradford. They crumbled, conceding four goals to crash out of the FA Cup in circumstances Mourinho called "disgraceful". It was the first time he had ever lost to lower league opposition. Bradford inflicted what was arguably Mourinho's worst ever defeat Credit: Getty images What happened next: Chelsea bucked up their ideas. They went 16 games unbeaten in the league to win the title, and also won the League Cup, exacting revenge over Spurs with a 2-0 win in the final. Manchester City 3 Chelsea 0 (Aug 2015) Mourinho's title defence didn't go as well as in his first spell: after the fiasco with Eva Carneiro at home to Swansea on the opening day of the season, Chelsea were crushed by City at the Etihad, with John Terry substituted at half time after a nightmare first 45 minutes. What happened next: Chelsea lost at home to Crystal Palace and then away to Everyon, but a 2-0 victory over Arsenal meant everyone thought they had turned a corner... Sport tweets of 2017 Chelsea 1 Southampton 3 (Oct 2015) 1-0 up at home to Southampton, things were back to normal, right? No. No, no, no, no, no. Saints scored three goals to turn the game on its head and leave Mourinho hanging on by a thread. What happened next: Chelsea's downward spiral continues... Chelsea 0 Bournemouth 1 (Dec 2015) Funnily enough, the defeat that actually did for Mourinho was against champions-to-be Leicester, but losing 1-0 at home to newly-promoted Bournemouth was pretty embarrassing for Roman Abramovich. Mourinho didn't last much longer after this defeat Credit: PA What happened next: Mourinho is sacked 12 days later. Chelsea 4 Manchester United 0 (Oct 2016) Mourinho's Stamford Bridge return played out worse than Mourinho could have possibly imagined. United fall to eighth in the table and Mourinho is heckled by the fans that used to adore him. What happened next: United tightened up, went 25 games unbeaten in the league, and won the EFL Cup and the Europa League.

Jose Mourinho's most humbling nights... what happens next?

Jose Mourinho doesn't lose many matches, let alone many cup games, and very few would have predicted the EFL Cup defeat to Bristol City. He therefore doesn't have much experience of responding to this kind of result: this was only his second-ever loss to lower league opposition, and the question is now, can his team bounce back against Leicester on Saturday night? Events after the most humiliating defeats of his managerial career have tended to follow one of two paths. More often than not, the result shocks his team into action, focuses his attention and provides the spark before a run that leads to silverware, as the 4-0 defeat to Chelsea did last season. The other option is rather more worrying: the defeat signals a sign of things to come, and ends up leading to the downfall of his empire. Here, we cast an eye over Mourinho's most chastening defeats, with a look at how things panned out for him afterwards. Manchester City 1 Chelsea 0 (Oct 2004) Long before the days of Sheikh Mansour, a City side including Paul Bosvelt, Jon Macken and Ben Thatcher inflicted Mourinho's first defeat at Chelsea, after Kevin Keegan took the surprising decision to use striker Nicolas Anelka to man-mark defensive midfielder Claude Makelele. What happened next: Chelsea responded to some effect, going unbeaten for the rest of the league season to win the title and also won the League Cup. Middlesbrough 3 Chelsea 0 (Feb 2006) Having already been knocked out of the League Cup by Charlton, the most embarrassing loss of Mourinho's first spell at Chelsea came at the Riverside Stadium, when the Premier League leaders went behind to a Fabio Rochemback strike after only 78 seconds and never recovered. Chelsea on their way to a 3-0 defeat at Middlesbrough Credit: Reuters What happened next: Chelsea won their next three games before losing at Fulham, but they were far enough clear at the top of the table that those defeats mattered little. They won the Premier League by eight clear points. Chelsea 1 Rosenborg 1 (Sept 2007) The result that ultimately did for Jose's first spell at Stamford Bridge. Having already lost at Aston Villa and drawn at home to Blackburn, Mourinho went into this Champions League tie against lowly Rosenborg needed the kind of performance that convinces the club's hierarchy that he had the players pulling in the same direction. Mourinho watches on as his Chelsea reign is brought to an end by Rosenborg Credit: Getty images Only 24,000 fans turned out at Stamford Bridge for a game everyone expected Chelsea to walk, but they ended up requiring an Andriy Shevchenko equaliser to scrap a point. What happened next: Mourinho left the club two days later. Inter 0 Panathanaikos 1 (Nov 2008) Inter's Champions League draw in 2008/09 was as favourable as they come: they faced Werder Bremen, Anothosis Famagusta and Panathanaikos in Group B. By the fifth round of fixtures they had dropped points at home to Werder and at Anorthosis, but they were still in top spot. Mourinho's first season in the Champions League at Inter didn't go well Credit: Reuters They went on to lose to the Greek side and surrendered first place in the group, thus forced to play Manchester United in the next round - a tie they lost.   What happened next: Inter won Serie A by 10 clear points but the season was viewed as a disappointment for their failure to improve in Europe. Inter learned from their mistakes in Europe, and won the treble a year later. Barcelona 5 Real Madrid 0 (November 2010) An embarrassing night for Mourinho but one he refused to call a "humiliation", probably because Barcelona were so frighteningly good that there was little Real or Mourinho could do to stop them. The first of many defeats to Pep Guardiola, but still the most chastening. Mourinho was thrashed by Pep's Barcelona Credit: Reuters What happened next: Real won the Copa del Rey, finished second in La Liga and reached the Champions League semi-final. Borussia Dortmund 4 Real Madrid 1 (April 2013) Mourinho's biggest failure in his time at Real Madrid was the lack of progress in the Champions League while rivals Barcelona and former club Chelsea both lifted the trophy. In his third and final season in Spain, his side was humbled by Jurgen Klopp's Dortmund in the first leg of the semi-final. They won the second leg but couldn't haul themselves back from the three-goal deficit. Robert Lewandowski tore Real apart Credit: Getty images What happened next: Real came close on three fronts, but won nothing this season, losing to Atletico in the final of the Copa del Rey. Mourinho called it "the worst season of my career". He left the club shortly after its conclusion. Chelsea 2 Bradford 4 (Jan 2015) Six weeks after defeat at Newcastle and three weeks after a 5-3 loss at Tottenham, it looked like the wheels might be coming off Mourinho's first season back in England when Chelsea threw away a two-goal home lead against third tier Bradford. They crumbled, conceding four goals to crash out of the FA Cup in circumstances Mourinho called "disgraceful". It was the first time he had ever lost to lower league opposition. Bradford inflicted what was arguably Mourinho's worst ever defeat Credit: Getty images What happened next: Chelsea bucked up their ideas. They went 16 games unbeaten in the league to win the title, and also won the League Cup, exacting revenge over Spurs with a 2-0 win in the final. Manchester City 3 Chelsea 0 (Aug 2015) Mourinho's title defence didn't go as well as in his first spell: after the fiasco with Eva Carneiro at home to Swansea on the opening day of the season, Chelsea were crushed by City at the Etihad, with John Terry substituted at half time after a nightmare first 45 minutes. What happened next: Chelsea lost at home to Crystal Palace and then away to Everyon, but a 2-0 victory over Arsenal meant everyone thought they had turned a corner... Sport tweets of 2017 Chelsea 1 Southampton 3 (Oct 2015) 1-0 up at home to Southampton, things were back to normal, right? No. No, no, no, no, no. Saints scored three goals to turn the game on its head and leave Mourinho hanging on by a thread. What happened next: Chelsea's downward spiral continues... Chelsea 0 Bournemouth 1 (Dec 2015) Funnily enough, the defeat that actually did for Mourinho was against champions-to-be Leicester, but losing 1-0 at home to newly-promoted Bournemouth was pretty embarrassing for Roman Abramovich. Mourinho didn't last much longer after this defeat Credit: PA What happened next: Mourinho is sacked 12 days later. Chelsea 4 Manchester United 0 (Oct 2016) Mourinho's Stamford Bridge return played out worse than Mourinho could have possibly imagined. United fall to eighth in the table and Mourinho is heckled by the fans that used to adore him. What happened next: United tightened up, went 25 games unbeaten in the league, and won the EFL Cup and the Europa League.

Jose Mourinho's most humbling nights... what happens next?

Jose Mourinho doesn't lose many matches, let alone many cup games, and very few would have predicted the EFL Cup defeat to Bristol City. He therefore doesn't have much experience of responding to this kind of result: this was only his second-ever loss to lower league opposition, and the question is now, can his team bounce back against Leicester on Saturday night? Events after the most humiliating defeats of his managerial career have tended to follow one of two paths. More often than not, the result shocks his team into action, focuses his attention and provides the spark before a run that leads to silverware, as the 4-0 defeat to Chelsea did last season. The other option is rather more worrying: the defeat signals a sign of things to come, and ends up leading to the downfall of his empire. Here, we cast an eye over Mourinho's most chastening defeats, with a look at how things panned out for him afterwards. Manchester City 1 Chelsea 0 (Oct 2004) Long before the days of Sheikh Mansour, a City side including Paul Bosvelt, Jon Macken and Ben Thatcher inflicted Mourinho's first defeat at Chelsea, after Kevin Keegan took the surprising decision to use striker Nicolas Anelka to man-mark defensive midfielder Claude Makelele. What happened next: Chelsea responded to some effect, going unbeaten for the rest of the league season to win the title and also won the League Cup. Middlesbrough 3 Chelsea 0 (Feb 2006) Having already been knocked out of the League Cup by Charlton, the most embarrassing loss of Mourinho's first spell at Chelsea came at the Riverside Stadium, when the Premier League leaders went behind to a Fabio Rochemback strike after only 78 seconds and never recovered. Chelsea on their way to a 3-0 defeat at Middlesbrough Credit: Reuters What happened next: Chelsea won their next three games before losing at Fulham, but they were far enough clear at the top of the table that those defeats mattered little. They won the Premier League by eight clear points. Chelsea 1 Rosenborg 1 (Sept 2007) The result that ultimately did for Jose's first spell at Stamford Bridge. Having already lost at Aston Villa and drawn at home to Blackburn, Mourinho went into this Champions League tie against lowly Rosenborg needed the kind of performance that convinces the club's hierarchy that he had the players pulling in the same direction. Mourinho watches on as his Chelsea reign is brought to an end by Rosenborg Credit: Getty images Only 24,000 fans turned out at Stamford Bridge for a game everyone expected Chelsea to walk, but they ended up requiring an Andriy Shevchenko equaliser to scrap a point. What happened next: Mourinho left the club two days later. Inter 0 Panathanaikos 1 (Nov 2008) Inter's Champions League draw in 2008/09 was as favourable as they come: they faced Werder Bremen, Anothosis Famagusta and Panathanaikos in Group B. By the fifth round of fixtures they had dropped points at home to Werder and at Anorthosis, but they were still in top spot. Mourinho's first season in the Champions League at Inter didn't go well Credit: Reuters They went on to lose to the Greek side and surrendered first place in the group, thus forced to play Manchester United in the next round - a tie they lost.   What happened next: Inter won Serie A by 10 clear points but the season was viewed as a disappointment for their failure to improve in Europe. Inter learned from their mistakes in Europe, and won the treble a year later. Barcelona 5 Real Madrid 0 (November 2010) An embarrassing night for Mourinho but one he refused to call a "humiliation", probably because Barcelona were so frighteningly good that there was little Real or Mourinho could do to stop them. The first of many defeats to Pep Guardiola, but still the most chastening. Mourinho was thrashed by Pep's Barcelona Credit: Reuters What happened next: Real won the Copa del Rey, finished second in La Liga and reached the Champions League semi-final. Borussia Dortmund 4 Real Madrid 1 (April 2013) Mourinho's biggest failure in his time at Real Madrid was the lack of progress in the Champions League while rivals Barcelona and former club Chelsea both lifted the trophy. In his third and final season in Spain, his side was humbled by Jurgen Klopp's Dortmund in the first leg of the semi-final. They won the second leg but couldn't haul themselves back from the three-goal deficit. Robert Lewandowski tore Real apart Credit: Getty images What happened next: Real came close on three fronts, but won nothing this season, losing to Atletico in the final of the Copa del Rey. Mourinho called it "the worst season of my career". He left the club shortly after its conclusion. Chelsea 2 Bradford 4 (Jan 2015) Six weeks after defeat at Newcastle and three weeks after a 5-3 loss at Tottenham, it looked like the wheels might be coming off Mourinho's first season back in England when Chelsea threw away a two-goal home lead against third tier Bradford. They crumbled, conceding four goals to crash out of the FA Cup in circumstances Mourinho called "disgraceful". It was the first time he had ever lost to lower league opposition. Bradford inflicted what was arguably Mourinho's worst ever defeat Credit: Getty images What happened next: Chelsea bucked up their ideas. They went 16 games unbeaten in the league to win the title, and also won the League Cup, exacting revenge over Spurs with a 2-0 win in the final. Manchester City 3 Chelsea 0 (Aug 2015) Mourinho's title defence didn't go as well as in his first spell: after the fiasco with Eva Carneiro at home to Swansea on the opening day of the season, Chelsea were crushed by City at the Etihad, with John Terry substituted at half time after a nightmare first 45 minutes. What happened next: Chelsea lost at home to Crystal Palace and then away to Everyon, but a 2-0 victory over Arsenal meant everyone thought they had turned a corner... Sport tweets of 2017 Chelsea 1 Southampton 3 (Oct 2015) 1-0 up at home to Southampton, things were back to normal, right? No. No, no, no, no, no. Saints scored three goals to turn the game on its head and leave Mourinho hanging on by a thread. What happened next: Chelsea's downward spiral continues... Chelsea 0 Bournemouth 1 (Dec 2015) Funnily enough, the defeat that actually did for Mourinho was against champions-to-be Leicester, but losing 1-0 at home to newly-promoted Bournemouth was pretty embarrassing for Roman Abramovich. Mourinho didn't last much longer after this defeat Credit: PA What happened next: Mourinho is sacked 12 days later. Chelsea 4 Manchester United 0 (Oct 2016) Mourinho's Stamford Bridge return played out worse than Mourinho could have possibly imagined. United fall to eighth in the table and Mourinho is heckled by the fans that used to adore him. What happened next: United tightened up, went 25 games unbeaten in the league, and won the EFL Cup and the Europa League.

Jose Mourinho's most humbling nights... what happens next?

Jose Mourinho doesn't lose many matches, let alone many cup games, and very few would have predicted the EFL Cup defeat to Bristol City. He therefore doesn't have much experience of responding to this kind of result: this was only his second-ever loss to lower league opposition, and the question is now, can his team bounce back against Leicester on Saturday night? Events after the most humiliating defeats of his managerial career have tended to follow one of two paths. More often than not, the result shocks his team into action, focuses his attention and provides the spark before a run that leads to silverware, as the 4-0 defeat to Chelsea did last season. The other option is rather more worrying: the defeat signals a sign of things to come, and ends up leading to the downfall of his empire. Here, we cast an eye over Mourinho's most chastening defeats, with a look at how things panned out for him afterwards. Manchester City 1 Chelsea 0 (Oct 2004) Long before the days of Sheikh Mansour, a City side including Paul Bosvelt, Jon Macken and Ben Thatcher inflicted Mourinho's first defeat at Chelsea, after Kevin Keegan took the surprising decision to use striker Nicolas Anelka to man-mark defensive midfielder Claude Makelele. What happened next: Chelsea responded to some effect, going unbeaten for the rest of the league season to win the title and also won the League Cup. Middlesbrough 3 Chelsea 0 (Feb 2006) Having already been knocked out of the League Cup by Charlton, the most embarrassing loss of Mourinho's first spell at Chelsea came at the Riverside Stadium, when the Premier League leaders went behind to a Fabio Rochemback strike after only 78 seconds and never recovered. Chelsea on their way to a 3-0 defeat at Middlesbrough Credit: Reuters What happened next: Chelsea won their next three games before losing at Fulham, but they were far enough clear at the top of the table that those defeats mattered little. They won the Premier League by eight clear points. Chelsea 1 Rosenborg 1 (Sept 2007) The result that ultimately did for Jose's first spell at Stamford Bridge. Having already lost at Aston Villa and drawn at home to Blackburn, Mourinho went into this Champions League tie against lowly Rosenborg needed the kind of performance that convinces the club's hierarchy that he had the players pulling in the same direction. Mourinho watches on as his Chelsea reign is brought to an end by Rosenborg Credit: Getty images Only 24,000 fans turned out at Stamford Bridge for a game everyone expected Chelsea to walk, but they ended up requiring an Andriy Shevchenko equaliser to scrap a point. What happened next: Mourinho left the club two days later. Inter 0 Panathanaikos 1 (Nov 2008) Inter's Champions League draw in 2008/09 was as favourable as they come: they faced Werder Bremen, Anothosis Famagusta and Panathanaikos in Group B. By the fifth round of fixtures they had dropped points at home to Werder and at Anorthosis, but they were still in top spot. Mourinho's first season in the Champions League at Inter didn't go well Credit: Reuters They went on to lose to the Greek side and surrendered first place in the group, thus forced to play Manchester United in the next round - a tie they lost.   What happened next: Inter won Serie A by 10 clear points but the season was viewed as a disappointment for their failure to improve in Europe. Inter learned from their mistakes in Europe, and won the treble a year later. Barcelona 5 Real Madrid 0 (November 2010) An embarrassing night for Mourinho but one he refused to call a "humiliation", probably because Barcelona were so frighteningly good that there was little Real or Mourinho could do to stop them. The first of many defeats to Pep Guardiola, but still the most chastening. Mourinho was thrashed by Pep's Barcelona Credit: Reuters What happened next: Real won the Copa del Rey, finished second in La Liga and reached the Champions League semi-final. Borussia Dortmund 4 Real Madrid 1 (April 2013) Mourinho's biggest failure in his time at Real Madrid was the lack of progress in the Champions League while rivals Barcelona and former club Chelsea both lifted the trophy. In his third and final season in Spain, his side was humbled by Jurgen Klopp's Dortmund in the first leg of the semi-final. They won the second leg but couldn't haul themselves back from the three-goal deficit. Robert Lewandowski tore Real apart Credit: Getty images What happened next: Real came close on three fronts, but won nothing this season, losing to Atletico in the final of the Copa del Rey. Mourinho called it "the worst season of my career". He left the club shortly after its conclusion. Chelsea 2 Bradford 4 (Jan 2015) Six weeks after defeat at Newcastle and three weeks after a 5-3 loss at Tottenham, it looked like the wheels might be coming off Mourinho's first season back in England when Chelsea threw away a two-goal home lead against third tier Bradford. They crumbled, conceding four goals to crash out of the FA Cup in circumstances Mourinho called "disgraceful". It was the first time he had ever lost to lower league opposition. Bradford inflicted what was arguably Mourinho's worst ever defeat Credit: Getty images What happened next: Chelsea bucked up their ideas. They went 16 games unbeaten in the league to win the title, and also won the League Cup, exacting revenge over Spurs with a 2-0 win in the final. Manchester City 3 Chelsea 0 (Aug 2015) Mourinho's title defence didn't go as well as in his first spell: after the fiasco with Eva Carneiro at home to Swansea on the opening day of the season, Chelsea were crushed by City at the Etihad, with John Terry substituted at half time after a nightmare first 45 minutes. What happened next: Chelsea lost at home to Crystal Palace and then away to Everyon, but a 2-0 victory over Arsenal meant everyone thought they had turned a corner... Sport tweets of 2017 Chelsea 1 Southampton 3 (Oct 2015) 1-0 up at home to Southampton, things were back to normal, right? No. No, no, no, no, no. Saints scored three goals to turn the game on its head and leave Mourinho hanging on by a thread. What happened next: Chelsea's downward spiral continues... Chelsea 0 Bournemouth 1 (Dec 2015) Funnily enough, the defeat that actually did for Mourinho was against champions-to-be Leicester, but losing 1-0 at home to newly-promoted Bournemouth was pretty embarrassing for Roman Abramovich. Mourinho didn't last much longer after this defeat Credit: PA What happened next: Mourinho is sacked 12 days later. Chelsea 4 Manchester United 0 (Oct 2016) Mourinho's Stamford Bridge return played out worse than Mourinho could have possibly imagined. United fall to eighth in the table and Mourinho is heckled by the fans that used to adore him. What happened next: United tightened up, went 25 games unbeaten in the league, and won the EFL Cup and the Europa League.

Jose Mourinho's most humbling nights... what happens next?

Jose Mourinho doesn't lose many matches, let alone many cup games, and very few would have predicted the EFL Cup defeat to Bristol City. He therefore doesn't have much experience of responding to this kind of result: this was only his second-ever loss to lower league opposition, and the question is now, can his team bounce back against Leicester on Saturday night? Events after the most humiliating defeats of his managerial career have tended to follow one of two paths. More often than not, the result shocks his team into action, focuses his attention and provides the spark before a run that leads to silverware, as the 4-0 defeat to Chelsea did last season. The other option is rather more worrying: the defeat signals a sign of things to come, and ends up leading to the downfall of his empire. Here, we cast an eye over Mourinho's most chastening defeats, with a look at how things panned out for him afterwards. Manchester City 1 Chelsea 0 (Oct 2004) Long before the days of Sheikh Mansour, a City side including Paul Bosvelt, Jon Macken and Ben Thatcher inflicted Mourinho's first defeat at Chelsea, after Kevin Keegan took the surprising decision to use striker Nicolas Anelka to man-mark defensive midfielder Claude Makelele. What happened next: Chelsea responded to some effect, going unbeaten for the rest of the league season to win the title and also won the League Cup. Middlesbrough 3 Chelsea 0 (Feb 2006) Having already been knocked out of the League Cup by Charlton, the most embarrassing loss of Mourinho's first spell at Chelsea came at the Riverside Stadium, when the Premier League leaders went behind to a Fabio Rochemback strike after only 78 seconds and never recovered. Chelsea on their way to a 3-0 defeat at Middlesbrough Credit: Reuters What happened next: Chelsea won their next three games before losing at Fulham, but they were far enough clear at the top of the table that those defeats mattered little. They won the Premier League by eight clear points. Chelsea 1 Rosenborg 1 (Sept 2007) The result that ultimately did for Jose's first spell at Stamford Bridge. Having already lost at Aston Villa and drawn at home to Blackburn, Mourinho went into this Champions League tie against lowly Rosenborg needed the kind of performance that convinces the club's hierarchy that he had the players pulling in the same direction. Mourinho watches on as his Chelsea reign is brought to an end by Rosenborg Credit: Getty images Only 24,000 fans turned out at Stamford Bridge for a game everyone expected Chelsea to walk, but they ended up requiring an Andriy Shevchenko equaliser to scrap a point. What happened next: Mourinho left the club two days later. Inter 0 Panathanaikos 1 (Nov 2008) Inter's Champions League draw in 2008/09 was as favourable as they come: they faced Werder Bremen, Anothosis Famagusta and Panathanaikos in Group B. By the fifth round of fixtures they had dropped points at home to Werder and at Anorthosis, but they were still in top spot. Mourinho's first season in the Champions League at Inter didn't go well Credit: Reuters They went on to lose to the Greek side and surrendered first place in the group, thus forced to play Manchester United in the next round - a tie they lost.   What happened next: Inter won Serie A by 10 clear points but the season was viewed as a disappointment for their failure to improve in Europe. Inter learned from their mistakes in Europe, and won the treble a year later. Barcelona 5 Real Madrid 0 (November 2010) An embarrassing night for Mourinho but one he refused to call a "humiliation", probably because Barcelona were so frighteningly good that there was little Real or Mourinho could do to stop them. The first of many defeats to Pep Guardiola, but still the most chastening. Mourinho was thrashed by Pep's Barcelona Credit: Reuters What happened next: Real won the Copa del Rey, finished second in La Liga and reached the Champions League semi-final. Borussia Dortmund 4 Real Madrid 1 (April 2013) Mourinho's biggest failure in his time at Real Madrid was the lack of progress in the Champions League while rivals Barcelona and former club Chelsea both lifted the trophy. In his third and final season in Spain, his side was humbled by Jurgen Klopp's Dortmund in the first leg of the semi-final. They won the second leg but couldn't haul themselves back from the three-goal deficit. Robert Lewandowski tore Real apart Credit: Getty images What happened next: Real came close on three fronts, but won nothing this season, losing to Atletico in the final of the Copa del Rey. Mourinho called it "the worst season of my career". He left the club shortly after its conclusion. Chelsea 2 Bradford 4 (Jan 2015) Six weeks after defeat at Newcastle and three weeks after a 5-3 loss at Tottenham, it looked like the wheels might be coming off Mourinho's first season back in England when Chelsea threw away a two-goal home lead against third tier Bradford. They crumbled, conceding four goals to crash out of the FA Cup in circumstances Mourinho called "disgraceful". It was the first time he had ever lost to lower league opposition. Bradford inflicted what was arguably Mourinho's worst ever defeat Credit: Getty images What happened next: Chelsea bucked up their ideas. They went 16 games unbeaten in the league to win the title, and also won the League Cup, exacting revenge over Spurs with a 2-0 win in the final. Manchester City 3 Chelsea 0 (Aug 2015) Mourinho's title defence didn't go as well as in his first spell: after the fiasco with Eva Carneiro at home to Swansea on the opening day of the season, Chelsea were crushed by City at the Etihad, with John Terry substituted at half time after a nightmare first 45 minutes. What happened next: Chelsea lost at home to Crystal Palace and then away to Everyon, but a 2-0 victory over Arsenal meant everyone thought they had turned a corner... Sport tweets of 2017 Chelsea 1 Southampton 3 (Oct 2015) 1-0 up at home to Southampton, things were back to normal, right? No. No, no, no, no, no. Saints scored three goals to turn the game on its head and leave Mourinho hanging on by a thread. What happened next: Chelsea's downward spiral continues... Chelsea 0 Bournemouth 1 (Dec 2015) Funnily enough, the defeat that actually did for Mourinho was against champions-to-be Leicester, but losing 1-0 at home to newly-promoted Bournemouth was pretty embarrassing for Roman Abramovich. Mourinho didn't last much longer after this defeat Credit: PA What happened next: Mourinho is sacked 12 days later. Chelsea 4 Manchester United 0 (Oct 2016) Mourinho's Stamford Bridge return played out worse than Mourinho could have possibly imagined. United fall to eighth in the table and Mourinho is heckled by the fans that used to adore him. What happened next: United tightened up, went 25 games unbeaten in the league, and won the EFL Cup and the Europa League.

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