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FA Cup first round draw: Hyde United (eighth tier) host MK Dons

  7:28PM And that's the draw The excitement is over! No more balls will be drawn! Morecambe vs Hartlepool is pretty good, Doncaster will visit either East Thurrock or Ebsfleet. Hyde vs MK Dons is a brilliant tie for the minnows. I was really hoping for a Slough vs Swindon draw, purely for Office quotes.  7:25PM Eighth tier Hyde will play MK Dons! The crowd goes wild in the BBC studio as the draw is announced. That's the big club the players wanted. 7:24PM Lads, can we please have some music Or something. This draw is not one of the most exciting things I've ever seen on television. That Liverpool vs Man Utd game on Saturday was more entertaining. 7:21PM AFC Wimbledon vs Lincoln City AFC Wimbledon are one of the clubs to have benefited immensely from TV money brought by the FA Cup and they are drawn against Lincoln City.  7:19PM Some more fixtures for you Peterborough Utd v Tranmere Cambridge Utd v Sutton Utd Forest Green Rovers v Macclesfield Town AFC Fylde v Kidderminster Harriers Luton v Portsmouth Shrewsbury v Aldershot Hereford v AFC Telford Utd Guiseley v Accrington Stanley Blackburn Rovers v Barnet 7:16PM No huge match ups so far Bradford City v Chesterfield Port Vale v Oxford Utd Newport County v Walsall Morecambe v Hartlepool Utd 7:14PM And it's set of balls number eight And Lancelot is the FA Cup draw machine for tonight. What a hilarious National Lottery joke. And the first fixture is Stevenage vs Nantwich or Kettering. IT'S ALL KICKING OFF NOW, CLIVE. 7:12PM Your Davids, your Goliaths Hyde, Heybridge Swifts and Ossett Town are the lowest ranked teams in the competition, with all three occupying the eighth tier of English football.  7:10PM David Sharpe The Wigan chairman, grandson of Dave Whelan, fancies Wigan's chances this season. And now it's time for the draw!   7:05PM Who do the small teams want to get in the draw? According to a couple of Hyde football staff (manager and player), the management want to play against a team they can probably beat whereas the players want to draw Blackburn or Charlton - one of the 'big' clubs. Hyde actually own the record for biggest defeat in the FA Cup. A 26-0 hiding (see what I did) by Preston North End. 7:00PM The live coverage begins! Here we go. The draw is being held at Hyde United's ground. Look how cool their sun was earlier: Red sun today. FA Cup draw at Hyde United. Is that an omen. #EmiratesFACuppic.twitter.com/LoZ27mZjKW— Hyde United FC (@hydeunited) October 16, 2017   6:47PM The difference the FA Cup actually makes I wrote this in January about just how much an FA Cup run is worth to a small club. It turns out the answer is everything. The FA awards a prize of £1.8million to the winners of the competition, the kind of short-change a Champions League club might use as a sweetener for a promising youth prospect’s signing-on fee. For non-league side Curzon Ashton just qualifying for the second round of the competition will, and has, had an enormous impact.   Image     Landscape Portrait Square Original/Custom   Edit Selected Crop... Caption:   Description: curzon ashton Agency: GETTY IMAGES Artist:       Edit...   Delete     “It means so much to us a club,” says their CEO Natalie Atkinson. “The FA Cup is enabling us, through prize money, funds gained and TV money to work with the FA and football foundations to replace our 3G pitch next to the stadium.” Curzon Ashton, currently 15th in the National League North, lost 4-3 to AFC Wimbledon in December, conceding four goals in the final 10 minutes of the game. The prize for qualifying for the second round was £27,000, in addition to £18,000 earned from the first round. Those sucker-punch goals prevented a windfall of £67,500 for making it to third round. However, thanks to the wonder of television money, the club received more for their defeat to Wimbledon than they would have if they’d won a non-televised second round match. There's more on the article, if you fancy clicking on it. 6:30PM The magic of the cup This most holy of trophies always produces magical moments and even if a guilty few/most don't pay attention to the competition until their team is involved, those matches between minnows of the lower leagues and giants of... in this case, League One, are always thoroughly enjoyable.  Sutton are looking to make a lot more money from another (pie free) run at the cup this year, Accrington Stanley's involvement will be upping the YouTube view count on this milk advert, and today is the first time I have ever heard of Gainsborough Trinity. Perhaps they will become my new favourite non-league - maybe they'll be yours! It all depends who has to play who - and which of those games the people in charge at BBC decide to broadcast... 6:15PM Good evening! Hello there sports fans. Welcome to our live coverage of what is sure to be a riveting FA Cup first round draw. The action will kick-off at 7:10pm and we'll keep you up to date with the draw as it happens. For right now, that wait should give you time to look at all the nice photographs of that weird looking sun from earlier today. It was like being in Blade Runner. 6:09PM Preview What is it? It's the draw for the first round proper of the FA Cup: the oldest competition in world football.  The first round sees the 48 teams from League One and League Two joined by 32 non-league sides. When is it? Monday October 16. What time is it? The draw itself will begin at 7:10pm on Monday evening. The first round of the FA Cup will take place on Saturday November 4  Credit: AP  What TV channel is it on? The draw will be broadcast live on both BBC Two and BT Sport. Mark Chapman will present the BBC's coverage of the draw in half-hour long episode from 7pm, while BT Sport 3's show will also begin at 7pm.  When will the matches take place?  The first round will take place over the weekend of Friday November 3 to Monday 6 November 2017 Who's in the hat? Sutton United made it to the fifth round of the FA Cup last season  Credit: Getty Images  Three teams from the eighth tier of English football are among the non-league teams in the hat for the first round. Hyde United, who play in the Northern Premier League, beat Scarborough Athletic on Sunday afternoon to book their place in the competition.  Hampton and Richmond, who are coached by Sky Sports commentator Martin Tyler, failed in their bid to reach the FA Cup proper after losing to  National League South rivals Truro City. Truro's 2-0 victory over their league rivals means they become the first Cornwal team to reach the FA Cup first round since 1969.  Billericay Town, whose current players include Jamie O'Hara, Paul Konchesky and Jermaine Pennant, will also take their place in the draw.  FA Cup first round numbers 1 ACCRINGTON STANLEY 2 AFC WIMBLEDON 3 BARNET 4 BLACKBURN ROVERS 5 BLACKPOOL 6 BRADFORD CITY 7 BRISTOL ROVERS 8 BURY 9 CAMBRIDGE UNITED 10 CARLISLE UNITED 11 CHARLTON ATHLETIC 12 CHELTENHAM TOWN 13 CHESTERFIELD 14 COLCHESTER UNITED 15 COVENTRY CITY 16 CRAWLEY TOWN 17 CREWE ALEXANDRA 18 DONCASTER ROVERS 19 EXETER CITY 20 FLEETWOOD TOWN 21 FOREST GREEN ROVERS 22 GILLINGHAM 23 GRIMSBY TOWN 24 LINCOLN CITY 25 LUTON TOWN 26 MANSFIELD TOWN 27 MILTON KEYNES DONS 28 MORECAMBE 29 NEWPORT COUNTY 30 NORTHAMPTON TOWN 31 NOTTS COUNTY 32 OLDHAM ATHLETIC 33 OXFORD UNITED 34 PETERBOROUGH UNITED 35 PLYMOUTH ARGYLE 36 PORT VALE 37 PORTSMOUTH 38 ROCHDALE 39 ROTHERHAM UNITED 40 SCUNTHORPE UNITED 41 SHREWSBURY TOWN 42 SOUTHEND UNITED 43 STEVENAGE 44 SWINDON TOWN 45 WALSALL 46 WIGAN ATHLETIC 47 WYCOMBE WANDERERS 48 YEOVIL TOWN 49 TRANMERE ROVERS 50 SOLIHULL MOORS OR OSSETT TOWN 51 HARTLEPOOL UNITED 52 SHAW LANE ASSOCIATION 53 CHORLEY OR BOSTON UNITED 54 AFC TELFORD UNITED 55 GAINSBOROUGH TRINITY 56 NANTWICH TOWN OR KETTERING TOWN 57 GATESHEAD 58 GUISELEY 59 AFC FYLDE 60 KIDDERMINSTER HARRIERS 61 HYDE UNITED 62 MACCLESFIELD TOWN 63 BRACKLEY TOWN OR BILLERICAY TOWN 64 DAGENHAM & REDBRIDGE OR LEYTON ORIENT 65 HEREFORD 66 ALDERSHOT TOWN  67 BATH CITY OR CHELMSFORD CITY 68 OXFORD CITY 69 MAIDENHEAD UNITED 70 HEYBRIDGE SWIFTS 71 WOKING OR CONCORD RANGERS 72 TRURO CITY 73 DOVER ATHLETIC OR BROMLEY 74 SLOUGH TOWN 75 DARTFORD 76 BOREHAM WOOD 77 MAIDSTONE UNITED OR ENFIELD TOWN 78 LEATHERHEAD 79 SUTTON UNITED 80 EAST THURROCK UNITED OR EBBSFLEET UNITED

FA Cup first round draw: Hyde United (eighth tier) host MK Dons

  7:28PM And that's the draw The excitement is over! No more balls will be drawn! Morecambe vs Hartlepool is pretty good, Doncaster will visit either East Thurrock or Ebsfleet. Hyde vs MK Dons is a brilliant tie for the minnows. I was really hoping for a Slough vs Swindon draw, purely for Office quotes.  7:25PM Eighth tier Hyde will play MK Dons! The crowd goes wild in the BBC studio as the draw is announced. That's the big club the players wanted. 7:24PM Lads, can we please have some music Or something. This draw is not one of the most exciting things I've ever seen on television. That Liverpool vs Man Utd game on Saturday was more entertaining. 7:21PM AFC Wimbledon vs Lincoln City AFC Wimbledon are one of the clubs to have benefited immensely from TV money brought by the FA Cup and they are drawn against Lincoln City.  7:19PM Some more fixtures for you Peterborough Utd v Tranmere Cambridge Utd v Sutton Utd Forest Green Rovers v Macclesfield Town AFC Fylde v Kidderminster Harriers Luton v Portsmouth Shrewsbury v Aldershot Hereford v AFC Telford Utd Guiseley v Accrington Stanley Blackburn Rovers v Barnet 7:16PM No huge match ups so far Bradford City v Chesterfield Port Vale v Oxford Utd Newport County v Walsall Morecambe v Hartlepool Utd 7:14PM And it's set of balls number eight And Lancelot is the FA Cup draw machine for tonight. What a hilarious National Lottery joke. And the first fixture is Stevenage vs Nantwich or Kettering. IT'S ALL KICKING OFF NOW, CLIVE. 7:12PM Your Davids, your Goliaths Hyde, Heybridge Swifts and Ossett Town are the lowest ranked teams in the competition, with all three occupying the eighth tier of English football.  7:10PM David Sharpe The Wigan chairman, grandson of Dave Whelan, fancies Wigan's chances this season. And now it's time for the draw!   7:05PM Who do the small teams want to get in the draw? According to a couple of Hyde football staff (manager and player), the management want to play against a team they can probably beat whereas the players want to draw Blackburn or Charlton - one of the 'big' clubs. Hyde actually own the record for biggest defeat in the FA Cup. A 26-0 hiding (see what I did) by Preston North End. 7:00PM The live coverage begins! Here we go. The draw is being held at Hyde United's ground. Look how cool their sun was earlier: Red sun today. FA Cup draw at Hyde United. Is that an omen. #EmiratesFACuppic.twitter.com/LoZ27mZjKW— Hyde United FC (@hydeunited) October 16, 2017   6:47PM The difference the FA Cup actually makes I wrote this in January about just how much an FA Cup run is worth to a small club. It turns out the answer is everything. The FA awards a prize of £1.8million to the winners of the competition, the kind of short-change a Champions League club might use as a sweetener for a promising youth prospect’s signing-on fee. For non-league side Curzon Ashton just qualifying for the second round of the competition will, and has, had an enormous impact.   Image     Landscape Portrait Square Original/Custom   Edit Selected Crop... Caption:   Description: curzon ashton Agency: GETTY IMAGES Artist:       Edit...   Delete     “It means so much to us a club,” says their CEO Natalie Atkinson. “The FA Cup is enabling us, through prize money, funds gained and TV money to work with the FA and football foundations to replace our 3G pitch next to the stadium.” Curzon Ashton, currently 15th in the National League North, lost 4-3 to AFC Wimbledon in December, conceding four goals in the final 10 minutes of the game. The prize for qualifying for the second round was £27,000, in addition to £18,000 earned from the first round. Those sucker-punch goals prevented a windfall of £67,500 for making it to third round. However, thanks to the wonder of television money, the club received more for their defeat to Wimbledon than they would have if they’d won a non-televised second round match. There's more on the article, if you fancy clicking on it. 6:30PM The magic of the cup This most holy of trophies always produces magical moments and even if a guilty few/most don't pay attention to the competition until their team is involved, those matches between minnows of the lower leagues and giants of... in this case, League One, are always thoroughly enjoyable.  Sutton are looking to make a lot more money from another (pie free) run at the cup this year, Accrington Stanley's involvement will be upping the YouTube view count on this milk advert, and today is the first time I have ever heard of Gainsborough Trinity. Perhaps they will become my new favourite non-league - maybe they'll be yours! It all depends who has to play who - and which of those games the people in charge at BBC decide to broadcast... 6:15PM Good evening! Hello there sports fans. Welcome to our live coverage of what is sure to be a riveting FA Cup first round draw. The action will kick-off at 7:10pm and we'll keep you up to date with the draw as it happens. For right now, that wait should give you time to look at all the nice photographs of that weird looking sun from earlier today. It was like being in Blade Runner. 6:09PM Preview What is it? It's the draw for the first round proper of the FA Cup: the oldest competition in world football.  The first round sees the 48 teams from League One and League Two joined by 32 non-league sides. When is it? Monday October 16. What time is it? The draw itself will begin at 7:10pm on Monday evening. The first round of the FA Cup will take place on Saturday November 4  Credit: AP  What TV channel is it on? The draw will be broadcast live on both BBC Two and BT Sport. Mark Chapman will present the BBC's coverage of the draw in half-hour long episode from 7pm, while BT Sport 3's show will also begin at 7pm.  When will the matches take place?  The first round will take place over the weekend of Friday November 3 to Monday 6 November 2017 Who's in the hat? Sutton United made it to the fifth round of the FA Cup last season  Credit: Getty Images  Three teams from the eighth tier of English football are among the non-league teams in the hat for the first round. Hyde United, who play in the Northern Premier League, beat Scarborough Athletic on Sunday afternoon to book their place in the competition.  Hampton and Richmond, who are coached by Sky Sports commentator Martin Tyler, failed in their bid to reach the FA Cup proper after losing to  National League South rivals Truro City. Truro's 2-0 victory over their league rivals means they become the first Cornwal team to reach the FA Cup first round since 1969.  Billericay Town, whose current players include Jamie O'Hara, Paul Konchesky and Jermaine Pennant, will also take their place in the draw.  FA Cup first round numbers 1 ACCRINGTON STANLEY 2 AFC WIMBLEDON 3 BARNET 4 BLACKBURN ROVERS 5 BLACKPOOL 6 BRADFORD CITY 7 BRISTOL ROVERS 8 BURY 9 CAMBRIDGE UNITED 10 CARLISLE UNITED 11 CHARLTON ATHLETIC 12 CHELTENHAM TOWN 13 CHESTERFIELD 14 COLCHESTER UNITED 15 COVENTRY CITY 16 CRAWLEY TOWN 17 CREWE ALEXANDRA 18 DONCASTER ROVERS 19 EXETER CITY 20 FLEETWOOD TOWN 21 FOREST GREEN ROVERS 22 GILLINGHAM 23 GRIMSBY TOWN 24 LINCOLN CITY 25 LUTON TOWN 26 MANSFIELD TOWN 27 MILTON KEYNES DONS 28 MORECAMBE 29 NEWPORT COUNTY 30 NORTHAMPTON TOWN 31 NOTTS COUNTY 32 OLDHAM ATHLETIC 33 OXFORD UNITED 34 PETERBOROUGH UNITED 35 PLYMOUTH ARGYLE 36 PORT VALE 37 PORTSMOUTH 38 ROCHDALE 39 ROTHERHAM UNITED 40 SCUNTHORPE UNITED 41 SHREWSBURY TOWN 42 SOUTHEND UNITED 43 STEVENAGE 44 SWINDON TOWN 45 WALSALL 46 WIGAN ATHLETIC 47 WYCOMBE WANDERERS 48 YEOVIL TOWN 49 TRANMERE ROVERS 50 SOLIHULL MOORS OR OSSETT TOWN 51 HARTLEPOOL UNITED 52 SHAW LANE ASSOCIATION 53 CHORLEY OR BOSTON UNITED 54 AFC TELFORD UNITED 55 GAINSBOROUGH TRINITY 56 NANTWICH TOWN OR KETTERING TOWN 57 GATESHEAD 58 GUISELEY 59 AFC FYLDE 60 KIDDERMINSTER HARRIERS 61 HYDE UNITED 62 MACCLESFIELD TOWN 63 BRACKLEY TOWN OR BILLERICAY TOWN 64 DAGENHAM & REDBRIDGE OR LEYTON ORIENT 65 HEREFORD 66 ALDERSHOT TOWN  67 BATH CITY OR CHELMSFORD CITY 68 OXFORD CITY 69 MAIDENHEAD UNITED 70 HEYBRIDGE SWIFTS 71 WOKING OR CONCORD RANGERS 72 TRURO CITY 73 DOVER ATHLETIC OR BROMLEY 74 SLOUGH TOWN 75 DARTFORD 76 BOREHAM WOOD 77 MAIDSTONE UNITED OR ENFIELD TOWN 78 LEATHERHEAD 79 SUTTON UNITED 80 EAST THURROCK UNITED OR EBBSFLEET UNITED

FA Cup first round draw: Hyde United (eighth tier) host MK Dons

  7:28PM And that's the draw The excitement is over! No more balls will be drawn! Morecambe vs Hartlepool is pretty good, Doncaster will visit either East Thurrock or Ebsfleet. Hyde vs MK Dons is a brilliant tie for the minnows. I was really hoping for a Slough vs Swindon draw, purely for Office quotes.  7:25PM Eighth tier Hyde will play MK Dons! The crowd goes wild in the BBC studio as the draw is announced. That's the big club the players wanted. 7:24PM Lads, can we please have some music Or something. This draw is not one of the most exciting things I've ever seen on television. That Liverpool vs Man Utd game on Saturday was more entertaining. 7:21PM AFC Wimbledon vs Lincoln City AFC Wimbledon are one of the clubs to have benefited immensely from TV money brought by the FA Cup and they are drawn against Lincoln City.  7:19PM Some more fixtures for you Peterborough Utd v Tranmere Cambridge Utd v Sutton Utd Forest Green Rovers v Macclesfield Town AFC Fylde v Kidderminster Harriers Luton v Portsmouth Shrewsbury v Aldershot Hereford v AFC Telford Utd Guiseley v Accrington Stanley Blackburn Rovers v Barnet 7:16PM No huge match ups so far Bradford City v Chesterfield Port Vale v Oxford Utd Newport County v Walsall Morecambe v Hartlepool Utd 7:14PM And it's set of balls number eight And Lancelot is the FA Cup draw machine for tonight. What a hilarious National Lottery joke. And the first fixture is Stevenage vs Nantwich or Kettering. IT'S ALL KICKING OFF NOW, CLIVE. 7:12PM Your Davids, your Goliaths Hyde, Heybridge Swifts and Ossett Town are the lowest ranked teams in the competition, with all three occupying the eighth tier of English football.  7:10PM David Sharpe The Wigan chairman, grandson of Dave Whelan, fancies Wigan's chances this season. And now it's time for the draw!   7:05PM Who do the small teams want to get in the draw? According to a couple of Hyde football staff (manager and player), the management want to play against a team they can probably beat whereas the players want to draw Blackburn or Charlton - one of the 'big' clubs. Hyde actually own the record for biggest defeat in the FA Cup. A 26-0 hiding (see what I did) by Preston North End. 7:00PM The live coverage begins! Here we go. The draw is being held at Hyde United's ground. Look how cool their sun was earlier: Red sun today. FA Cup draw at Hyde United. Is that an omen. #EmiratesFACuppic.twitter.com/LoZ27mZjKW— Hyde United FC (@hydeunited) October 16, 2017   6:47PM The difference the FA Cup actually makes I wrote this in January about just how much an FA Cup run is worth to a small club. It turns out the answer is everything. The FA awards a prize of £1.8million to the winners of the competition, the kind of short-change a Champions League club might use as a sweetener for a promising youth prospect’s signing-on fee. For non-league side Curzon Ashton just qualifying for the second round of the competition will, and has, had an enormous impact.   Image     Landscape Portrait Square Original/Custom   Edit Selected Crop... Caption:   Description: curzon ashton Agency: GETTY IMAGES Artist:       Edit...   Delete     “It means so much to us a club,” says their CEO Natalie Atkinson. “The FA Cup is enabling us, through prize money, funds gained and TV money to work with the FA and football foundations to replace our 3G pitch next to the stadium.” Curzon Ashton, currently 15th in the National League North, lost 4-3 to AFC Wimbledon in December, conceding four goals in the final 10 minutes of the game. The prize for qualifying for the second round was £27,000, in addition to £18,000 earned from the first round. Those sucker-punch goals prevented a windfall of £67,500 for making it to third round. However, thanks to the wonder of television money, the club received more for their defeat to Wimbledon than they would have if they’d won a non-televised second round match. There's more on the article, if you fancy clicking on it. 6:30PM The magic of the cup This most holy of trophies always produces magical moments and even if a guilty few/most don't pay attention to the competition until their team is involved, those matches between minnows of the lower leagues and giants of... in this case, League One, are always thoroughly enjoyable.  Sutton are looking to make a lot more money from another (pie free) run at the cup this year, Accrington Stanley's involvement will be upping the YouTube view count on this milk advert, and today is the first time I have ever heard of Gainsborough Trinity. Perhaps they will become my new favourite non-league - maybe they'll be yours! It all depends who has to play who - and which of those games the people in charge at BBC decide to broadcast... 6:15PM Good evening! Hello there sports fans. Welcome to our live coverage of what is sure to be a riveting FA Cup first round draw. The action will kick-off at 7:10pm and we'll keep you up to date with the draw as it happens. For right now, that wait should give you time to look at all the nice photographs of that weird looking sun from earlier today. It was like being in Blade Runner. 6:09PM Preview What is it? It's the draw for the first round proper of the FA Cup: the oldest competition in world football.  The first round sees the 48 teams from League One and League Two joined by 32 non-league sides. When is it? Monday October 16. What time is it? The draw itself will begin at 7:10pm on Monday evening. The first round of the FA Cup will take place on Saturday November 4  Credit: AP  What TV channel is it on? The draw will be broadcast live on both BBC Two and BT Sport. Mark Chapman will present the BBC's coverage of the draw in half-hour long episode from 7pm, while BT Sport 3's show will also begin at 7pm.  When will the matches take place?  The first round will take place over the weekend of Friday November 3 to Monday 6 November 2017 Who's in the hat? Sutton United made it to the fifth round of the FA Cup last season  Credit: Getty Images  Three teams from the eighth tier of English football are among the non-league teams in the hat for the first round. Hyde United, who play in the Northern Premier League, beat Scarborough Athletic on Sunday afternoon to book their place in the competition.  Hampton and Richmond, who are coached by Sky Sports commentator Martin Tyler, failed in their bid to reach the FA Cup proper after losing to  National League South rivals Truro City. Truro's 2-0 victory over their league rivals means they become the first Cornwal team to reach the FA Cup first round since 1969.  Billericay Town, whose current players include Jamie O'Hara, Paul Konchesky and Jermaine Pennant, will also take their place in the draw.  FA Cup first round numbers 1 ACCRINGTON STANLEY 2 AFC WIMBLEDON 3 BARNET 4 BLACKBURN ROVERS 5 BLACKPOOL 6 BRADFORD CITY 7 BRISTOL ROVERS 8 BURY 9 CAMBRIDGE UNITED 10 CARLISLE UNITED 11 CHARLTON ATHLETIC 12 CHELTENHAM TOWN 13 CHESTERFIELD 14 COLCHESTER UNITED 15 COVENTRY CITY 16 CRAWLEY TOWN 17 CREWE ALEXANDRA 18 DONCASTER ROVERS 19 EXETER CITY 20 FLEETWOOD TOWN 21 FOREST GREEN ROVERS 22 GILLINGHAM 23 GRIMSBY TOWN 24 LINCOLN CITY 25 LUTON TOWN 26 MANSFIELD TOWN 27 MILTON KEYNES DONS 28 MORECAMBE 29 NEWPORT COUNTY 30 NORTHAMPTON TOWN 31 NOTTS COUNTY 32 OLDHAM ATHLETIC 33 OXFORD UNITED 34 PETERBOROUGH UNITED 35 PLYMOUTH ARGYLE 36 PORT VALE 37 PORTSMOUTH 38 ROCHDALE 39 ROTHERHAM UNITED 40 SCUNTHORPE UNITED 41 SHREWSBURY TOWN 42 SOUTHEND UNITED 43 STEVENAGE 44 SWINDON TOWN 45 WALSALL 46 WIGAN ATHLETIC 47 WYCOMBE WANDERERS 48 YEOVIL TOWN 49 TRANMERE ROVERS 50 SOLIHULL MOORS OR OSSETT TOWN 51 HARTLEPOOL UNITED 52 SHAW LANE ASSOCIATION 53 CHORLEY OR BOSTON UNITED 54 AFC TELFORD UNITED 55 GAINSBOROUGH TRINITY 56 NANTWICH TOWN OR KETTERING TOWN 57 GATESHEAD 58 GUISELEY 59 AFC FYLDE 60 KIDDERMINSTER HARRIERS 61 HYDE UNITED 62 MACCLESFIELD TOWN 63 BRACKLEY TOWN OR BILLERICAY TOWN 64 DAGENHAM & REDBRIDGE OR LEYTON ORIENT 65 HEREFORD 66 ALDERSHOT TOWN  67 BATH CITY OR CHELMSFORD CITY 68 OXFORD CITY 69 MAIDENHEAD UNITED 70 HEYBRIDGE SWIFTS 71 WOKING OR CONCORD RANGERS 72 TRURO CITY 73 DOVER ATHLETIC OR BROMLEY 74 SLOUGH TOWN 75 DARTFORD 76 BOREHAM WOOD 77 MAIDSTONE UNITED OR ENFIELD TOWN 78 LEATHERHEAD 79 SUTTON UNITED 80 EAST THURROCK UNITED OR EBBSFLEET UNITED

Referee Left Motionless on the Pitch After Horror Collision With Charlton Player

​There are certain incidents that transcend the sport of football, and one of those incidents is the health of our players. But, also included in the small print is obviously the health of the officials. In Saturday's matchup between Charlton Athletic and Doncaster Rovers, the referee that officiated the game was involved in an incident that left him motionless on the pitch. Robert Lewis, the referee, was subbed off dramatically after colliding with Charlton player, Josh Magennis early in the...

Referee Left Motionless on the Pitch After Horror Collision With Charlton Player

​There are certain incidents that transcend the sport of football, and one of those incidents is the health of our players. But, also included in the small print is obviously the health of the officials. In Saturday's matchup between Charlton Athletic and Doncaster Rovers, the referee that officiated the game was involved in an incident that left him motionless on the pitch. Robert Lewis, the referee, was subbed off dramatically after colliding with Charlton player, Josh Magennis early in the...

Referee Left Motionless on the Pitch After Horror Collision With Charlton Player

​There are certain incidents that transcend the sport of football, and one of those incidents is the health of our players. But, also included in the small print is obviously the health of the officials. In Saturday's matchup between Charlton Athletic and Doncaster Rovers, the referee that officiated the game was involved in an incident that left him motionless on the pitch. Robert Lewis, the referee, was subbed off dramatically after colliding with Charlton player, Josh Magennis early in the...

Talking Horses: will Charlton keep his strike-rate up at Ascot?

Talking Horses: will Charlton keep his strike-rate up at Ascot?

Australia Has Been Recession Free for 26 Years

Oct.02 -- AlphaBeta Advisors Director Andrew Charlton weighs in on the Australian economy. Bloomberg's Michael Heath also speaks on "Bloomberg Daybreak: Australia."

Australia Has Been Recession Free for 26 Years

Oct.02 -- AlphaBeta Advisors Director Andrew Charlton weighs in on the Australian economy. Bloomberg's Michael Heath also speaks on "Bloomberg Daybreak: Australia."

Australia Has Been Recession Free for 26 Years

Oct.02 -- AlphaBeta Advisors Director Andrew Charlton weighs in on the Australian economy. Bloomberg's Michael Heath also speaks on "Bloomberg Daybreak: Australia."

Australia Has Been Recession Free for 26 Years

Oct.02 -- AlphaBeta Advisors Director Andrew Charlton weighs in on the Australian economy. Bloomberg's Michael Heath also speaks on "Bloomberg Daybreak: Australia."

'Cruise line penalised me £500 because I was travelling alone'

Charles Sargent writes I am travelling solo and would like to book a cruise around the Canary Islands on the Tui Discovery 2, departing on October 6. I travelled on this ship earlier in the year and really enjoyed the experience, especially as I was able to upgrade to a Deluxe Balcony cabin. When I tried to book for the cruise in October, I discovered that I would be charged more than a couple would pay for the same cabin. Two people travelling together would pay just over £3,600 including flights. Yet as a solo traveller I would have to pay £4,100.  Thomson told me that the best way forward was to lie, and book the cruise for two people I accept – grudgingly – that I will have to pay for two flights but it seems very unfair to be charged an extra £500 over and above this simply because I’m travelling on my own. The Thomson agent said she did not know why but said that’s what the pricing system came up with.  I was told I had two options: find someone to share the cabin or book the cruise for two people and notify Thomson on arrival at the airport that the second person would not be travelling. She stressed that I must not do this beforehand. I did not want to lie or do things in this underhand way. Please can you find out why I am being penalised for travelling alone? Steep single supplements stalled one reader's attempts to book a cruise to the Canary Islands Credit: ©elenakibrik - stock.adobe.com Gill Charlton replies There are cheaper solo occupancy cabins on the Tui Discovery 2 but, as Mr Sargent discovered, these are in cabins on lower decks where he does not wish to be.  I asked Thomson why it was penalising solo travellers in this way. After all, Mr Sargent was already paying for a second unused flight that, presumably, Thomson could leave on sale. A member of the director’s office staff contacted Mr Sargent to explain that the price discrepancy was due to a discount being offered to couples. Mr Sargent pointed out that as he was effectively being treated as a couple surely he was eligible for the discount, too. The Thomson agent said he would see what he could do but after a week he had still not got back in touch. Cruise secrets: 12 things you didn't know about holidays at sea I nudged Thomson and, once again, Mr Sargent was told that the best way forward was to book for two and only alert the company that his companion couldn’t make it on the departure day. Once again, Mr Sargent asked why Thomson was asking him to lie. An hour later, the agent called back to say he could, after all, have the cabin at the same price as a couple. In fact, the cost had now been reduced to £3,300.  I asked Thomson for a proper explanation, fully expecting it to spout that old chestnut about solo passengers spending less on drinks and excursions than couples – whereas the reality is that, as they are travelling alone, solos are more likely to be sociable joiners-in.  Thomson hasn’t come up with a convincing explanation for this pricing conundrum, but it has accepted that the issue exists. The company tells me that it will now review its booking processes for solo cruise passengers and provide further training for its customer service teams so that solo cruisers get fairer treatment.  That’s a good start, but what I would like to see is a time when solo cruisers only have to buy one flight as part of their package deal. Three of the best cruise lines for solo travellers The last bastion of big single supplements is the cruise industry, but that is changing. New ships are being built with a complement of single cabins; some cruise lines offer supplement-free double cabins to both early and late bookers as they struggle to match capacity with demand. There are sometimes get-togethers for singles, and restaurant managers can arrange singles tables. Here are some cruise lines that are making a big effort. Fred Olsen (0845 004 2747; fredolsencruises.com) Has 40-plus single cabins on each of its four ships and good twin-for-sole-occupancy deals for late bookers. Norwegian Epic has 128 studio staterooms for singles NCL (0845 201 8900; ncl.co.uk) Led the way when it launched the Norwegian Epic in 2010 with 128 studio staterooms for singles (full-sized bed and bathroom) and access to a dedicated lounge and bar to interact with other solos  Pandaw Cruises (0208 326 5620; pandaw.com) No-supplement deals for singles occupying twin cabins (for early bookers and to sell last-minute spaces) on most departures of its luxury cruises on the rivers of south-east Asia. More essential advice What to do when holidays go wrong The 20 secrets to saving money on your hire car – and avoiding the rip-offs The only guide to travel insurance you'll ever need 10 tips for avoiding holiday villa fraud How to claim compensation when a flight is delayed Ask the experts Send your questions to asktheexperts@telegraph.co.uk. Please provide your name and nearest town and, if your query is about a dispute with a travel company, your full address, daytime telephone number and any booking reference. We regret that we cannot answer all the emails we receive.

'Cruise line penalised me £500 because I was travelling alone'

Charles Sargent writes I am travelling solo and would like to book a cruise around the Canary Islands on the Tui Discovery 2, departing on October 6. I travelled on this ship earlier in the year and really enjoyed the experience, especially as I was able to upgrade to a Deluxe Balcony cabin. When I tried to book for the cruise in October, I discovered that I would be charged more than a couple would pay for the same cabin. Two people travelling together would pay just over £3,600 including flights. Yet as a solo traveller I would have to pay £4,100.  Thomson told me that the best way forward was to lie, and book the cruise for two people I accept – grudgingly – that I will have to pay for two flights but it seems very unfair to be charged an extra £500 over and above this simply because I’m travelling on my own. The Thomson agent said she did not know why but said that’s what the pricing system came up with.  I was told I had two options: find someone to share the cabin or book the cruise for two people and notify Thomson on arrival at the airport that the second person would not be travelling. She stressed that I must not do this beforehand. I did not want to lie or do things in this underhand way. Please can you find out why I am being penalised for travelling alone? Steep single supplements stalled one reader's attempts to book a cruise to the Canary Islands Credit: ©elenakibrik - stock.adobe.com Gill Charlton replies There are cheaper solo occupancy cabins on the Tui Discovery 2 but, as Mr Sargent discovered, these are in cabins on lower decks where he does not wish to be.  I asked Thomson why it was penalising solo travellers in this way. After all, Mr Sargent was already paying for a second unused flight that, presumably, Thomson could leave on sale. A member of the director’s office staff contacted Mr Sargent to explain that the price discrepancy was due to a discount being offered to couples. Mr Sargent pointed out that as he was effectively being treated as a couple surely he was eligible for the discount, too. The Thomson agent said he would see what he could do but after a week he had still not got back in touch. Cruise secrets: 12 things you didn't know about holidays at sea I nudged Thomson and, once again, Mr Sargent was told that the best way forward was to book for two and only alert the company that his companion couldn’t make it on the departure day. Once again, Mr Sargent asked why Thomson was asking him to lie. An hour later, the agent called back to say he could, after all, have the cabin at the same price as a couple. In fact, the cost had now been reduced to £3,300.  I asked Thomson for a proper explanation, fully expecting it to spout that old chestnut about solo passengers spending less on drinks and excursions than couples – whereas the reality is that, as they are travelling alone, solos are more likely to be sociable joiners-in.  Thomson hasn’t come up with a convincing explanation for this pricing conundrum, but it has accepted that the issue exists. The company tells me that it will now review its booking processes for solo cruise passengers and provide further training for its customer service teams so that solo cruisers get fairer treatment.  That’s a good start, but what I would like to see is a time when solo cruisers only have to buy one flight as part of their package deal. Three of the best cruise lines for solo travellers The last bastion of big single supplements is the cruise industry, but that is changing. New ships are being built with a complement of single cabins; some cruise lines offer supplement-free double cabins to both early and late bookers as they struggle to match capacity with demand. There are sometimes get-togethers for singles, and restaurant managers can arrange singles tables. Here are some cruise lines that are making a big effort. Fred Olsen (0845 004 2747; fredolsencruises.com) Has 40-plus single cabins on each of its four ships and good twin-for-sole-occupancy deals for late bookers. Norwegian Epic has 128 studio staterooms for singles NCL (0845 201 8900; ncl.co.uk) Led the way when it launched the Norwegian Epic in 2010 with 128 studio staterooms for singles (full-sized bed and bathroom) and access to a dedicated lounge and bar to interact with other solos  Pandaw Cruises (0208 326 5620; pandaw.com) No-supplement deals for singles occupying twin cabins (for early bookers and to sell last-minute spaces) on most departures of its luxury cruises on the rivers of south-east Asia. More essential advice What to do when holidays go wrong The 20 secrets to saving money on your hire car – and avoiding the rip-offs The only guide to travel insurance you'll ever need 10 tips for avoiding holiday villa fraud How to claim compensation when a flight is delayed Ask the experts Send your questions to asktheexperts@telegraph.co.uk. Please provide your name and nearest town and, if your query is about a dispute with a travel company, your full address, daytime telephone number and any booking reference. We regret that we cannot answer all the emails we receive.

Chris Wilder steeled for an emotional Sheffield derby 

For someone who grew up watching Sheffield United on the terraces and later played for them, taking charge of his first Steel City derby as manager is likely to be an emotional occasion for Chris Wilder. Hillsborough will host the first meeting of United and Sheffield Wednesday for 5½ years and Wilder will hope the experience proves happier than his first real memory of the derby at that ground almost 40 years ago. Wilder had not long turned 12 when United travelled to Hillsborough on Boxing Day 1979 in the old third division and were duly trounced, with Jack Charlton’s Wednesday going on to win promotion that season. “I didn’t go to Hillsborough that day but they gave us a right doing and their fans have never stopped talking about it since,” Wilder said. Hillsborough will host the first Steel City derby in five and a half years Credit: GETTY IMAGES “A lot of water has gone under the bridge since then and right the way through there have been good and bad derby days I’ve had.  “I have been in the Kop as a fan after supping three pints with my mates but three pints? All I have ever really wanted against Sheff Wednesday is three points.” United missed the opportunity to go top of the Championship with a 1-0 defeat against Norwich last weekend, when Wilder, frustrated by the visitors’ perceived time-wasting and gamesmanship, was sent to the stands for entering the opposition technical area and kicking the ball back into play. But Wilder, who will be in the dug-out after escaping punishment for the Norwich flare-up, is not worried about losing his head again. “I think it’ll possibly be calmer than friends and family who are going to watch the game,” he said. 

Chris Wilder steeled for an emotional Sheffield derby 

For someone who grew up watching Sheffield United on the terraces and later played for them, taking charge of his first Steel City derby as manager is likely to be an emotional occasion for Chris Wilder. Hillsborough will host the first meeting of United and Sheffield Wednesday for 5½ years and Wilder will hope the experience proves happier than his first real memory of the derby at that ground almost 40 years ago. Wilder had not long turned 12 when United travelled to Hillsborough on Boxing Day 1979 in the old third division and were duly trounced, with Jack Charlton’s Wednesday going on to win promotion that season. “I didn’t go to Hillsborough that day but they gave us a right doing and their fans have never stopped talking about it since,” Wilder said. Hillsborough will host the first Steel City derby in five and a half years Credit: GETTY IMAGES “A lot of water has gone under the bridge since then and right the way through there have been good and bad derby days I’ve had.  “I have been in the Kop as a fan after supping three pints with my mates but three pints? All I have ever really wanted against Sheff Wednesday is three points.” United missed the opportunity to go top of the Championship with a 1-0 defeat against Norwich last weekend, when Wilder, frustrated by the visitors’ perceived time-wasting and gamesmanship, was sent to the stands for entering the opposition technical area and kicking the ball back into play. But Wilder, who will be in the dug-out after escaping punishment for the Norwich flare-up, is not worried about losing his head again. “I think it’ll possibly be calmer than friends and family who are going to watch the game,” he said. 

Manchester United vs Burton Albion, Carabao Cup: live score updates

Carabao Cup fourth round draw live   9:55PM Join us for the fourth round draw Here: Carabao Cup fourth round draw live. 9:54PM Full time Dyer scores again in the League Cup but it's not so much on the threshold of time but halfway through the door. United were very good at times,  the opposition notwithstanding. Burton battled gamely but there was an understandable gulf in class. Here's Dyer's goal. Man Utd 4 - 1 Burton (Lloyd Dyer, 90 + 1 min)   9:51PM 90+1 min Finally the opposition score at Old Trafford this season. Akers went off up the right, played in Murphy who bent a cross into the box where it was headed on. Pereira and Blind made a right Horlicks of it and it bobbled out to Dyer who drilled his shot into the net.    9:49PM Goal!! Man Utd 4-1 Burton (Dyer) 9:47PM Arsenal have won 1-0 Doncaster go out of the competition.  9:46PM 88 min He gets it over the wall but has out too much bend on it, merely a soupçon, a wafer-thin excess. It kisses the outside of the side netting. 9:45PM 87 min United free-kick juss to the left of the D. Martial to take ... 9:44PM 85 min Mason takes the ball away from Herrera, takes it five steps on and rolls it to Dyer who digs out a chip and lofts it over the bar.  9:40PM 81 min Lingard has done very well in the central role since half-time. It helps if you're winning so comfortably but his movement and especially his passing have been commendable.  Possession: Man Utd vs Burton   9:38PM 79 min Martial takes a diagonal pass through the inside-left channel, he takes  a touch then another to try to round Ripley which perhaps takes him too for for a left-foot finish. From an angle of about 345 degrees he bends a left-foot shot towards the far post but it bends back towards the field of play.  9:36PM 77 min Hope Akpan goes off for Albion to be replaced by Luke Akins. That's three Lukes on for Burton. What's your favourite gospel, Nigel?  9:35PM 76 min United sub: Ronero off, a rare goalkeeping sup. On comes Joel Pereira.  9:33PM 73 min Naylor yomps forward, makes 20 yards then pushes a pass out to Lund on the overlap up the right. He arcs a menacing cross to the back post that is met by Akpan, challenged by Smalling, who heads it over.  9:32PM 71 min Martial is having a whale of a time, bullocking up the left, weaving towards and then away form the touchline. He loses it, though, when he makes it into the box. Instead of dropping his head, though, in fear of the hook, he smiles ruefully.  9:28PM 69 min Shaw has an opportunity to shoot from 22 yards but plays the team man and curves a pass round intended for Herrera but Flanagan, in the absence of Allen who went off at half-term, makes the interception.  9:26PM 67 min Lingard drops deeper to arrow a pass out to the right for McTominay who runs through to try to meet it 18 yards out but Warnock, the former Liverpool, Blackburn, Villa Leeds, Derby and England left-back, just edges him and belts the ball behind.  9:24PM 65 min Martial is playing through the middle now but United are having a prolonged spell of keepball at the back.  9:22PM Manchester United sub Rashford off, McTominay on. The former hasn't scored a hat-trick yet for United but he'll have to wait.  9:21PM 62 min Martial taps the ball up to Rashford by the D who takes it back to goal, controls it with his first touch and lays it into his team-mate's path with the second as he turned. Martial receives it in his stride and sweeps his shot past Ripley from 18 yards. Possession: Man Utd vs Burton   9:18PM Goal!! Manchester United 4-0 Burton Albion (Martial) 9:17PM 58 min Sensational touch from Martial 10 yards outside the Burton box to control the pass and roll Flanagan by moving it forward with his sole but his shot after the slalom run, when he opened his body and aimed for the bottom right corner, wasn't pushed wide enough and gave Ripley a chance to reach it at full-stretch.  9:15PM 56 min Interesting point from Danny Higginbotham noting how much Shaw can help Rashford or Martial - whoever plays on the left. That Blind doesn't have the pace and that Darmian and Young are right-footed so cut inside. But if Shaw hits full fitness and his confidence can be restored, his ability to go buzzing down the line occupies a defender and creates space for the left-winger. United are passing it around in midfield in case you were wondering.  9:13PM 54 min Shaw opens up a run for Lingard with a pass into space down the right. Dogged work from Flanagan thwarts the opportunity when he snaps into a tackle to whip it away from Lingard.  Possession: Man Utd vs Burton   9:11PM 52 min Rashford sprints 20 yards to try to put the frighteners on Ripley who calmly whacks it long at the last moment. He must have felt Rashford's breath on him. The ball flies up the Albion right and Shaw controls it with a classy touch and turns away from danger.  9:08PM 49 min Luke Shaw makes a tremendous run in from the left, held it by running horizontally for a while and then darted towards the box. Picked out by a superb Carrick pass he rolls it past Ripley a split-second after the referee blew. The replay shows he was on Lund's shoulder, his left foot the only thing that was offside.  9:05PM 47 min Quick Burton attack after winning the ball from the kick-off. Akpan gets beyond Rashford to meet Plamer's swerving cross but wastes the service. United are playing a back three now with Lindelof-Smalling-Blind.  9:04PM Three half-time changes Luke Shaw replaces the wonderful Juan Mata for United. Burton bring on Luke Murphy and Stephen Warnock for Ben Turner and Jamie Allen.   Lingard scores Credit: Alex Livesey/Getty Images   9:01PM The only negative for United so far Has been defensively. They've let Burton's reserves have five chances, two of them gilded. It's not all Lindelof's fault but he has looked the most unconvincing of the four.  8:55PM What a difference a year makes 2016-17. MUFC score 15th home goal on Nov 24th in ninth H game. 2017-18. MUFC score 15th home goal on Sept 20th after four and bit H games.— Andy Mitten (@AndyMitten) September 20, 2017 8:52PM Half-time It's raining heavily as the teams go off. Job done. Changes for the second half likely with run outs for Shaw and McTominay. Look how high Blind is and how many touches Dyer has had, consequently making Darmian the deeper of the United full-backs. Man Utd vs Burton shots on goal  And the shot map. It's all about the accuracy ... and the frequency.  Man Utd vs Burton shots on goal Man Utd vs Burton shots on goal   8:47PM 45 min Varney takes on Carrick in a race through the box to the byline and cuts back a pass to the edge of the area. No one there.  8:45PM 43 min Varney leaps for a clearance in the centre-circle and gets a good 4ft in the air. His left leg clatters into Smalling's head and Burton are given a free-kick. Smalling looks as though he's been mugged.  8:44PM 42 min Slightest chance for Burton when the two Mattys team up, Palmer from the left crossing for Lund at the back stick who spoons his shot wide.  8:42PM 40 min Lingard goes down in the box after haring past Turner who chased him into the area. There was a touch from the defender and we could charitably say that Lingard is such an express that the merest touch was the reason he went sprawling. But the bump wasn't enough to warrant a penalty.  8:40PM 38 min It may be given as an own goal as the deflection from Turner was the key to beating Ripley but I think it was just about on target. It was made by Martial, who has been excellent. He played another neat passing move with Blind, advanced on a diagonal heading and stabbed a disguised pass through to Lingard when he looked as if he was shaping to shoot. That bit of skill diddled the defence and gave Lingard the space to hit it. It says Mata on this graphic but I'd swear it was Blind. Man Utd vs Burton shots on goal   8:37PM GOAL!! Man Utd 3-0 Burton (Lingard) 8:36PM 34 min Some respite for Burton up the left with a spell of possession until Dyer and Varney run out of space.  8:34PM Arsenal lead 1-0 at half-time Through Walcott's goal.  8:34PM 31 min Another quick turn from Mata in the box and a speared shot at Ripley that's saved. He's popping up all over the place, a ginger-bearded, philanthropic whack-a-Mata. Ripley is earning his keep. Man Utd vs Burton shots on goal   8:32PM 29 min Brilliant from Mata after United defend the corner comfortably. He receives the ball on the angle of the Burton box to the right. He sends Palmer off to buy a pint of milk with a feint and a shimmy then thrashes a left-foot shot against the foot of the post. It deflects out to Herrera who lifts it to the far post where Martial contorts himself into a scissor kick that some brave soul wears and deflects out for a corner.  8:29PM 26 min Chances at both ends First Martial goes kipping through the box and take son one too many defenders, losing the ball when he could have shot a couple of seconds earlier. Then he redeems himself by setting up Rashford for a header that Ripley saves because he held his nerve and stayed upright long enough when the striker expected him to go down. Then Burton break, Varney skins the very shaky Lindelof and squares to Mason through the six-yard box. If he lifts it over Romero, it's a goal but he doesn't get enough elevation and only gets a corner for all Varney's efforts.    Here's goal No2 for Rashford.  Rashford makes it two Credit:  Matthew Peters/Man Utd via Getty Images   8:25PM 23 min Rashford has a chance of a hat-trick, created by himself as he sprints down the right, beats Flanagan and flashes a shot at Ripley. Thirty seconds later Martial squares for Mata in the box, 10 yards out and he scoops his shot straight at Ripley.  8:22PM 20 min Wayward pass from Lindelof from the right touchline, makes a gift of the ball to Akpan who stuns it and moves forward. Herrera bundles him down to stop the break. Free-kick to Burton's reserves who lose the ball in two phases.  8:20PM 18 min Takes the ball in the inside-left position, plays a lovely triangle with Carrick and Blind. He takes the return, spins, slips Turner, takes two strides then whacks in a dippin shot that creeps in at the near post. Terrific finish again.   Man Utd 2 - 0 Burton (Marcus Rashford, 17 min)   8:18PM Goal!! Man Utd 2-0 Burton (Rashford)  8:17PM 15 min Martial runs back to Rob Lund. Mourinho has turned him into a much more disciplined player - but has he also trodden on his off-the-cuff creativity? Here's the goal: Rashford scores Credit: ANDREW YATES/Reuters   8:15PM 13 min Dyer is awarded a free-kick for a trip by Darmian. A trip followed by a grapple. The free-kick is parallel with the penalty spot, out on  the left. It's spun to the back post with the right foot, swinging in towards the far post. Romero goes up with Mason who is penalised for shoving him.  8:13PM Arsenal 1-0 Doncaster Rovers Theo Walcott scores, controlling a 40-yard diagonal pass over the defence on the right of the box. He cushions it and belts it past the keeper.  8:10PM 9 min Manchester United fans 'all hate Leeds scum'. It's been 13 years and they still sing it. Not famous any more? Right. Shot by Martial on the left of the box is well-saved by the talented Mr Ripley.  8:09PM 7 min Chances at both ends: first Lingard is set free to run down the inside-right channel on a diagonal burst to  meet the pass and shoot but it's blocked by a sliding defender. Burton clear and Jamie Allen gulls Mata and tries to chip Romero from 20 yards but hoists his shot on to the roof of the net.  8:07PM 5 min Ball up the middle to Lingard just beyond the D. He has his back to goal and lays it off cutely to his left for Rashford who lifts a crisp shot over Ripley's dive. Good finish that, and a good pass from Lingard.  Man Utd 1 - 0 Burton (Marcus Rashford, 5 min)   8:05PM Goal!! Man Utd 1-0 Burton (Rashford) 8:05PM 4 min Dyer is 35 but still has the legs to keep pace with Lingard and he kettles him in the corner quadrant for a few seconds before nicking it off him.  8:04PM 3 min Herrera spins off up the right and wins a throw in that comes to naught. United fans are singing their favourite Herman's Hermits song which spurs Burton into life. Lund threads a pass to the right of the area and Varney scuds a low shot straight at Romero.  8:02PM 1 min Burton kick off, set up in a 3-5-2. They play it back to Flanagan who launches it 50 yards up the left, Dyer chases and wins a throw off Darmian which quickly produces another. Lingard sticks to Dyer this time and pushes him back into his own half.   8:00PM Here come the teams And therefore here comes the ad break. Speaking of which ... Tonight's Carabao Cup betting offers including Manchester United to beat Burton at 16/1 7:52PM Why so many changes, Nigel? To reward the players who got us this far. Fair enough. 'Is this one of the best squads you've ever had, Jose?' 'No.' 7:33PM Line-ups in the trad style Man Utd Romero, Darmian, Lindelof, Smalling, Blind, Carrick,  Ander Herrera, Lingard, Mata, Martial, Rashford. Substitutes Jones, Lukaku, Young, Shaw, Fellaini, McTominay, Joel Pereira.  Luke Shaw gets a place on the bench for United Credit:  Matthew Peters/Man Utd via Getty Images Burton Albion Ripley, Lund, Turner, Flanagan, Naylor, Dyer,  Akpan, Palmer, Allen, Mason, Varney. Substitutes Warnock, McFadzean,  Murphy, Scannell, Akins, Sordell, Campbell.  Referee Graham Scott (Oxfordshire)  7:25PM Burton's fans are early birds The 'Holy Trinity' statue at Old Trafford is a focal point not only for fans of Best, Law and Charlton Credit: John Peters/Man Utd via Getty Images Burton fans take their seats early Credit: JASON CAIRNDUFF/ACTION IMAGES   7:20PM We're going to be keeping an eye on Arsenal v Doncaster, too So, with that in mind, here are the teams: Arsenal Ospina; Holding, Mertesacker, Chambers;  Maitland-Niles, Elneny, Wilshere, Nelson; Walcott, Sanchez;  Giroud. Substitutes Iwobi, Monreal, Akpom, Macey, Joseph Willock,  Da Silva, Nketiah.  Jack Wilshere starts for Arsenal Credit: Stuart MacFarlane/Arsenal FC via Getty Images Doncaster Rovers Lawlor, Blair, Butler, Whiteman, Wright, Kongolo,  Mason, Coppinger, Rowe, Houghton, May. Substitutes Toffolo, Alcock,  Marquis, Williams, Marosi, Mandeville, Garrett.  Referee Scott Duncan (Tyne & Wear)  7:09PM And here's how Burton line up Tonight's #MUFC starting line-up... pic.twitter.com/kOamxnn6Nr— Manchester United (@ManUtd) September 20, 2017   7:07PM Carrick starts for Manchester United And Rashford plays through the middle: Tonight's #MUFC starting line-up... pic.twitter.com/kOamxnn6Nr— Manchester United (@ManUtd) September 20, 2017   6:57PM Good evening It's been more than 25 years since a Clough emerged victorious at Old Trafford and, painfully for United, it was a decisive defeat celebrated by Brian and Nigel when Nottingham Forest defeated title-chasing United and gave Leeds renewed hope in the title race. Nigel has been back as a manager as well as when playing for Forest, Liverpool, Manchester City when his Cpnference side lost 5-0 having held United in the home leg of their third round FA Cup tie in 2006, memorably recalled here by John Percy in conversation with Clough. We don't have to go too far back to find an example of when United crashed out of this competition early - the 4-0 away defeat by MK Dons in round two in 2014 which flashed the first significant signs that Louis van Gaal may have lost his Midas touch. You have to go much further back, 10 years to be precise, for an exit in this round - and at home and by a Championship side. That was Coventry City, who went to Old Trafford and won 2-0 with Michael Mifsud, still in Malta's squad scoring twice. Best-priced accumulators | New customer offers But take a look at United's line-up from that match: Tomasz Kuszczak; Phil Bardsley, Jonny Evans, Gerard Pique, Danny Simpson; Nani, Lee Martin, John O'Shea, Chris Eagles; Anderson;  Dong.  OK, I'll give you the centre-forward and perhaps Lee Martin who has had a good if not stellar career. But the rest of them were good enough, perhaps not ready enough, to cope with a Championship side. Still, by the season's end, when they had won the title for the second year running and the Champions League, memories of the visit of Cov were probably erased by the euphoria doing a Lacuna Inc job to leave them with the eternal sunshine of the spotless mind.  Anderson, Dong Fangzhuo (left) and Chris Eagles (right) contemplate the coming hairdryer after Coventry score in 2007  Credit: DARREN STAPLES/REUTERS Jose Mourinho, a winner of this competition four times , has only one third round blemish to earse from his grey cells, the defeat by Charlton on penalties back in 2006. Of course he has grander ambitions but one thing that we should all agree is an admirable quality of the divisive Manchester United manager, he has no trophy snobbery whatsoever. If it glistens, he wants it.  Join us for the team news as soon as it drops. 

Manchester United vs Burton Albion, Carabao Cup: live score updates

Get odds of 16/1 on Man Utd to beat Burton inside 90 minutes   8:07PM 5 min Ball up the middle to Lingard just beyond the D. He has his back to goal and lays it off cutely to his left for Rashford who lifts a crisp shot over Ripley's dive. Good finish that, and a good pass from Lingard.  Man Utd 1 - 0 Burton (Marcus Rashford, 5 min)   8:05PM Goal!! Man Utd 1-0 Burton (Rashford) 8:05PM 4 min Dyer is 35 but still has the legs to keep pace with Lingard and he kettles him in the corner quadrant for a few seconds before nicking it off him.  8:04PM 3 min Herrera spins off up the right and wins a throw in that comes to naught. United fans are singing their favourite Herman's Hermits song which spurs Burton into life. Lund threads a pass to the right of the area and Varney scuds a low shot straight at Romero.  8:02PM 1 min Burton kick off, set up in a 3-5-2. They play it back to Flanagan who launches it 50 yards up the left, Dyer chases and wins a throw off Darmian which quickly produces another. Lingard sticks to Dyer this time and pushes him back into his own half.   8:00PM Here come the teams And therefore here comes the ad break. Speaking of which ... Tonight's Carabao Cup betting offers including Manchester United to beat Burton at 16/1 7:52PM Why so many changes, Nigel? To reward the players who got us this far. Fair enough. 'Is this one of the best squads you've ever had, Jose?' 'No.' 7:33PM Line-ups in the trad style Man Utd Romero, Darmian, Lindelof, Smalling, Blind, Carrick,  Ander Herrera, Lingard, Mata, Martial, Rashford. Substitutes Jones, Lukaku, Young, Shaw, Fellaini, McTominay, Joel Pereira.  Luke Shaw gets a place on the bench for United Credit:  Matthew Peters/Man Utd via Getty Images Burton Albion Ripley, Lund, Turner, Flanagan, Naylor, Dyer,  Akpan, Palmer, Allen, Mason, Varney. Substitutes Warnock, McFadzean,  Murphy, Scannell, Akins, Sordell, Campbell.  Referee Graham Scott (Oxfordshire)  7:25PM Burton's fans are early birds The 'Holy Trinity' statue at Old Trafford is a focal point not only for fans of Best, Law and Charlton Credit: John Peters/Man Utd via Getty Images Burton fans take their seats early Credit: JASON CAIRNDUFF/ACTION IMAGES   7:20PM We're going to be keeping an eye on Arsenal v Doncaster, too So, with that in mind, here are the teams: Arsenal Ospina; Holding, Mertesacker, Chambers;  Maitland-Niles, Elneny, Wilshere, Nelson; Walcott, Sanchez;  Giroud. Substitutes Iwobi, Monreal, Akpom, Macey, Joseph Willock,  Da Silva, Nketiah.  Jack Wilshere starts for Arsenal Credit: Stuart MacFarlane/Arsenal FC via Getty Images Doncaster Rovers Lawlor, Blair, Butler, Whiteman, Wright, Kongolo,  Mason, Coppinger, Rowe, Houghton, May. Substitutes Toffolo, Alcock,  Marquis, Williams, Marosi, Mandeville, Garrett.  Referee Scott Duncan (Tyne & Wear)  7:09PM And here's how Burton line up Tonight's #MUFC starting line-up... pic.twitter.com/kOamxnn6Nr— Manchester United (@ManUtd) September 20, 2017   7:07PM Carrick starts for Manchester United And Rashford plays through the middle: Tonight's #MUFC starting line-up... pic.twitter.com/kOamxnn6Nr— Manchester United (@ManUtd) September 20, 2017   6:57PM Good evening It's been more than 25 years since a Clough emerged victorious at Old Trafford and, painfully for United, it was a decisive defeat celebrated by Brian and Nigel when Nottingham Forest defeated title-chasing United and gave Leeds renewed hope in the title race. Nigel has been back as a manager as well as when playing for Forest, Liverpool, Manchester City when his Cpnference side lost 5-0 having held United in the home leg of their third round FA Cup tie in 2006, memorably recalled here by John Percy in conversation with Clough. We don't have to go too far back to find an example of when United crashed out of this competition early - the 4-0 away defeat by MK Dons in round two in 2014 which flashed the first significant signs that Louis van Gaal may have lost his Midas touch. You have to go much further back, 10 years to be precise, for an exit in this round - and at home and by a Championship side. That was Coventry City, who went to Old Trafford and won 2-0 with Michael Mifsud, still in Malta's squad scoring twice. Best-priced accumulators | New customer offers But take a look at United's line-up from that match: Tomasz Kuszczak; Phil Bardsley, Jonny Evans, Gerard Pique, Danny Simpson; Nani, Lee Martin, John O'Shea, Chris Eagles; Anderson;  Dong.  OK, I'll give you the centre-forward and perhaps Lee Martin who has had a good if not stellar career. But the rest of them were good enough, perhaps not ready enough, to cope with a Championship side. Still, by the season's end, when they had won the title for the second year running and the Champions League, memories of the visit of Cov were probably erased by the euphoria doing a Lacuna Inc job to leave them with the eternal sunshine of the spotless mind.  Anderson, Dong Fangzhuo (left) and Chris Eagles (right) contemplate the coming hairdryer after Coventry score in 2007  Credit: DARREN STAPLES/REUTERS Jose Mourinho, a winner of this competition four times , has only one third round blemish to earse from his grey cells, the defeat by Charlton on penalties back in 2006. Of course he has grander ambitions but one thing that we should all agree is an admirable quality of the divisive Manchester United manager, he has no trophy snobbery whatsoever. If it glistens, he wants it.  Join us for the team news as soon as it drops. 

Manchester United vs Burton Albion, Carabao Cup: live score updates

Get odds of 16/1 on Man Utd to beat Burton inside 90 minutes   7:09PM And here's how Burton line up Tonight's #MUFC starting line-up... pic.twitter.com/kOamxnn6Nr— Manchester United (@ManUtd) September 20, 2017   7:07PM Carrick starts for Manchester United And Rashford plays through the middle: Tonight's #MUFC starting line-up... pic.twitter.com/kOamxnn6Nr— Manchester United (@ManUtd) September 20, 2017   6:57PM Good evening It's been more than 25 years since a Clough emerged victorious at Old Trafford and, painfully for United, it was a decisive defeat celebrated by Brian and Nigel when Nottingham Forest defeated title-chasing United and gave Leeds renewed hope in the title race. Nigel has been back as a manager as well as when playing for Forest, Liverpool, Manchester City when his Cpnference side lost 5-0 having held United in the home leg of their third round FA Cup tie in 2006, memorably recalled here by John Percy in conversation with Clough. We don't have to go too far back to find an example of when United crashed out of this competition early - the 4-0 away defeat by MK Dons in round two in 2014 which flashed the first significant signs that Louis van Gaal may have lost his Midas touch. You have to go much further back, 10 years to be precise, for an exit in this round - and at home and by a Championship side. That was Coventry City, who went to Old Trafford and won 2-0 with Michael Mifsud, still in Malta's squad scoring twice. Best-priced accumulators | New customer offers But take a look at United's line-up from that match: Tomasz Kuszczak; Phil Bardsley, Jonny Evans, Gerard Pique, Danny Simpson; Nani, Lee Martin, John O'Shea, Chris Eagles; Anderson;  Dong.  OK, I'll give you the centre-forward and perhaps Lee Martin who has had a good if not stellar career. But the rest of them were good enough, perhaps not ready enough, to cope with a Championship side. Still, by the season's end, when they had won the title for the second year running and the Champions League, memories of the visit of Cov were probably erased by the euphoria doing a Lacuna Inc job to leave them with the eternal sunshine of the spotless mind.  Anderson, Dong Fangzhuo (left) and Chris Eagles (right) contemplate the coming hairdryer after Coventry score in 2007  Credit: DARREN STAPLES/REUTERS Jose Mourinho, a winner of this competition four times , has only one third round blemish to earse from his grey cells, the defeat by Charlton on penalties back in 2006. Of course he has grander ambitions but one thing that we should all agree is an admirable quality of the divisive Manchester United manager, he has no trophy snobbery whatsoever. If it glistens, he wants it.  Join us for the team news as soon as it drops. 

Britain's loveliest restaurants with rooms for autumn

What could be more appealing than the epicurean informality of an inn or restaurant with rooms? These wonderfully relaxed establishments combine an emphasis on great ingredients from the area with local charm and stylish panache. There’s an insider feel that you don’t get at a more formal hotel, and there’s a foodie enthusiasm that wouldn’t be exuded quite as joyfully at a larger enterprise. Autumn/winter is a particularly good time to seek out their gently indulgent accommodation and fabulous seasonal flavours – the likes of wild rabbit with foraged mushrooms, grouse and damsons, elderberries and more. Harriet O'Brien Our experts round up their favourite establishments in Britain, from the Cotswolds to Cornwall, Suffolk to Skye, for feasting – and then flopping.  ENGLAND Cotswolds The Wild RabbitKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Wild Rabbit is a haven of eco-elegance a few fields away from sister enterprise Daylesford, the organic farm shop, deli, spa (and more) of Carole Bamford. She transformed this 18th-century inn and it has been meticulously devised in quiet colours, stone and wood. It’s a beautiful posh pub, with food to match. The kitchen is masterminded by Tim Allen, who won the Wild Rabbit a Michelin star in October 2016. His cuisine takes diners on a taste adventure, with dishes such as haddock on leek and apple slaw, topped with an amazingly cooked egg – poached and lightly deep fried. Read expert review From £148per night The Feathered Nest Country InnOxfordshire, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fabulous food and a superb setting above the Evenlode valley make this old country inn a hedonistic haven. The owners describe it as a pub with a twist. They’ve created an elegant restaurant that has won armloads of awards since it opened, with three stylish and supremely comfy bedrooms. The exquisite food is almost on a par with sleek gastro establishments such as Tom Kerridge’s The Hand and Flowers in Marlow - and even Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons where head chef Kuba Winkowski previously worked. There’s a stupendous wine list, too. Among the choice of 200 or so is a wonderful range of South African wines. There’s also a bar menu featuring classics such as burgers of brilliant quality. Read expert review From £140per night The Wheatsheaf InnNorthleach, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A creeper-clad coaching inn turned arty, boutique haven. The Wheatsheaf is in a particularly pretty and enterprising little Cotswold town. The restaurant draws a regular local crowd and the emphasis is on the very best quality, from the menu ingredients to the room amenities. The sophisticated menu offers great flavour combinations, the likes of roast parsnip and fennel salad with chestnuts, and mutton and apple pie with creamed potatoes. If there’s space in the bar beforehand try an aperitif of Sloe Negroni, with sloe gin and Campari, or opt for a pint of Cotswold Old Hooky. Read expert review From £102per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Kingham PloughKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Kingham Plough is a treat of a foodie destinatio, with relaxing furnishings, genial staff and brilliantly conceived menus. Emily Watkins has won numerous awards for her modern British cuisine with a twist ‒ dishes are often based on old Cotswold recipes. Her food is also much inspired by local produce; the likes of Windrush Valley goat cheese and pork from Paddock Farm a few miles away. There’s a pleasingly short and sophisticated à la carte menu: starters might include slow braised oxtail with horseradish, and mains could feature venison wellington, with meat supplied from nearby Cornbury Park. There’s also a well-priced bar menu featuring gastro comfort food such as rabbit parfait. Read expert review From £145per night The Ebrington ArmsEbrington, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating This hidden treasure set in a gloriously unspoilt village is a modern day version of a country tavern – it’s at once a genuine pub that brews its own very smooth ales; a lovely restaurant with real local flavour; and a charming hotel with rural-chic bedrooms. Chef Ben Dulley offers short, understated menus which reflect his commitment to freshness, with many vegetables straight from surrounding Drinkwater Farm. Dishes are beautifully presented and packed with local flavour – the likes of hot-smoked Bibury trout salad, and Cotswold lamb with stuffed tomatoes. Wines are from independent growers, including the Cotswolds’ own Little Oak Vineyard. Read expert review From £165per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best Cotswolds pubs with rooms   Oxfordshire Artist Residence OxfordshireSouth Leigh, Oxfordshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A unique country pub with a bohemian twist and arty vibe, offering gorgeous quirky rooms, scrumptious meals and contemporary art. The food is as heart-warming as the dining room. Local game and meat, foraged herbs and flowers join vegetables from the garden. The menu could include the likes of smoky pigeon breast electrified by a pickled walnut with caramelised chicory, port jelly and smoked spring onions and plaice in seaweed butter, smoked cockles, sea vegetables and bisque. The wine list is small, selective and good value. Join locals for a pint at the bar, read the paper or play cards around the fire. Read expert review From £130per night • The best luxury hotels in Oxfordshire   Lake District L’EnclumeCartmel, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Simon Rogan's two-Michelin-starred restaurant plus handful of rooms stay true both to the simple village location and rich surrounding land. Rooms are modest but smartly furnished, the setting picture-box pretty while the food is an exemplar of local sourcing and creativity. This isn’t Blumenthal-style magic but simply 20 (tiny) courses of exceptional skill, balance and creativity: an egg shell containing a yolk in mushroom broth; confit cauliflower in a pea and calamint sauce; a finger of turbot in nasturtium butter, the dinkiest caramel mousse sitting on compressed apple. All is presented exquisitely but without fanfare on rustic pottery, handmade glass, even a pebble. The Coravin wine system allows you to try top-rank or small-producer wines. Read expert review From £129per night The Punch Bowl InnLake District, Cumbria, England 8Telegraph expert rating A smart but relaxed country inn, in a quiet corner of the Lake District, with a deserved reputation for its classy food. The ground floor is a semi open-plan series of dining rooms, bar and relaxed eating areas, separated by little steps. The cooking is smart-city-restaurant standard producing assured, modern British dishes that are interesting without being tricksy or fussy. No fancy canapés or pre-starters, just clean flavours. Starters might include black pudding with bubble and squeak or tomato salad with local crab and lobster while mains could be pork with ham hock croquette or cod with Morteau sausage. There's a wide-ranging wine list, plus a couple of local real ales. Read expert review From £130per night • The Lake District's best pubs and inns   Peak District The Samuel Fox Country InnHope Valley, Peak District, England 8Telegraph expert rating This stone-built inn – which is more of a restaurant with rooms than a standard country pub – has an ever-growing reputation. Come for a great dinner, stay over in one of four comfortable rooms and spend the next day exploring the glorious Peak District. The foodie credentials are strong: chef-patron James Duckett has worked with Albert Roux, Michel Roux, Marcus Wareing and Philip Howard, and done extended stints in Australia and Spain. Now he turns out some of the best food in the area: everything from a piquant, pretty-as-a-picture starter of soused sardines to the kind of iced chocolate cherry parfait that makes you wish you hadn’t shared with your other half. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Peak District   Yorkshire Crab Manor HotelThirsk, Yorkshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fun and exotic, individually themed rooms combined with a well-regarded seafood restaurant and an overall madcap sense of decoration make this a hugely popular choice for special occasions. The restaurant specialises in fish and seafood serving both classics – lobster thermidor, grilled Queen scallops – as well as more modern dishes such as sea trout with samphire. It's open for lunch and dinner, and for afternoon 'lighter' options (including moules mariniere), but there's nothing delicate about portion sizes. Half the fun is the setting: jolly bar, romantic dining room or brighter conservatory, all with a bonkers decoration that includes a suite of orchestral instruments. Breakfast is also a delight. Read expert review From £165per night The Star InnHarome, Helmsley, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant-with-rooms with chocolate-box, thatched-pub looks and a bucolic farming-village location. Bedrooms, across the road, have a comfy, hunting-lodge style. Whitby-born chef-owner Andrew Pern was one of the first champions of local sourcing - and why wouldn’t you be with his ‘back garden’: moorland game and pasture-fed meat, coastal fish, Yorkshire Wolds’ fruit and vegetables. He now has a huge kitchen garden at the back of the pub. His menus are punchy, robust yet skilfully balanced and as much about texture as taste: crab stick with seashore vegetables and avocado ice, perhaps followed by roasted lamb chop with truffled faggot or honey-roasted duck with tea-poached quail’s egg. Read expert review From £150per night The Timble InnNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 8Telegraph expert rating A food-driven village pub in a quiet, yet surprisingly well-connected location with bold, contemporary styling and smart bedrooms. Glorious views and walks are on the doorstep. A pub that does two sittings for Sunday lunch is serious about food, and has been awarded two AA rosettes for it. It’s ambitious stuff – wood pigeon with quail’s egg and black pudding; venison loin with celeriac remoulade and chestnuts. The seafood platter and chateaubriand steak are favourites. It's not really a beer pub but offers a wide-ranging wine list – including fine ones by the glass – plus local gins. Read expert review From £150per night The Yorke ArmsNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant with rooms in an off-the-beaten-track location; perfect for walking off the spoiling food. The food is why people come here – some helicopter in from London for chef-proprietor Frances Atkins’s flavour-intense cooking. It’s not fussy or tricksy, just skilled, imaginative and full of the unexpected – quail with lychee and jasmine; brill with fennel in turmeric broth, peach and curd tart. Choose the eight-course tasting menu and everything is a surprise. Much is home-grown; the huge kitchen garden produces a summer surplus. These are meals to savour (even the lunchtime bar menu includes devilled kidneys, and gratin of seared scallops). Read expert review From £345per night • The best luxury hotels in Yorkshire   Norfolk Morston HallNorfolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating A flint- and brick-built Jacobean country-house hotel, with large conservatory extensions that provide extra dining space. Inside, you’ll find open fires, squashy sofas and cosy corners in a hushed, fairly formal atmosphere. The food is the main reason to come to Morston Hall, the only restaurant with a Michelin star on this stretch of coast. Galton Blackiston’s cooking is rated highly by both visitors and locals: he offers a set dinner based on fresh, local ingredients, served at 8pm daily. Four courses usually include two meat dishes (perhaps confit of duck or beef fillet) and a fish course. Recommended wines are suggested to accompany the dishes – or you can choose from an extensive list. Read expert review From £340per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Norfolk   Suffolk The Great HouseLavenham, Suffolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating The five-bedroom hotel looks onto the market square of Lavenham, a well-preserved medieval village of timbered houses. It would be wrong to stay here without sampling the food, as this is primarily a restaurant – and a very good one at that. From a regularly changing menu, you might find starters of mussels with chilli, coriander and cream, tuna sashimi or wild mushroom ravioli, and main courses of pheasant supreme, grilled fillet of lamb with thyme sauce or roasted duck breast with grilled beetroot. Desserts could be dark chocolate terrine, millefeuille or maple syrup rice pudding. Read expert review From £99per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best spa hotels in Suffolk   Somerset The White PostYeovil, Somerset, England 8Telegraph expert rating At this cosy Victorian ‘pub-and-lodgings’, the elegant gastronomy is as much a pull as the rooms. Brett’s passion for foraging and elegant presentation seeps through. The best way to experience the dishes? The 10-course tasting menu, which pays homage to the West Country (pork done eight ways, served with local chilli and ginger cider) as well as international influences (spiced lentil dhal with gurnard, mango and coconut). The wine list is sufficient but it’s the local ales and ciders that stand out, particularly if you pair a pint of Dorset Knob bitter with the Sunday roast. Painted walls are interrupted only by the wide windows, long cardinal-coloured drapes and filament bulb lamps that, along with on-table candles, add just enough light during evening dining. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The most romantic hotels in Somerset   Dorset La FosseCranborne, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating Snug in the wave-like green hills of east Dorset, La Fosse at Cranborne is a peaceful bed and breakfast as well as popular restaurant. Run by husband and wife, this simple West Country retreat, embracing both modern and traditional, feels as far from the madding crowds as possible. Owner-chef Mark is a true locavore, sourcing as much from in and around the village as possible. His passion for local, inventive cuisine has seen him named best chef in Dorset. The colourful duck dish, replete with homegrown vegetables, is a highlight, drizzled in a piquant jus. Mark’s award-winning cheeseboard is part of the experience, so save some room. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Anchor InnSeatown, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Anchor Inn, sat beyond snaking lanes and tucked between scarped cliffs on the edge of a little known Dorset village, is a destination gastropub serving elevated British classics. It is also a boutique hideaway that cocoons guests amid the sound of rolling waves. If the weather is decent, expect a fight to secure a lunchtime spot, either tucked inside or al fresco. Menus from head chef Jean-Paul De Ronne — who previously worked under Masterchef winner Mat Follas — reveal commitment to seasonal fare from land and sea, such as the fresh crab salad using crustacea caught only metres away. Ales are all from Palmers, brewed four miles away, while an extensive cocktail list from former Hix bartender David Smith features a number of Dorset’s own spirits. Read expert review From £120per night • The best hotels in Dorset   Buckinghamshire The Mash InnRadnage, Buckinghamshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating Described by its owner Nick Mash as a ‘new generation inn’, The Mash Inn's aim is to remove the barriers between chef and diner. The open kitchen takes centre stage: a solid wood workstation groaning with ingredients and stacked plates, beneath a ceiling rack dripping with pots and pans, in front of an open fire for rotisserie cooking. Chef Jon Parry cooks up a storm, producing a delicious, earthy and inventive no frills tasting menu and a short à la carte menu. Much of the produce is from the garden or very local. Diners sit at individual tables or at a large communal table, which may sound daunting but such is the communal, friendly atmosphere that it’s a pleasure to do so. Read expert review From £100per night The Hand & FlowersMarlow, Buckinghamshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn with a Michelin-starred restaurant, enticing locals to dine, and couples for weekends or nights away. It's on busy West Street, just along the road from the house where Mary Shelley created Frankenstein. The chef-proprietor is Tom Kerridge, who gained a Michelin star within 10 months from a kitchen which was then the size of a large cupboard. These days he has a new, celadon green kitchen and a brigade of chefs. As restaurants go, it rocks. Expect crayfish scotch egg, slow cooked duck breast with duck fat chips and other earthy, deeply satisfying dishes that are also full of imaginative twists, served in a cosy and convivial dining room. Read expert review From £140per night • The best hotels in Buckinghamshire   Kent RocksaltFolkestone, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Rocksalt is the littoral culinary kingdom of Mark Sargeant of Claridge's fame. A microcosm of London sophistication in gritty Folkestone, it's a genuine dining destination. The recent addition of four bedrooms above "Sargey's" adjacent Smokehouse enables visitors to abandon themselves to gluttony. His dedication to local ingredients introduces diners to new treasures, such as meaty huss dogfish and tart sea buckthorn (oozing out of a dense chocolate mousse fondant), yet dishes are refreshingly clean and unpretentious. Hunks of bread, served with beef dripping, rich butter and home-roasted salt, and nuggets of treacly fudge and slices of colourful rock bookend a perfectly executed meal. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Wife of BathWye, Kent, England 9Telegraph expert rating Another addition to chef Mark Sargeant and Josh De Haan's portfolio of Kentish restaurants with rooms. With a superb Spanish restaurant and tiny tapas bar, its signature quirky style and authentic cuisine works surprisingly well in the bucolic setting. The restaurant serves impeccable fare: juicy scallops with spicy chorizo and earthy morcillo (black pudding); honey sweet melon smothered in Brindisa's finest Serrano ham; succulent Galician steaks with creamy aioli and fiery paprika potatoes; and hake with radishes, Seville orange and a buttery sauce laced with Gin Mare. Save space for pudding: the bitter chocolate tart with salt and olive oil is revelatory, as is ice-cream made with raisins soaked in PX sherry. Read expert review From £70per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Read's Restaurant With RoomsFaversham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Read's, housed in a Georgian mansion on the north Kentish coast, is a smart restaurant with six rooms, owned and run by acclaimed chef David Pitchford and his wife Rona. Sticking firmly to their decades-long recipe for success, they deliver classic cuisine and unfussy hospitality. David won a Michelin star in 1992, which he retained for 20 consecutive years, becoming the second longest holder of the accolade in Britain. The food is hard to fault, if lacking the innovation and excitement that comes with Michelin recognition: comforting, classic French cuisine with British influence. Think ham and pea mousse; smoked haddock in cream sauce topped with cheese soufflé; Kentish lamb served with buttery asparagus and garden vegetables; and a Cassis-soaked summer pudding. Read expert review From £145per night The Dog at WinghamWingham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating A medieval pub in a rural village, run by an enterprising local family, that serves exceptionally good food and features eight attractive bedrooms. Virtually equidistant from Canterbury and Sandwich, it’s ideally located for exploring the Kentish city, countryside and coast. The kitchen is overseen by the young and talented Dan Johns, who has worked at Gary Rhodes’ Searcy’s at The Gherkin and Urban Coterie. The menu changes monthly to reflect seasonality and local produce. Imaginative starters such as fragrant Thai-style chicken salad and rich pork and pistachio terrine with pineapple jam are followed by melt-in-the-mouth Moroccan spiced lamb and crisp pork collar with chorizo dumplings. Read expert review From £86per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best pubs with rooms in Kent   Devon The Dartmoor InnOkehampton, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 16th-century coaching inn on the north-western edge of Dartmoor National Park is acclaimed for its fresh, seasonal cooking, but it’s worth bedding down for a stay in one of its three chic bedrooms. A blackboard heralds not only the breed of cattle, but also the name of the farmer it has come from. Dishes are pub classics, done to perfection: rib-eye steak and chips, confit of duck leg with toffee apple puree and roasted hazelnuts, and brisket of beef. Philip has a strong ethical policy, forging strong links with local artisan food producers, and ensures the beef has been grass fed and reared within a 20-mile radius. Breakfast is refreshingly original, with dainty portions of caramelised bananas or a daring cooked menu, including herb-crusted goat’s cheese, black pudding and bacon lardons. Read expert review From £65per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Lamb InnSandford, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating With open fires, beamed walls, deep sofas and award-winning food, this 16th-century inn in the village of Sandford is a pub of dreams for town-dwellers. Upstairs, seven bedrooms have big beds, soft linen and powerful showers, and there’s a pretty cobbled terrace at the rear. The Lamb Inn’s menu consistently attracts rave reviews. The produce is seasonal and locally sourced, mixing upmarket dishes with pub classics: shellfish bisque, mushroom ravioli, roasted pigeon with smoked bacon and savoy cabbage or steak and chips. The perfectly fluffy sticky toffee pudding is worth a visit alone. Landlord Mark is a fan of real ale and regularly rotates his cask brews to ensure they stay fresh. Read expert review From £69per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Masons ArmsBranscombe, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This dog-friendly 14th-century thatched inn, in Branscombe, on the Jurassic Coast, is one of Devon’s best. It prides itself on serving local, seasonal Devon fare on a traditional pub menu – it even has a 'food sourcing map' detailing exactly where the produce comes from. There’s steamed River Exe mussels and fries, steak and kidney shortcrust pie, rump steak and a seafood platter. Ales, hand-pumped from casks, are just as local. On a sunny day, the action moves outside to the pretty suntrap terrace. It's a 15-minute walk to Branscombe Beach, a lovely, long shingle cove from where you can pick up the South West Coastal Path. Read expert review From £75per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Salutation InnTopsham, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating Eat well and rest your head at this 18th-century coaching inn in chichi Topsham: a stylish option with a truly excellent restaurant, helmed by one of Gordon Ramsay's former protégés. Exquisite handmade petit-fours welcome guests on arrival – the first hint that your dining experience will be full of extra surprises. The wild mushroom appetiser comes accompanied by an umami-enhancing pinot noir, and the tomato gazpacho with local crab, served in a glass on ice, and followed by a rich rump of beef from Greendale Farm. Each modern dish is accompanied by diverse wines chosen by Stephen Edwardes – the unusual sake complements the beautiful strawberry dessert which is garnished with home-grown edible flowers. Read expert review From £145per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Devon   Cornwall The Gurnard's HeadSt Ives, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn offering outstanding food, fabulous sea and moorland views, situated close to St Ives and Land's End. Popular with walkers and couples of all ages seeking a low-key, restorative break in a wild coastal location. Locals come from miles around to dine here. The Scottish head chef, Bruce Rennie, cooks a short, inventive menu. Lunch may include beetroot risotto, octopus and white wine stew, or Merguez sausages with Puy lentils. The supper menu may include salmon and lobster tortellini, cod with pig’s trotter, and sole with Vermouth. The wine list focuses on Old World wines, notably from France, Italy and Portugal. Read expert review From £110per night Padstow TownhousePadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A handsome listed townhouse on Padstow's high street that has been superbly renovated and opened as a six-bedroom luxury guesthouse by chef Paul Ainsworth to complement his Michelin-starred restaurant, Paul Ainsworth at Number 6. Head there for amusingly-presented, delicately-flavoured meat and fish dishes and a fun and informal atmosphere, or to his even more informal restaurant, Rojanos, for superior pasta, pizza and hamburgers. Breakfast is served at the latter. The guesthouse owns an electric BMW in which guests can be transported if they don’t want to walk around. Read expert review From £280per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com St Petroc's HotelPadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A sociable, intimate townhouse with a labyrinth of gorgeously styled sitting and reading rooms – as well as a buzzy bistro. St Petroc’s Bistro opened along with the hotel in 1988. It’s a lovely room – with an engaging selection of original art on the walls – and a relaxing, happy place to eat at either lunch or dinner. Pride of place on the menu goes to the 30-day dry-aged steaks, but there are fish, chicken and vegetarian options as well – all of them classic Rick Stein recipes (try the grilled hake with Serrano ham, succotash and chives). Ruby’s Bar is the new Stein pub – a great place for a local beer or cocktail. Read expert review From £112per night Kota Restaurant with RoomsPorthleven, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating With a fantastic Asian-Cornish fusion restaurant downstairs, and Porthleven’s picturesque harbour on the doorstep, the Kota’s two simple, homey rooms are proof that sometimes substance can win over style. The vibe in the restaurant is casual, with a long room overlooking the harbour and a waterfront lawn on which you can dine in good weather. New Zealander Jude, who is part Maori, part Malay-Chinese, brings Asian spices and cooking styles to fresh, meticulously sourced Cornish produce – squid with green mango salad, scallops with miso dressing and seaweed salad, and Laksa with prawns, mussels and fish. There are also some very creative burgers – tempura fish with wasabi tartare, and satay chicken with Asian slaw. Read expert review From £75per night DriftwoodPortscatho, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating Sitting on a hill above the rugged coastline of the Roseland peninsula, Driftwood is nautically furnished in soft creams and blues. A Michelin-starred restaurant, private sea-facing terraces, and a private beach make this the perfect venue for pretty much everyone. There are wonderful coastal path walks for miles in each direction. This is Cornish cooking at its finest: unfussy and focused on bringing out the flavour of fresh fish and seafood and locally reared beef and lamb. Dinner in summer comprises a six-course tasting menu with complementary wines. For children there are early suppers with proper chef-made food. Read expert review From £250per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Coombeshead FarmLewannick, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating This is the joint venture from chef Tom Adams of London restaurant Pitt Cue and April Bloomfield, English born chef/proprietor of The Spotted Pig in New York. Both wanted to get back to the roots of food and hospitality and the result is this relaxed communal dining farmhouse b&b. Tom and his partner Lottie Mew live off the land and share their fresh, foraged, pickled and harvested produce with their guests. Tom cooks a three-course feast, kicking off with plates of delicious nibbles from 6.30pm onwards, which is shared at a communal table by all the guests. Tom’s own rare breed Mangalitza pigs feature large, plus perhaps a cep and walnut broth, lamb shoulder and mushroom porridge, with madeleine, whey and prune for pudding. Wines are unusual. Read expert review From £175per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Cornwall   Sussex The Barn at RoundhurstLurgashall, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating A rural South Downs retreat on a 250-acre organic farm with its own lakes. Home-reared food is a specialty. Converted outhouses with six rooms are set around a courtyard, just steps from a dramatic converted barn for dining and lounging. A four-course set menu with generous portions is available for guests and non-guests Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays; a light supper is provided for guests on other days. Meals highlight the farm’s own organic beef, lamb and pork and could include colourful heritage carrots and an exceptional triple chocolate mousse. Read expert review From £98per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com CrouchersChichester, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating An unassuming motel-like exterior belies a foodie haven a short drive from the Witterings. Relax on the patio of a garden-facing room, head to the beach, or explore the cultural and sporting highlights around Chichester but leave room for dinner in the impressive restaurant. Proximity to the coast ensures good seafood. The squid-ink pasta starter is light and delicate and a showy dessert of white chocolate and saffron mousse with edible flowers, caramel and orange ice-cream is a multi-sensory delight. A strong wine list includes an emphasis on the owners’ native South Africa. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Crab & LobsterWest Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating Herons can be seen on the doorstep of this modernised 350-year-old pub beside a bird sanctuary, where guests can stay in cosy bedrooms or an adjoining cottage. Tuck into locally caught seafood in the bar-restaurant and plan nature walks or trips to nearby beaches. The menu, as this gastropub’s name suggests, makes good use of locally caught seafood. Baked Selsey crab with a salad or crab cakes is a highlight. Meat, like rump of lamb (on an autumn menu with garlic Pommes Anna, butternut squash purée, confit tomatoes, baby leeks and Madeira jus) is also locally reared. There’s an extensive wine list and takeaway fish and chips. Read expert review From £160per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith Wingrove HouseAlfriston, South Downs, England 8Telegraph expert rating Yards from the South Downs Way and the half-timbered, candlelit pubs of Alfriston, this swish 19th-century boutique hotel with a modern country restaurant delivers roaring log fires, low-slung sofas and top-notch food, and draws city dwellers craving an easy country escape. Matthew Comben, formerly of the Hungry Monk in Jevington, heads up the kitchen and has brought with him the Monk's original banoffee pie recipe. Highlights from the seasonal menu include cauliflower fritters with Brighton blue cheese mayonnaise, and a soft beef fillet with tarragon. There's an impressive gin menu with 11 different options, including Brighton Gin, and a refreshingly reasonable wine list. Read expert review From £108per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best places and cities to visit in England – and where to stay   Cheshire The Roebuck InnMobberley, Cheshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This French-influenced bistro with rooms is perfect weekend break material, with lashings of character, great food and a beautifully designed garden. The bistro menu, tweaked with the seasons, is European in style, and everything comes in generous portions, whether it’s ‘small plates’ of cassoulet, caponata and crostini; mains such as saffron risotto, venison bourguignon and moules marinière; or puds of tarte au citron, profiteroles and crème caramel. On the drinks front, you’ll find an interesting selection of local ales, old-world wines and a vintage dresser filled with classic aperitifs and digestifs. Read expert review From £115per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • Britain's cosiest hotels for autumn   County Durham Lord Crewe ArmsBlanchland, Northumberland, England 9Telegraph expert rating A lord-of-the-manor building, in a pin-neat estate village, that oozes atmosphere at every stone-flagged turn. A reputation for honest, British cooking, plus its rural location, makes it popular with walkers and foodies as well as the country-sports fraternity. Expect punchy, robust, British cooking, rich with flavour and unusual combinations: devilled lamb’s kidneys on roasted cauliflower; grilled sea trout and mixed alliums; sea buckthorn posset. There’s an element of fun, too; eggy bread with fried bacon or Bloody Mary tomatoes on toast for breakfast. Some ingredients come from the kitchen garden. Eat on the terrace in the summer. The atmospheric, barrel-vaulted bar has local ales including a custom-made Lord Crewe Brew. Read expert review From £155per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Rose & CrownCounty Durham, England 9Telegraph expert rating A foodie destination country inn that has smartened up while still maintaining a sense of village pub: country-comfortable rooms; horse-brasses and dogs in the bar. Surrounded by the sheep-dotted fields and moors of the North Pennines, you come to eat, relax and then walk it off. The modern British menu shows confident cooking that lets the ingredients shine through; no fuss but definitely interesting: honey-glazed goat's cheese with beetroot, hazelnuts and gingerbread, perhaps, or pan-fried fillet of sea trout with roasted baby gem and crushed peas. There’s good local sourcing with Teesdale lamb rarely off the menu. Eat in the candle-lit dining room or buzzier bar; the latter offers three real ales and a good selection of single malts. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best country house hotels in Britain   Cities The Henrietta HotelCovent Garden, London, England 8Telegraph expert rating An 18-bedroom boutique address in one of Covent Garden’s most attractive streets, owned and run by the Paris-based Experimental Group, with a cocktail bar, Ollie Dabbous restaurant and quirky interior design by Dorothée Meilichzon. The food, is delicious – clean, clever and uncomplicated – with highlights that might include the sheeps’ milk curds with pistachio, beef tartare with nasturtium and rye, and wonderful freshly baked warm madeleines with Chantilly cream. Don't miss a cocktail, which can be chosen à la carte or with a consultation from the barman. Read expert review From £220per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Ginger PigHove, Brighton, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 11-bedroom guesthouse above Hove’s highly-acclaimed Ginger Pig Bar and Restaurant is ideal if you want a quieter seaside base. Spacious and elegantly understated rooms include thoughtful beach bags with towels and well-stocked minibars. Always buzzy, this sprawling gastropub serves up highly delicious grub and excellent Sunday roasts. Look out for seasonal specials like asparagus with brown crab and chipotle mayo, or seabream with samphire. The adjoining Orangerie is where breakfast is served (there’s an outdoor area for sunny days), offering imaginative dishes such as baked eggs with hummus, chorizo and peppers, Irish rock oysters and rarebit with roasted tomatoes and mushrooms. Read expert review From £80per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Simpsons RestaurantBirmingham, England 8Telegraph expert rating The cooking is superlative at this gastronomic powerhouse, which also offers three individually styled – and great value – rooms. Throw in the added draw of the Simpsons Cookery School and you pretty much have Michelin-starred, Brummie food nirvana. The winning team of owner Andreas Antona and chef director Luke Tipping, one of Britain’s finest sauciers, has weathered fashions and trends. The three-course à la carte menu features plump marinière-style mussels on a delicate, buttery skate wing, while refined hipster influences are showcased with a barbecued beef cheek with a rich, silky bone marrow sauce. The pastry section’s take on a Belgian Speculoos cookie, with caramelised white chocolate and coffee granite, is fabulous. Read expert review From £110per night The White Star TavernSouthampton, Hampshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating A characterful tavern with rooms on Southampton’s vibrant Oxford Street. The restaurant is a destination in itself, with a varied menu that caters to all comers. If you fancy a plate of fish and chips washed down with real ale, then you’ll get the crispest batter and a unique brew from Itchen Valley. But the real tour de force is the à la carte menu, where chef Matt Noonan serves up his creativity and innovation in dishes that linger long in the memory: a melt-in-the-mouth braised ox cheek with black bean glaze and oriental vegetables to start, perhaps, or a seared bass with a sauté of wild mushrooms, egg yolk ketchup, smoked and cured egg yolk, leek and fresh Dorset truffle as a main. The Death by Chocolate dessert is served up like a piece of street art and really is to die for. Read expert review From £105per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels for a UK city break   WALES Llys MeddygPembrokeshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating A cosy hotel in the small town of Newport, on the Pembrokeshire coast, offering colourful interiors, reasonable rates and an exceptional restaurant, which has gained a reputation in Pembrokeshire and beyond as one of the best and most reasonable fine dining establishments. Chef Daniel Jones does wonders with local produce – such as Newport bay crab and lobster, Preseli lamb, Welsh beef and West Wales cheeses – in two separate dining areas: the romantic basement-level Cellar Bar, which has a slate floor and leather settees, and a wood burning stove in an inglenook fireplace; and, on the ground floor, the recently refurbished main dining room. Ed smokes salmon in a shed in his house just next door. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Ynyshir Restaurant and RoomsPowys, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Queen Victoria once owned this handsome white painted house as a hidden retreat. The undulating grounds are lovely and lead to the RSPB Ynys Hir Nature Reserve at the head of the Dovey estuary. Current owner and professional artist Rob Reen is responsible for the vibrant interiors, their colours taking a lead from his equally bold canvasses that dominate the walls. In the kitchen, Gareth Ward, who trained with Sat Bains, is a rising star, a recipient of one Michelin star and gunning for a second. He prefers to serve a series of small, integrated dishes, and is always coming up with new ideas and loves surprises. The tasting menu at dinner might include simple plates such as Welsh wagyu, pork belly with 'river bacon' or pollock with black bean. Read expert review From £215per night Tyddyn LlanDenbighshire, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A modest Georgian house just outside Llandrillo, with a complementary extension using local slate and stone. The house was once a shooting lodge belonging to the Dukes of Westminster, but now places food centre stage. The views are spectacular, with the Vale of Edeyrnion’s meadows and the slopes of the Berwyn Mountains beyond. The dining room is decorated in Wedgewood blue with tall windows on three sides. Bryan Webb is considered one of Wales’s foremost chefs, with a long-held Michelin star and a commitment to local produce, such as melting Welsh black beef, and quality seasonal ingredients. The menu changes daily. Read expert review From £195per night The Old Rectory on the LakeSnowdonia, Tal-y-llyn, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A sun-trap hideaway on the shores of a huge lake, and at the foot of the mountain, Cadair Idris. It’s elegant and relaxing with free-standing roll-top baths, an outdoor hot tub and locally sourced food perfectly cooked to order in the restaurant. The food, courtesy of the self-trained chef, Ricky, is outstanding. There may be freshly-caught trout, or local Bala lamb on the menu, along with perfectly-cooked vegetables and perhaps Dauphinois potatoes. The chocolate fondant is a signature pudding. The terrace is the perfect place to enjoy the sunset over the lake with a Welsh gin and tonic. Read expert review From £110per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Harbourmaster HotelAberaeron, Cardigan Bay, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating Beach chic comes into its own at this forget-me-not-blue boutique hotel on Aberaeron’s harbour wall. And you won’t likely forget it with these killer sea views, glam rooms and imaginatively thought-out menus. The restaurant has a serious foodie bent in the evening – try to snag the cwtch (cubby hole) for intimate dining. Go for Carlingford oysters, a plump, sweet burst of the sea, and the perfect prelude for well-cooked Welsh fillet of steak, followed by an oozy chocolate fondant with salted caramel ice cream. For a buzzier vibe, head to the bar-lounge to nurse a Brecon gin or nibble bar snacks like crispy cockles with chilli vinegar. Read expert review From £185per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith FairyhillReynoldston, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Snuggled away in 24 acres of woodland near the Gower coast, Fairyhill enchants with more than just its name. Think Downton Abbey meets Watership Down with a pinch of 21st-century cool. It has carved out its name as a foodie retreat with good reason. The chef pulls off a daring, imaginative menu, taking a pride in local sourcing and garden-grown ingredients in dishes that are both robust and refined. Clean flavours sing of the seasons in dishes simple as gazpacho, pear and Pembroke crab, and goat's cheese mousse with courgette flower with beetroot gel. Mains like meltingly tender Welsh lamb served three ways and Serrano-wrapped monkfish with clams, samphire and fresh linguine strike the perfect balance. Read expert review From £135per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com JabajakCarmarthenshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Jabajak is a former drover’s farm, now a fine vineyard and boutique bolthole, serving home-grown food and wines with a slice of history, rustic elegance and first-class service. The restaurant has scooped awards for its locally sourced, home-grown approach. A drink in the lounge bar piques the appetite for dishes prepared with garden herbs, fruit, veg and edible flowers, ramped up flavour-wise by foraged ingredients such as nettles and wild garlic when in season. Starters including basil-marinated bruschetta with gooseberry and elderflower chutney prelude mains such as butter-soft Celtic steak with local Moody Mabel cheese. There are many nods to local produce at breakfast, too, and the cooked Welsh option with a side order of cockles is bang on the money. Read expert review From £130per night Rates provided by Booking.com   SCOTLAND The Three Chimneys and The House Over-ByDunvegan, Isle of Skye, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This destination restaurant with rooms is back doing what it does best, with a new chef, updated look and reinvigorated sense of discipline and purpose. The essential ingredients are there: attentive service, attractive rooms with mesmerising views and a talented young chef. Choose from a three-course à la carte menu or the epic Skye Showcase Menu, served at the ‘Kitchen Table’, right in the heart of the action. Dishes on the latter menu might include the likes of Dungvegan crab, seaweed and miso-cured halibut, Orbost Farm beef and pot-roasted young grouse. A road (albeit single-track and quiet) runs between the House Over-By and the shore of Loch Dunvegan, slightly eroding what would otherwise be a feeling of privacy, but not unduly distracting from the peaceful views. Read expert review From £345per night The Peat InnSt Andrews, Fife, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating A long-standing gastro-destination lying between the 'town and gown' of St Andrews and Fife’s East Neuk fishing villages, this is well worth a detour. It’s a short stagger from restaurant to homely split-level suites: a calm, comfortable place to sleep off the fabulous Michelin-starred food. The rustic-chic restaurant, all tender taupes with amber and deep sea-blue accents, is a fittingly sophisticated setting for the triumphant cooking. You come here for the food and you won’t leave disappointed. From the home-made butter to the unusually good petit-fours, everything is a reflection of chef Geoffrey Smeddle’s joyous approach to food, with dishes like a starter of smoked beef tartare with wasabi puree raising your eyebrows and your expectations simultaneously. Read expert review From £195per night The Taynuilt Etive Restaurant with RoomsTaynuilt, Argyll & Bute, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating This historic rural hotel has been reinvented as a restaurant with rooms with a young Scottish chef leading a bright and creative team. It's at the heart of a small community that makes an ideal base for exploring Argyll and the isles. The Etive restaurant is the axis here, a genuine foodie oasis and arguably the finest place to eat in the region. John McNulty works wonders with the ultra-local produce, whether it be the Mull Pig’s Heed or the salmon he smokes using local larch from Loch Awe. Sound provenance ripples through the Etive even as far as breakfast, where local fish stars. Read expert review From £79per night 21212Edinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating The four bedrooms above this Michelin-starred restaurant are no afterthought; there is a confident hand at work in rooms that are as striking as the food, displaying a sometimes surprising but always sensual contemporary/baroque style and unexpectedly leafy views. Michelin-starred chef Paul Kitching is a maverick who likes to tease flavours, building fantastic creations that sound impossible, but work, like silky pink trout served with artichokes, pasta, almonds, chickpeas, kidney beans, oriental mushrooms, warm coleslaw and feta cheese. He’s utterly serious but there’s an edge of play - such as a pre-dessert of porridge, milk and cinnamon poured from a china cow. Read expert review From £112per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith The Bridge Inn, RathoEdinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This 18-century coaching inn – now an award-winning gastropub with rooms – is on a leafy canal in a tranquil village just 20 minutes away from Edinburgh's city centre. Four pretty bedrooms are each individually decorated. The cooking is exceptional, with talented head chef Ben doing wonderful things with good Scottish fish and game, properly hung beef, and pork from their own fat and sassy pigs. They grow their own vegetables, herbs and fruit too, in an old walled garden a short walk away down the canal path. Breakfast is a fine indulgence. You can have a hair of the dog as well: Champagne, Prosecco, Buck’s Fizz or a Bloody Mary. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best castle hotels in Scotland Contributions from Ros Belford, Suzy Bennett, Sophie Butler, Gill Charlton, Kerry Christiani, Fiona Duncan, Suzanne King, Gabriella Le Breton, Linda Macdonald, Richard McComb, Robin McKelvie, Harriet O'Brien, Ben Parker, Helen Pickles, Louise Roddon, Cathy Stebbings, Sarah Stirling, Anna Turns, Debbie Ward and Antonia Windsor.

Britain's loveliest restaurants with rooms for autumn

What could be more appealing than the epicurean informality of an inn or restaurant with rooms? These wonderfully relaxed establishments combine an emphasis on great ingredients from the area with local charm and stylish panache. There’s an insider feel that you don’t get at a more formal hotel, and there’s a foodie enthusiasm that wouldn’t be exuded quite as joyfully at a larger enterprise. Autumn/winter is a particularly good time to seek out their gently indulgent accommodation and fabulous seasonal flavours – the likes of wild rabbit with foraged mushrooms, grouse and damsons, elderberries and more. Harriet O'Brien Our experts round up their favourite establishments in Britain, from the Cotswolds to Cornwall, Suffolk to Skye, for feasting – and then flopping.  ENGLAND Cotswolds The Wild RabbitKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Wild Rabbit is a haven of eco-elegance a few fields away from sister enterprise Daylesford, the organic farm shop, deli, spa (and more) of Carole Bamford. She transformed this 18th-century inn and it has been meticulously devised in quiet colours, stone and wood. It’s a beautiful posh pub, with food to match. The kitchen is masterminded by Tim Allen, who won the Wild Rabbit a Michelin star in October 2016. His cuisine takes diners on a taste adventure, with dishes such as haddock on leek and apple slaw, topped with an amazingly cooked egg – poached and lightly deep fried. Read expert review From £148per night The Feathered Nest Country InnOxfordshire, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fabulous food and a superb setting above the Evenlode valley make this old country inn a hedonistic haven. The owners describe it as a pub with a twist. They’ve created an elegant restaurant that has won armloads of awards since it opened, with three stylish and supremely comfy bedrooms. The exquisite food is almost on a par with sleek gastro establishments such as Tom Kerridge’s The Hand and Flowers in Marlow - and even Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons where head chef Kuba Winkowski previously worked. There’s a stupendous wine list, too. Among the choice of 200 or so is a wonderful range of South African wines. There’s also a bar menu featuring classics such as burgers of brilliant quality. Read expert review From £140per night The Wheatsheaf InnNorthleach, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A creeper-clad coaching inn turned arty, boutique haven. The Wheatsheaf is in a particularly pretty and enterprising little Cotswold town. The restaurant draws a regular local crowd and the emphasis is on the very best quality, from the menu ingredients to the room amenities. The sophisticated menu offers great flavour combinations, the likes of roast parsnip and fennel salad with chestnuts, and mutton and apple pie with creamed potatoes. If there’s space in the bar beforehand try an aperitif of Sloe Negroni, with sloe gin and Campari, or opt for a pint of Cotswold Old Hooky. Read expert review From £102per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Kingham PloughKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Kingham Plough is a treat of a foodie destinatio, with relaxing furnishings, genial staff and brilliantly conceived menus. Emily Watkins has won numerous awards for her modern British cuisine with a twist ‒ dishes are often based on old Cotswold recipes. Her food is also much inspired by local produce; the likes of Windrush Valley goat cheese and pork from Paddock Farm a few miles away. There’s a pleasingly short and sophisticated à la carte menu: starters might include slow braised oxtail with horseradish, and mains could feature venison wellington, with meat supplied from nearby Cornbury Park. There’s also a well-priced bar menu featuring gastro comfort food such as rabbit parfait. Read expert review From £145per night The Ebrington ArmsEbrington, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating This hidden treasure set in a gloriously unspoilt village is a modern day version of a country tavern – it’s at once a genuine pub that brews its own very smooth ales; a lovely restaurant with real local flavour; and a charming hotel with rural-chic bedrooms. Chef Ben Dulley offers short, understated menus which reflect his commitment to freshness, with many vegetables straight from surrounding Drinkwater Farm. Dishes are beautifully presented and packed with local flavour – the likes of hot-smoked Bibury trout salad, and Cotswold lamb with stuffed tomatoes. Wines are from independent growers, including the Cotswolds’ own Little Oak Vineyard. Read expert review From £165per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best Cotswolds pubs with rooms   Oxfordshire Artist Residence OxfordshireSouth Leigh, Oxfordshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A unique country pub with a bohemian twist and arty vibe, offering gorgeous quirky rooms, scrumptious meals and contemporary art. The food is as heart-warming as the dining room. Local game and meat, foraged herbs and flowers join vegetables from the garden. The menu could include the likes of smoky pigeon breast electrified by a pickled walnut with caramelised chicory, port jelly and smoked spring onions and plaice in seaweed butter, smoked cockles, sea vegetables and bisque. The wine list is small, selective and good value. Join locals for a pint at the bar, read the paper or play cards around the fire. Read expert review From £130per night • The best luxury hotels in Oxfordshire   Lake District L’EnclumeCartmel, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Simon Rogan's two-Michelin-starred restaurant plus handful of rooms stay true both to the simple village location and rich surrounding land. Rooms are modest but smartly furnished, the setting picture-box pretty while the food is an exemplar of local sourcing and creativity. This isn’t Blumenthal-style magic but simply 20 (tiny) courses of exceptional skill, balance and creativity: an egg shell containing a yolk in mushroom broth; confit cauliflower in a pea and calamint sauce; a finger of turbot in nasturtium butter, the dinkiest caramel mousse sitting on compressed apple. All is presented exquisitely but without fanfare on rustic pottery, handmade glass, even a pebble. The Coravin wine system allows you to try top-rank or small-producer wines. Read expert review From £129per night The Punch Bowl InnLake District, Cumbria, England 8Telegraph expert rating A smart but relaxed country inn, in a quiet corner of the Lake District, with a deserved reputation for its classy food. The ground floor is a semi open-plan series of dining rooms, bar and relaxed eating areas, separated by little steps. The cooking is smart-city-restaurant standard producing assured, modern British dishes that are interesting without being tricksy or fussy. No fancy canapés or pre-starters, just clean flavours. Starters might include black pudding with bubble and squeak or tomato salad with local crab and lobster while mains could be pork with ham hock croquette or cod with Morteau sausage. There's a wide-ranging wine list, plus a couple of local real ales. Read expert review From £130per night • The Lake District's best pubs and inns   Peak District The Samuel Fox Country InnHope Valley, Peak District, England 8Telegraph expert rating This stone-built inn – which is more of a restaurant with rooms than a standard country pub – has an ever-growing reputation. Come for a great dinner, stay over in one of four comfortable rooms and spend the next day exploring the glorious Peak District. The foodie credentials are strong: chef-patron James Duckett has worked with Albert Roux, Michel Roux, Marcus Wareing and Philip Howard, and done extended stints in Australia and Spain. Now he turns out some of the best food in the area: everything from a piquant, pretty-as-a-picture starter of soused sardines to the kind of iced chocolate cherry parfait that makes you wish you hadn’t shared with your other half. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Peak District   Yorkshire Crab Manor HotelThirsk, Yorkshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fun and exotic, individually themed rooms combined with a well-regarded seafood restaurant and an overall madcap sense of decoration make this a hugely popular choice for special occasions. The restaurant specialises in fish and seafood serving both classics – lobster thermidor, grilled Queen scallops – as well as more modern dishes such as sea trout with samphire. It's open for lunch and dinner, and for afternoon 'lighter' options (including moules mariniere), but there's nothing delicate about portion sizes. Half the fun is the setting: jolly bar, romantic dining room or brighter conservatory, all with a bonkers decoration that includes a suite of orchestral instruments. Breakfast is also a delight. Read expert review From £165per night The Star InnHarome, Helmsley, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant-with-rooms with chocolate-box, thatched-pub looks and a bucolic farming-village location. Bedrooms, across the road, have a comfy, hunting-lodge style. Whitby-born chef-owner Andrew Pern was one of the first champions of local sourcing - and why wouldn’t you be with his ‘back garden’: moorland game and pasture-fed meat, coastal fish, Yorkshire Wolds’ fruit and vegetables. He now has a huge kitchen garden at the back of the pub. His menus are punchy, robust yet skilfully balanced and as much about texture as taste: crab stick with seashore vegetables and avocado ice, perhaps followed by roasted lamb chop with truffled faggot or honey-roasted duck with tea-poached quail’s egg. Read expert review From £150per night The Timble InnNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 8Telegraph expert rating A food-driven village pub in a quiet, yet surprisingly well-connected location with bold, contemporary styling and smart bedrooms. Glorious views and walks are on the doorstep. A pub that does two sittings for Sunday lunch is serious about food, and has been awarded two AA rosettes for it. It’s ambitious stuff – wood pigeon with quail’s egg and black pudding; venison loin with celeriac remoulade and chestnuts. The seafood platter and chateaubriand steak are favourites. It's not really a beer pub but offers a wide-ranging wine list – including fine ones by the glass – plus local gins. Read expert review From £150per night The Yorke ArmsNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant with rooms in an off-the-beaten-track location; perfect for walking off the spoiling food. The food is why people come here – some helicopter in from London for chef-proprietor Frances Atkins’s flavour-intense cooking. It’s not fussy or tricksy, just skilled, imaginative and full of the unexpected – quail with lychee and jasmine; brill with fennel in turmeric broth, peach and curd tart. Choose the eight-course tasting menu and everything is a surprise. Much is home-grown; the huge kitchen garden produces a summer surplus. These are meals to savour (even the lunchtime bar menu includes devilled kidneys, and gratin of seared scallops). Read expert review From £345per night • The best luxury hotels in Yorkshire   Norfolk Morston HallNorfolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating A flint- and brick-built Jacobean country-house hotel, with large conservatory extensions that provide extra dining space. Inside, you’ll find open fires, squashy sofas and cosy corners in a hushed, fairly formal atmosphere. The food is the main reason to come to Morston Hall, the only restaurant with a Michelin star on this stretch of coast. Galton Blackiston’s cooking is rated highly by both visitors and locals: he offers a set dinner based on fresh, local ingredients, served at 8pm daily. Four courses usually include two meat dishes (perhaps confit of duck or beef fillet) and a fish course. Recommended wines are suggested to accompany the dishes – or you can choose from an extensive list. Read expert review From £340per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Norfolk   Suffolk The Great HouseLavenham, Suffolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating The five-bedroom hotel looks onto the market square of Lavenham, a well-preserved medieval village of timbered houses. It would be wrong to stay here without sampling the food, as this is primarily a restaurant – and a very good one at that. From a regularly changing menu, you might find starters of mussels with chilli, coriander and cream, tuna sashimi or wild mushroom ravioli, and main courses of pheasant supreme, grilled fillet of lamb with thyme sauce or roasted duck breast with grilled beetroot. Desserts could be dark chocolate terrine, millefeuille or maple syrup rice pudding. Read expert review From £99per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best spa hotels in Suffolk   Somerset The White PostYeovil, Somerset, England 8Telegraph expert rating At this cosy Victorian ‘pub-and-lodgings’, the elegant gastronomy is as much a pull as the rooms. Brett’s passion for foraging and elegant presentation seeps through. The best way to experience the dishes? The 10-course tasting menu, which pays homage to the West Country (pork done eight ways, served with local chilli and ginger cider) as well as international influences (spiced lentil dhal with gurnard, mango and coconut). The wine list is sufficient but it’s the local ales and ciders that stand out, particularly if you pair a pint of Dorset Knob bitter with the Sunday roast. Painted walls are interrupted only by the wide windows, long cardinal-coloured drapes and filament bulb lamps that, along with on-table candles, add just enough light during evening dining. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The most romantic hotels in Somerset   Dorset La FosseCranborne, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating Snug in the wave-like green hills of east Dorset, La Fosse at Cranborne is a peaceful bed and breakfast as well as popular restaurant. Run by husband and wife, this simple West Country retreat, embracing both modern and traditional, feels as far from the madding crowds as possible. Owner-chef Mark is a true locavore, sourcing as much from in and around the village as possible. His passion for local, inventive cuisine has seen him named best chef in Dorset. The colourful duck dish, replete with homegrown vegetables, is a highlight, drizzled in a piquant jus. Mark’s award-winning cheeseboard is part of the experience, so save some room. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Anchor InnSeatown, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Anchor Inn, sat beyond snaking lanes and tucked between scarped cliffs on the edge of a little known Dorset village, is a destination gastropub serving elevated British classics. It is also a boutique hideaway that cocoons guests amid the sound of rolling waves. If the weather is decent, expect a fight to secure a lunchtime spot, either tucked inside or al fresco. Menus from head chef Jean-Paul De Ronne — who previously worked under Masterchef winner Mat Follas — reveal commitment to seasonal fare from land and sea, such as the fresh crab salad using crustacea caught only metres away. Ales are all from Palmers, brewed four miles away, while an extensive cocktail list from former Hix bartender David Smith features a number of Dorset’s own spirits. Read expert review From £120per night • The best hotels in Dorset   Buckinghamshire The Mash InnRadnage, Buckinghamshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating Described by its owner Nick Mash as a ‘new generation inn’, The Mash Inn's aim is to remove the barriers between chef and diner. The open kitchen takes centre stage: a solid wood workstation groaning with ingredients and stacked plates, beneath a ceiling rack dripping with pots and pans, in front of an open fire for rotisserie cooking. Chef Jon Parry cooks up a storm, producing a delicious, earthy and inventive no frills tasting menu and a short à la carte menu. Much of the produce is from the garden or very local. Diners sit at individual tables or at a large communal table, which may sound daunting but such is the communal, friendly atmosphere that it’s a pleasure to do so. Read expert review From £100per night The Hand & FlowersMarlow, Buckinghamshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn with a Michelin-starred restaurant, enticing locals to dine, and couples for weekends or nights away. It's on busy West Street, just along the road from the house where Mary Shelley created Frankenstein. The chef-proprietor is Tom Kerridge, who gained a Michelin star within 10 months from a kitchen which was then the size of a large cupboard. These days he has a new, celadon green kitchen and a brigade of chefs. As restaurants go, it rocks. Expect crayfish scotch egg, slow cooked duck breast with duck fat chips and other earthy, deeply satisfying dishes that are also full of imaginative twists, served in a cosy and convivial dining room. Read expert review From £140per night • The best hotels in Buckinghamshire   Kent RocksaltFolkestone, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Rocksalt is the littoral culinary kingdom of Mark Sargeant of Claridge's fame. A microcosm of London sophistication in gritty Folkestone, it's a genuine dining destination. The recent addition of four bedrooms above "Sargey's" adjacent Smokehouse enables visitors to abandon themselves to gluttony. His dedication to local ingredients introduces diners to new treasures, such as meaty huss dogfish and tart sea buckthorn (oozing out of a dense chocolate mousse fondant), yet dishes are refreshingly clean and unpretentious. Hunks of bread, served with beef dripping, rich butter and home-roasted salt, and nuggets of treacly fudge and slices of colourful rock bookend a perfectly executed meal. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Wife of BathWye, Kent, England 9Telegraph expert rating Another addition to chef Mark Sargeant and Josh De Haan's portfolio of Kentish restaurants with rooms. With a superb Spanish restaurant and tiny tapas bar, its signature quirky style and authentic cuisine works surprisingly well in the bucolic setting. The restaurant serves impeccable fare: juicy scallops with spicy chorizo and earthy morcillo (black pudding); honey sweet melon smothered in Brindisa's finest Serrano ham; succulent Galician steaks with creamy aioli and fiery paprika potatoes; and hake with radishes, Seville orange and a buttery sauce laced with Gin Mare. Save space for pudding: the bitter chocolate tart with salt and olive oil is revelatory, as is ice-cream made with raisins soaked in PX sherry. Read expert review From £70per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Read's Restaurant With RoomsFaversham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Read's, housed in a Georgian mansion on the north Kentish coast, is a smart restaurant with six rooms, owned and run by acclaimed chef David Pitchford and his wife Rona. Sticking firmly to their decades-long recipe for success, they deliver classic cuisine and unfussy hospitality. David won a Michelin star in 1992, which he retained for 20 consecutive years, becoming the second longest holder of the accolade in Britain. The food is hard to fault, if lacking the innovation and excitement that comes with Michelin recognition: comforting, classic French cuisine with British influence. Think ham and pea mousse; smoked haddock in cream sauce topped with cheese soufflé; Kentish lamb served with buttery asparagus and garden vegetables; and a Cassis-soaked summer pudding. Read expert review From £145per night The Dog at WinghamWingham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating A medieval pub in a rural village, run by an enterprising local family, that serves exceptionally good food and features eight attractive bedrooms. Virtually equidistant from Canterbury and Sandwich, it’s ideally located for exploring the Kentish city, countryside and coast. The kitchen is overseen by the young and talented Dan Johns, who has worked at Gary Rhodes’ Searcy’s at The Gherkin and Urban Coterie. The menu changes monthly to reflect seasonality and local produce. Imaginative starters such as fragrant Thai-style chicken salad and rich pork and pistachio terrine with pineapple jam are followed by melt-in-the-mouth Moroccan spiced lamb and crisp pork collar with chorizo dumplings. Read expert review From £86per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best pubs with rooms in Kent   Devon The Dartmoor InnOkehampton, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 16th-century coaching inn on the north-western edge of Dartmoor National Park is acclaimed for its fresh, seasonal cooking, but it’s worth bedding down for a stay in one of its three chic bedrooms. A blackboard heralds not only the breed of cattle, but also the name of the farmer it has come from. Dishes are pub classics, done to perfection: rib-eye steak and chips, confit of duck leg with toffee apple puree and roasted hazelnuts, and brisket of beef. Philip has a strong ethical policy, forging strong links with local artisan food producers, and ensures the beef has been grass fed and reared within a 20-mile radius. Breakfast is refreshingly original, with dainty portions of caramelised bananas or a daring cooked menu, including herb-crusted goat’s cheese, black pudding and bacon lardons. Read expert review From £65per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Lamb InnSandford, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating With open fires, beamed walls, deep sofas and award-winning food, this 16th-century inn in the village of Sandford is a pub of dreams for town-dwellers. Upstairs, seven bedrooms have big beds, soft linen and powerful showers, and there’s a pretty cobbled terrace at the rear. The Lamb Inn’s menu consistently attracts rave reviews. The produce is seasonal and locally sourced, mixing upmarket dishes with pub classics: shellfish bisque, mushroom ravioli, roasted pigeon with smoked bacon and savoy cabbage or steak and chips. The perfectly fluffy sticky toffee pudding is worth a visit alone. Landlord Mark is a fan of real ale and regularly rotates his cask brews to ensure they stay fresh. Read expert review From £69per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Masons ArmsBranscombe, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This dog-friendly 14th-century thatched inn, in Branscombe, on the Jurassic Coast, is one of Devon’s best. It prides itself on serving local, seasonal Devon fare on a traditional pub menu – it even has a 'food sourcing map' detailing exactly where the produce comes from. There’s steamed River Exe mussels and fries, steak and kidney shortcrust pie, rump steak and a seafood platter. Ales, hand-pumped from casks, are just as local. On a sunny day, the action moves outside to the pretty suntrap terrace. It's a 15-minute walk to Branscombe Beach, a lovely, long shingle cove from where you can pick up the South West Coastal Path. Read expert review From £75per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Salutation InnTopsham, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating Eat well and rest your head at this 18th-century coaching inn in chichi Topsham: a stylish option with a truly excellent restaurant, helmed by one of Gordon Ramsay's former protégés. Exquisite handmade petit-fours welcome guests on arrival – the first hint that your dining experience will be full of extra surprises. The wild mushroom appetiser comes accompanied by an umami-enhancing pinot noir, and the tomato gazpacho with local crab, served in a glass on ice, and followed by a rich rump of beef from Greendale Farm. Each modern dish is accompanied by diverse wines chosen by Stephen Edwardes – the unusual sake complements the beautiful strawberry dessert which is garnished with home-grown edible flowers. Read expert review From £145per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Devon   Cornwall The Gurnard's HeadSt Ives, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn offering outstanding food, fabulous sea and moorland views, situated close to St Ives and Land's End. Popular with walkers and couples of all ages seeking a low-key, restorative break in a wild coastal location. Locals come from miles around to dine here. The Scottish head chef, Bruce Rennie, cooks a short, inventive menu. Lunch may include beetroot risotto, octopus and white wine stew, or Merguez sausages with Puy lentils. The supper menu may include salmon and lobster tortellini, cod with pig’s trotter, and sole with Vermouth. The wine list focuses on Old World wines, notably from France, Italy and Portugal. Read expert review From £110per night Padstow TownhousePadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A handsome listed townhouse on Padstow's high street that has been superbly renovated and opened as a six-bedroom luxury guesthouse by chef Paul Ainsworth to complement his Michelin-starred restaurant, Paul Ainsworth at Number 6. Head there for amusingly-presented, delicately-flavoured meat and fish dishes and a fun and informal atmosphere, or to his even more informal restaurant, Rojanos, for superior pasta, pizza and hamburgers. Breakfast is served at the latter. The guesthouse owns an electric BMW in which guests can be transported if they don’t want to walk around. Read expert review From £280per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com St Petroc's HotelPadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A sociable, intimate townhouse with a labyrinth of gorgeously styled sitting and reading rooms – as well as a buzzy bistro. St Petroc’s Bistro opened along with the hotel in 1988. It’s a lovely room – with an engaging selection of original art on the walls – and a relaxing, happy place to eat at either lunch or dinner. Pride of place on the menu goes to the 30-day dry-aged steaks, but there are fish, chicken and vegetarian options as well – all of them classic Rick Stein recipes (try the grilled hake with Serrano ham, succotash and chives). Ruby’s Bar is the new Stein pub – a great place for a local beer or cocktail. Read expert review From £112per night Kota Restaurant with RoomsPorthleven, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating With a fantastic Asian-Cornish fusion restaurant downstairs, and Porthleven’s picturesque harbour on the doorstep, the Kota’s two simple, homey rooms are proof that sometimes substance can win over style. The vibe in the restaurant is casual, with a long room overlooking the harbour and a waterfront lawn on which you can dine in good weather. New Zealander Jude, who is part Maori, part Malay-Chinese, brings Asian spices and cooking styles to fresh, meticulously sourced Cornish produce – squid with green mango salad, scallops with miso dressing and seaweed salad, and Laksa with prawns, mussels and fish. There are also some very creative burgers – tempura fish with wasabi tartare, and satay chicken with Asian slaw. Read expert review From £75per night DriftwoodPortscatho, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating Sitting on a hill above the rugged coastline of the Roseland peninsula, Driftwood is nautically furnished in soft creams and blues. A Michelin-starred restaurant, private sea-facing terraces, and a private beach make this the perfect venue for pretty much everyone. There are wonderful coastal path walks for miles in each direction. This is Cornish cooking at its finest: unfussy and focused on bringing out the flavour of fresh fish and seafood and locally reared beef and lamb. Dinner in summer comprises a six-course tasting menu with complementary wines. For children there are early suppers with proper chef-made food. Read expert review From £250per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Coombeshead FarmLewannick, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating This is the joint venture from chef Tom Adams of London restaurant Pitt Cue and April Bloomfield, English born chef/proprietor of The Spotted Pig in New York. Both wanted to get back to the roots of food and hospitality and the result is this relaxed communal dining farmhouse b&b. Tom and his partner Lottie Mew live off the land and share their fresh, foraged, pickled and harvested produce with their guests. Tom cooks a three-course feast, kicking off with plates of delicious nibbles from 6.30pm onwards, which is shared at a communal table by all the guests. Tom’s own rare breed Mangalitza pigs feature large, plus perhaps a cep and walnut broth, lamb shoulder and mushroom porridge, with madeleine, whey and prune for pudding. Wines are unusual. Read expert review From £175per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Cornwall   Sussex The Barn at RoundhurstLurgashall, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating A rural South Downs retreat on a 250-acre organic farm with its own lakes. Home-reared food is a specialty. Converted outhouses with six rooms are set around a courtyard, just steps from a dramatic converted barn for dining and lounging. A four-course set menu with generous portions is available for guests and non-guests Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays; a light supper is provided for guests on other days. Meals highlight the farm’s own organic beef, lamb and pork and could include colourful heritage carrots and an exceptional triple chocolate mousse. Read expert review From £98per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com CrouchersChichester, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating An unassuming motel-like exterior belies a foodie haven a short drive from the Witterings. Relax on the patio of a garden-facing room, head to the beach, or explore the cultural and sporting highlights around Chichester but leave room for dinner in the impressive restaurant. Proximity to the coast ensures good seafood. The squid-ink pasta starter is light and delicate and a showy dessert of white chocolate and saffron mousse with edible flowers, caramel and orange ice-cream is a multi-sensory delight. A strong wine list includes an emphasis on the owners’ native South Africa. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Crab & LobsterWest Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating Herons can be seen on the doorstep of this modernised 350-year-old pub beside a bird sanctuary, where guests can stay in cosy bedrooms or an adjoining cottage. Tuck into locally caught seafood in the bar-restaurant and plan nature walks or trips to nearby beaches. The menu, as this gastropub’s name suggests, makes good use of locally caught seafood. Baked Selsey crab with a salad or crab cakes is a highlight. Meat, like rump of lamb (on an autumn menu with garlic Pommes Anna, butternut squash purée, confit tomatoes, baby leeks and Madeira jus) is also locally reared. There’s an extensive wine list and takeaway fish and chips. Read expert review From £160per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith Wingrove HouseAlfriston, South Downs, England 8Telegraph expert rating Yards from the South Downs Way and the half-timbered, candlelit pubs of Alfriston, this swish 19th-century boutique hotel with a modern country restaurant delivers roaring log fires, low-slung sofas and top-notch food, and draws city dwellers craving an easy country escape. Matthew Comben, formerly of the Hungry Monk in Jevington, heads up the kitchen and has brought with him the Monk's original banoffee pie recipe. Highlights from the seasonal menu include cauliflower fritters with Brighton blue cheese mayonnaise, and a soft beef fillet with tarragon. There's an impressive gin menu with 11 different options, including Brighton Gin, and a refreshingly reasonable wine list. Read expert review From £108per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best places and cities to visit in England – and where to stay   Cheshire The Roebuck InnMobberley, Cheshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This French-influenced bistro with rooms is perfect weekend break material, with lashings of character, great food and a beautifully designed garden. The bistro menu, tweaked with the seasons, is European in style, and everything comes in generous portions, whether it’s ‘small plates’ of cassoulet, caponata and crostini; mains such as saffron risotto, venison bourguignon and moules marinière; or puds of tarte au citron, profiteroles and crème caramel. On the drinks front, you’ll find an interesting selection of local ales, old-world wines and a vintage dresser filled with classic aperitifs and digestifs. Read expert review From £115per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • Britain's cosiest hotels for autumn   County Durham Lord Crewe ArmsBlanchland, Northumberland, England 9Telegraph expert rating A lord-of-the-manor building, in a pin-neat estate village, that oozes atmosphere at every stone-flagged turn. A reputation for honest, British cooking, plus its rural location, makes it popular with walkers and foodies as well as the country-sports fraternity. Expect punchy, robust, British cooking, rich with flavour and unusual combinations: devilled lamb’s kidneys on roasted cauliflower; grilled sea trout and mixed alliums; sea buckthorn posset. There’s an element of fun, too; eggy bread with fried bacon or Bloody Mary tomatoes on toast for breakfast. Some ingredients come from the kitchen garden. Eat on the terrace in the summer. The atmospheric, barrel-vaulted bar has local ales including a custom-made Lord Crewe Brew. Read expert review From £155per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Rose & CrownCounty Durham, England 9Telegraph expert rating A foodie destination country inn that has smartened up while still maintaining a sense of village pub: country-comfortable rooms; horse-brasses and dogs in the bar. Surrounded by the sheep-dotted fields and moors of the North Pennines, you come to eat, relax and then walk it off. The modern British menu shows confident cooking that lets the ingredients shine through; no fuss but definitely interesting: honey-glazed goat's cheese with beetroot, hazelnuts and gingerbread, perhaps, or pan-fried fillet of sea trout with roasted baby gem and crushed peas. There’s good local sourcing with Teesdale lamb rarely off the menu. Eat in the candle-lit dining room or buzzier bar; the latter offers three real ales and a good selection of single malts. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best country house hotels in Britain   Cities The Henrietta HotelCovent Garden, London, England 8Telegraph expert rating An 18-bedroom boutique address in one of Covent Garden’s most attractive streets, owned and run by the Paris-based Experimental Group, with a cocktail bar, Ollie Dabbous restaurant and quirky interior design by Dorothée Meilichzon. The food, is delicious – clean, clever and uncomplicated – with highlights that might include the sheeps’ milk curds with pistachio, beef tartare with nasturtium and rye, and wonderful freshly baked warm madeleines with Chantilly cream. Don't miss a cocktail, which can be chosen à la carte or with a consultation from the barman. Read expert review From £220per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Ginger PigHove, Brighton, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 11-bedroom guesthouse above Hove’s highly-acclaimed Ginger Pig Bar and Restaurant is ideal if you want a quieter seaside base. Spacious and elegantly understated rooms include thoughtful beach bags with towels and well-stocked minibars. Always buzzy, this sprawling gastropub serves up highly delicious grub and excellent Sunday roasts. Look out for seasonal specials like asparagus with brown crab and chipotle mayo, or seabream with samphire. The adjoining Orangerie is where breakfast is served (there’s an outdoor area for sunny days), offering imaginative dishes such as baked eggs with hummus, chorizo and peppers, Irish rock oysters and rarebit with roasted tomatoes and mushrooms. Read expert review From £80per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Simpsons RestaurantBirmingham, England 8Telegraph expert rating The cooking is superlative at this gastronomic powerhouse, which also offers three individually styled – and great value – rooms. Throw in the added draw of the Simpsons Cookery School and you pretty much have Michelin-starred, Brummie food nirvana. The winning team of owner Andreas Antona and chef director Luke Tipping, one of Britain’s finest sauciers, has weathered fashions and trends. The three-course à la carte menu features plump marinière-style mussels on a delicate, buttery skate wing, while refined hipster influences are showcased with a barbecued beef cheek with a rich, silky bone marrow sauce. The pastry section’s take on a Belgian Speculoos cookie, with caramelised white chocolate and coffee granite, is fabulous. Read expert review From £110per night The White Star TavernSouthampton, Hampshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating A characterful tavern with rooms on Southampton’s vibrant Oxford Street. The restaurant is a destination in itself, with a varied menu that caters to all comers. If you fancy a plate of fish and chips washed down with real ale, then you’ll get the crispest batter and a unique brew from Itchen Valley. But the real tour de force is the à la carte menu, where chef Matt Noonan serves up his creativity and innovation in dishes that linger long in the memory: a melt-in-the-mouth braised ox cheek with black bean glaze and oriental vegetables to start, perhaps, or a seared bass with a sauté of wild mushrooms, egg yolk ketchup, smoked and cured egg yolk, leek and fresh Dorset truffle as a main. The Death by Chocolate dessert is served up like a piece of street art and really is to die for. Read expert review From £105per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels for a UK city break   WALES Llys MeddygPembrokeshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating A cosy hotel in the small town of Newport, on the Pembrokeshire coast, offering colourful interiors, reasonable rates and an exceptional restaurant, which has gained a reputation in Pembrokeshire and beyond as one of the best and most reasonable fine dining establishments. Chef Daniel Jones does wonders with local produce – such as Newport bay crab and lobster, Preseli lamb, Welsh beef and West Wales cheeses – in two separate dining areas: the romantic basement-level Cellar Bar, which has a slate floor and leather settees, and a wood burning stove in an inglenook fireplace; and, on the ground floor, the recently refurbished main dining room. Ed smokes salmon in a shed in his house just next door. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Ynyshir Restaurant and RoomsPowys, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Queen Victoria once owned this handsome white painted house as a hidden retreat. The undulating grounds are lovely and lead to the RSPB Ynys Hir Nature Reserve at the head of the Dovey estuary. Current owner and professional artist Rob Reen is responsible for the vibrant interiors, their colours taking a lead from his equally bold canvasses that dominate the walls. In the kitchen, Gareth Ward, who trained with Sat Bains, is a rising star, a recipient of one Michelin star and gunning for a second. He prefers to serve a series of small, integrated dishes, and is always coming up with new ideas and loves surprises. The tasting menu at dinner might include simple plates such as Welsh wagyu, pork belly with 'river bacon' or pollock with black bean. Read expert review From £215per night Tyddyn LlanDenbighshire, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A modest Georgian house just outside Llandrillo, with a complementary extension using local slate and stone. The house was once a shooting lodge belonging to the Dukes of Westminster, but now places food centre stage. The views are spectacular, with the Vale of Edeyrnion’s meadows and the slopes of the Berwyn Mountains beyond. The dining room is decorated in Wedgewood blue with tall windows on three sides. Bryan Webb is considered one of Wales’s foremost chefs, with a long-held Michelin star and a commitment to local produce, such as melting Welsh black beef, and quality seasonal ingredients. The menu changes daily. Read expert review From £195per night The Old Rectory on the LakeSnowdonia, Tal-y-llyn, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A sun-trap hideaway on the shores of a huge lake, and at the foot of the mountain, Cadair Idris. It’s elegant and relaxing with free-standing roll-top baths, an outdoor hot tub and locally sourced food perfectly cooked to order in the restaurant. The food, courtesy of the self-trained chef, Ricky, is outstanding. There may be freshly-caught trout, or local Bala lamb on the menu, along with perfectly-cooked vegetables and perhaps Dauphinois potatoes. The chocolate fondant is a signature pudding. The terrace is the perfect place to enjoy the sunset over the lake with a Welsh gin and tonic. Read expert review From £110per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Harbourmaster HotelAberaeron, Cardigan Bay, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating Beach chic comes into its own at this forget-me-not-blue boutique hotel on Aberaeron’s harbour wall. And you won’t likely forget it with these killer sea views, glam rooms and imaginatively thought-out menus. The restaurant has a serious foodie bent in the evening – try to snag the cwtch (cubby hole) for intimate dining. Go for Carlingford oysters, a plump, sweet burst of the sea, and the perfect prelude for well-cooked Welsh fillet of steak, followed by an oozy chocolate fondant with salted caramel ice cream. For a buzzier vibe, head to the bar-lounge to nurse a Brecon gin or nibble bar snacks like crispy cockles with chilli vinegar. Read expert review From £185per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith FairyhillReynoldston, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Snuggled away in 24 acres of woodland near the Gower coast, Fairyhill enchants with more than just its name. Think Downton Abbey meets Watership Down with a pinch of 21st-century cool. It has carved out its name as a foodie retreat with good reason. The chef pulls off a daring, imaginative menu, taking a pride in local sourcing and garden-grown ingredients in dishes that are both robust and refined. Clean flavours sing of the seasons in dishes simple as gazpacho, pear and Pembroke crab, and goat's cheese mousse with courgette flower with beetroot gel. Mains like meltingly tender Welsh lamb served three ways and Serrano-wrapped monkfish with clams, samphire and fresh linguine strike the perfect balance. Read expert review From £135per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com JabajakCarmarthenshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Jabajak is a former drover’s farm, now a fine vineyard and boutique bolthole, serving home-grown food and wines with a slice of history, rustic elegance and first-class service. The restaurant has scooped awards for its locally sourced, home-grown approach. A drink in the lounge bar piques the appetite for dishes prepared with garden herbs, fruit, veg and edible flowers, ramped up flavour-wise by foraged ingredients such as nettles and wild garlic when in season. Starters including basil-marinated bruschetta with gooseberry and elderflower chutney prelude mains such as butter-soft Celtic steak with local Moody Mabel cheese. There are many nods to local produce at breakfast, too, and the cooked Welsh option with a side order of cockles is bang on the money. Read expert review From £130per night Rates provided by Booking.com   SCOTLAND The Three Chimneys and The House Over-ByDunvegan, Isle of Skye, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This destination restaurant with rooms is back doing what it does best, with a new chef, updated look and reinvigorated sense of discipline and purpose. The essential ingredients are there: attentive service, attractive rooms with mesmerising views and a talented young chef. Choose from a three-course à la carte menu or the epic Skye Showcase Menu, served at the ‘Kitchen Table’, right in the heart of the action. Dishes on the latter menu might include the likes of Dungvegan crab, seaweed and miso-cured halibut, Orbost Farm beef and pot-roasted young grouse. A road (albeit single-track and quiet) runs between the House Over-By and the shore of Loch Dunvegan, slightly eroding what would otherwise be a feeling of privacy, but not unduly distracting from the peaceful views. Read expert review From £345per night The Peat InnSt Andrews, Fife, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating A long-standing gastro-destination lying between the 'town and gown' of St Andrews and Fife’s East Neuk fishing villages, this is well worth a detour. It’s a short stagger from restaurant to homely split-level suites: a calm, comfortable place to sleep off the fabulous Michelin-starred food. The rustic-chic restaurant, all tender taupes with amber and deep sea-blue accents, is a fittingly sophisticated setting for the triumphant cooking. You come here for the food and you won’t leave disappointed. From the home-made butter to the unusually good petit-fours, everything is a reflection of chef Geoffrey Smeddle’s joyous approach to food, with dishes like a starter of smoked beef tartare with wasabi puree raising your eyebrows and your expectations simultaneously. Read expert review From £195per night The Taynuilt Etive Restaurant with RoomsTaynuilt, Argyll & Bute, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating This historic rural hotel has been reinvented as a restaurant with rooms with a young Scottish chef leading a bright and creative team. It's at the heart of a small community that makes an ideal base for exploring Argyll and the isles. The Etive restaurant is the axis here, a genuine foodie oasis and arguably the finest place to eat in the region. John McNulty works wonders with the ultra-local produce, whether it be the Mull Pig’s Heed or the salmon he smokes using local larch from Loch Awe. Sound provenance ripples through the Etive even as far as breakfast, where local fish stars. Read expert review From £79per night 21212Edinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating The four bedrooms above this Michelin-starred restaurant are no afterthought; there is a confident hand at work in rooms that are as striking as the food, displaying a sometimes surprising but always sensual contemporary/baroque style and unexpectedly leafy views. Michelin-starred chef Paul Kitching is a maverick who likes to tease flavours, building fantastic creations that sound impossible, but work, like silky pink trout served with artichokes, pasta, almonds, chickpeas, kidney beans, oriental mushrooms, warm coleslaw and feta cheese. He’s utterly serious but there’s an edge of play - such as a pre-dessert of porridge, milk and cinnamon poured from a china cow. Read expert review From £112per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith The Bridge Inn, RathoEdinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This 18-century coaching inn – now an award-winning gastropub with rooms – is on a leafy canal in a tranquil village just 20 minutes away from Edinburgh's city centre. Four pretty bedrooms are each individually decorated. The cooking is exceptional, with talented head chef Ben doing wonderful things with good Scottish fish and game, properly hung beef, and pork from their own fat and sassy pigs. They grow their own vegetables, herbs and fruit too, in an old walled garden a short walk away down the canal path. Breakfast is a fine indulgence. You can have a hair of the dog as well: Champagne, Prosecco, Buck’s Fizz or a Bloody Mary. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best castle hotels in Scotland Contributions from Ros Belford, Suzy Bennett, Sophie Butler, Gill Charlton, Kerry Christiani, Fiona Duncan, Suzanne King, Gabriella Le Breton, Linda Macdonald, Richard McComb, Robin McKelvie, Harriet O'Brien, Ben Parker, Helen Pickles, Louise Roddon, Cathy Stebbings, Sarah Stirling, Anna Turns, Debbie Ward and Antonia Windsor.

Britain's loveliest restaurants with rooms for autumn

What could be more appealing than the epicurean informality of an inn or restaurant with rooms? These wonderfully relaxed establishments combine an emphasis on great ingredients from the area with local charm and stylish panache. There’s an insider feel that you don’t get at a more formal hotel, and there’s a foodie enthusiasm that wouldn’t be exuded quite as joyfully at a larger enterprise. Autumn/winter is a particularly good time to seek out their gently indulgent accommodation and fabulous seasonal flavours – the likes of wild rabbit with foraged mushrooms, grouse and damsons, elderberries and more. Harriet O'Brien Our experts round up their favourite establishments in Britain, from the Cotswolds to Cornwall, Suffolk to Skye, for feasting – and then flopping.  ENGLAND Cotswolds The Wild RabbitKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Wild Rabbit is a haven of eco-elegance a few fields away from sister enterprise Daylesford, the organic farm shop, deli, spa (and more) of Carole Bamford. She transformed this 18th-century inn and it has been meticulously devised in quiet colours, stone and wood. It’s a beautiful posh pub, with food to match. The kitchen is masterminded by Tim Allen, who won the Wild Rabbit a Michelin star in October 2016. His cuisine takes diners on a taste adventure, with dishes such as haddock on leek and apple slaw, topped with an amazingly cooked egg – poached and lightly deep fried. Read expert review From £148per night The Feathered Nest Country InnOxfordshire, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fabulous food and a superb setting above the Evenlode valley make this old country inn a hedonistic haven. The owners describe it as a pub with a twist. They’ve created an elegant restaurant that has won armloads of awards since it opened, with three stylish and supremely comfy bedrooms. The exquisite food is almost on a par with sleek gastro establishments such as Tom Kerridge’s The Hand and Flowers in Marlow - and even Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons where head chef Kuba Winkowski previously worked. There’s a stupendous wine list, too. Among the choice of 200 or so is a wonderful range of South African wines. There’s also a bar menu featuring classics such as burgers of brilliant quality. Read expert review From £140per night The Wheatsheaf InnNorthleach, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A creeper-clad coaching inn turned arty, boutique haven. The Wheatsheaf is in a particularly pretty and enterprising little Cotswold town. The restaurant draws a regular local crowd and the emphasis is on the very best quality, from the menu ingredients to the room amenities. The sophisticated menu offers great flavour combinations, the likes of roast parsnip and fennel salad with chestnuts, and mutton and apple pie with creamed potatoes. If there’s space in the bar beforehand try an aperitif of Sloe Negroni, with sloe gin and Campari, or opt for a pint of Cotswold Old Hooky. Read expert review From £102per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Kingham PloughKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Kingham Plough is a treat of a foodie destinatio, with relaxing furnishings, genial staff and brilliantly conceived menus. Emily Watkins has won numerous awards for her modern British cuisine with a twist ‒ dishes are often based on old Cotswold recipes. Her food is also much inspired by local produce; the likes of Windrush Valley goat cheese and pork from Paddock Farm a few miles away. There’s a pleasingly short and sophisticated à la carte menu: starters might include slow braised oxtail with horseradish, and mains could feature venison wellington, with meat supplied from nearby Cornbury Park. There’s also a well-priced bar menu featuring gastro comfort food such as rabbit parfait. Read expert review From £145per night The Ebrington ArmsEbrington, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating This hidden treasure set in a gloriously unspoilt village is a modern day version of a country tavern – it’s at once a genuine pub that brews its own very smooth ales; a lovely restaurant with real local flavour; and a charming hotel with rural-chic bedrooms. Chef Ben Dulley offers short, understated menus which reflect his commitment to freshness, with many vegetables straight from surrounding Drinkwater Farm. Dishes are beautifully presented and packed with local flavour – the likes of hot-smoked Bibury trout salad, and Cotswold lamb with stuffed tomatoes. Wines are from independent growers, including the Cotswolds’ own Little Oak Vineyard. Read expert review From £165per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best Cotswolds pubs with rooms   Oxfordshire Artist Residence OxfordshireSouth Leigh, Oxfordshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A unique country pub with a bohemian twist and arty vibe, offering gorgeous quirky rooms, scrumptious meals and contemporary art. The food is as heart-warming as the dining room. Local game and meat, foraged herbs and flowers join vegetables from the garden. The menu could include the likes of smoky pigeon breast electrified by a pickled walnut with caramelised chicory, port jelly and smoked spring onions and plaice in seaweed butter, smoked cockles, sea vegetables and bisque. The wine list is small, selective and good value. Join locals for a pint at the bar, read the paper or play cards around the fire. Read expert review From £130per night • The best luxury hotels in Oxfordshire   Lake District L’EnclumeCartmel, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Simon Rogan's two-Michelin-starred restaurant plus handful of rooms stay true both to the simple village location and rich surrounding land. Rooms are modest but smartly furnished, the setting picture-box pretty while the food is an exemplar of local sourcing and creativity. This isn’t Blumenthal-style magic but simply 20 (tiny) courses of exceptional skill, balance and creativity: an egg shell containing a yolk in mushroom broth; confit cauliflower in a pea and calamint sauce; a finger of turbot in nasturtium butter, the dinkiest caramel mousse sitting on compressed apple. All is presented exquisitely but without fanfare on rustic pottery, handmade glass, even a pebble. The Coravin wine system allows you to try top-rank or small-producer wines. Read expert review From £129per night The Punch Bowl InnLake District, Cumbria, England 8Telegraph expert rating A smart but relaxed country inn, in a quiet corner of the Lake District, with a deserved reputation for its classy food. The ground floor is a semi open-plan series of dining rooms, bar and relaxed eating areas, separated by little steps. The cooking is smart-city-restaurant standard producing assured, modern British dishes that are interesting without being tricksy or fussy. No fancy canapés or pre-starters, just clean flavours. Starters might include black pudding with bubble and squeak or tomato salad with local crab and lobster while mains could be pork with ham hock croquette or cod with Morteau sausage. There's a wide-ranging wine list, plus a couple of local real ales. Read expert review From £130per night • The Lake District's best pubs and inns   Peak District The Samuel Fox Country InnHope Valley, Peak District, England 8Telegraph expert rating This stone-built inn – which is more of a restaurant with rooms than a standard country pub – has an ever-growing reputation. Come for a great dinner, stay over in one of four comfortable rooms and spend the next day exploring the glorious Peak District. The foodie credentials are strong: chef-patron James Duckett has worked with Albert Roux, Michel Roux, Marcus Wareing and Philip Howard, and done extended stints in Australia and Spain. Now he turns out some of the best food in the area: everything from a piquant, pretty-as-a-picture starter of soused sardines to the kind of iced chocolate cherry parfait that makes you wish you hadn’t shared with your other half. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Peak District   Yorkshire Crab Manor HotelThirsk, Yorkshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fun and exotic, individually themed rooms combined with a well-regarded seafood restaurant and an overall madcap sense of decoration make this a hugely popular choice for special occasions. The restaurant specialises in fish and seafood serving both classics – lobster thermidor, grilled Queen scallops – as well as more modern dishes such as sea trout with samphire. It's open for lunch and dinner, and for afternoon 'lighter' options (including moules mariniere), but there's nothing delicate about portion sizes. Half the fun is the setting: jolly bar, romantic dining room or brighter conservatory, all with a bonkers decoration that includes a suite of orchestral instruments. Breakfast is also a delight. Read expert review From £165per night The Star InnHarome, Helmsley, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant-with-rooms with chocolate-box, thatched-pub looks and a bucolic farming-village location. Bedrooms, across the road, have a comfy, hunting-lodge style. Whitby-born chef-owner Andrew Pern was one of the first champions of local sourcing - and why wouldn’t you be with his ‘back garden’: moorland game and pasture-fed meat, coastal fish, Yorkshire Wolds’ fruit and vegetables. He now has a huge kitchen garden at the back of the pub. His menus are punchy, robust yet skilfully balanced and as much about texture as taste: crab stick with seashore vegetables and avocado ice, perhaps followed by roasted lamb chop with truffled faggot or honey-roasted duck with tea-poached quail’s egg. Read expert review From £150per night The Timble InnNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 8Telegraph expert rating A food-driven village pub in a quiet, yet surprisingly well-connected location with bold, contemporary styling and smart bedrooms. Glorious views and walks are on the doorstep. A pub that does two sittings for Sunday lunch is serious about food, and has been awarded two AA rosettes for it. It’s ambitious stuff – wood pigeon with quail’s egg and black pudding; venison loin with celeriac remoulade and chestnuts. The seafood platter and chateaubriand steak are favourites. It's not really a beer pub but offers a wide-ranging wine list – including fine ones by the glass – plus local gins. Read expert review From £150per night The Yorke ArmsNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant with rooms in an off-the-beaten-track location; perfect for walking off the spoiling food. The food is why people come here – some helicopter in from London for chef-proprietor Frances Atkins’s flavour-intense cooking. It’s not fussy or tricksy, just skilled, imaginative and full of the unexpected – quail with lychee and jasmine; brill with fennel in turmeric broth, peach and curd tart. Choose the eight-course tasting menu and everything is a surprise. Much is home-grown; the huge kitchen garden produces a summer surplus. These are meals to savour (even the lunchtime bar menu includes devilled kidneys, and gratin of seared scallops). Read expert review From £345per night • The best luxury hotels in Yorkshire   Norfolk Morston HallNorfolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating A flint- and brick-built Jacobean country-house hotel, with large conservatory extensions that provide extra dining space. Inside, you’ll find open fires, squashy sofas and cosy corners in a hushed, fairly formal atmosphere. The food is the main reason to come to Morston Hall, the only restaurant with a Michelin star on this stretch of coast. Galton Blackiston’s cooking is rated highly by both visitors and locals: he offers a set dinner based on fresh, local ingredients, served at 8pm daily. Four courses usually include two meat dishes (perhaps confit of duck or beef fillet) and a fish course. Recommended wines are suggested to accompany the dishes – or you can choose from an extensive list. Read expert review From £340per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Norfolk   Suffolk The Great HouseLavenham, Suffolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating The five-bedroom hotel looks onto the market square of Lavenham, a well-preserved medieval village of timbered houses. It would be wrong to stay here without sampling the food, as this is primarily a restaurant – and a very good one at that. From a regularly changing menu, you might find starters of mussels with chilli, coriander and cream, tuna sashimi or wild mushroom ravioli, and main courses of pheasant supreme, grilled fillet of lamb with thyme sauce or roasted duck breast with grilled beetroot. Desserts could be dark chocolate terrine, millefeuille or maple syrup rice pudding. Read expert review From £99per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best spa hotels in Suffolk   Somerset The White PostYeovil, Somerset, England 8Telegraph expert rating At this cosy Victorian ‘pub-and-lodgings’, the elegant gastronomy is as much a pull as the rooms. Brett’s passion for foraging and elegant presentation seeps through. The best way to experience the dishes? The 10-course tasting menu, which pays homage to the West Country (pork done eight ways, served with local chilli and ginger cider) as well as international influences (spiced lentil dhal with gurnard, mango and coconut). The wine list is sufficient but it’s the local ales and ciders that stand out, particularly if you pair a pint of Dorset Knob bitter with the Sunday roast. Painted walls are interrupted only by the wide windows, long cardinal-coloured drapes and filament bulb lamps that, along with on-table candles, add just enough light during evening dining. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The most romantic hotels in Somerset   Dorset La FosseCranborne, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating Snug in the wave-like green hills of east Dorset, La Fosse at Cranborne is a peaceful bed and breakfast as well as popular restaurant. Run by husband and wife, this simple West Country retreat, embracing both modern and traditional, feels as far from the madding crowds as possible. Owner-chef Mark is a true locavore, sourcing as much from in and around the village as possible. His passion for local, inventive cuisine has seen him named best chef in Dorset. The colourful duck dish, replete with homegrown vegetables, is a highlight, drizzled in a piquant jus. Mark’s award-winning cheeseboard is part of the experience, so save some room. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Anchor InnSeatown, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Anchor Inn, sat beyond snaking lanes and tucked between scarped cliffs on the edge of a little known Dorset village, is a destination gastropub serving elevated British classics. It is also a boutique hideaway that cocoons guests amid the sound of rolling waves. If the weather is decent, expect a fight to secure a lunchtime spot, either tucked inside or al fresco. Menus from head chef Jean-Paul De Ronne — who previously worked under Masterchef winner Mat Follas — reveal commitment to seasonal fare from land and sea, such as the fresh crab salad using crustacea caught only metres away. Ales are all from Palmers, brewed four miles away, while an extensive cocktail list from former Hix bartender David Smith features a number of Dorset’s own spirits. Read expert review From £120per night • The best hotels in Dorset   Buckinghamshire The Mash InnRadnage, Buckinghamshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating Described by its owner Nick Mash as a ‘new generation inn’, The Mash Inn's aim is to remove the barriers between chef and diner. The open kitchen takes centre stage: a solid wood workstation groaning with ingredients and stacked plates, beneath a ceiling rack dripping with pots and pans, in front of an open fire for rotisserie cooking. Chef Jon Parry cooks up a storm, producing a delicious, earthy and inventive no frills tasting menu and a short à la carte menu. Much of the produce is from the garden or very local. Diners sit at individual tables or at a large communal table, which may sound daunting but such is the communal, friendly atmosphere that it’s a pleasure to do so. Read expert review From £100per night The Hand & FlowersMarlow, Buckinghamshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn with a Michelin-starred restaurant, enticing locals to dine, and couples for weekends or nights away. It's on busy West Street, just along the road from the house where Mary Shelley created Frankenstein. The chef-proprietor is Tom Kerridge, who gained a Michelin star within 10 months from a kitchen which was then the size of a large cupboard. These days he has a new, celadon green kitchen and a brigade of chefs. As restaurants go, it rocks. Expect crayfish scotch egg, slow cooked duck breast with duck fat chips and other earthy, deeply satisfying dishes that are also full of imaginative twists, served in a cosy and convivial dining room. Read expert review From £140per night • The best hotels in Buckinghamshire   Kent RocksaltFolkestone, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Rocksalt is the littoral culinary kingdom of Mark Sargeant of Claridge's fame. A microcosm of London sophistication in gritty Folkestone, it's a genuine dining destination. The recent addition of four bedrooms above "Sargey's" adjacent Smokehouse enables visitors to abandon themselves to gluttony. His dedication to local ingredients introduces diners to new treasures, such as meaty huss dogfish and tart sea buckthorn (oozing out of a dense chocolate mousse fondant), yet dishes are refreshingly clean and unpretentious. Hunks of bread, served with beef dripping, rich butter and home-roasted salt, and nuggets of treacly fudge and slices of colourful rock bookend a perfectly executed meal. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Wife of BathWye, Kent, England 9Telegraph expert rating Another addition to chef Mark Sargeant and Josh De Haan's portfolio of Kentish restaurants with rooms. With a superb Spanish restaurant and tiny tapas bar, its signature quirky style and authentic cuisine works surprisingly well in the bucolic setting. The restaurant serves impeccable fare: juicy scallops with spicy chorizo and earthy morcillo (black pudding); honey sweet melon smothered in Brindisa's finest Serrano ham; succulent Galician steaks with creamy aioli and fiery paprika potatoes; and hake with radishes, Seville orange and a buttery sauce laced with Gin Mare. Save space for pudding: the bitter chocolate tart with salt and olive oil is revelatory, as is ice-cream made with raisins soaked in PX sherry. Read expert review From £70per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Read's Restaurant With RoomsFaversham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Read's, housed in a Georgian mansion on the north Kentish coast, is a smart restaurant with six rooms, owned and run by acclaimed chef David Pitchford and his wife Rona. Sticking firmly to their decades-long recipe for success, they deliver classic cuisine and unfussy hospitality. David won a Michelin star in 1992, which he retained for 20 consecutive years, becoming the second longest holder of the accolade in Britain. The food is hard to fault, if lacking the innovation and excitement that comes with Michelin recognition: comforting, classic French cuisine with British influence. Think ham and pea mousse; smoked haddock in cream sauce topped with cheese soufflé; Kentish lamb served with buttery asparagus and garden vegetables; and a Cassis-soaked summer pudding. Read expert review From £145per night The Dog at WinghamWingham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating A medieval pub in a rural village, run by an enterprising local family, that serves exceptionally good food and features eight attractive bedrooms. Virtually equidistant from Canterbury and Sandwich, it’s ideally located for exploring the Kentish city, countryside and coast. The kitchen is overseen by the young and talented Dan Johns, who has worked at Gary Rhodes’ Searcy’s at The Gherkin and Urban Coterie. The menu changes monthly to reflect seasonality and local produce. Imaginative starters such as fragrant Thai-style chicken salad and rich pork and pistachio terrine with pineapple jam are followed by melt-in-the-mouth Moroccan spiced lamb and crisp pork collar with chorizo dumplings. Read expert review From £86per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best pubs with rooms in Kent   Devon The Dartmoor InnOkehampton, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 16th-century coaching inn on the north-western edge of Dartmoor National Park is acclaimed for its fresh, seasonal cooking, but it’s worth bedding down for a stay in one of its three chic bedrooms. A blackboard heralds not only the breed of cattle, but also the name of the farmer it has come from. Dishes are pub classics, done to perfection: rib-eye steak and chips, confit of duck leg with toffee apple puree and roasted hazelnuts, and brisket of beef. Philip has a strong ethical policy, forging strong links with local artisan food producers, and ensures the beef has been grass fed and reared within a 20-mile radius. Breakfast is refreshingly original, with dainty portions of caramelised bananas or a daring cooked menu, including herb-crusted goat’s cheese, black pudding and bacon lardons. Read expert review From £65per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Lamb InnSandford, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating With open fires, beamed walls, deep sofas and award-winning food, this 16th-century inn in the village of Sandford is a pub of dreams for town-dwellers. Upstairs, seven bedrooms have big beds, soft linen and powerful showers, and there’s a pretty cobbled terrace at the rear. The Lamb Inn’s menu consistently attracts rave reviews. The produce is seasonal and locally sourced, mixing upmarket dishes with pub classics: shellfish bisque, mushroom ravioli, roasted pigeon with smoked bacon and savoy cabbage or steak and chips. The perfectly fluffy sticky toffee pudding is worth a visit alone. Landlord Mark is a fan of real ale and regularly rotates his cask brews to ensure they stay fresh. Read expert review From £69per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Masons ArmsBranscombe, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This dog-friendly 14th-century thatched inn, in Branscombe, on the Jurassic Coast, is one of Devon’s best. It prides itself on serving local, seasonal Devon fare on a traditional pub menu – it even has a 'food sourcing map' detailing exactly where the produce comes from. There’s steamed River Exe mussels and fries, steak and kidney shortcrust pie, rump steak and a seafood platter. Ales, hand-pumped from casks, are just as local. On a sunny day, the action moves outside to the pretty suntrap terrace. It's a 15-minute walk to Branscombe Beach, a lovely, long shingle cove from where you can pick up the South West Coastal Path. Read expert review From £75per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Salutation InnTopsham, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating Eat well and rest your head at this 18th-century coaching inn in chichi Topsham: a stylish option with a truly excellent restaurant, helmed by one of Gordon Ramsay's former protégés. Exquisite handmade petit-fours welcome guests on arrival – the first hint that your dining experience will be full of extra surprises. The wild mushroom appetiser comes accompanied by an umami-enhancing pinot noir, and the tomato gazpacho with local crab, served in a glass on ice, and followed by a rich rump of beef from Greendale Farm. Each modern dish is accompanied by diverse wines chosen by Stephen Edwardes – the unusual sake complements the beautiful strawberry dessert which is garnished with home-grown edible flowers. Read expert review From £145per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Devon   Cornwall The Gurnard's HeadSt Ives, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn offering outstanding food, fabulous sea and moorland views, situated close to St Ives and Land's End. Popular with walkers and couples of all ages seeking a low-key, restorative break in a wild coastal location. Locals come from miles around to dine here. The Scottish head chef, Bruce Rennie, cooks a short, inventive menu. Lunch may include beetroot risotto, octopus and white wine stew, or Merguez sausages with Puy lentils. The supper menu may include salmon and lobster tortellini, cod with pig’s trotter, and sole with Vermouth. The wine list focuses on Old World wines, notably from France, Italy and Portugal. Read expert review From £110per night Padstow TownhousePadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A handsome listed townhouse on Padstow's high street that has been superbly renovated and opened as a six-bedroom luxury guesthouse by chef Paul Ainsworth to complement his Michelin-starred restaurant, Paul Ainsworth at Number 6. Head there for amusingly-presented, delicately-flavoured meat and fish dishes and a fun and informal atmosphere, or to his even more informal restaurant, Rojanos, for superior pasta, pizza and hamburgers. Breakfast is served at the latter. The guesthouse owns an electric BMW in which guests can be transported if they don’t want to walk around. Read expert review From £280per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com St Petroc's HotelPadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A sociable, intimate townhouse with a labyrinth of gorgeously styled sitting and reading rooms – as well as a buzzy bistro. St Petroc’s Bistro opened along with the hotel in 1988. It’s a lovely room – with an engaging selection of original art on the walls – and a relaxing, happy place to eat at either lunch or dinner. Pride of place on the menu goes to the 30-day dry-aged steaks, but there are fish, chicken and vegetarian options as well – all of them classic Rick Stein recipes (try the grilled hake with Serrano ham, succotash and chives). Ruby’s Bar is the new Stein pub – a great place for a local beer or cocktail. Read expert review From £112per night Kota Restaurant with RoomsPorthleven, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating With a fantastic Asian-Cornish fusion restaurant downstairs, and Porthleven’s picturesque harbour on the doorstep, the Kota’s two simple, homey rooms are proof that sometimes substance can win over style. The vibe in the restaurant is casual, with a long room overlooking the harbour and a waterfront lawn on which you can dine in good weather. New Zealander Jude, who is part Maori, part Malay-Chinese, brings Asian spices and cooking styles to fresh, meticulously sourced Cornish produce – squid with green mango salad, scallops with miso dressing and seaweed salad, and Laksa with prawns, mussels and fish. There are also some very creative burgers – tempura fish with wasabi tartare, and satay chicken with Asian slaw. Read expert review From £75per night DriftwoodPortscatho, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating Sitting on a hill above the rugged coastline of the Roseland peninsula, Driftwood is nautically furnished in soft creams and blues. A Michelin-starred restaurant, private sea-facing terraces, and a private beach make this the perfect venue for pretty much everyone. There are wonderful coastal path walks for miles in each direction. This is Cornish cooking at its finest: unfussy and focused on bringing out the flavour of fresh fish and seafood and locally reared beef and lamb. Dinner in summer comprises a six-course tasting menu with complementary wines. For children there are early suppers with proper chef-made food. Read expert review From £250per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Coombeshead FarmLewannick, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating This is the joint venture from chef Tom Adams of London restaurant Pitt Cue and April Bloomfield, English born chef/proprietor of The Spotted Pig in New York. Both wanted to get back to the roots of food and hospitality and the result is this relaxed communal dining farmhouse b&b. Tom and his partner Lottie Mew live off the land and share their fresh, foraged, pickled and harvested produce with their guests. Tom cooks a three-course feast, kicking off with plates of delicious nibbles from 6.30pm onwards, which is shared at a communal table by all the guests. Tom’s own rare breed Mangalitza pigs feature large, plus perhaps a cep and walnut broth, lamb shoulder and mushroom porridge, with madeleine, whey and prune for pudding. Wines are unusual. Read expert review From £175per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Cornwall   Sussex The Barn at RoundhurstLurgashall, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating A rural South Downs retreat on a 250-acre organic farm with its own lakes. Home-reared food is a specialty. Converted outhouses with six rooms are set around a courtyard, just steps from a dramatic converted barn for dining and lounging. A four-course set menu with generous portions is available for guests and non-guests Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays; a light supper is provided for guests on other days. Meals highlight the farm’s own organic beef, lamb and pork and could include colourful heritage carrots and an exceptional triple chocolate mousse. Read expert review From £98per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com CrouchersChichester, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating An unassuming motel-like exterior belies a foodie haven a short drive from the Witterings. Relax on the patio of a garden-facing room, head to the beach, or explore the cultural and sporting highlights around Chichester but leave room for dinner in the impressive restaurant. Proximity to the coast ensures good seafood. The squid-ink pasta starter is light and delicate and a showy dessert of white chocolate and saffron mousse with edible flowers, caramel and orange ice-cream is a multi-sensory delight. A strong wine list includes an emphasis on the owners’ native South Africa. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Crab & LobsterWest Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating Herons can be seen on the doorstep of this modernised 350-year-old pub beside a bird sanctuary, where guests can stay in cosy bedrooms or an adjoining cottage. Tuck into locally caught seafood in the bar-restaurant and plan nature walks or trips to nearby beaches. The menu, as this gastropub’s name suggests, makes good use of locally caught seafood. Baked Selsey crab with a salad or crab cakes is a highlight. Meat, like rump of lamb (on an autumn menu with garlic Pommes Anna, butternut squash purée, confit tomatoes, baby leeks and Madeira jus) is also locally reared. There’s an extensive wine list and takeaway fish and chips. Read expert review From £160per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith Wingrove HouseAlfriston, South Downs, England 8Telegraph expert rating Yards from the South Downs Way and the half-timbered, candlelit pubs of Alfriston, this swish 19th-century boutique hotel with a modern country restaurant delivers roaring log fires, low-slung sofas and top-notch food, and draws city dwellers craving an easy country escape. Matthew Comben, formerly of the Hungry Monk in Jevington, heads up the kitchen and has brought with him the Monk's original banoffee pie recipe. Highlights from the seasonal menu include cauliflower fritters with Brighton blue cheese mayonnaise, and a soft beef fillet with tarragon. There's an impressive gin menu with 11 different options, including Brighton Gin, and a refreshingly reasonable wine list. Read expert review From £108per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best places and cities to visit in England – and where to stay   Cheshire The Roebuck InnMobberley, Cheshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This French-influenced bistro with rooms is perfect weekend break material, with lashings of character, great food and a beautifully designed garden. The bistro menu, tweaked with the seasons, is European in style, and everything comes in generous portions, whether it’s ‘small plates’ of cassoulet, caponata and crostini; mains such as saffron risotto, venison bourguignon and moules marinière; or puds of tarte au citron, profiteroles and crème caramel. On the drinks front, you’ll find an interesting selection of local ales, old-world wines and a vintage dresser filled with classic aperitifs and digestifs. Read expert review From £115per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • Britain's cosiest hotels for autumn   County Durham Lord Crewe ArmsBlanchland, Northumberland, England 9Telegraph expert rating A lord-of-the-manor building, in a pin-neat estate village, that oozes atmosphere at every stone-flagged turn. A reputation for honest, British cooking, plus its rural location, makes it popular with walkers and foodies as well as the country-sports fraternity. Expect punchy, robust, British cooking, rich with flavour and unusual combinations: devilled lamb’s kidneys on roasted cauliflower; grilled sea trout and mixed alliums; sea buckthorn posset. There’s an element of fun, too; eggy bread with fried bacon or Bloody Mary tomatoes on toast for breakfast. Some ingredients come from the kitchen garden. Eat on the terrace in the summer. The atmospheric, barrel-vaulted bar has local ales including a custom-made Lord Crewe Brew. Read expert review From £155per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Rose & CrownCounty Durham, England 9Telegraph expert rating A foodie destination country inn that has smartened up while still maintaining a sense of village pub: country-comfortable rooms; horse-brasses and dogs in the bar. Surrounded by the sheep-dotted fields and moors of the North Pennines, you come to eat, relax and then walk it off. The modern British menu shows confident cooking that lets the ingredients shine through; no fuss but definitely interesting: honey-glazed goat's cheese with beetroot, hazelnuts and gingerbread, perhaps, or pan-fried fillet of sea trout with roasted baby gem and crushed peas. There’s good local sourcing with Teesdale lamb rarely off the menu. Eat in the candle-lit dining room or buzzier bar; the latter offers three real ales and a good selection of single malts. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best country house hotels in Britain   Cities The Henrietta HotelCovent Garden, London, England 8Telegraph expert rating An 18-bedroom boutique address in one of Covent Garden’s most attractive streets, owned and run by the Paris-based Experimental Group, with a cocktail bar, Ollie Dabbous restaurant and quirky interior design by Dorothée Meilichzon. The food, is delicious – clean, clever and uncomplicated – with highlights that might include the sheeps’ milk curds with pistachio, beef tartare with nasturtium and rye, and wonderful freshly baked warm madeleines with Chantilly cream. Don't miss a cocktail, which can be chosen à la carte or with a consultation from the barman. Read expert review From £220per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Ginger PigHove, Brighton, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 11-bedroom guesthouse above Hove’s highly-acclaimed Ginger Pig Bar and Restaurant is ideal if you want a quieter seaside base. Spacious and elegantly understated rooms include thoughtful beach bags with towels and well-stocked minibars. Always buzzy, this sprawling gastropub serves up highly delicious grub and excellent Sunday roasts. Look out for seasonal specials like asparagus with brown crab and chipotle mayo, or seabream with samphire. The adjoining Orangerie is where breakfast is served (there’s an outdoor area for sunny days), offering imaginative dishes such as baked eggs with hummus, chorizo and peppers, Irish rock oysters and rarebit with roasted tomatoes and mushrooms. Read expert review From £80per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Simpsons RestaurantBirmingham, England 8Telegraph expert rating The cooking is superlative at this gastronomic powerhouse, which also offers three individually styled – and great value – rooms. Throw in the added draw of the Simpsons Cookery School and you pretty much have Michelin-starred, Brummie food nirvana. The winning team of owner Andreas Antona and chef director Luke Tipping, one of Britain’s finest sauciers, has weathered fashions and trends. The three-course à la carte menu features plump marinière-style mussels on a delicate, buttery skate wing, while refined hipster influences are showcased with a barbecued beef cheek with a rich, silky bone marrow sauce. The pastry section’s take on a Belgian Speculoos cookie, with caramelised white chocolate and coffee granite, is fabulous. Read expert review From £110per night The White Star TavernSouthampton, Hampshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating A characterful tavern with rooms on Southampton’s vibrant Oxford Street. The restaurant is a destination in itself, with a varied menu that caters to all comers. If you fancy a plate of fish and chips washed down with real ale, then you’ll get the crispest batter and a unique brew from Itchen Valley. But the real tour de force is the à la carte menu, where chef Matt Noonan serves up his creativity and innovation in dishes that linger long in the memory: a melt-in-the-mouth braised ox cheek with black bean glaze and oriental vegetables to start, perhaps, or a seared bass with a sauté of wild mushrooms, egg yolk ketchup, smoked and cured egg yolk, leek and fresh Dorset truffle as a main. The Death by Chocolate dessert is served up like a piece of street art and really is to die for. Read expert review From £105per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels for a UK city break   WALES Llys MeddygPembrokeshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating A cosy hotel in the small town of Newport, on the Pembrokeshire coast, offering colourful interiors, reasonable rates and an exceptional restaurant, which has gained a reputation in Pembrokeshire and beyond as one of the best and most reasonable fine dining establishments. Chef Daniel Jones does wonders with local produce – such as Newport bay crab and lobster, Preseli lamb, Welsh beef and West Wales cheeses – in two separate dining areas: the romantic basement-level Cellar Bar, which has a slate floor and leather settees, and a wood burning stove in an inglenook fireplace; and, on the ground floor, the recently refurbished main dining room. Ed smokes salmon in a shed in his house just next door. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Ynyshir Restaurant and RoomsPowys, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Queen Victoria once owned this handsome white painted house as a hidden retreat. The undulating grounds are lovely and lead to the RSPB Ynys Hir Nature Reserve at the head of the Dovey estuary. Current owner and professional artist Rob Reen is responsible for the vibrant interiors, their colours taking a lead from his equally bold canvasses that dominate the walls. In the kitchen, Gareth Ward, who trained with Sat Bains, is a rising star, a recipient of one Michelin star and gunning for a second. He prefers to serve a series of small, integrated dishes, and is always coming up with new ideas and loves surprises. The tasting menu at dinner might include simple plates such as Welsh wagyu, pork belly with 'river bacon' or pollock with black bean. Read expert review From £215per night Tyddyn LlanDenbighshire, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A modest Georgian house just outside Llandrillo, with a complementary extension using local slate and stone. The house was once a shooting lodge belonging to the Dukes of Westminster, but now places food centre stage. The views are spectacular, with the Vale of Edeyrnion’s meadows and the slopes of the Berwyn Mountains beyond. The dining room is decorated in Wedgewood blue with tall windows on three sides. Bryan Webb is considered one of Wales’s foremost chefs, with a long-held Michelin star and a commitment to local produce, such as melting Welsh black beef, and quality seasonal ingredients. The menu changes daily. Read expert review From £195per night The Old Rectory on the LakeSnowdonia, Tal-y-llyn, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A sun-trap hideaway on the shores of a huge lake, and at the foot of the mountain, Cadair Idris. It’s elegant and relaxing with free-standing roll-top baths, an outdoor hot tub and locally sourced food perfectly cooked to order in the restaurant. The food, courtesy of the self-trained chef, Ricky, is outstanding. There may be freshly-caught trout, or local Bala lamb on the menu, along with perfectly-cooked vegetables and perhaps Dauphinois potatoes. The chocolate fondant is a signature pudding. The terrace is the perfect place to enjoy the sunset over the lake with a Welsh gin and tonic. Read expert review From £110per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Harbourmaster HotelAberaeron, Cardigan Bay, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating Beach chic comes into its own at this forget-me-not-blue boutique hotel on Aberaeron’s harbour wall. And you won’t likely forget it with these killer sea views, glam rooms and imaginatively thought-out menus. The restaurant has a serious foodie bent in the evening – try to snag the cwtch (cubby hole) for intimate dining. Go for Carlingford oysters, a plump, sweet burst of the sea, and the perfect prelude for well-cooked Welsh fillet of steak, followed by an oozy chocolate fondant with salted caramel ice cream. For a buzzier vibe, head to the bar-lounge to nurse a Brecon gin or nibble bar snacks like crispy cockles with chilli vinegar. Read expert review From £185per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith FairyhillReynoldston, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Snuggled away in 24 acres of woodland near the Gower coast, Fairyhill enchants with more than just its name. Think Downton Abbey meets Watership Down with a pinch of 21st-century cool. It has carved out its name as a foodie retreat with good reason. The chef pulls off a daring, imaginative menu, taking a pride in local sourcing and garden-grown ingredients in dishes that are both robust and refined. Clean flavours sing of the seasons in dishes simple as gazpacho, pear and Pembroke crab, and goat's cheese mousse with courgette flower with beetroot gel. Mains like meltingly tender Welsh lamb served three ways and Serrano-wrapped monkfish with clams, samphire and fresh linguine strike the perfect balance. Read expert review From £135per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com JabajakCarmarthenshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Jabajak is a former drover’s farm, now a fine vineyard and boutique bolthole, serving home-grown food and wines with a slice of history, rustic elegance and first-class service. The restaurant has scooped awards for its locally sourced, home-grown approach. A drink in the lounge bar piques the appetite for dishes prepared with garden herbs, fruit, veg and edible flowers, ramped up flavour-wise by foraged ingredients such as nettles and wild garlic when in season. Starters including basil-marinated bruschetta with gooseberry and elderflower chutney prelude mains such as butter-soft Celtic steak with local Moody Mabel cheese. There are many nods to local produce at breakfast, too, and the cooked Welsh option with a side order of cockles is bang on the money. Read expert review From £130per night Rates provided by Booking.com   SCOTLAND The Three Chimneys and The House Over-ByDunvegan, Isle of Skye, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This destination restaurant with rooms is back doing what it does best, with a new chef, updated look and reinvigorated sense of discipline and purpose. The essential ingredients are there: attentive service, attractive rooms with mesmerising views and a talented young chef. Choose from a three-course à la carte menu or the epic Skye Showcase Menu, served at the ‘Kitchen Table’, right in the heart of the action. Dishes on the latter menu might include the likes of Dungvegan crab, seaweed and miso-cured halibut, Orbost Farm beef and pot-roasted young grouse. A road (albeit single-track and quiet) runs between the House Over-By and the shore of Loch Dunvegan, slightly eroding what would otherwise be a feeling of privacy, but not unduly distracting from the peaceful views. Read expert review From £345per night The Peat InnSt Andrews, Fife, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating A long-standing gastro-destination lying between the 'town and gown' of St Andrews and Fife’s East Neuk fishing villages, this is well worth a detour. It’s a short stagger from restaurant to homely split-level suites: a calm, comfortable place to sleep off the fabulous Michelin-starred food. The rustic-chic restaurant, all tender taupes with amber and deep sea-blue accents, is a fittingly sophisticated setting for the triumphant cooking. You come here for the food and you won’t leave disappointed. From the home-made butter to the unusually good petit-fours, everything is a reflection of chef Geoffrey Smeddle’s joyous approach to food, with dishes like a starter of smoked beef tartare with wasabi puree raising your eyebrows and your expectations simultaneously. Read expert review From £195per night The Taynuilt Etive Restaurant with RoomsTaynuilt, Argyll & Bute, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating This historic rural hotel has been reinvented as a restaurant with rooms with a young Scottish chef leading a bright and creative team. It's at the heart of a small community that makes an ideal base for exploring Argyll and the isles. The Etive restaurant is the axis here, a genuine foodie oasis and arguably the finest place to eat in the region. John McNulty works wonders with the ultra-local produce, whether it be the Mull Pig’s Heed or the salmon he smokes using local larch from Loch Awe. Sound provenance ripples through the Etive even as far as breakfast, where local fish stars. Read expert review From £79per night 21212Edinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating The four bedrooms above this Michelin-starred restaurant are no afterthought; there is a confident hand at work in rooms that are as striking as the food, displaying a sometimes surprising but always sensual contemporary/baroque style and unexpectedly leafy views. Michelin-starred chef Paul Kitching is a maverick who likes to tease flavours, building fantastic creations that sound impossible, but work, like silky pink trout served with artichokes, pasta, almonds, chickpeas, kidney beans, oriental mushrooms, warm coleslaw and feta cheese. He’s utterly serious but there’s an edge of play - such as a pre-dessert of porridge, milk and cinnamon poured from a china cow. Read expert review From £112per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith The Bridge Inn, RathoEdinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This 18-century coaching inn – now an award-winning gastropub with rooms – is on a leafy canal in a tranquil village just 20 minutes away from Edinburgh's city centre. Four pretty bedrooms are each individually decorated. The cooking is exceptional, with talented head chef Ben doing wonderful things with good Scottish fish and game, properly hung beef, and pork from their own fat and sassy pigs. They grow their own vegetables, herbs and fruit too, in an old walled garden a short walk away down the canal path. Breakfast is a fine indulgence. You can have a hair of the dog as well: Champagne, Prosecco, Buck’s Fizz or a Bloody Mary. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best castle hotels in Scotland Contributions from Ros Belford, Suzy Bennett, Sophie Butler, Gill Charlton, Kerry Christiani, Fiona Duncan, Suzanne King, Gabriella Le Breton, Linda Macdonald, Richard McComb, Robin McKelvie, Harriet O'Brien, Ben Parker, Helen Pickles, Louise Roddon, Cathy Stebbings, Sarah Stirling, Anna Turns, Debbie Ward and Antonia Windsor.

Britain's loveliest restaurants with rooms for autumn

What could be more appealing than the epicurean informality of an inn or restaurant with rooms? These wonderfully relaxed establishments combine an emphasis on great ingredients from the area with local charm and stylish panache. There’s an insider feel that you don’t get at a more formal hotel, and there’s a foodie enthusiasm that wouldn’t be exuded quite as joyfully at a larger enterprise. Autumn/winter is a particularly good time to seek out their gently indulgent accommodation and fabulous seasonal flavours – the likes of wild rabbit with foraged mushrooms, grouse and damsons, elderberries and more. Harriet O'Brien Our experts round up their favourite establishments in Britain, from the Cotswolds to Cornwall, Suffolk to Skye, for feasting – and then flopping.  ENGLAND Cotswolds The Wild RabbitKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Wild Rabbit is a haven of eco-elegance a few fields away from sister enterprise Daylesford, the organic farm shop, deli, spa (and more) of Carole Bamford. She transformed this 18th-century inn and it has been meticulously devised in quiet colours, stone and wood. It’s a beautiful posh pub, with food to match. The kitchen is masterminded by Tim Allen, who won the Wild Rabbit a Michelin star in October 2016. His cuisine takes diners on a taste adventure, with dishes such as haddock on leek and apple slaw, topped with an amazingly cooked egg – poached and lightly deep fried. Read expert review From £148per night The Feathered Nest Country InnOxfordshire, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fabulous food and a superb setting above the Evenlode valley make this old country inn a hedonistic haven. The owners describe it as a pub with a twist. They’ve created an elegant restaurant that has won armloads of awards since it opened, with three stylish and supremely comfy bedrooms. The exquisite food is almost on a par with sleek gastro establishments such as Tom Kerridge’s The Hand and Flowers in Marlow - and even Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons where head chef Kuba Winkowski previously worked. There’s a stupendous wine list, too. Among the choice of 200 or so is a wonderful range of South African wines. There’s also a bar menu featuring classics such as burgers of brilliant quality. Read expert review From £140per night The Wheatsheaf InnNorthleach, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A creeper-clad coaching inn turned arty, boutique haven. The Wheatsheaf is in a particularly pretty and enterprising little Cotswold town. The restaurant draws a regular local crowd and the emphasis is on the very best quality, from the menu ingredients to the room amenities. The sophisticated menu offers great flavour combinations, the likes of roast parsnip and fennel salad with chestnuts, and mutton and apple pie with creamed potatoes. If there’s space in the bar beforehand try an aperitif of Sloe Negroni, with sloe gin and Campari, or opt for a pint of Cotswold Old Hooky. Read expert review From £102per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Kingham PloughKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Kingham Plough is a treat of a foodie destinatio, with relaxing furnishings, genial staff and brilliantly conceived menus. Emily Watkins has won numerous awards for her modern British cuisine with a twist ‒ dishes are often based on old Cotswold recipes. Her food is also much inspired by local produce; the likes of Windrush Valley goat cheese and pork from Paddock Farm a few miles away. There’s a pleasingly short and sophisticated à la carte menu: starters might include slow braised oxtail with horseradish, and mains could feature venison wellington, with meat supplied from nearby Cornbury Park. There’s also a well-priced bar menu featuring gastro comfort food such as rabbit parfait. Read expert review From £145per night The Ebrington ArmsEbrington, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating This hidden treasure set in a gloriously unspoilt village is a modern day version of a country tavern – it’s at once a genuine pub that brews its own very smooth ales; a lovely restaurant with real local flavour; and a charming hotel with rural-chic bedrooms. Chef Ben Dulley offers short, understated menus which reflect his commitment to freshness, with many vegetables straight from surrounding Drinkwater Farm. Dishes are beautifully presented and packed with local flavour – the likes of hot-smoked Bibury trout salad, and Cotswold lamb with stuffed tomatoes. Wines are from independent growers, including the Cotswolds’ own Little Oak Vineyard. Read expert review From £165per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best Cotswolds pubs with rooms   Oxfordshire Artist Residence OxfordshireSouth Leigh, Oxfordshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A unique country pub with a bohemian twist and arty vibe, offering gorgeous quirky rooms, scrumptious meals and contemporary art. The food is as heart-warming as the dining room. Local game and meat, foraged herbs and flowers join vegetables from the garden. The menu could include the likes of smoky pigeon breast electrified by a pickled walnut with caramelised chicory, port jelly and smoked spring onions and plaice in seaweed butter, smoked cockles, sea vegetables and bisque. The wine list is small, selective and good value. Join locals for a pint at the bar, read the paper or play cards around the fire. Read expert review From £130per night • The best luxury hotels in Oxfordshire   Lake District L’EnclumeCartmel, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Simon Rogan's two-Michelin-starred restaurant plus handful of rooms stay true both to the simple village location and rich surrounding land. Rooms are modest but smartly furnished, the setting picture-box pretty while the food is an exemplar of local sourcing and creativity. This isn’t Blumenthal-style magic but simply 20 (tiny) courses of exceptional skill, balance and creativity: an egg shell containing a yolk in mushroom broth; confit cauliflower in a pea and calamint sauce; a finger of turbot in nasturtium butter, the dinkiest caramel mousse sitting on compressed apple. All is presented exquisitely but without fanfare on rustic pottery, handmade glass, even a pebble. The Coravin wine system allows you to try top-rank or small-producer wines. Read expert review From £129per night The Punch Bowl InnLake District, Cumbria, England 8Telegraph expert rating A smart but relaxed country inn, in a quiet corner of the Lake District, with a deserved reputation for its classy food. The ground floor is a semi open-plan series of dining rooms, bar and relaxed eating areas, separated by little steps. The cooking is smart-city-restaurant standard producing assured, modern British dishes that are interesting without being tricksy or fussy. No fancy canapés or pre-starters, just clean flavours. Starters might include black pudding with bubble and squeak or tomato salad with local crab and lobster while mains could be pork with ham hock croquette or cod with Morteau sausage. There's a wide-ranging wine list, plus a couple of local real ales. Read expert review From £130per night • The Lake District's best pubs and inns   Peak District The Samuel Fox Country InnHope Valley, Peak District, England 8Telegraph expert rating This stone-built inn – which is more of a restaurant with rooms than a standard country pub – has an ever-growing reputation. Come for a great dinner, stay over in one of four comfortable rooms and spend the next day exploring the glorious Peak District. The foodie credentials are strong: chef-patron James Duckett has worked with Albert Roux, Michel Roux, Marcus Wareing and Philip Howard, and done extended stints in Australia and Spain. Now he turns out some of the best food in the area: everything from a piquant, pretty-as-a-picture starter of soused sardines to the kind of iced chocolate cherry parfait that makes you wish you hadn’t shared with your other half. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Peak District   Yorkshire Crab Manor HotelThirsk, Yorkshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fun and exotic, individually themed rooms combined with a well-regarded seafood restaurant and an overall madcap sense of decoration make this a hugely popular choice for special occasions. The restaurant specialises in fish and seafood serving both classics – lobster thermidor, grilled Queen scallops – as well as more modern dishes such as sea trout with samphire. It's open for lunch and dinner, and for afternoon 'lighter' options (including moules mariniere), but there's nothing delicate about portion sizes. Half the fun is the setting: jolly bar, romantic dining room or brighter conservatory, all with a bonkers decoration that includes a suite of orchestral instruments. Breakfast is also a delight. Read expert review From £165per night The Star InnHarome, Helmsley, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant-with-rooms with chocolate-box, thatched-pub looks and a bucolic farming-village location. Bedrooms, across the road, have a comfy, hunting-lodge style. Whitby-born chef-owner Andrew Pern was one of the first champions of local sourcing - and why wouldn’t you be with his ‘back garden’: moorland game and pasture-fed meat, coastal fish, Yorkshire Wolds’ fruit and vegetables. He now has a huge kitchen garden at the back of the pub. His menus are punchy, robust yet skilfully balanced and as much about texture as taste: crab stick with seashore vegetables and avocado ice, perhaps followed by roasted lamb chop with truffled faggot or honey-roasted duck with tea-poached quail’s egg. Read expert review From £150per night The Timble InnNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 8Telegraph expert rating A food-driven village pub in a quiet, yet surprisingly well-connected location with bold, contemporary styling and smart bedrooms. Glorious views and walks are on the doorstep. A pub that does two sittings for Sunday lunch is serious about food, and has been awarded two AA rosettes for it. It’s ambitious stuff – wood pigeon with quail’s egg and black pudding; venison loin with celeriac remoulade and chestnuts. The seafood platter and chateaubriand steak are favourites. It's not really a beer pub but offers a wide-ranging wine list – including fine ones by the glass – plus local gins. Read expert review From £150per night The Yorke ArmsNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant with rooms in an off-the-beaten-track location; perfect for walking off the spoiling food. The food is why people come here – some helicopter in from London for chef-proprietor Frances Atkins’s flavour-intense cooking. It’s not fussy or tricksy, just skilled, imaginative and full of the unexpected – quail with lychee and jasmine; brill with fennel in turmeric broth, peach and curd tart. Choose the eight-course tasting menu and everything is a surprise. Much is home-grown; the huge kitchen garden produces a summer surplus. These are meals to savour (even the lunchtime bar menu includes devilled kidneys, and gratin of seared scallops). Read expert review From £345per night • The best luxury hotels in Yorkshire   Norfolk Morston HallNorfolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating A flint- and brick-built Jacobean country-house hotel, with large conservatory extensions that provide extra dining space. Inside, you’ll find open fires, squashy sofas and cosy corners in a hushed, fairly formal atmosphere. The food is the main reason to come to Morston Hall, the only restaurant with a Michelin star on this stretch of coast. Galton Blackiston’s cooking is rated highly by both visitors and locals: he offers a set dinner based on fresh, local ingredients, served at 8pm daily. Four courses usually include two meat dishes (perhaps confit of duck or beef fillet) and a fish course. Recommended wines are suggested to accompany the dishes – or you can choose from an extensive list. Read expert review From £340per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Norfolk   Suffolk The Great HouseLavenham, Suffolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating The five-bedroom hotel looks onto the market square of Lavenham, a well-preserved medieval village of timbered houses. It would be wrong to stay here without sampling the food, as this is primarily a restaurant – and a very good one at that. From a regularly changing menu, you might find starters of mussels with chilli, coriander and cream, tuna sashimi or wild mushroom ravioli, and main courses of pheasant supreme, grilled fillet of lamb with thyme sauce or roasted duck breast with grilled beetroot. Desserts could be dark chocolate terrine, millefeuille or maple syrup rice pudding. Read expert review From £99per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best spa hotels in Suffolk   Somerset The White PostYeovil, Somerset, England 8Telegraph expert rating At this cosy Victorian ‘pub-and-lodgings’, the elegant gastronomy is as much a pull as the rooms. Brett’s passion for foraging and elegant presentation seeps through. The best way to experience the dishes? The 10-course tasting menu, which pays homage to the West Country (pork done eight ways, served with local chilli and ginger cider) as well as international influences (spiced lentil dhal with gurnard, mango and coconut). The wine list is sufficient but it’s the local ales and ciders that stand out, particularly if you pair a pint of Dorset Knob bitter with the Sunday roast. Painted walls are interrupted only by the wide windows, long cardinal-coloured drapes and filament bulb lamps that, along with on-table candles, add just enough light during evening dining. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The most romantic hotels in Somerset   Dorset La FosseCranborne, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating Snug in the wave-like green hills of east Dorset, La Fosse at Cranborne is a peaceful bed and breakfast as well as popular restaurant. Run by husband and wife, this simple West Country retreat, embracing both modern and traditional, feels as far from the madding crowds as possible. Owner-chef Mark is a true locavore, sourcing as much from in and around the village as possible. His passion for local, inventive cuisine has seen him named best chef in Dorset. The colourful duck dish, replete with homegrown vegetables, is a highlight, drizzled in a piquant jus. Mark’s award-winning cheeseboard is part of the experience, so save some room. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Anchor InnSeatown, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Anchor Inn, sat beyond snaking lanes and tucked between scarped cliffs on the edge of a little known Dorset village, is a destination gastropub serving elevated British classics. It is also a boutique hideaway that cocoons guests amid the sound of rolling waves. If the weather is decent, expect a fight to secure a lunchtime spot, either tucked inside or al fresco. Menus from head chef Jean-Paul De Ronne — who previously worked under Masterchef winner Mat Follas — reveal commitment to seasonal fare from land and sea, such as the fresh crab salad using crustacea caught only metres away. Ales are all from Palmers, brewed four miles away, while an extensive cocktail list from former Hix bartender David Smith features a number of Dorset’s own spirits. Read expert review From £120per night • The best hotels in Dorset   Buckinghamshire The Mash InnRadnage, Buckinghamshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating Described by its owner Nick Mash as a ‘new generation inn’, The Mash Inn's aim is to remove the barriers between chef and diner. The open kitchen takes centre stage: a solid wood workstation groaning with ingredients and stacked plates, beneath a ceiling rack dripping with pots and pans, in front of an open fire for rotisserie cooking. Chef Jon Parry cooks up a storm, producing a delicious, earthy and inventive no frills tasting menu and a short à la carte menu. Much of the produce is from the garden or very local. Diners sit at individual tables or at a large communal table, which may sound daunting but such is the communal, friendly atmosphere that it’s a pleasure to do so. Read expert review From £100per night The Hand & FlowersMarlow, Buckinghamshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn with a Michelin-starred restaurant, enticing locals to dine, and couples for weekends or nights away. It's on busy West Street, just along the road from the house where Mary Shelley created Frankenstein. The chef-proprietor is Tom Kerridge, who gained a Michelin star within 10 months from a kitchen which was then the size of a large cupboard. These days he has a new, celadon green kitchen and a brigade of chefs. As restaurants go, it rocks. Expect crayfish scotch egg, slow cooked duck breast with duck fat chips and other earthy, deeply satisfying dishes that are also full of imaginative twists, served in a cosy and convivial dining room. Read expert review From £140per night • The best hotels in Buckinghamshire   Kent RocksaltFolkestone, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Rocksalt is the littoral culinary kingdom of Mark Sargeant of Claridge's fame. A microcosm of London sophistication in gritty Folkestone, it's a genuine dining destination. The recent addition of four bedrooms above "Sargey's" adjacent Smokehouse enables visitors to abandon themselves to gluttony. His dedication to local ingredients introduces diners to new treasures, such as meaty huss dogfish and tart sea buckthorn (oozing out of a dense chocolate mousse fondant), yet dishes are refreshingly clean and unpretentious. Hunks of bread, served with beef dripping, rich butter and home-roasted salt, and nuggets of treacly fudge and slices of colourful rock bookend a perfectly executed meal. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Wife of BathWye, Kent, England 9Telegraph expert rating Another addition to chef Mark Sargeant and Josh De Haan's portfolio of Kentish restaurants with rooms. With a superb Spanish restaurant and tiny tapas bar, its signature quirky style and authentic cuisine works surprisingly well in the bucolic setting. The restaurant serves impeccable fare: juicy scallops with spicy chorizo and earthy morcillo (black pudding); honey sweet melon smothered in Brindisa's finest Serrano ham; succulent Galician steaks with creamy aioli and fiery paprika potatoes; and hake with radishes, Seville orange and a buttery sauce laced with Gin Mare. Save space for pudding: the bitter chocolate tart with salt and olive oil is revelatory, as is ice-cream made with raisins soaked in PX sherry. Read expert review From £70per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Read's Restaurant With RoomsFaversham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Read's, housed in a Georgian mansion on the north Kentish coast, is a smart restaurant with six rooms, owned and run by acclaimed chef David Pitchford and his wife Rona. Sticking firmly to their decades-long recipe for success, they deliver classic cuisine and unfussy hospitality. David won a Michelin star in 1992, which he retained for 20 consecutive years, becoming the second longest holder of the accolade in Britain. The food is hard to fault, if lacking the innovation and excitement that comes with Michelin recognition: comforting, classic French cuisine with British influence. Think ham and pea mousse; smoked haddock in cream sauce topped with cheese soufflé; Kentish lamb served with buttery asparagus and garden vegetables; and a Cassis-soaked summer pudding. Read expert review From £145per night The Dog at WinghamWingham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating A medieval pub in a rural village, run by an enterprising local family, that serves exceptionally good food and features eight attractive bedrooms. Virtually equidistant from Canterbury and Sandwich, it’s ideally located for exploring the Kentish city, countryside and coast. The kitchen is overseen by the young and talented Dan Johns, who has worked at Gary Rhodes’ Searcy’s at The Gherkin and Urban Coterie. The menu changes monthly to reflect seasonality and local produce. Imaginative starters such as fragrant Thai-style chicken salad and rich pork and pistachio terrine with pineapple jam are followed by melt-in-the-mouth Moroccan spiced lamb and crisp pork collar with chorizo dumplings. Read expert review From £86per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best pubs with rooms in Kent   Devon The Dartmoor InnOkehampton, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 16th-century coaching inn on the north-western edge of Dartmoor National Park is acclaimed for its fresh, seasonal cooking, but it’s worth bedding down for a stay in one of its three chic bedrooms. A blackboard heralds not only the breed of cattle, but also the name of the farmer it has come from. Dishes are pub classics, done to perfection: rib-eye steak and chips, confit of duck leg with toffee apple puree and roasted hazelnuts, and brisket of beef. Philip has a strong ethical policy, forging strong links with local artisan food producers, and ensures the beef has been grass fed and reared within a 20-mile radius. Breakfast is refreshingly original, with dainty portions of caramelised bananas or a daring cooked menu, including herb-crusted goat’s cheese, black pudding and bacon lardons. Read expert review From £65per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Lamb InnSandford, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating With open fires, beamed walls, deep sofas and award-winning food, this 16th-century inn in the village of Sandford is a pub of dreams for town-dwellers. Upstairs, seven bedrooms have big beds, soft linen and powerful showers, and there’s a pretty cobbled terrace at the rear. The Lamb Inn’s menu consistently attracts rave reviews. The produce is seasonal and locally sourced, mixing upmarket dishes with pub classics: shellfish bisque, mushroom ravioli, roasted pigeon with smoked bacon and savoy cabbage or steak and chips. The perfectly fluffy sticky toffee pudding is worth a visit alone. Landlord Mark is a fan of real ale and regularly rotates his cask brews to ensure they stay fresh. Read expert review From £69per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Masons ArmsBranscombe, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This dog-friendly 14th-century thatched inn, in Branscombe, on the Jurassic Coast, is one of Devon’s best. It prides itself on serving local, seasonal Devon fare on a traditional pub menu – it even has a 'food sourcing map' detailing exactly where the produce comes from. There’s steamed River Exe mussels and fries, steak and kidney shortcrust pie, rump steak and a seafood platter. Ales, hand-pumped from casks, are just as local. On a sunny day, the action moves outside to the pretty suntrap terrace. It's a 15-minute walk to Branscombe Beach, a lovely, long shingle cove from where you can pick up the South West Coastal Path. Read expert review From £75per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Salutation InnTopsham, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating Eat well and rest your head at this 18th-century coaching inn in chichi Topsham: a stylish option with a truly excellent restaurant, helmed by one of Gordon Ramsay's former protégés. Exquisite handmade petit-fours welcome guests on arrival – the first hint that your dining experience will be full of extra surprises. The wild mushroom appetiser comes accompanied by an umami-enhancing pinot noir, and the tomato gazpacho with local crab, served in a glass on ice, and followed by a rich rump of beef from Greendale Farm. Each modern dish is accompanied by diverse wines chosen by Stephen Edwardes – the unusual sake complements the beautiful strawberry dessert which is garnished with home-grown edible flowers. Read expert review From £145per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Devon   Cornwall The Gurnard's HeadSt Ives, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn offering outstanding food, fabulous sea and moorland views, situated close to St Ives and Land's End. Popular with walkers and couples of all ages seeking a low-key, restorative break in a wild coastal location. Locals come from miles around to dine here. The Scottish head chef, Bruce Rennie, cooks a short, inventive menu. Lunch may include beetroot risotto, octopus and white wine stew, or Merguez sausages with Puy lentils. The supper menu may include salmon and lobster tortellini, cod with pig’s trotter, and sole with Vermouth. The wine list focuses on Old World wines, notably from France, Italy and Portugal. Read expert review From £110per night Padstow TownhousePadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A handsome listed townhouse on Padstow's high street that has been superbly renovated and opened as a six-bedroom luxury guesthouse by chef Paul Ainsworth to complement his Michelin-starred restaurant, Paul Ainsworth at Number 6. Head there for amusingly-presented, delicately-flavoured meat and fish dishes and a fun and informal atmosphere, or to his even more informal restaurant, Rojanos, for superior pasta, pizza and hamburgers. Breakfast is served at the latter. The guesthouse owns an electric BMW in which guests can be transported if they don’t want to walk around. Read expert review From £280per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com St Petroc's HotelPadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A sociable, intimate townhouse with a labyrinth of gorgeously styled sitting and reading rooms – as well as a buzzy bistro. St Petroc’s Bistro opened along with the hotel in 1988. It’s a lovely room – with an engaging selection of original art on the walls – and a relaxing, happy place to eat at either lunch or dinner. Pride of place on the menu goes to the 30-day dry-aged steaks, but there are fish, chicken and vegetarian options as well – all of them classic Rick Stein recipes (try the grilled hake with Serrano ham, succotash and chives). Ruby’s Bar is the new Stein pub – a great place for a local beer or cocktail. Read expert review From £112per night Kota Restaurant with RoomsPorthleven, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating With a fantastic Asian-Cornish fusion restaurant downstairs, and Porthleven’s picturesque harbour on the doorstep, the Kota’s two simple, homey rooms are proof that sometimes substance can win over style. The vibe in the restaurant is casual, with a long room overlooking the harbour and a waterfront lawn on which you can dine in good weather. New Zealander Jude, who is part Maori, part Malay-Chinese, brings Asian spices and cooking styles to fresh, meticulously sourced Cornish produce – squid with green mango salad, scallops with miso dressing and seaweed salad, and Laksa with prawns, mussels and fish. There are also some very creative burgers – tempura fish with wasabi tartare, and satay chicken with Asian slaw. Read expert review From £75per night DriftwoodPortscatho, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating Sitting on a hill above the rugged coastline of the Roseland peninsula, Driftwood is nautically furnished in soft creams and blues. A Michelin-starred restaurant, private sea-facing terraces, and a private beach make this the perfect venue for pretty much everyone. There are wonderful coastal path walks for miles in each direction. This is Cornish cooking at its finest: unfussy and focused on bringing out the flavour of fresh fish and seafood and locally reared beef and lamb. Dinner in summer comprises a six-course tasting menu with complementary wines. For children there are early suppers with proper chef-made food. Read expert review From £250per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Coombeshead FarmLewannick, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating This is the joint venture from chef Tom Adams of London restaurant Pitt Cue and April Bloomfield, English born chef/proprietor of The Spotted Pig in New York. Both wanted to get back to the roots of food and hospitality and the result is this relaxed communal dining farmhouse b&b. Tom and his partner Lottie Mew live off the land and share their fresh, foraged, pickled and harvested produce with their guests. Tom cooks a three-course feast, kicking off with plates of delicious nibbles from 6.30pm onwards, which is shared at a communal table by all the guests. Tom’s own rare breed Mangalitza pigs feature large, plus perhaps a cep and walnut broth, lamb shoulder and mushroom porridge, with madeleine, whey and prune for pudding. Wines are unusual. Read expert review From £175per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Cornwall   Sussex The Barn at RoundhurstLurgashall, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating A rural South Downs retreat on a 250-acre organic farm with its own lakes. Home-reared food is a specialty. Converted outhouses with six rooms are set around a courtyard, just steps from a dramatic converted barn for dining and lounging. A four-course set menu with generous portions is available for guests and non-guests Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays; a light supper is provided for guests on other days. Meals highlight the farm’s own organic beef, lamb and pork and could include colourful heritage carrots and an exceptional triple chocolate mousse. Read expert review From £98per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com CrouchersChichester, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating An unassuming motel-like exterior belies a foodie haven a short drive from the Witterings. Relax on the patio of a garden-facing room, head to the beach, or explore the cultural and sporting highlights around Chichester but leave room for dinner in the impressive restaurant. Proximity to the coast ensures good seafood. The squid-ink pasta starter is light and delicate and a showy dessert of white chocolate and saffron mousse with edible flowers, caramel and orange ice-cream is a multi-sensory delight. A strong wine list includes an emphasis on the owners’ native South Africa. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Crab & LobsterWest Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating Herons can be seen on the doorstep of this modernised 350-year-old pub beside a bird sanctuary, where guests can stay in cosy bedrooms or an adjoining cottage. Tuck into locally caught seafood in the bar-restaurant and plan nature walks or trips to nearby beaches. The menu, as this gastropub’s name suggests, makes good use of locally caught seafood. Baked Selsey crab with a salad or crab cakes is a highlight. Meat, like rump of lamb (on an autumn menu with garlic Pommes Anna, butternut squash purée, confit tomatoes, baby leeks and Madeira jus) is also locally reared. There’s an extensive wine list and takeaway fish and chips. Read expert review From £160per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith Wingrove HouseAlfriston, South Downs, England 8Telegraph expert rating Yards from the South Downs Way and the half-timbered, candlelit pubs of Alfriston, this swish 19th-century boutique hotel with a modern country restaurant delivers roaring log fires, low-slung sofas and top-notch food, and draws city dwellers craving an easy country escape. Matthew Comben, formerly of the Hungry Monk in Jevington, heads up the kitchen and has brought with him the Monk's original banoffee pie recipe. Highlights from the seasonal menu include cauliflower fritters with Brighton blue cheese mayonnaise, and a soft beef fillet with tarragon. There's an impressive gin menu with 11 different options, including Brighton Gin, and a refreshingly reasonable wine list. Read expert review From £108per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best places and cities to visit in England – and where to stay   Cheshire The Roebuck InnMobberley, Cheshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This French-influenced bistro with rooms is perfect weekend break material, with lashings of character, great food and a beautifully designed garden. The bistro menu, tweaked with the seasons, is European in style, and everything comes in generous portions, whether it’s ‘small plates’ of cassoulet, caponata and crostini; mains such as saffron risotto, venison bourguignon and moules marinière; or puds of tarte au citron, profiteroles and crème caramel. On the drinks front, you’ll find an interesting selection of local ales, old-world wines and a vintage dresser filled with classic aperitifs and digestifs. Read expert review From £115per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • Britain's cosiest hotels for autumn   County Durham Lord Crewe ArmsBlanchland, Northumberland, England 9Telegraph expert rating A lord-of-the-manor building, in a pin-neat estate village, that oozes atmosphere at every stone-flagged turn. A reputation for honest, British cooking, plus its rural location, makes it popular with walkers and foodies as well as the country-sports fraternity. Expect punchy, robust, British cooking, rich with flavour and unusual combinations: devilled lamb’s kidneys on roasted cauliflower; grilled sea trout and mixed alliums; sea buckthorn posset. There’s an element of fun, too; eggy bread with fried bacon or Bloody Mary tomatoes on toast for breakfast. Some ingredients come from the kitchen garden. Eat on the terrace in the summer. The atmospheric, barrel-vaulted bar has local ales including a custom-made Lord Crewe Brew. Read expert review From £155per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Rose & CrownCounty Durham, England 9Telegraph expert rating A foodie destination country inn that has smartened up while still maintaining a sense of village pub: country-comfortable rooms; horse-brasses and dogs in the bar. Surrounded by the sheep-dotted fields and moors of the North Pennines, you come to eat, relax and then walk it off. The modern British menu shows confident cooking that lets the ingredients shine through; no fuss but definitely interesting: honey-glazed goat's cheese with beetroot, hazelnuts and gingerbread, perhaps, or pan-fried fillet of sea trout with roasted baby gem and crushed peas. There’s good local sourcing with Teesdale lamb rarely off the menu. Eat in the candle-lit dining room or buzzier bar; the latter offers three real ales and a good selection of single malts. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best country house hotels in Britain   Cities The Henrietta HotelCovent Garden, London, England 8Telegraph expert rating An 18-bedroom boutique address in one of Covent Garden’s most attractive streets, owned and run by the Paris-based Experimental Group, with a cocktail bar, Ollie Dabbous restaurant and quirky interior design by Dorothée Meilichzon. The food, is delicious – clean, clever and uncomplicated – with highlights that might include the sheeps’ milk curds with pistachio, beef tartare with nasturtium and rye, and wonderful freshly baked warm madeleines with Chantilly cream. Don't miss a cocktail, which can be chosen à la carte or with a consultation from the barman. Read expert review From £220per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Ginger PigHove, Brighton, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 11-bedroom guesthouse above Hove’s highly-acclaimed Ginger Pig Bar and Restaurant is ideal if you want a quieter seaside base. Spacious and elegantly understated rooms include thoughtful beach bags with towels and well-stocked minibars. Always buzzy, this sprawling gastropub serves up highly delicious grub and excellent Sunday roasts. Look out for seasonal specials like asparagus with brown crab and chipotle mayo, or seabream with samphire. The adjoining Orangerie is where breakfast is served (there’s an outdoor area for sunny days), offering imaginative dishes such as baked eggs with hummus, chorizo and peppers, Irish rock oysters and rarebit with roasted tomatoes and mushrooms. Read expert review From £80per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Simpsons RestaurantBirmingham, England 8Telegraph expert rating The cooking is superlative at this gastronomic powerhouse, which also offers three individually styled – and great value – rooms. Throw in the added draw of the Simpsons Cookery School and you pretty much have Michelin-starred, Brummie food nirvana. The winning team of owner Andreas Antona and chef director Luke Tipping, one of Britain’s finest sauciers, has weathered fashions and trends. The three-course à la carte menu features plump marinière-style mussels on a delicate, buttery skate wing, while refined hipster influences are showcased with a barbecued beef cheek with a rich, silky bone marrow sauce. The pastry section’s take on a Belgian Speculoos cookie, with caramelised white chocolate and coffee granite, is fabulous. Read expert review From £110per night The White Star TavernSouthampton, Hampshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating A characterful tavern with rooms on Southampton’s vibrant Oxford Street. The restaurant is a destination in itself, with a varied menu that caters to all comers. If you fancy a plate of fish and chips washed down with real ale, then you’ll get the crispest batter and a unique brew from Itchen Valley. But the real tour de force is the à la carte menu, where chef Matt Noonan serves up his creativity and innovation in dishes that linger long in the memory: a melt-in-the-mouth braised ox cheek with black bean glaze and oriental vegetables to start, perhaps, or a seared bass with a sauté of wild mushrooms, egg yolk ketchup, smoked and cured egg yolk, leek and fresh Dorset truffle as a main. The Death by Chocolate dessert is served up like a piece of street art and really is to die for. Read expert review From £105per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels for a UK city break   WALES Llys MeddygPembrokeshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating A cosy hotel in the small town of Newport, on the Pembrokeshire coast, offering colourful interiors, reasonable rates and an exceptional restaurant, which has gained a reputation in Pembrokeshire and beyond as one of the best and most reasonable fine dining establishments. Chef Daniel Jones does wonders with local produce – such as Newport bay crab and lobster, Preseli lamb, Welsh beef and West Wales cheeses – in two separate dining areas: the romantic basement-level Cellar Bar, which has a slate floor and leather settees, and a wood burning stove in an inglenook fireplace; and, on the ground floor, the recently refurbished main dining room. Ed smokes salmon in a shed in his house just next door. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Ynyshir Restaurant and RoomsPowys, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Queen Victoria once owned this handsome white painted house as a hidden retreat. The undulating grounds are lovely and lead to the RSPB Ynys Hir Nature Reserve at the head of the Dovey estuary. Current owner and professional artist Rob Reen is responsible for the vibrant interiors, their colours taking a lead from his equally bold canvasses that dominate the walls. In the kitchen, Gareth Ward, who trained with Sat Bains, is a rising star, a recipient of one Michelin star and gunning for a second. He prefers to serve a series of small, integrated dishes, and is always coming up with new ideas and loves surprises. The tasting menu at dinner might include simple plates such as Welsh wagyu, pork belly with 'river bacon' or pollock with black bean. Read expert review From £215per night Tyddyn LlanDenbighshire, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A modest Georgian house just outside Llandrillo, with a complementary extension using local slate and stone. The house was once a shooting lodge belonging to the Dukes of Westminster, but now places food centre stage. The views are spectacular, with the Vale of Edeyrnion’s meadows and the slopes of the Berwyn Mountains beyond. The dining room is decorated in Wedgewood blue with tall windows on three sides. Bryan Webb is considered one of Wales’s foremost chefs, with a long-held Michelin star and a commitment to local produce, such as melting Welsh black beef, and quality seasonal ingredients. The menu changes daily. Read expert review From £195per night The Old Rectory on the LakeSnowdonia, Tal-y-llyn, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A sun-trap hideaway on the shores of a huge lake, and at the foot of the mountain, Cadair Idris. It’s elegant and relaxing with free-standing roll-top baths, an outdoor hot tub and locally sourced food perfectly cooked to order in the restaurant. The food, courtesy of the self-trained chef, Ricky, is outstanding. There may be freshly-caught trout, or local Bala lamb on the menu, along with perfectly-cooked vegetables and perhaps Dauphinois potatoes. The chocolate fondant is a signature pudding. The terrace is the perfect place to enjoy the sunset over the lake with a Welsh gin and tonic. Read expert review From £110per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Harbourmaster HotelAberaeron, Cardigan Bay, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating Beach chic comes into its own at this forget-me-not-blue boutique hotel on Aberaeron’s harbour wall. And you won’t likely forget it with these killer sea views, glam rooms and imaginatively thought-out menus. The restaurant has a serious foodie bent in the evening – try to snag the cwtch (cubby hole) for intimate dining. Go for Carlingford oysters, a plump, sweet burst of the sea, and the perfect prelude for well-cooked Welsh fillet of steak, followed by an oozy chocolate fondant with salted caramel ice cream. For a buzzier vibe, head to the bar-lounge to nurse a Brecon gin or nibble bar snacks like crispy cockles with chilli vinegar. Read expert review From £185per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith FairyhillReynoldston, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Snuggled away in 24 acres of woodland near the Gower coast, Fairyhill enchants with more than just its name. Think Downton Abbey meets Watership Down with a pinch of 21st-century cool. It has carved out its name as a foodie retreat with good reason. The chef pulls off a daring, imaginative menu, taking a pride in local sourcing and garden-grown ingredients in dishes that are both robust and refined. Clean flavours sing of the seasons in dishes simple as gazpacho, pear and Pembroke crab, and goat's cheese mousse with courgette flower with beetroot gel. Mains like meltingly tender Welsh lamb served three ways and Serrano-wrapped monkfish with clams, samphire and fresh linguine strike the perfect balance. Read expert review From £135per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com JabajakCarmarthenshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Jabajak is a former drover’s farm, now a fine vineyard and boutique bolthole, serving home-grown food and wines with a slice of history, rustic elegance and first-class service. The restaurant has scooped awards for its locally sourced, home-grown approach. A drink in the lounge bar piques the appetite for dishes prepared with garden herbs, fruit, veg and edible flowers, ramped up flavour-wise by foraged ingredients such as nettles and wild garlic when in season. Starters including basil-marinated bruschetta with gooseberry and elderflower chutney prelude mains such as butter-soft Celtic steak with local Moody Mabel cheese. There are many nods to local produce at breakfast, too, and the cooked Welsh option with a side order of cockles is bang on the money. Read expert review From £130per night Rates provided by Booking.com   SCOTLAND The Three Chimneys and The House Over-ByDunvegan, Isle of Skye, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This destination restaurant with rooms is back doing what it does best, with a new chef, updated look and reinvigorated sense of discipline and purpose. The essential ingredients are there: attentive service, attractive rooms with mesmerising views and a talented young chef. Choose from a three-course à la carte menu or the epic Skye Showcase Menu, served at the ‘Kitchen Table’, right in the heart of the action. Dishes on the latter menu might include the likes of Dungvegan crab, seaweed and miso-cured halibut, Orbost Farm beef and pot-roasted young grouse. A road (albeit single-track and quiet) runs between the House Over-By and the shore of Loch Dunvegan, slightly eroding what would otherwise be a feeling of privacy, but not unduly distracting from the peaceful views. Read expert review From £345per night The Peat InnSt Andrews, Fife, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating A long-standing gastro-destination lying between the 'town and gown' of St Andrews and Fife’s East Neuk fishing villages, this is well worth a detour. It’s a short stagger from restaurant to homely split-level suites: a calm, comfortable place to sleep off the fabulous Michelin-starred food. The rustic-chic restaurant, all tender taupes with amber and deep sea-blue accents, is a fittingly sophisticated setting for the triumphant cooking. You come here for the food and you won’t leave disappointed. From the home-made butter to the unusually good petit-fours, everything is a reflection of chef Geoffrey Smeddle’s joyous approach to food, with dishes like a starter of smoked beef tartare with wasabi puree raising your eyebrows and your expectations simultaneously. Read expert review From £195per night The Taynuilt Etive Restaurant with RoomsTaynuilt, Argyll & Bute, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating This historic rural hotel has been reinvented as a restaurant with rooms with a young Scottish chef leading a bright and creative team. It's at the heart of a small community that makes an ideal base for exploring Argyll and the isles. The Etive restaurant is the axis here, a genuine foodie oasis and arguably the finest place to eat in the region. John McNulty works wonders with the ultra-local produce, whether it be the Mull Pig’s Heed or the salmon he smokes using local larch from Loch Awe. Sound provenance ripples through the Etive even as far as breakfast, where local fish stars. Read expert review From £79per night 21212Edinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating The four bedrooms above this Michelin-starred restaurant are no afterthought; there is a confident hand at work in rooms that are as striking as the food, displaying a sometimes surprising but always sensual contemporary/baroque style and unexpectedly leafy views. Michelin-starred chef Paul Kitching is a maverick who likes to tease flavours, building fantastic creations that sound impossible, but work, like silky pink trout served with artichokes, pasta, almonds, chickpeas, kidney beans, oriental mushrooms, warm coleslaw and feta cheese. He’s utterly serious but there’s an edge of play - such as a pre-dessert of porridge, milk and cinnamon poured from a china cow. Read expert review From £112per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith The Bridge Inn, RathoEdinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This 18-century coaching inn – now an award-winning gastropub with rooms – is on a leafy canal in a tranquil village just 20 minutes away from Edinburgh's city centre. Four pretty bedrooms are each individually decorated. The cooking is exceptional, with talented head chef Ben doing wonderful things with good Scottish fish and game, properly hung beef, and pork from their own fat and sassy pigs. They grow their own vegetables, herbs and fruit too, in an old walled garden a short walk away down the canal path. Breakfast is a fine indulgence. You can have a hair of the dog as well: Champagne, Prosecco, Buck’s Fizz or a Bloody Mary. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best castle hotels in Scotland Contributions from Ros Belford, Suzy Bennett, Sophie Butler, Gill Charlton, Kerry Christiani, Fiona Duncan, Suzanne King, Gabriella Le Breton, Linda Macdonald, Richard McComb, Robin McKelvie, Harriet O'Brien, Ben Parker, Helen Pickles, Louise Roddon, Cathy Stebbings, Sarah Stirling, Anna Turns, Debbie Ward and Antonia Windsor.

Britain's loveliest restaurants with rooms for autumn

What could be more appealing than the epicurean informality of an inn or restaurant with rooms? These wonderfully relaxed establishments combine an emphasis on great ingredients from the area with local charm and stylish panache. There’s an insider feel that you don’t get at a more formal hotel, and there’s a foodie enthusiasm that wouldn’t be exuded quite as joyfully at a larger enterprise. Autumn/winter is a particularly good time to seek out their gently indulgent accommodation and fabulous seasonal flavours – the likes of wild rabbit with foraged mushrooms, grouse and damsons, elderberries and more. Harriet O'Brien Our experts round up their favourite establishments in Britain, from the Cotswolds to Cornwall, Suffolk to Skye, for feasting – and then flopping.  ENGLAND Cotswolds The Wild RabbitKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Wild Rabbit is a haven of eco-elegance a few fields away from sister enterprise Daylesford, the organic farm shop, deli, spa (and more) of Carole Bamford. She transformed this 18th-century inn and it has been meticulously devised in quiet colours, stone and wood. It’s a beautiful posh pub, with food to match. The kitchen is masterminded by Tim Allen, who won the Wild Rabbit a Michelin star in October 2016. His cuisine takes diners on a taste adventure, with dishes such as haddock on leek and apple slaw, topped with an amazingly cooked egg – poached and lightly deep fried. Read expert review From £148per night The Feathered Nest Country InnOxfordshire, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fabulous food and a superb setting above the Evenlode valley make this old country inn a hedonistic haven. The owners describe it as a pub with a twist. They’ve created an elegant restaurant that has won armloads of awards since it opened, with three stylish and supremely comfy bedrooms. The exquisite food is almost on a par with sleek gastro establishments such as Tom Kerridge’s The Hand and Flowers in Marlow - and even Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons where head chef Kuba Winkowski previously worked. There’s a stupendous wine list, too. Among the choice of 200 or so is a wonderful range of South African wines. There’s also a bar menu featuring classics such as burgers of brilliant quality. Read expert review From £140per night The Wheatsheaf InnNorthleach, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A creeper-clad coaching inn turned arty, boutique haven. The Wheatsheaf is in a particularly pretty and enterprising little Cotswold town. The restaurant draws a regular local crowd and the emphasis is on the very best quality, from the menu ingredients to the room amenities. The sophisticated menu offers great flavour combinations, the likes of roast parsnip and fennel salad with chestnuts, and mutton and apple pie with creamed potatoes. If there’s space in the bar beforehand try an aperitif of Sloe Negroni, with sloe gin and Campari, or opt for a pint of Cotswold Old Hooky. Read expert review From £102per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Kingham PloughKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Kingham Plough is a treat of a foodie destinatio, with relaxing furnishings, genial staff and brilliantly conceived menus. Emily Watkins has won numerous awards for her modern British cuisine with a twist ‒ dishes are often based on old Cotswold recipes. Her food is also much inspired by local produce; the likes of Windrush Valley goat cheese and pork from Paddock Farm a few miles away. There’s a pleasingly short and sophisticated à la carte menu: starters might include slow braised oxtail with horseradish, and mains could feature venison wellington, with meat supplied from nearby Cornbury Park. There’s also a well-priced bar menu featuring gastro comfort food such as rabbit parfait. Read expert review From £145per night The Ebrington ArmsEbrington, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating This hidden treasure set in a gloriously unspoilt village is a modern day version of a country tavern – it’s at once a genuine pub that brews its own very smooth ales; a lovely restaurant with real local flavour; and a charming hotel with rural-chic bedrooms. Chef Ben Dulley offers short, understated menus which reflect his commitment to freshness, with many vegetables straight from surrounding Drinkwater Farm. Dishes are beautifully presented and packed with local flavour – the likes of hot-smoked Bibury trout salad, and Cotswold lamb with stuffed tomatoes. Wines are from independent growers, including the Cotswolds’ own Little Oak Vineyard. Read expert review From £165per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best Cotswolds pubs with rooms   Oxfordshire Artist Residence OxfordshireSouth Leigh, Oxfordshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A unique country pub with a bohemian twist and arty vibe, offering gorgeous quirky rooms, scrumptious meals and contemporary art. The food is as heart-warming as the dining room. Local game and meat, foraged herbs and flowers join vegetables from the garden. The menu could include the likes of smoky pigeon breast electrified by a pickled walnut with caramelised chicory, port jelly and smoked spring onions and plaice in seaweed butter, smoked cockles, sea vegetables and bisque. The wine list is small, selective and good value. Join locals for a pint at the bar, read the paper or play cards around the fire. Read expert review From £130per night • The best luxury hotels in Oxfordshire   Lake District L’EnclumeCartmel, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Simon Rogan's two-Michelin-starred restaurant plus handful of rooms stay true both to the simple village location and rich surrounding land. Rooms are modest but smartly furnished, the setting picture-box pretty while the food is an exemplar of local sourcing and creativity. This isn’t Blumenthal-style magic but simply 20 (tiny) courses of exceptional skill, balance and creativity: an egg shell containing a yolk in mushroom broth; confit cauliflower in a pea and calamint sauce; a finger of turbot in nasturtium butter, the dinkiest caramel mousse sitting on compressed apple. All is presented exquisitely but without fanfare on rustic pottery, handmade glass, even a pebble. The Coravin wine system allows you to try top-rank or small-producer wines. Read expert review From £129per night The Punch Bowl InnLake District, Cumbria, England 8Telegraph expert rating A smart but relaxed country inn, in a quiet corner of the Lake District, with a deserved reputation for its classy food. The ground floor is a semi open-plan series of dining rooms, bar and relaxed eating areas, separated by little steps. The cooking is smart-city-restaurant standard producing assured, modern British dishes that are interesting without being tricksy or fussy. No fancy canapés or pre-starters, just clean flavours. Starters might include black pudding with bubble and squeak or tomato salad with local crab and lobster while mains could be pork with ham hock croquette or cod with Morteau sausage. There's a wide-ranging wine list, plus a couple of local real ales. Read expert review From £130per night • The Lake District's best pubs and inns   Peak District The Samuel Fox Country InnHope Valley, Peak District, England 8Telegraph expert rating This stone-built inn – which is more of a restaurant with rooms than a standard country pub – has an ever-growing reputation. Come for a great dinner, stay over in one of four comfortable rooms and spend the next day exploring the glorious Peak District. The foodie credentials are strong: chef-patron James Duckett has worked with Albert Roux, Michel Roux, Marcus Wareing and Philip Howard, and done extended stints in Australia and Spain. Now he turns out some of the best food in the area: everything from a piquant, pretty-as-a-picture starter of soused sardines to the kind of iced chocolate cherry parfait that makes you wish you hadn’t shared with your other half. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Peak District   Yorkshire Crab Manor HotelThirsk, Yorkshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fun and exotic, individually themed rooms combined with a well-regarded seafood restaurant and an overall madcap sense of decoration make this a hugely popular choice for special occasions. The restaurant specialises in fish and seafood serving both classics – lobster thermidor, grilled Queen scallops – as well as more modern dishes such as sea trout with samphire. It's open for lunch and dinner, and for afternoon 'lighter' options (including moules mariniere), but there's nothing delicate about portion sizes. Half the fun is the setting: jolly bar, romantic dining room or brighter conservatory, all with a bonkers decoration that includes a suite of orchestral instruments. Breakfast is also a delight. Read expert review From £165per night The Star InnHarome, Helmsley, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant-with-rooms with chocolate-box, thatched-pub looks and a bucolic farming-village location. Bedrooms, across the road, have a comfy, hunting-lodge style. Whitby-born chef-owner Andrew Pern was one of the first champions of local sourcing - and why wouldn’t you be with his ‘back garden’: moorland game and pasture-fed meat, coastal fish, Yorkshire Wolds’ fruit and vegetables. He now has a huge kitchen garden at the back of the pub. His menus are punchy, robust yet skilfully balanced and as much about texture as taste: crab stick with seashore vegetables and avocado ice, perhaps followed by roasted lamb chop with truffled faggot or honey-roasted duck with tea-poached quail’s egg. Read expert review From £150per night The Timble InnNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 8Telegraph expert rating A food-driven village pub in a quiet, yet surprisingly well-connected location with bold, contemporary styling and smart bedrooms. Glorious views and walks are on the doorstep. A pub that does two sittings for Sunday lunch is serious about food, and has been awarded two AA rosettes for it. It’s ambitious stuff – wood pigeon with quail’s egg and black pudding; venison loin with celeriac remoulade and chestnuts. The seafood platter and chateaubriand steak are favourites. It's not really a beer pub but offers a wide-ranging wine list – including fine ones by the glass – plus local gins. Read expert review From £150per night The Yorke ArmsNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant with rooms in an off-the-beaten-track location; perfect for walking off the spoiling food. The food is why people come here – some helicopter in from London for chef-proprietor Frances Atkins’s flavour-intense cooking. It’s not fussy or tricksy, just skilled, imaginative and full of the unexpected – quail with lychee and jasmine; brill with fennel in turmeric broth, peach and curd tart. Choose the eight-course tasting menu and everything is a surprise. Much is home-grown; the huge kitchen garden produces a summer surplus. These are meals to savour (even the lunchtime bar menu includes devilled kidneys, and gratin of seared scallops). Read expert review From £345per night • The best luxury hotels in Yorkshire   Norfolk Morston HallNorfolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating A flint- and brick-built Jacobean country-house hotel, with large conservatory extensions that provide extra dining space. Inside, you’ll find open fires, squashy sofas and cosy corners in a hushed, fairly formal atmosphere. The food is the main reason to come to Morston Hall, the only restaurant with a Michelin star on this stretch of coast. Galton Blackiston’s cooking is rated highly by both visitors and locals: he offers a set dinner based on fresh, local ingredients, served at 8pm daily. Four courses usually include two meat dishes (perhaps confit of duck or beef fillet) and a fish course. Recommended wines are suggested to accompany the dishes – or you can choose from an extensive list. Read expert review From £340per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Norfolk   Suffolk The Great HouseLavenham, Suffolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating The five-bedroom hotel looks onto the market square of Lavenham, a well-preserved medieval village of timbered houses. It would be wrong to stay here without sampling the food, as this is primarily a restaurant – and a very good one at that. From a regularly changing menu, you might find starters of mussels with chilli, coriander and cream, tuna sashimi or wild mushroom ravioli, and main courses of pheasant supreme, grilled fillet of lamb with thyme sauce or roasted duck breast with grilled beetroot. Desserts could be dark chocolate terrine, millefeuille or maple syrup rice pudding. Read expert review From £99per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best spa hotels in Suffolk   Somerset The White PostYeovil, Somerset, England 8Telegraph expert rating At this cosy Victorian ‘pub-and-lodgings’, the elegant gastronomy is as much a pull as the rooms. Brett’s passion for foraging and elegant presentation seeps through. The best way to experience the dishes? The 10-course tasting menu, which pays homage to the West Country (pork done eight ways, served with local chilli and ginger cider) as well as international influences (spiced lentil dhal with gurnard, mango and coconut). The wine list is sufficient but it’s the local ales and ciders that stand out, particularly if you pair a pint of Dorset Knob bitter with the Sunday roast. Painted walls are interrupted only by the wide windows, long cardinal-coloured drapes and filament bulb lamps that, along with on-table candles, add just enough light during evening dining. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The most romantic hotels in Somerset   Dorset La FosseCranborne, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating Snug in the wave-like green hills of east Dorset, La Fosse at Cranborne is a peaceful bed and breakfast as well as popular restaurant. Run by husband and wife, this simple West Country retreat, embracing both modern and traditional, feels as far from the madding crowds as possible. Owner-chef Mark is a true locavore, sourcing as much from in and around the village as possible. His passion for local, inventive cuisine has seen him named best chef in Dorset. The colourful duck dish, replete with homegrown vegetables, is a highlight, drizzled in a piquant jus. Mark’s award-winning cheeseboard is part of the experience, so save some room. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Anchor InnSeatown, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Anchor Inn, sat beyond snaking lanes and tucked between scarped cliffs on the edge of a little known Dorset village, is a destination gastropub serving elevated British classics. It is also a boutique hideaway that cocoons guests amid the sound of rolling waves. If the weather is decent, expect a fight to secure a lunchtime spot, either tucked inside or al fresco. Menus from head chef Jean-Paul De Ronne — who previously worked under Masterchef winner Mat Follas — reveal commitment to seasonal fare from land and sea, such as the fresh crab salad using crustacea caught only metres away. Ales are all from Palmers, brewed four miles away, while an extensive cocktail list from former Hix bartender David Smith features a number of Dorset’s own spirits. Read expert review From £120per night • The best hotels in Dorset   Buckinghamshire The Mash InnRadnage, Buckinghamshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating Described by its owner Nick Mash as a ‘new generation inn’, The Mash Inn's aim is to remove the barriers between chef and diner. The open kitchen takes centre stage: a solid wood workstation groaning with ingredients and stacked plates, beneath a ceiling rack dripping with pots and pans, in front of an open fire for rotisserie cooking. Chef Jon Parry cooks up a storm, producing a delicious, earthy and inventive no frills tasting menu and a short à la carte menu. Much of the produce is from the garden or very local. Diners sit at individual tables or at a large communal table, which may sound daunting but such is the communal, friendly atmosphere that it’s a pleasure to do so. Read expert review From £100per night The Hand & FlowersMarlow, Buckinghamshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn with a Michelin-starred restaurant, enticing locals to dine, and couples for weekends or nights away. It's on busy West Street, just along the road from the house where Mary Shelley created Frankenstein. The chef-proprietor is Tom Kerridge, who gained a Michelin star within 10 months from a kitchen which was then the size of a large cupboard. These days he has a new, celadon green kitchen and a brigade of chefs. As restaurants go, it rocks. Expect crayfish scotch egg, slow cooked duck breast with duck fat chips and other earthy, deeply satisfying dishes that are also full of imaginative twists, served in a cosy and convivial dining room. Read expert review From £140per night • The best hotels in Buckinghamshire   Kent RocksaltFolkestone, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Rocksalt is the littoral culinary kingdom of Mark Sargeant of Claridge's fame. A microcosm of London sophistication in gritty Folkestone, it's a genuine dining destination. The recent addition of four bedrooms above "Sargey's" adjacent Smokehouse enables visitors to abandon themselves to gluttony. His dedication to local ingredients introduces diners to new treasures, such as meaty huss dogfish and tart sea buckthorn (oozing out of a dense chocolate mousse fondant), yet dishes are refreshingly clean and unpretentious. Hunks of bread, served with beef dripping, rich butter and home-roasted salt, and nuggets of treacly fudge and slices of colourful rock bookend a perfectly executed meal. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Wife of BathWye, Kent, England 9Telegraph expert rating Another addition to chef Mark Sargeant and Josh De Haan's portfolio of Kentish restaurants with rooms. With a superb Spanish restaurant and tiny tapas bar, its signature quirky style and authentic cuisine works surprisingly well in the bucolic setting. The restaurant serves impeccable fare: juicy scallops with spicy chorizo and earthy morcillo (black pudding); honey sweet melon smothered in Brindisa's finest Serrano ham; succulent Galician steaks with creamy aioli and fiery paprika potatoes; and hake with radishes, Seville orange and a buttery sauce laced with Gin Mare. Save space for pudding: the bitter chocolate tart with salt and olive oil is revelatory, as is ice-cream made with raisins soaked in PX sherry. Read expert review From £70per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Read's Restaurant With RoomsFaversham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Read's, housed in a Georgian mansion on the north Kentish coast, is a smart restaurant with six rooms, owned and run by acclaimed chef David Pitchford and his wife Rona. Sticking firmly to their decades-long recipe for success, they deliver classic cuisine and unfussy hospitality. David won a Michelin star in 1992, which he retained for 20 consecutive years, becoming the second longest holder of the accolade in Britain. The food is hard to fault, if lacking the innovation and excitement that comes with Michelin recognition: comforting, classic French cuisine with British influence. Think ham and pea mousse; smoked haddock in cream sauce topped with cheese soufflé; Kentish lamb served with buttery asparagus and garden vegetables; and a Cassis-soaked summer pudding. Read expert review From £145per night The Dog at WinghamWingham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating A medieval pub in a rural village, run by an enterprising local family, that serves exceptionally good food and features eight attractive bedrooms. Virtually equidistant from Canterbury and Sandwich, it’s ideally located for exploring the Kentish city, countryside and coast. The kitchen is overseen by the young and talented Dan Johns, who has worked at Gary Rhodes’ Searcy’s at The Gherkin and Urban Coterie. The menu changes monthly to reflect seasonality and local produce. Imaginative starters such as fragrant Thai-style chicken salad and rich pork and pistachio terrine with pineapple jam are followed by melt-in-the-mouth Moroccan spiced lamb and crisp pork collar with chorizo dumplings. Read expert review From £86per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best pubs with rooms in Kent   Devon The Dartmoor InnOkehampton, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 16th-century coaching inn on the north-western edge of Dartmoor National Park is acclaimed for its fresh, seasonal cooking, but it’s worth bedding down for a stay in one of its three chic bedrooms. A blackboard heralds not only the breed of cattle, but also the name of the farmer it has come from. Dishes are pub classics, done to perfection: rib-eye steak and chips, confit of duck leg with toffee apple puree and roasted hazelnuts, and brisket of beef. Philip has a strong ethical policy, forging strong links with local artisan food producers, and ensures the beef has been grass fed and reared within a 20-mile radius. Breakfast is refreshingly original, with dainty portions of caramelised bananas or a daring cooked menu, including herb-crusted goat’s cheese, black pudding and bacon lardons. Read expert review From £65per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Lamb InnSandford, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating With open fires, beamed walls, deep sofas and award-winning food, this 16th-century inn in the village of Sandford is a pub of dreams for town-dwellers. Upstairs, seven bedrooms have big beds, soft linen and powerful showers, and there’s a pretty cobbled terrace at the rear. The Lamb Inn’s menu consistently attracts rave reviews. The produce is seasonal and locally sourced, mixing upmarket dishes with pub classics: shellfish bisque, mushroom ravioli, roasted pigeon with smoked bacon and savoy cabbage or steak and chips. The perfectly fluffy sticky toffee pudding is worth a visit alone. Landlord Mark is a fan of real ale and regularly rotates his cask brews to ensure they stay fresh. Read expert review From £69per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Masons ArmsBranscombe, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This dog-friendly 14th-century thatched inn, in Branscombe, on the Jurassic Coast, is one of Devon’s best. It prides itself on serving local, seasonal Devon fare on a traditional pub menu – it even has a 'food sourcing map' detailing exactly where the produce comes from. There’s steamed River Exe mussels and fries, steak and kidney shortcrust pie, rump steak and a seafood platter. Ales, hand-pumped from casks, are just as local. On a sunny day, the action moves outside to the pretty suntrap terrace. It's a 15-minute walk to Branscombe Beach, a lovely, long shingle cove from where you can pick up the South West Coastal Path. Read expert review From £75per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Salutation InnTopsham, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating Eat well and rest your head at this 18th-century coaching inn in chichi Topsham: a stylish option with a truly excellent restaurant, helmed by one of Gordon Ramsay's former protégés. Exquisite handmade petit-fours welcome guests on arrival – the first hint that your dining experience will be full of extra surprises. The wild mushroom appetiser comes accompanied by an umami-enhancing pinot noir, and the tomato gazpacho with local crab, served in a glass on ice, and followed by a rich rump of beef from Greendale Farm. Each modern dish is accompanied by diverse wines chosen by Stephen Edwardes – the unusual sake complements the beautiful strawberry dessert which is garnished with home-grown edible flowers. Read expert review From £145per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Devon   Cornwall The Gurnard's HeadSt Ives, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn offering outstanding food, fabulous sea and moorland views, situated close to St Ives and Land's End. Popular with walkers and couples of all ages seeking a low-key, restorative break in a wild coastal location. Locals come from miles around to dine here. The Scottish head chef, Bruce Rennie, cooks a short, inventive menu. Lunch may include beetroot risotto, octopus and white wine stew, or Merguez sausages with Puy lentils. The supper menu may include salmon and lobster tortellini, cod with pig’s trotter, and sole with Vermouth. The wine list focuses on Old World wines, notably from France, Italy and Portugal. Read expert review From £110per night Padstow TownhousePadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A handsome listed townhouse on Padstow's high street that has been superbly renovated and opened as a six-bedroom luxury guesthouse by chef Paul Ainsworth to complement his Michelin-starred restaurant, Paul Ainsworth at Number 6. Head there for amusingly-presented, delicately-flavoured meat and fish dishes and a fun and informal atmosphere, or to his even more informal restaurant, Rojanos, for superior pasta, pizza and hamburgers. Breakfast is served at the latter. The guesthouse owns an electric BMW in which guests can be transported if they don’t want to walk around. Read expert review From £280per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com St Petroc's HotelPadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A sociable, intimate townhouse with a labyrinth of gorgeously styled sitting and reading rooms – as well as a buzzy bistro. St Petroc’s Bistro opened along with the hotel in 1988. It’s a lovely room – with an engaging selection of original art on the walls – and a relaxing, happy place to eat at either lunch or dinner. Pride of place on the menu goes to the 30-day dry-aged steaks, but there are fish, chicken and vegetarian options as well – all of them classic Rick Stein recipes (try the grilled hake with Serrano ham, succotash and chives). Ruby’s Bar is the new Stein pub – a great place for a local beer or cocktail. Read expert review From £112per night Kota Restaurant with RoomsPorthleven, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating With a fantastic Asian-Cornish fusion restaurant downstairs, and Porthleven’s picturesque harbour on the doorstep, the Kota’s two simple, homey rooms are proof that sometimes substance can win over style. The vibe in the restaurant is casual, with a long room overlooking the harbour and a waterfront lawn on which you can dine in good weather. New Zealander Jude, who is part Maori, part Malay-Chinese, brings Asian spices and cooking styles to fresh, meticulously sourced Cornish produce – squid with green mango salad, scallops with miso dressing and seaweed salad, and Laksa with prawns, mussels and fish. There are also some very creative burgers – tempura fish with wasabi tartare, and satay chicken with Asian slaw. Read expert review From £75per night DriftwoodPortscatho, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating Sitting on a hill above the rugged coastline of the Roseland peninsula, Driftwood is nautically furnished in soft creams and blues. A Michelin-starred restaurant, private sea-facing terraces, and a private beach make this the perfect venue for pretty much everyone. There are wonderful coastal path walks for miles in each direction. This is Cornish cooking at its finest: unfussy and focused on bringing out the flavour of fresh fish and seafood and locally reared beef and lamb. Dinner in summer comprises a six-course tasting menu with complementary wines. For children there are early suppers with proper chef-made food. Read expert review From £250per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Coombeshead FarmLewannick, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating This is the joint venture from chef Tom Adams of London restaurant Pitt Cue and April Bloomfield, English born chef/proprietor of The Spotted Pig in New York. Both wanted to get back to the roots of food and hospitality and the result is this relaxed communal dining farmhouse b&b. Tom and his partner Lottie Mew live off the land and share their fresh, foraged, pickled and harvested produce with their guests. Tom cooks a three-course feast, kicking off with plates of delicious nibbles from 6.30pm onwards, which is shared at a communal table by all the guests. Tom’s own rare breed Mangalitza pigs feature large, plus perhaps a cep and walnut broth, lamb shoulder and mushroom porridge, with madeleine, whey and prune for pudding. Wines are unusual. Read expert review From £175per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Cornwall   Sussex The Barn at RoundhurstLurgashall, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating A rural South Downs retreat on a 250-acre organic farm with its own lakes. Home-reared food is a specialty. Converted outhouses with six rooms are set around a courtyard, just steps from a dramatic converted barn for dining and lounging. A four-course set menu with generous portions is available for guests and non-guests Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays; a light supper is provided for guests on other days. Meals highlight the farm’s own organic beef, lamb and pork and could include colourful heritage carrots and an exceptional triple chocolate mousse. Read expert review From £98per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com CrouchersChichester, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating An unassuming motel-like exterior belies a foodie haven a short drive from the Witterings. Relax on the patio of a garden-facing room, head to the beach, or explore the cultural and sporting highlights around Chichester but leave room for dinner in the impressive restaurant. Proximity to the coast ensures good seafood. The squid-ink pasta starter is light and delicate and a showy dessert of white chocolate and saffron mousse with edible flowers, caramel and orange ice-cream is a multi-sensory delight. A strong wine list includes an emphasis on the owners’ native South Africa. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Crab & LobsterWest Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating Herons can be seen on the doorstep of this modernised 350-year-old pub beside a bird sanctuary, where guests can stay in cosy bedrooms or an adjoining cottage. Tuck into locally caught seafood in the bar-restaurant and plan nature walks or trips to nearby beaches. The menu, as this gastropub’s name suggests, makes good use of locally caught seafood. Baked Selsey crab with a salad or crab cakes is a highlight. Meat, like rump of lamb (on an autumn menu with garlic Pommes Anna, butternut squash purée, confit tomatoes, baby leeks and Madeira jus) is also locally reared. There’s an extensive wine list and takeaway fish and chips. Read expert review From £160per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith Wingrove HouseAlfriston, South Downs, England 8Telegraph expert rating Yards from the South Downs Way and the half-timbered, candlelit pubs of Alfriston, this swish 19th-century boutique hotel with a modern country restaurant delivers roaring log fires, low-slung sofas and top-notch food, and draws city dwellers craving an easy country escape. Matthew Comben, formerly of the Hungry Monk in Jevington, heads up the kitchen and has brought with him the Monk's original banoffee pie recipe. Highlights from the seasonal menu include cauliflower fritters with Brighton blue cheese mayonnaise, and a soft beef fillet with tarragon. There's an impressive gin menu with 11 different options, including Brighton Gin, and a refreshingly reasonable wine list. Read expert review From £108per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best places and cities to visit in England – and where to stay   Cheshire The Roebuck InnMobberley, Cheshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This French-influenced bistro with rooms is perfect weekend break material, with lashings of character, great food and a beautifully designed garden. The bistro menu, tweaked with the seasons, is European in style, and everything comes in generous portions, whether it’s ‘small plates’ of cassoulet, caponata and crostini; mains such as saffron risotto, venison bourguignon and moules marinière; or puds of tarte au citron, profiteroles and crème caramel. On the drinks front, you’ll find an interesting selection of local ales, old-world wines and a vintage dresser filled with classic aperitifs and digestifs. Read expert review From £115per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • Britain's cosiest hotels for autumn   County Durham Lord Crewe ArmsBlanchland, Northumberland, England 9Telegraph expert rating A lord-of-the-manor building, in a pin-neat estate village, that oozes atmosphere at every stone-flagged turn. A reputation for honest, British cooking, plus its rural location, makes it popular with walkers and foodies as well as the country-sports fraternity. Expect punchy, robust, British cooking, rich with flavour and unusual combinations: devilled lamb’s kidneys on roasted cauliflower; grilled sea trout and mixed alliums; sea buckthorn posset. There’s an element of fun, too; eggy bread with fried bacon or Bloody Mary tomatoes on toast for breakfast. Some ingredients come from the kitchen garden. Eat on the terrace in the summer. The atmospheric, barrel-vaulted bar has local ales including a custom-made Lord Crewe Brew. Read expert review From £155per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Rose & CrownCounty Durham, England 9Telegraph expert rating A foodie destination country inn that has smartened up while still maintaining a sense of village pub: country-comfortable rooms; horse-brasses and dogs in the bar. Surrounded by the sheep-dotted fields and moors of the North Pennines, you come to eat, relax and then walk it off. The modern British menu shows confident cooking that lets the ingredients shine through; no fuss but definitely interesting: honey-glazed goat's cheese with beetroot, hazelnuts and gingerbread, perhaps, or pan-fried fillet of sea trout with roasted baby gem and crushed peas. There’s good local sourcing with Teesdale lamb rarely off the menu. Eat in the candle-lit dining room or buzzier bar; the latter offers three real ales and a good selection of single malts. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best country house hotels in Britain   Cities The Henrietta HotelCovent Garden, London, England 8Telegraph expert rating An 18-bedroom boutique address in one of Covent Garden’s most attractive streets, owned and run by the Paris-based Experimental Group, with a cocktail bar, Ollie Dabbous restaurant and quirky interior design by Dorothée Meilichzon. The food, is delicious – clean, clever and uncomplicated – with highlights that might include the sheeps’ milk curds with pistachio, beef tartare with nasturtium and rye, and wonderful freshly baked warm madeleines with Chantilly cream. Don't miss a cocktail, which can be chosen à la carte or with a consultation from the barman. Read expert review From £220per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Ginger PigHove, Brighton, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 11-bedroom guesthouse above Hove’s highly-acclaimed Ginger Pig Bar and Restaurant is ideal if you want a quieter seaside base. Spacious and elegantly understated rooms include thoughtful beach bags with towels and well-stocked minibars. Always buzzy, this sprawling gastropub serves up highly delicious grub and excellent Sunday roasts. Look out for seasonal specials like asparagus with brown crab and chipotle mayo, or seabream with samphire. The adjoining Orangerie is where breakfast is served (there’s an outdoor area for sunny days), offering imaginative dishes such as baked eggs with hummus, chorizo and peppers, Irish rock oysters and rarebit with roasted tomatoes and mushrooms. Read expert review From £80per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Simpsons RestaurantBirmingham, England 8Telegraph expert rating The cooking is superlative at this gastronomic powerhouse, which also offers three individually styled – and great value – rooms. Throw in the added draw of the Simpsons Cookery School and you pretty much have Michelin-starred, Brummie food nirvana. The winning team of owner Andreas Antona and chef director Luke Tipping, one of Britain’s finest sauciers, has weathered fashions and trends. The three-course à la carte menu features plump marinière-style mussels on a delicate, buttery skate wing, while refined hipster influences are showcased with a barbecued beef cheek with a rich, silky bone marrow sauce. The pastry section’s take on a Belgian Speculoos cookie, with caramelised white chocolate and coffee granite, is fabulous. Read expert review From £110per night The White Star TavernSouthampton, Hampshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating A characterful tavern with rooms on Southampton’s vibrant Oxford Street. The restaurant is a destination in itself, with a varied menu that caters to all comers. If you fancy a plate of fish and chips washed down with real ale, then you’ll get the crispest batter and a unique brew from Itchen Valley. But the real tour de force is the à la carte menu, where chef Matt Noonan serves up his creativity and innovation in dishes that linger long in the memory: a melt-in-the-mouth braised ox cheek with black bean glaze and oriental vegetables to start, perhaps, or a seared bass with a sauté of wild mushrooms, egg yolk ketchup, smoked and cured egg yolk, leek and fresh Dorset truffle as a main. The Death by Chocolate dessert is served up like a piece of street art and really is to die for. Read expert review From £105per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels for a UK city break   WALES Llys MeddygPembrokeshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating A cosy hotel in the small town of Newport, on the Pembrokeshire coast, offering colourful interiors, reasonable rates and an exceptional restaurant, which has gained a reputation in Pembrokeshire and beyond as one of the best and most reasonable fine dining establishments. Chef Daniel Jones does wonders with local produce – such as Newport bay crab and lobster, Preseli lamb, Welsh beef and West Wales cheeses – in two separate dining areas: the romantic basement-level Cellar Bar, which has a slate floor and leather settees, and a wood burning stove in an inglenook fireplace; and, on the ground floor, the recently refurbished main dining room. Ed smokes salmon in a shed in his house just next door. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Ynyshir Restaurant and RoomsPowys, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Queen Victoria once owned this handsome white painted house as a hidden retreat. The undulating grounds are lovely and lead to the RSPB Ynys Hir Nature Reserve at the head of the Dovey estuary. Current owner and professional artist Rob Reen is responsible for the vibrant interiors, their colours taking a lead from his equally bold canvasses that dominate the walls. In the kitchen, Gareth Ward, who trained with Sat Bains, is a rising star, a recipient of one Michelin star and gunning for a second. He prefers to serve a series of small, integrated dishes, and is always coming up with new ideas and loves surprises. The tasting menu at dinner might include simple plates such as Welsh wagyu, pork belly with 'river bacon' or pollock with black bean. Read expert review From £215per night Tyddyn LlanDenbighshire, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A modest Georgian house just outside Llandrillo, with a complementary extension using local slate and stone. The house was once a shooting lodge belonging to the Dukes of Westminster, but now places food centre stage. The views are spectacular, with the Vale of Edeyrnion’s meadows and the slopes of the Berwyn Mountains beyond. The dining room is decorated in Wedgewood blue with tall windows on three sides. Bryan Webb is considered one of Wales’s foremost chefs, with a long-held Michelin star and a commitment to local produce, such as melting Welsh black beef, and quality seasonal ingredients. The menu changes daily. Read expert review From £195per night The Old Rectory on the LakeSnowdonia, Tal-y-llyn, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A sun-trap hideaway on the shores of a huge lake, and at the foot of the mountain, Cadair Idris. It’s elegant and relaxing with free-standing roll-top baths, an outdoor hot tub and locally sourced food perfectly cooked to order in the restaurant. The food, courtesy of the self-trained chef, Ricky, is outstanding. There may be freshly-caught trout, or local Bala lamb on the menu, along with perfectly-cooked vegetables and perhaps Dauphinois potatoes. The chocolate fondant is a signature pudding. The terrace is the perfect place to enjoy the sunset over the lake with a Welsh gin and tonic. Read expert review From £110per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Harbourmaster HotelAberaeron, Cardigan Bay, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating Beach chic comes into its own at this forget-me-not-blue boutique hotel on Aberaeron’s harbour wall. And you won’t likely forget it with these killer sea views, glam rooms and imaginatively thought-out menus. The restaurant has a serious foodie bent in the evening – try to snag the cwtch (cubby hole) for intimate dining. Go for Carlingford oysters, a plump, sweet burst of the sea, and the perfect prelude for well-cooked Welsh fillet of steak, followed by an oozy chocolate fondant with salted caramel ice cream. For a buzzier vibe, head to the bar-lounge to nurse a Brecon gin or nibble bar snacks like crispy cockles with chilli vinegar. Read expert review From £185per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith FairyhillReynoldston, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Snuggled away in 24 acres of woodland near the Gower coast, Fairyhill enchants with more than just its name. Think Downton Abbey meets Watership Down with a pinch of 21st-century cool. It has carved out its name as a foodie retreat with good reason. The chef pulls off a daring, imaginative menu, taking a pride in local sourcing and garden-grown ingredients in dishes that are both robust and refined. Clean flavours sing of the seasons in dishes simple as gazpacho, pear and Pembroke crab, and goat's cheese mousse with courgette flower with beetroot gel. Mains like meltingly tender Welsh lamb served three ways and Serrano-wrapped monkfish with clams, samphire and fresh linguine strike the perfect balance. Read expert review From £135per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com JabajakCarmarthenshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Jabajak is a former drover’s farm, now a fine vineyard and boutique bolthole, serving home-grown food and wines with a slice of history, rustic elegance and first-class service. The restaurant has scooped awards for its locally sourced, home-grown approach. A drink in the lounge bar piques the appetite for dishes prepared with garden herbs, fruit, veg and edible flowers, ramped up flavour-wise by foraged ingredients such as nettles and wild garlic when in season. Starters including basil-marinated bruschetta with gooseberry and elderflower chutney prelude mains such as butter-soft Celtic steak with local Moody Mabel cheese. There are many nods to local produce at breakfast, too, and the cooked Welsh option with a side order of cockles is bang on the money. Read expert review From £130per night Rates provided by Booking.com   SCOTLAND The Three Chimneys and The House Over-ByDunvegan, Isle of Skye, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This destination restaurant with rooms is back doing what it does best, with a new chef, updated look and reinvigorated sense of discipline and purpose. The essential ingredients are there: attentive service, attractive rooms with mesmerising views and a talented young chef. Choose from a three-course à la carte menu or the epic Skye Showcase Menu, served at the ‘Kitchen Table’, right in the heart of the action. Dishes on the latter menu might include the likes of Dungvegan crab, seaweed and miso-cured halibut, Orbost Farm beef and pot-roasted young grouse. A road (albeit single-track and quiet) runs between the House Over-By and the shore of Loch Dunvegan, slightly eroding what would otherwise be a feeling of privacy, but not unduly distracting from the peaceful views. Read expert review From £345per night The Peat InnSt Andrews, Fife, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating A long-standing gastro-destination lying between the 'town and gown' of St Andrews and Fife’s East Neuk fishing villages, this is well worth a detour. It’s a short stagger from restaurant to homely split-level suites: a calm, comfortable place to sleep off the fabulous Michelin-starred food. The rustic-chic restaurant, all tender taupes with amber and deep sea-blue accents, is a fittingly sophisticated setting for the triumphant cooking. You come here for the food and you won’t leave disappointed. From the home-made butter to the unusually good petit-fours, everything is a reflection of chef Geoffrey Smeddle’s joyous approach to food, with dishes like a starter of smoked beef tartare with wasabi puree raising your eyebrows and your expectations simultaneously. Read expert review From £195per night The Taynuilt Etive Restaurant with RoomsTaynuilt, Argyll & Bute, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating This historic rural hotel has been reinvented as a restaurant with rooms with a young Scottish chef leading a bright and creative team. It's at the heart of a small community that makes an ideal base for exploring Argyll and the isles. The Etive restaurant is the axis here, a genuine foodie oasis and arguably the finest place to eat in the region. John McNulty works wonders with the ultra-local produce, whether it be the Mull Pig’s Heed or the salmon he smokes using local larch from Loch Awe. Sound provenance ripples through the Etive even as far as breakfast, where local fish stars. Read expert review From £79per night 21212Edinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating The four bedrooms above this Michelin-starred restaurant are no afterthought; there is a confident hand at work in rooms that are as striking as the food, displaying a sometimes surprising but always sensual contemporary/baroque style and unexpectedly leafy views. Michelin-starred chef Paul Kitching is a maverick who likes to tease flavours, building fantastic creations that sound impossible, but work, like silky pink trout served with artichokes, pasta, almonds, chickpeas, kidney beans, oriental mushrooms, warm coleslaw and feta cheese. He’s utterly serious but there’s an edge of play - such as a pre-dessert of porridge, milk and cinnamon poured from a china cow. Read expert review From £112per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith The Bridge Inn, RathoEdinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This 18-century coaching inn – now an award-winning gastropub with rooms – is on a leafy canal in a tranquil village just 20 minutes away from Edinburgh's city centre. Four pretty bedrooms are each individually decorated. The cooking is exceptional, with talented head chef Ben doing wonderful things with good Scottish fish and game, properly hung beef, and pork from their own fat and sassy pigs. They grow their own vegetables, herbs and fruit too, in an old walled garden a short walk away down the canal path. Breakfast is a fine indulgence. You can have a hair of the dog as well: Champagne, Prosecco, Buck’s Fizz or a Bloody Mary. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best castle hotels in Scotland Contributions from Ros Belford, Suzy Bennett, Sophie Butler, Gill Charlton, Kerry Christiani, Fiona Duncan, Suzanne King, Gabriella Le Breton, Linda Macdonald, Richard McComb, Robin McKelvie, Harriet O'Brien, Ben Parker, Helen Pickles, Louise Roddon, Cathy Stebbings, Sarah Stirling, Anna Turns, Debbie Ward and Antonia Windsor.

Britain's loveliest restaurants with rooms for autumn

What could be more appealing than the epicurean informality of an inn or restaurant with rooms? These wonderfully relaxed establishments combine an emphasis on great ingredients from the area with local charm and stylish panache. There’s an insider feel that you don’t get at a more formal hotel, and there’s a foodie enthusiasm that wouldn’t be exuded quite as joyfully at a larger enterprise. Autumn/winter is a particularly good time to seek out their gently indulgent accommodation and fabulous seasonal flavours – the likes of wild rabbit with foraged mushrooms, grouse and damsons, elderberries and more. Harriet O'Brien Our experts round up their favourite establishments in Britain, from the Cotswolds to Cornwall, Suffolk to Skye, for feasting – and then flopping.  ENGLAND Cotswolds The Wild RabbitKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Wild Rabbit is a haven of eco-elegance a few fields away from sister enterprise Daylesford, the organic farm shop, deli, spa (and more) of Carole Bamford. She transformed this 18th-century inn and it has been meticulously devised in quiet colours, stone and wood. It’s a beautiful posh pub, with food to match. The kitchen is masterminded by Tim Allen, who won the Wild Rabbit a Michelin star in October 2016. His cuisine takes diners on a taste adventure, with dishes such as haddock on leek and apple slaw, topped with an amazingly cooked egg – poached and lightly deep fried. Read expert review From £148per night The Feathered Nest Country InnOxfordshire, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fabulous food and a superb setting above the Evenlode valley make this old country inn a hedonistic haven. The owners describe it as a pub with a twist. They’ve created an elegant restaurant that has won armloads of awards since it opened, with three stylish and supremely comfy bedrooms. The exquisite food is almost on a par with sleek gastro establishments such as Tom Kerridge’s The Hand and Flowers in Marlow - and even Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons where head chef Kuba Winkowski previously worked. There’s a stupendous wine list, too. Among the choice of 200 or so is a wonderful range of South African wines. There’s also a bar menu featuring classics such as burgers of brilliant quality. Read expert review From £140per night The Wheatsheaf InnNorthleach, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A creeper-clad coaching inn turned arty, boutique haven. The Wheatsheaf is in a particularly pretty and enterprising little Cotswold town. The restaurant draws a regular local crowd and the emphasis is on the very best quality, from the menu ingredients to the room amenities. The sophisticated menu offers great flavour combinations, the likes of roast parsnip and fennel salad with chestnuts, and mutton and apple pie with creamed potatoes. If there’s space in the bar beforehand try an aperitif of Sloe Negroni, with sloe gin and Campari, or opt for a pint of Cotswold Old Hooky. Read expert review From £102per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Kingham PloughKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Kingham Plough is a treat of a foodie destinatio, with relaxing furnishings, genial staff and brilliantly conceived menus. Emily Watkins has won numerous awards for her modern British cuisine with a twist ‒ dishes are often based on old Cotswold recipes. Her food is also much inspired by local produce; the likes of Windrush Valley goat cheese and pork from Paddock Farm a few miles away. There’s a pleasingly short and sophisticated à la carte menu: starters might include slow braised oxtail with horseradish, and mains could feature venison wellington, with meat supplied from nearby Cornbury Park. There’s also a well-priced bar menu featuring gastro comfort food such as rabbit parfait. Read expert review From £145per night The Ebrington ArmsEbrington, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating This hidden treasure set in a gloriously unspoilt village is a modern day version of a country tavern – it’s at once a genuine pub that brews its own very smooth ales; a lovely restaurant with real local flavour; and a charming hotel with rural-chic bedrooms. Chef Ben Dulley offers short, understated menus which reflect his commitment to freshness, with many vegetables straight from surrounding Drinkwater Farm. Dishes are beautifully presented and packed with local flavour – the likes of hot-smoked Bibury trout salad, and Cotswold lamb with stuffed tomatoes. Wines are from independent growers, including the Cotswolds’ own Little Oak Vineyard. Read expert review From £165per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best Cotswolds pubs with rooms   Oxfordshire Artist Residence OxfordshireSouth Leigh, Oxfordshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A unique country pub with a bohemian twist and arty vibe, offering gorgeous quirky rooms, scrumptious meals and contemporary art. The food is as heart-warming as the dining room. Local game and meat, foraged herbs and flowers join vegetables from the garden. The menu could include the likes of smoky pigeon breast electrified by a pickled walnut with caramelised chicory, port jelly and smoked spring onions and plaice in seaweed butter, smoked cockles, sea vegetables and bisque. The wine list is small, selective and good value. Join locals for a pint at the bar, read the paper or play cards around the fire. Read expert review From £130per night • The best luxury hotels in Oxfordshire   Lake District L’EnclumeCartmel, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Simon Rogan's two-Michelin-starred restaurant plus handful of rooms stay true both to the simple village location and rich surrounding land. Rooms are modest but smartly furnished, the setting picture-box pretty while the food is an exemplar of local sourcing and creativity. This isn’t Blumenthal-style magic but simply 20 (tiny) courses of exceptional skill, balance and creativity: an egg shell containing a yolk in mushroom broth; confit cauliflower in a pea and calamint sauce; a finger of turbot in nasturtium butter, the dinkiest caramel mousse sitting on compressed apple. All is presented exquisitely but without fanfare on rustic pottery, handmade glass, even a pebble. The Coravin wine system allows you to try top-rank or small-producer wines. Read expert review From £129per night The Punch Bowl InnLake District, Cumbria, England 8Telegraph expert rating A smart but relaxed country inn, in a quiet corner of the Lake District, with a deserved reputation for its classy food. The ground floor is a semi open-plan series of dining rooms, bar and relaxed eating areas, separated by little steps. The cooking is smart-city-restaurant standard producing assured, modern British dishes that are interesting without being tricksy or fussy. No fancy canapés or pre-starters, just clean flavours. Starters might include black pudding with bubble and squeak or tomato salad with local crab and lobster while mains could be pork with ham hock croquette or cod with Morteau sausage. There's a wide-ranging wine list, plus a couple of local real ales. Read expert review From £130per night • The Lake District's best pubs and inns   Peak District The Samuel Fox Country InnHope Valley, Peak District, England 8Telegraph expert rating This stone-built inn – which is more of a restaurant with rooms than a standard country pub – has an ever-growing reputation. Come for a great dinner, stay over in one of four comfortable rooms and spend the next day exploring the glorious Peak District. The foodie credentials are strong: chef-patron James Duckett has worked with Albert Roux, Michel Roux, Marcus Wareing and Philip Howard, and done extended stints in Australia and Spain. Now he turns out some of the best food in the area: everything from a piquant, pretty-as-a-picture starter of soused sardines to the kind of iced chocolate cherry parfait that makes you wish you hadn’t shared with your other half. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Peak District   Yorkshire Crab Manor HotelThirsk, Yorkshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fun and exotic, individually themed rooms combined with a well-regarded seafood restaurant and an overall madcap sense of decoration make this a hugely popular choice for special occasions. The restaurant specialises in fish and seafood serving both classics – lobster thermidor, grilled Queen scallops – as well as more modern dishes such as sea trout with samphire. It's open for lunch and dinner, and for afternoon 'lighter' options (including moules mariniere), but there's nothing delicate about portion sizes. Half the fun is the setting: jolly bar, romantic dining room or brighter conservatory, all with a bonkers decoration that includes a suite of orchestral instruments. Breakfast is also a delight. Read expert review From £165per night The Star InnHarome, Helmsley, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant-with-rooms with chocolate-box, thatched-pub looks and a bucolic farming-village location. Bedrooms, across the road, have a comfy, hunting-lodge style. Whitby-born chef-owner Andrew Pern was one of the first champions of local sourcing - and why wouldn’t you be with his ‘back garden’: moorland game and pasture-fed meat, coastal fish, Yorkshire Wolds’ fruit and vegetables. He now has a huge kitchen garden at the back of the pub. His menus are punchy, robust yet skilfully balanced and as much about texture as taste: crab stick with seashore vegetables and avocado ice, perhaps followed by roasted lamb chop with truffled faggot or honey-roasted duck with tea-poached quail’s egg. Read expert review From £150per night The Timble InnNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 8Telegraph expert rating A food-driven village pub in a quiet, yet surprisingly well-connected location with bold, contemporary styling and smart bedrooms. Glorious views and walks are on the doorstep. A pub that does two sittings for Sunday lunch is serious about food, and has been awarded two AA rosettes for it. It’s ambitious stuff – wood pigeon with quail’s egg and black pudding; venison loin with celeriac remoulade and chestnuts. The seafood platter and chateaubriand steak are favourites. It's not really a beer pub but offers a wide-ranging wine list – including fine ones by the glass – plus local gins. Read expert review From £150per night The Yorke ArmsNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant with rooms in an off-the-beaten-track location; perfect for walking off the spoiling food. The food is why people come here – some helicopter in from London for chef-proprietor Frances Atkins’s flavour-intense cooking. It’s not fussy or tricksy, just skilled, imaginative and full of the unexpected – quail with lychee and jasmine; brill with fennel in turmeric broth, peach and curd tart. Choose the eight-course tasting menu and everything is a surprise. Much is home-grown; the huge kitchen garden produces a summer surplus. These are meals to savour (even the lunchtime bar menu includes devilled kidneys, and gratin of seared scallops). Read expert review From £345per night • The best luxury hotels in Yorkshire   Norfolk Morston HallNorfolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating A flint- and brick-built Jacobean country-house hotel, with large conservatory extensions that provide extra dining space. Inside, you’ll find open fires, squashy sofas and cosy corners in a hushed, fairly formal atmosphere. The food is the main reason to come to Morston Hall, the only restaurant with a Michelin star on this stretch of coast. Galton Blackiston’s cooking is rated highly by both visitors and locals: he offers a set dinner based on fresh, local ingredients, served at 8pm daily. Four courses usually include two meat dishes (perhaps confit of duck or beef fillet) and a fish course. Recommended wines are suggested to accompany the dishes – or you can choose from an extensive list. Read expert review From £340per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Norfolk   Suffolk The Great HouseLavenham, Suffolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating The five-bedroom hotel looks onto the market square of Lavenham, a well-preserved medieval village of timbered houses. It would be wrong to stay here without sampling the food, as this is primarily a restaurant – and a very good one at that. From a regularly changing menu, you might find starters of mussels with chilli, coriander and cream, tuna sashimi or wild mushroom ravioli, and main courses of pheasant supreme, grilled fillet of lamb with thyme sauce or roasted duck breast with grilled beetroot. Desserts could be dark chocolate terrine, millefeuille or maple syrup rice pudding. Read expert review From £99per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best spa hotels in Suffolk   Somerset The White PostYeovil, Somerset, England 8Telegraph expert rating At this cosy Victorian ‘pub-and-lodgings’, the elegant gastronomy is as much a pull as the rooms. Brett’s passion for foraging and elegant presentation seeps through. The best way to experience the dishes? The 10-course tasting menu, which pays homage to the West Country (pork done eight ways, served with local chilli and ginger cider) as well as international influences (spiced lentil dhal with gurnard, mango and coconut). The wine list is sufficient but it’s the local ales and ciders that stand out, particularly if you pair a pint of Dorset Knob bitter with the Sunday roast. Painted walls are interrupted only by the wide windows, long cardinal-coloured drapes and filament bulb lamps that, along with on-table candles, add just enough light during evening dining. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The most romantic hotels in Somerset   Dorset La FosseCranborne, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating Snug in the wave-like green hills of east Dorset, La Fosse at Cranborne is a peaceful bed and breakfast as well as popular restaurant. Run by husband and wife, this simple West Country retreat, embracing both modern and traditional, feels as far from the madding crowds as possible. Owner-chef Mark is a true locavore, sourcing as much from in and around the village as possible. His passion for local, inventive cuisine has seen him named best chef in Dorset. The colourful duck dish, replete with homegrown vegetables, is a highlight, drizzled in a piquant jus. Mark’s award-winning cheeseboard is part of the experience, so save some room. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Anchor InnSeatown, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Anchor Inn, sat beyond snaking lanes and tucked between scarped cliffs on the edge of a little known Dorset village, is a destination gastropub serving elevated British classics. It is also a boutique hideaway that cocoons guests amid the sound of rolling waves. If the weather is decent, expect a fight to secure a lunchtime spot, either tucked inside or al fresco. Menus from head chef Jean-Paul De Ronne — who previously worked under Masterchef winner Mat Follas — reveal commitment to seasonal fare from land and sea, such as the fresh crab salad using crustacea caught only metres away. Ales are all from Palmers, brewed four miles away, while an extensive cocktail list from former Hix bartender David Smith features a number of Dorset’s own spirits. Read expert review From £120per night • The best hotels in Dorset   Buckinghamshire The Mash InnRadnage, Buckinghamshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating Described by its owner Nick Mash as a ‘new generation inn’, The Mash Inn's aim is to remove the barriers between chef and diner. The open kitchen takes centre stage: a solid wood workstation groaning with ingredients and stacked plates, beneath a ceiling rack dripping with pots and pans, in front of an open fire for rotisserie cooking. Chef Jon Parry cooks up a storm, producing a delicious, earthy and inventive no frills tasting menu and a short à la carte menu. Much of the produce is from the garden or very local. Diners sit at individual tables or at a large communal table, which may sound daunting but such is the communal, friendly atmosphere that it’s a pleasure to do so. Read expert review From £100per night The Hand & FlowersMarlow, Buckinghamshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn with a Michelin-starred restaurant, enticing locals to dine, and couples for weekends or nights away. It's on busy West Street, just along the road from the house where Mary Shelley created Frankenstein. The chef-proprietor is Tom Kerridge, who gained a Michelin star within 10 months from a kitchen which was then the size of a large cupboard. These days he has a new, celadon green kitchen and a brigade of chefs. As restaurants go, it rocks. Expect crayfish scotch egg, slow cooked duck breast with duck fat chips and other earthy, deeply satisfying dishes that are also full of imaginative twists, served in a cosy and convivial dining room. Read expert review From £140per night • The best hotels in Buckinghamshire   Kent RocksaltFolkestone, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Rocksalt is the littoral culinary kingdom of Mark Sargeant of Claridge's fame. A microcosm of London sophistication in gritty Folkestone, it's a genuine dining destination. The recent addition of four bedrooms above "Sargey's" adjacent Smokehouse enables visitors to abandon themselves to gluttony. His dedication to local ingredients introduces diners to new treasures, such as meaty huss dogfish and tart sea buckthorn (oozing out of a dense chocolate mousse fondant), yet dishes are refreshingly clean and unpretentious. Hunks of bread, served with beef dripping, rich butter and home-roasted salt, and nuggets of treacly fudge and slices of colourful rock bookend a perfectly executed meal. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Wife of BathWye, Kent, England 9Telegraph expert rating Another addition to chef Mark Sargeant and Josh De Haan's portfolio of Kentish restaurants with rooms. With a superb Spanish restaurant and tiny tapas bar, its signature quirky style and authentic cuisine works surprisingly well in the bucolic setting. The restaurant serves impeccable fare: juicy scallops with spicy chorizo and earthy morcillo (black pudding); honey sweet melon smothered in Brindisa's finest Serrano ham; succulent Galician steaks with creamy aioli and fiery paprika potatoes; and hake with radishes, Seville orange and a buttery sauce laced with Gin Mare. Save space for pudding: the bitter chocolate tart with salt and olive oil is revelatory, as is ice-cream made with raisins soaked in PX sherry. Read expert review From £70per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Read's Restaurant With RoomsFaversham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Read's, housed in a Georgian mansion on the north Kentish coast, is a smart restaurant with six rooms, owned and run by acclaimed chef David Pitchford and his wife Rona. Sticking firmly to their decades-long recipe for success, they deliver classic cuisine and unfussy hospitality. David won a Michelin star in 1992, which he retained for 20 consecutive years, becoming the second longest holder of the accolade in Britain. The food is hard to fault, if lacking the innovation and excitement that comes with Michelin recognition: comforting, classic French cuisine with British influence. Think ham and pea mousse; smoked haddock in cream sauce topped with cheese soufflé; Kentish lamb served with buttery asparagus and garden vegetables; and a Cassis-soaked summer pudding. Read expert review From £145per night The Dog at WinghamWingham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating A medieval pub in a rural village, run by an enterprising local family, that serves exceptionally good food and features eight attractive bedrooms. Virtually equidistant from Canterbury and Sandwich, it’s ideally located for exploring the Kentish city, countryside and coast. The kitchen is overseen by the young and talented Dan Johns, who has worked at Gary Rhodes’ Searcy’s at The Gherkin and Urban Coterie. The menu changes monthly to reflect seasonality and local produce. Imaginative starters such as fragrant Thai-style chicken salad and rich pork and pistachio terrine with pineapple jam are followed by melt-in-the-mouth Moroccan spiced lamb and crisp pork collar with chorizo dumplings. Read expert review From £86per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best pubs with rooms in Kent   Devon The Dartmoor InnOkehampton, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 16th-century coaching inn on the north-western edge of Dartmoor National Park is acclaimed for its fresh, seasonal cooking, but it’s worth bedding down for a stay in one of its three chic bedrooms. A blackboard heralds not only the breed of cattle, but also the name of the farmer it has come from. Dishes are pub classics, done to perfection: rib-eye steak and chips, confit of duck leg with toffee apple puree and roasted hazelnuts, and brisket of beef. Philip has a strong ethical policy, forging strong links with local artisan food producers, and ensures the beef has been grass fed and reared within a 20-mile radius. Breakfast is refreshingly original, with dainty portions of caramelised bananas or a daring cooked menu, including herb-crusted goat’s cheese, black pudding and bacon lardons. Read expert review From £65per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Lamb InnSandford, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating With open fires, beamed walls, deep sofas and award-winning food, this 16th-century inn in the village of Sandford is a pub of dreams for town-dwellers. Upstairs, seven bedrooms have big beds, soft linen and powerful showers, and there’s a pretty cobbled terrace at the rear. The Lamb Inn’s menu consistently attracts rave reviews. The produce is seasonal and locally sourced, mixing upmarket dishes with pub classics: shellfish bisque, mushroom ravioli, roasted pigeon with smoked bacon and savoy cabbage or steak and chips. The perfectly fluffy sticky toffee pudding is worth a visit alone. Landlord Mark is a fan of real ale and regularly rotates his cask brews to ensure they stay fresh. Read expert review From £69per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Masons ArmsBranscombe, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This dog-friendly 14th-century thatched inn, in Branscombe, on the Jurassic Coast, is one of Devon’s best. It prides itself on serving local, seasonal Devon fare on a traditional pub menu – it even has a 'food sourcing map' detailing exactly where the produce comes from. There’s steamed River Exe mussels and fries, steak and kidney shortcrust pie, rump steak and a seafood platter. Ales, hand-pumped from casks, are just as local. On a sunny day, the action moves outside to the pretty suntrap terrace. It's a 15-minute walk to Branscombe Beach, a lovely, long shingle cove from where you can pick up the South West Coastal Path. Read expert review From £75per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Salutation InnTopsham, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating Eat well and rest your head at this 18th-century coaching inn in chichi Topsham: a stylish option with a truly excellent restaurant, helmed by one of Gordon Ramsay's former protégés. Exquisite handmade petit-fours welcome guests on arrival – the first hint that your dining experience will be full of extra surprises. The wild mushroom appetiser comes accompanied by an umami-enhancing pinot noir, and the tomato gazpacho with local crab, served in a glass on ice, and followed by a rich rump of beef from Greendale Farm. Each modern dish is accompanied by diverse wines chosen by Stephen Edwardes – the unusual sake complements the beautiful strawberry dessert which is garnished with home-grown edible flowers. Read expert review From £145per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Devon   Cornwall The Gurnard's HeadSt Ives, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn offering outstanding food, fabulous sea and moorland views, situated close to St Ives and Land's End. Popular with walkers and couples of all ages seeking a low-key, restorative break in a wild coastal location. Locals come from miles around to dine here. The Scottish head chef, Bruce Rennie, cooks a short, inventive menu. Lunch may include beetroot risotto, octopus and white wine stew, or Merguez sausages with Puy lentils. The supper menu may include salmon and lobster tortellini, cod with pig’s trotter, and sole with Vermouth. The wine list focuses on Old World wines, notably from France, Italy and Portugal. Read expert review From £110per night Padstow TownhousePadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A handsome listed townhouse on Padstow's high street that has been superbly renovated and opened as a six-bedroom luxury guesthouse by chef Paul Ainsworth to complement his Michelin-starred restaurant, Paul Ainsworth at Number 6. Head there for amusingly-presented, delicately-flavoured meat and fish dishes and a fun and informal atmosphere, or to his even more informal restaurant, Rojanos, for superior pasta, pizza and hamburgers. Breakfast is served at the latter. The guesthouse owns an electric BMW in which guests can be transported if they don’t want to walk around. Read expert review From £280per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com St Petroc's HotelPadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A sociable, intimate townhouse with a labyrinth of gorgeously styled sitting and reading rooms – as well as a buzzy bistro. St Petroc’s Bistro opened along with the hotel in 1988. It’s a lovely room – with an engaging selection of original art on the walls – and a relaxing, happy place to eat at either lunch or dinner. Pride of place on the menu goes to the 30-day dry-aged steaks, but there are fish, chicken and vegetarian options as well – all of them classic Rick Stein recipes (try the grilled hake with Serrano ham, succotash and chives). Ruby’s Bar is the new Stein pub – a great place for a local beer or cocktail. Read expert review From £112per night Kota Restaurant with RoomsPorthleven, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating With a fantastic Asian-Cornish fusion restaurant downstairs, and Porthleven’s picturesque harbour on the doorstep, the Kota’s two simple, homey rooms are proof that sometimes substance can win over style. The vibe in the restaurant is casual, with a long room overlooking the harbour and a waterfront lawn on which you can dine in good weather. New Zealander Jude, who is part Maori, part Malay-Chinese, brings Asian spices and cooking styles to fresh, meticulously sourced Cornish produce – squid with green mango salad, scallops with miso dressing and seaweed salad, and Laksa with prawns, mussels and fish. There are also some very creative burgers – tempura fish with wasabi tartare, and satay chicken with Asian slaw. Read expert review From £75per night DriftwoodPortscatho, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating Sitting on a hill above the rugged coastline of the Roseland peninsula, Driftwood is nautically furnished in soft creams and blues. A Michelin-starred restaurant, private sea-facing terraces, and a private beach make this the perfect venue for pretty much everyone. There are wonderful coastal path walks for miles in each direction. This is Cornish cooking at its finest: unfussy and focused on bringing out the flavour of fresh fish and seafood and locally reared beef and lamb. Dinner in summer comprises a six-course tasting menu with complementary wines. For children there are early suppers with proper chef-made food. Read expert review From £250per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Coombeshead FarmLewannick, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating This is the joint venture from chef Tom Adams of London restaurant Pitt Cue and April Bloomfield, English born chef/proprietor of The Spotted Pig in New York. Both wanted to get back to the roots of food and hospitality and the result is this relaxed communal dining farmhouse b&b. Tom and his partner Lottie Mew live off the land and share their fresh, foraged, pickled and harvested produce with their guests. Tom cooks a three-course feast, kicking off with plates of delicious nibbles from 6.30pm onwards, which is shared at a communal table by all the guests. Tom’s own rare breed Mangalitza pigs feature large, plus perhaps a cep and walnut broth, lamb shoulder and mushroom porridge, with madeleine, whey and prune for pudding. Wines are unusual. Read expert review From £175per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Cornwall   Sussex The Barn at RoundhurstLurgashall, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating A rural South Downs retreat on a 250-acre organic farm with its own lakes. Home-reared food is a specialty. Converted outhouses with six rooms are set around a courtyard, just steps from a dramatic converted barn for dining and lounging. A four-course set menu with generous portions is available for guests and non-guests Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays; a light supper is provided for guests on other days. Meals highlight the farm’s own organic beef, lamb and pork and could include colourful heritage carrots and an exceptional triple chocolate mousse. Read expert review From £98per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com CrouchersChichester, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating An unassuming motel-like exterior belies a foodie haven a short drive from the Witterings. Relax on the patio of a garden-facing room, head to the beach, or explore the cultural and sporting highlights around Chichester but leave room for dinner in the impressive restaurant. Proximity to the coast ensures good seafood. The squid-ink pasta starter is light and delicate and a showy dessert of white chocolate and saffron mousse with edible flowers, caramel and orange ice-cream is a multi-sensory delight. A strong wine list includes an emphasis on the owners’ native South Africa. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Crab & LobsterWest Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating Herons can be seen on the doorstep of this modernised 350-year-old pub beside a bird sanctuary, where guests can stay in cosy bedrooms or an adjoining cottage. Tuck into locally caught seafood in the bar-restaurant and plan nature walks or trips to nearby beaches. The menu, as this gastropub’s name suggests, makes good use of locally caught seafood. Baked Selsey crab with a salad or crab cakes is a highlight. Meat, like rump of lamb (on an autumn menu with garlic Pommes Anna, butternut squash purée, confit tomatoes, baby leeks and Madeira jus) is also locally reared. There’s an extensive wine list and takeaway fish and chips. Read expert review From £160per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith Wingrove HouseAlfriston, South Downs, England 8Telegraph expert rating Yards from the South Downs Way and the half-timbered, candlelit pubs of Alfriston, this swish 19th-century boutique hotel with a modern country restaurant delivers roaring log fires, low-slung sofas and top-notch food, and draws city dwellers craving an easy country escape. Matthew Comben, formerly of the Hungry Monk in Jevington, heads up the kitchen and has brought with him the Monk's original banoffee pie recipe. Highlights from the seasonal menu include cauliflower fritters with Brighton blue cheese mayonnaise, and a soft beef fillet with tarragon. There's an impressive gin menu with 11 different options, including Brighton Gin, and a refreshingly reasonable wine list. Read expert review From £108per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best places and cities to visit in England – and where to stay   Cheshire The Roebuck InnMobberley, Cheshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This French-influenced bistro with rooms is perfect weekend break material, with lashings of character, great food and a beautifully designed garden. The bistro menu, tweaked with the seasons, is European in style, and everything comes in generous portions, whether it’s ‘small plates’ of cassoulet, caponata and crostini; mains such as saffron risotto, venison bourguignon and moules marinière; or puds of tarte au citron, profiteroles and crème caramel. On the drinks front, you’ll find an interesting selection of local ales, old-world wines and a vintage dresser filled with classic aperitifs and digestifs. Read expert review From £115per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • Britain's cosiest hotels for autumn   County Durham Lord Crewe ArmsBlanchland, Northumberland, England 9Telegraph expert rating A lord-of-the-manor building, in a pin-neat estate village, that oozes atmosphere at every stone-flagged turn. A reputation for honest, British cooking, plus its rural location, makes it popular with walkers and foodies as well as the country-sports fraternity. Expect punchy, robust, British cooking, rich with flavour and unusual combinations: devilled lamb’s kidneys on roasted cauliflower; grilled sea trout and mixed alliums; sea buckthorn posset. There’s an element of fun, too; eggy bread with fried bacon or Bloody Mary tomatoes on toast for breakfast. Some ingredients come from the kitchen garden. Eat on the terrace in the summer. The atmospheric, barrel-vaulted bar has local ales including a custom-made Lord Crewe Brew. Read expert review From £155per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Rose & CrownCounty Durham, England 9Telegraph expert rating A foodie destination country inn that has smartened up while still maintaining a sense of village pub: country-comfortable rooms; horse-brasses and dogs in the bar. Surrounded by the sheep-dotted fields and moors of the North Pennines, you come to eat, relax and then walk it off. The modern British menu shows confident cooking that lets the ingredients shine through; no fuss but definitely interesting: honey-glazed goat's cheese with beetroot, hazelnuts and gingerbread, perhaps, or pan-fried fillet of sea trout with roasted baby gem and crushed peas. There’s good local sourcing with Teesdale lamb rarely off the menu. Eat in the candle-lit dining room or buzzier bar; the latter offers three real ales and a good selection of single malts. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best country house hotels in Britain   Cities The Henrietta HotelCovent Garden, London, England 8Telegraph expert rating An 18-bedroom boutique address in one of Covent Garden’s most attractive streets, owned and run by the Paris-based Experimental Group, with a cocktail bar, Ollie Dabbous restaurant and quirky interior design by Dorothée Meilichzon. The food, is delicious – clean, clever and uncomplicated – with highlights that might include the sheeps’ milk curds with pistachio, beef tartare with nasturtium and rye, and wonderful freshly baked warm madeleines with Chantilly cream. Don't miss a cocktail, which can be chosen à la carte or with a consultation from the barman. Read expert review From £220per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Ginger PigHove, Brighton, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 11-bedroom guesthouse above Hove’s highly-acclaimed Ginger Pig Bar and Restaurant is ideal if you want a quieter seaside base. Spacious and elegantly understated rooms include thoughtful beach bags with towels and well-stocked minibars. Always buzzy, this sprawling gastropub serves up highly delicious grub and excellent Sunday roasts. Look out for seasonal specials like asparagus with brown crab and chipotle mayo, or seabream with samphire. The adjoining Orangerie is where breakfast is served (there’s an outdoor area for sunny days), offering imaginative dishes such as baked eggs with hummus, chorizo and peppers, Irish rock oysters and rarebit with roasted tomatoes and mushrooms. Read expert review From £80per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Simpsons RestaurantBirmingham, England 8Telegraph expert rating The cooking is superlative at this gastronomic powerhouse, which also offers three individually styled – and great value – rooms. Throw in the added draw of the Simpsons Cookery School and you pretty much have Michelin-starred, Brummie food nirvana. The winning team of owner Andreas Antona and chef director Luke Tipping, one of Britain’s finest sauciers, has weathered fashions and trends. The three-course à la carte menu features plump marinière-style mussels on a delicate, buttery skate wing, while refined hipster influences are showcased with a barbecued beef cheek with a rich, silky bone marrow sauce. The pastry section’s take on a Belgian Speculoos cookie, with caramelised white chocolate and coffee granite, is fabulous. Read expert review From £110per night The White Star TavernSouthampton, Hampshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating A characterful tavern with rooms on Southampton’s vibrant Oxford Street. The restaurant is a destination in itself, with a varied menu that caters to all comers. If you fancy a plate of fish and chips washed down with real ale, then you’ll get the crispest batter and a unique brew from Itchen Valley. But the real tour de force is the à la carte menu, where chef Matt Noonan serves up his creativity and innovation in dishes that linger long in the memory: a melt-in-the-mouth braised ox cheek with black bean glaze and oriental vegetables to start, perhaps, or a seared bass with a sauté of wild mushrooms, egg yolk ketchup, smoked and cured egg yolk, leek and fresh Dorset truffle as a main. The Death by Chocolate dessert is served up like a piece of street art and really is to die for. Read expert review From £105per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels for a UK city break   WALES Llys MeddygPembrokeshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating A cosy hotel in the small town of Newport, on the Pembrokeshire coast, offering colourful interiors, reasonable rates and an exceptional restaurant, which has gained a reputation in Pembrokeshire and beyond as one of the best and most reasonable fine dining establishments. Chef Daniel Jones does wonders with local produce – such as Newport bay crab and lobster, Preseli lamb, Welsh beef and West Wales cheeses – in two separate dining areas: the romantic basement-level Cellar Bar, which has a slate floor and leather settees, and a wood burning stove in an inglenook fireplace; and, on the ground floor, the recently refurbished main dining room. Ed smokes salmon in a shed in his house just next door. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Ynyshir Restaurant and RoomsPowys, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Queen Victoria once owned this handsome white painted house as a hidden retreat. The undulating grounds are lovely and lead to the RSPB Ynys Hir Nature Reserve at the head of the Dovey estuary. Current owner and professional artist Rob Reen is responsible for the vibrant interiors, their colours taking a lead from his equally bold canvasses that dominate the walls. In the kitchen, Gareth Ward, who trained with Sat Bains, is a rising star, a recipient of one Michelin star and gunning for a second. He prefers to serve a series of small, integrated dishes, and is always coming up with new ideas and loves surprises. The tasting menu at dinner might include simple plates such as Welsh wagyu, pork belly with 'river bacon' or pollock with black bean. Read expert review From £215per night Tyddyn LlanDenbighshire, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A modest Georgian house just outside Llandrillo, with a complementary extension using local slate and stone. The house was once a shooting lodge belonging to the Dukes of Westminster, but now places food centre stage. The views are spectacular, with the Vale of Edeyrnion’s meadows and the slopes of the Berwyn Mountains beyond. The dining room is decorated in Wedgewood blue with tall windows on three sides. Bryan Webb is considered one of Wales’s foremost chefs, with a long-held Michelin star and a commitment to local produce, such as melting Welsh black beef, and quality seasonal ingredients. The menu changes daily. Read expert review From £195per night The Old Rectory on the LakeSnowdonia, Tal-y-llyn, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A sun-trap hideaway on the shores of a huge lake, and at the foot of the mountain, Cadair Idris. It’s elegant and relaxing with free-standing roll-top baths, an outdoor hot tub and locally sourced food perfectly cooked to order in the restaurant. The food, courtesy of the self-trained chef, Ricky, is outstanding. There may be freshly-caught trout, or local Bala lamb on the menu, along with perfectly-cooked vegetables and perhaps Dauphinois potatoes. The chocolate fondant is a signature pudding. The terrace is the perfect place to enjoy the sunset over the lake with a Welsh gin and tonic. Read expert review From £110per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Harbourmaster HotelAberaeron, Cardigan Bay, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating Beach chic comes into its own at this forget-me-not-blue boutique hotel on Aberaeron’s harbour wall. And you won’t likely forget it with these killer sea views, glam rooms and imaginatively thought-out menus. The restaurant has a serious foodie bent in the evening – try to snag the cwtch (cubby hole) for intimate dining. Go for Carlingford oysters, a plump, sweet burst of the sea, and the perfect prelude for well-cooked Welsh fillet of steak, followed by an oozy chocolate fondant with salted caramel ice cream. For a buzzier vibe, head to the bar-lounge to nurse a Brecon gin or nibble bar snacks like crispy cockles with chilli vinegar. Read expert review From £185per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith FairyhillReynoldston, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Snuggled away in 24 acres of woodland near the Gower coast, Fairyhill enchants with more than just its name. Think Downton Abbey meets Watership Down with a pinch of 21st-century cool. It has carved out its name as a foodie retreat with good reason. The chef pulls off a daring, imaginative menu, taking a pride in local sourcing and garden-grown ingredients in dishes that are both robust and refined. Clean flavours sing of the seasons in dishes simple as gazpacho, pear and Pembroke crab, and goat's cheese mousse with courgette flower with beetroot gel. Mains like meltingly tender Welsh lamb served three ways and Serrano-wrapped monkfish with clams, samphire and fresh linguine strike the perfect balance. Read expert review From £135per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com JabajakCarmarthenshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Jabajak is a former drover’s farm, now a fine vineyard and boutique bolthole, serving home-grown food and wines with a slice of history, rustic elegance and first-class service. The restaurant has scooped awards for its locally sourced, home-grown approach. A drink in the lounge bar piques the appetite for dishes prepared with garden herbs, fruit, veg and edible flowers, ramped up flavour-wise by foraged ingredients such as nettles and wild garlic when in season. Starters including basil-marinated bruschetta with gooseberry and elderflower chutney prelude mains such as butter-soft Celtic steak with local Moody Mabel cheese. There are many nods to local produce at breakfast, too, and the cooked Welsh option with a side order of cockles is bang on the money. Read expert review From £130per night Rates provided by Booking.com   SCOTLAND The Three Chimneys and The House Over-ByDunvegan, Isle of Skye, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This destination restaurant with rooms is back doing what it does best, with a new chef, updated look and reinvigorated sense of discipline and purpose. The essential ingredients are there: attentive service, attractive rooms with mesmerising views and a talented young chef. Choose from a three-course à la carte menu or the epic Skye Showcase Menu, served at the ‘Kitchen Table’, right in the heart of the action. Dishes on the latter menu might include the likes of Dungvegan crab, seaweed and miso-cured halibut, Orbost Farm beef and pot-roasted young grouse. A road (albeit single-track and quiet) runs between the House Over-By and the shore of Loch Dunvegan, slightly eroding what would otherwise be a feeling of privacy, but not unduly distracting from the peaceful views. Read expert review From £345per night The Peat InnSt Andrews, Fife, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating A long-standing gastro-destination lying between the 'town and gown' of St Andrews and Fife’s East Neuk fishing villages, this is well worth a detour. It’s a short stagger from restaurant to homely split-level suites: a calm, comfortable place to sleep off the fabulous Michelin-starred food. The rustic-chic restaurant, all tender taupes with amber and deep sea-blue accents, is a fittingly sophisticated setting for the triumphant cooking. You come here for the food and you won’t leave disappointed. From the home-made butter to the unusually good petit-fours, everything is a reflection of chef Geoffrey Smeddle’s joyous approach to food, with dishes like a starter of smoked beef tartare with wasabi puree raising your eyebrows and your expectations simultaneously. Read expert review From £195per night The Taynuilt Etive Restaurant with RoomsTaynuilt, Argyll & Bute, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating This historic rural hotel has been reinvented as a restaurant with rooms with a young Scottish chef leading a bright and creative team. It's at the heart of a small community that makes an ideal base for exploring Argyll and the isles. The Etive restaurant is the axis here, a genuine foodie oasis and arguably the finest place to eat in the region. John McNulty works wonders with the ultra-local produce, whether it be the Mull Pig’s Heed or the salmon he smokes using local larch from Loch Awe. Sound provenance ripples through the Etive even as far as breakfast, where local fish stars. Read expert review From £79per night 21212Edinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating The four bedrooms above this Michelin-starred restaurant are no afterthought; there is a confident hand at work in rooms that are as striking as the food, displaying a sometimes surprising but always sensual contemporary/baroque style and unexpectedly leafy views. Michelin-starred chef Paul Kitching is a maverick who likes to tease flavours, building fantastic creations that sound impossible, but work, like silky pink trout served with artichokes, pasta, almonds, chickpeas, kidney beans, oriental mushrooms, warm coleslaw and feta cheese. He’s utterly serious but there’s an edge of play - such as a pre-dessert of porridge, milk and cinnamon poured from a china cow. Read expert review From £112per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith The Bridge Inn, RathoEdinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This 18-century coaching inn – now an award-winning gastropub with rooms – is on a leafy canal in a tranquil village just 20 minutes away from Edinburgh's city centre. Four pretty bedrooms are each individually decorated. The cooking is exceptional, with talented head chef Ben doing wonderful things with good Scottish fish and game, properly hung beef, and pork from their own fat and sassy pigs. They grow their own vegetables, herbs and fruit too, in an old walled garden a short walk away down the canal path. Breakfast is a fine indulgence. You can have a hair of the dog as well: Champagne, Prosecco, Buck’s Fizz or a Bloody Mary. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best castle hotels in Scotland Contributions from Ros Belford, Suzy Bennett, Sophie Butler, Gill Charlton, Kerry Christiani, Fiona Duncan, Suzanne King, Gabriella Le Breton, Linda Macdonald, Richard McComb, Robin McKelvie, Harriet O'Brien, Ben Parker, Helen Pickles, Louise Roddon, Cathy Stebbings, Sarah Stirling, Anna Turns, Debbie Ward and Antonia Windsor.

Britain's loveliest restaurants with rooms for autumn

What could be more appealing than the epicurean informality of an inn or restaurant with rooms? These wonderfully relaxed establishments combine an emphasis on great ingredients from the area with local charm and stylish panache. There’s an insider feel that you don’t get at a more formal hotel, and there’s a foodie enthusiasm that wouldn’t be exuded quite as joyfully at a larger enterprise. Autumn/winter is a particularly good time to seek out their gently indulgent accommodation and fabulous seasonal flavours – the likes of wild rabbit with foraged mushrooms, grouse and damsons, elderberries and more. Harriet O'Brien Our experts round up their favourite establishments in Britain, from the Cotswolds to Cornwall, Suffolk to Skye, for feasting – and then flopping.  ENGLAND Cotswolds The Wild RabbitKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Wild Rabbit is a haven of eco-elegance a few fields away from sister enterprise Daylesford, the organic farm shop, deli, spa (and more) of Carole Bamford. She transformed this 18th-century inn and it has been meticulously devised in quiet colours, stone and wood. It’s a beautiful posh pub, with food to match. The kitchen is masterminded by Tim Allen, who won the Wild Rabbit a Michelin star in October 2016. His cuisine takes diners on a taste adventure, with dishes such as haddock on leek and apple slaw, topped with an amazingly cooked egg – poached and lightly deep fried. Read expert review From £148per night The Feathered Nest Country InnOxfordshire, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fabulous food and a superb setting above the Evenlode valley make this old country inn a hedonistic haven. The owners describe it as a pub with a twist. They’ve created an elegant restaurant that has won armloads of awards since it opened, with three stylish and supremely comfy bedrooms. The exquisite food is almost on a par with sleek gastro establishments such as Tom Kerridge’s The Hand and Flowers in Marlow - and even Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons where head chef Kuba Winkowski previously worked. There’s a stupendous wine list, too. Among the choice of 200 or so is a wonderful range of South African wines. There’s also a bar menu featuring classics such as burgers of brilliant quality. Read expert review From £140per night The Wheatsheaf InnNorthleach, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A creeper-clad coaching inn turned arty, boutique haven. The Wheatsheaf is in a particularly pretty and enterprising little Cotswold town. The restaurant draws a regular local crowd and the emphasis is on the very best quality, from the menu ingredients to the room amenities. The sophisticated menu offers great flavour combinations, the likes of roast parsnip and fennel salad with chestnuts, and mutton and apple pie with creamed potatoes. If there’s space in the bar beforehand try an aperitif of Sloe Negroni, with sloe gin and Campari, or opt for a pint of Cotswold Old Hooky. Read expert review From £102per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Kingham PloughKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Kingham Plough is a treat of a foodie destinatio, with relaxing furnishings, genial staff and brilliantly conceived menus. Emily Watkins has won numerous awards for her modern British cuisine with a twist ‒ dishes are often based on old Cotswold recipes. Her food is also much inspired by local produce; the likes of Windrush Valley goat cheese and pork from Paddock Farm a few miles away. There’s a pleasingly short and sophisticated à la carte menu: starters might include slow braised oxtail with horseradish, and mains could feature venison wellington, with meat supplied from nearby Cornbury Park. There’s also a well-priced bar menu featuring gastro comfort food such as rabbit parfait. Read expert review From £145per night The Ebrington ArmsEbrington, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating This hidden treasure set in a gloriously unspoilt village is a modern day version of a country tavern – it’s at once a genuine pub that brews its own very smooth ales; a lovely restaurant with real local flavour; and a charming hotel with rural-chic bedrooms. Chef Ben Dulley offers short, understated menus which reflect his commitment to freshness, with many vegetables straight from surrounding Drinkwater Farm. Dishes are beautifully presented and packed with local flavour – the likes of hot-smoked Bibury trout salad, and Cotswold lamb with stuffed tomatoes. Wines are from independent growers, including the Cotswolds’ own Little Oak Vineyard. Read expert review From £165per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best Cotswolds pubs with rooms   Oxfordshire Artist Residence OxfordshireSouth Leigh, Oxfordshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A unique country pub with a bohemian twist and arty vibe, offering gorgeous quirky rooms, scrumptious meals and contemporary art. The food is as heart-warming as the dining room. Local game and meat, foraged herbs and flowers join vegetables from the garden. The menu could include the likes of smoky pigeon breast electrified by a pickled walnut with caramelised chicory, port jelly and smoked spring onions and plaice in seaweed butter, smoked cockles, sea vegetables and bisque. The wine list is small, selective and good value. Join locals for a pint at the bar, read the paper or play cards around the fire. Read expert review From £130per night • The best luxury hotels in Oxfordshire   Lake District L’EnclumeCartmel, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Simon Rogan's two-Michelin-starred restaurant plus handful of rooms stay true both to the simple village location and rich surrounding land. Rooms are modest but smartly furnished, the setting picture-box pretty while the food is an exemplar of local sourcing and creativity. This isn’t Blumenthal-style magic but simply 20 (tiny) courses of exceptional skill, balance and creativity: an egg shell containing a yolk in mushroom broth; confit cauliflower in a pea and calamint sauce; a finger of turbot in nasturtium butter, the dinkiest caramel mousse sitting on compressed apple. All is presented exquisitely but without fanfare on rustic pottery, handmade glass, even a pebble. The Coravin wine system allows you to try top-rank or small-producer wines. Read expert review From £129per night The Punch Bowl InnLake District, Cumbria, England 8Telegraph expert rating A smart but relaxed country inn, in a quiet corner of the Lake District, with a deserved reputation for its classy food. The ground floor is a semi open-plan series of dining rooms, bar and relaxed eating areas, separated by little steps. The cooking is smart-city-restaurant standard producing assured, modern British dishes that are interesting without being tricksy or fussy. No fancy canapés or pre-starters, just clean flavours. Starters might include black pudding with bubble and squeak or tomato salad with local crab and lobster while mains could be pork with ham hock croquette or cod with Morteau sausage. There's a wide-ranging wine list, plus a couple of local real ales. Read expert review From £130per night • The Lake District's best pubs and inns   Peak District The Samuel Fox Country InnHope Valley, Peak District, England 8Telegraph expert rating This stone-built inn – which is more of a restaurant with rooms than a standard country pub – has an ever-growing reputation. Come for a great dinner, stay over in one of four comfortable rooms and spend the next day exploring the glorious Peak District. The foodie credentials are strong: chef-patron James Duckett has worked with Albert Roux, Michel Roux, Marcus Wareing and Philip Howard, and done extended stints in Australia and Spain. Now he turns out some of the best food in the area: everything from a piquant, pretty-as-a-picture starter of soused sardines to the kind of iced chocolate cherry parfait that makes you wish you hadn’t shared with your other half. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Peak District   Yorkshire Crab Manor HotelThirsk, Yorkshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fun and exotic, individually themed rooms combined with a well-regarded seafood restaurant and an overall madcap sense of decoration make this a hugely popular choice for special occasions. The restaurant specialises in fish and seafood serving both classics – lobster thermidor, grilled Queen scallops – as well as more modern dishes such as sea trout with samphire. It's open for lunch and dinner, and for afternoon 'lighter' options (including moules mariniere), but there's nothing delicate about portion sizes. Half the fun is the setting: jolly bar, romantic dining room or brighter conservatory, all with a bonkers decoration that includes a suite of orchestral instruments. Breakfast is also a delight. Read expert review From £165per night The Star InnHarome, Helmsley, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant-with-rooms with chocolate-box, thatched-pub looks and a bucolic farming-village location. Bedrooms, across the road, have a comfy, hunting-lodge style. Whitby-born chef-owner Andrew Pern was one of the first champions of local sourcing - and why wouldn’t you be with his ‘back garden’: moorland game and pasture-fed meat, coastal fish, Yorkshire Wolds’ fruit and vegetables. He now has a huge kitchen garden at the back of the pub. His menus are punchy, robust yet skilfully balanced and as much about texture as taste: crab stick with seashore vegetables and avocado ice, perhaps followed by roasted lamb chop with truffled faggot or honey-roasted duck with tea-poached quail’s egg. Read expert review From £150per night The Timble InnNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 8Telegraph expert rating A food-driven village pub in a quiet, yet surprisingly well-connected location with bold, contemporary styling and smart bedrooms. Glorious views and walks are on the doorstep. A pub that does two sittings for Sunday lunch is serious about food, and has been awarded two AA rosettes for it. It’s ambitious stuff – wood pigeon with quail’s egg and black pudding; venison loin with celeriac remoulade and chestnuts. The seafood platter and chateaubriand steak are favourites. It's not really a beer pub but offers a wide-ranging wine list – including fine ones by the glass – plus local gins. Read expert review From £150per night The Yorke ArmsNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant with rooms in an off-the-beaten-track location; perfect for walking off the spoiling food. The food is why people come here – some helicopter in from London for chef-proprietor Frances Atkins’s flavour-intense cooking. It’s not fussy or tricksy, just skilled, imaginative and full of the unexpected – quail with lychee and jasmine; brill with fennel in turmeric broth, peach and curd tart. Choose the eight-course tasting menu and everything is a surprise. Much is home-grown; the huge kitchen garden produces a summer surplus. These are meals to savour (even the lunchtime bar menu includes devilled kidneys, and gratin of seared scallops). Read expert review From £345per night • The best luxury hotels in Yorkshire   Norfolk Morston HallNorfolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating A flint- and brick-built Jacobean country-house hotel, with large conservatory extensions that provide extra dining space. Inside, you’ll find open fires, squashy sofas and cosy corners in a hushed, fairly formal atmosphere. The food is the main reason to come to Morston Hall, the only restaurant with a Michelin star on this stretch of coast. Galton Blackiston’s cooking is rated highly by both visitors and locals: he offers a set dinner based on fresh, local ingredients, served at 8pm daily. Four courses usually include two meat dishes (perhaps confit of duck or beef fillet) and a fish course. Recommended wines are suggested to accompany the dishes – or you can choose from an extensive list. Read expert review From £340per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Norfolk   Suffolk The Great HouseLavenham, Suffolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating The five-bedroom hotel looks onto the market square of Lavenham, a well-preserved medieval village of timbered houses. It would be wrong to stay here without sampling the food, as this is primarily a restaurant – and a very good one at that. From a regularly changing menu, you might find starters of mussels with chilli, coriander and cream, tuna sashimi or wild mushroom ravioli, and main courses of pheasant supreme, grilled fillet of lamb with thyme sauce or roasted duck breast with grilled beetroot. Desserts could be dark chocolate terrine, millefeuille or maple syrup rice pudding. Read expert review From £99per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best spa hotels in Suffolk   Somerset The White PostYeovil, Somerset, England 8Telegraph expert rating At this cosy Victorian ‘pub-and-lodgings’, the elegant gastronomy is as much a pull as the rooms. Brett’s passion for foraging and elegant presentation seeps through. The best way to experience the dishes? The 10-course tasting menu, which pays homage to the West Country (pork done eight ways, served with local chilli and ginger cider) as well as international influences (spiced lentil dhal with gurnard, mango and coconut). The wine list is sufficient but it’s the local ales and ciders that stand out, particularly if you pair a pint of Dorset Knob bitter with the Sunday roast. Painted walls are interrupted only by the wide windows, long cardinal-coloured drapes and filament bulb lamps that, along with on-table candles, add just enough light during evening dining. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The most romantic hotels in Somerset   Dorset La FosseCranborne, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating Snug in the wave-like green hills of east Dorset, La Fosse at Cranborne is a peaceful bed and breakfast as well as popular restaurant. Run by husband and wife, this simple West Country retreat, embracing both modern and traditional, feels as far from the madding crowds as possible. Owner-chef Mark is a true locavore, sourcing as much from in and around the village as possible. His passion for local, inventive cuisine has seen him named best chef in Dorset. The colourful duck dish, replete with homegrown vegetables, is a highlight, drizzled in a piquant jus. Mark’s award-winning cheeseboard is part of the experience, so save some room. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Anchor InnSeatown, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Anchor Inn, sat beyond snaking lanes and tucked between scarped cliffs on the edge of a little known Dorset village, is a destination gastropub serving elevated British classics. It is also a boutique hideaway that cocoons guests amid the sound of rolling waves. If the weather is decent, expect a fight to secure a lunchtime spot, either tucked inside or al fresco. Menus from head chef Jean-Paul De Ronne — who previously worked under Masterchef winner Mat Follas — reveal commitment to seasonal fare from land and sea, such as the fresh crab salad using crustacea caught only metres away. Ales are all from Palmers, brewed four miles away, while an extensive cocktail list from former Hix bartender David Smith features a number of Dorset’s own spirits. Read expert review From £120per night • The best hotels in Dorset   Buckinghamshire The Mash InnRadnage, Buckinghamshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating Described by its owner Nick Mash as a ‘new generation inn’, The Mash Inn's aim is to remove the barriers between chef and diner. The open kitchen takes centre stage: a solid wood workstation groaning with ingredients and stacked plates, beneath a ceiling rack dripping with pots and pans, in front of an open fire for rotisserie cooking. Chef Jon Parry cooks up a storm, producing a delicious, earthy and inventive no frills tasting menu and a short à la carte menu. Much of the produce is from the garden or very local. Diners sit at individual tables or at a large communal table, which may sound daunting but such is the communal, friendly atmosphere that it’s a pleasure to do so. Read expert review From £100per night The Hand & FlowersMarlow, Buckinghamshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn with a Michelin-starred restaurant, enticing locals to dine, and couples for weekends or nights away. It's on busy West Street, just along the road from the house where Mary Shelley created Frankenstein. The chef-proprietor is Tom Kerridge, who gained a Michelin star within 10 months from a kitchen which was then the size of a large cupboard. These days he has a new, celadon green kitchen and a brigade of chefs. As restaurants go, it rocks. Expect crayfish scotch egg, slow cooked duck breast with duck fat chips and other earthy, deeply satisfying dishes that are also full of imaginative twists, served in a cosy and convivial dining room. Read expert review From £140per night • The best hotels in Buckinghamshire   Kent RocksaltFolkestone, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Rocksalt is the littoral culinary kingdom of Mark Sargeant of Claridge's fame. A microcosm of London sophistication in gritty Folkestone, it's a genuine dining destination. The recent addition of four bedrooms above "Sargey's" adjacent Smokehouse enables visitors to abandon themselves to gluttony. His dedication to local ingredients introduces diners to new treasures, such as meaty huss dogfish and tart sea buckthorn (oozing out of a dense chocolate mousse fondant), yet dishes are refreshingly clean and unpretentious. Hunks of bread, served with beef dripping, rich butter and home-roasted salt, and nuggets of treacly fudge and slices of colourful rock bookend a perfectly executed meal. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Wife of BathWye, Kent, England 9Telegraph expert rating Another addition to chef Mark Sargeant and Josh De Haan's portfolio of Kentish restaurants with rooms. With a superb Spanish restaurant and tiny tapas bar, its signature quirky style and authentic cuisine works surprisingly well in the bucolic setting. The restaurant serves impeccable fare: juicy scallops with spicy chorizo and earthy morcillo (black pudding); honey sweet melon smothered in Brindisa's finest Serrano ham; succulent Galician steaks with creamy aioli and fiery paprika potatoes; and hake with radishes, Seville orange and a buttery sauce laced with Gin Mare. Save space for pudding: the bitter chocolate tart with salt and olive oil is revelatory, as is ice-cream made with raisins soaked in PX sherry. Read expert review From £70per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Read's Restaurant With RoomsFaversham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Read's, housed in a Georgian mansion on the north Kentish coast, is a smart restaurant with six rooms, owned and run by acclaimed chef David Pitchford and his wife Rona. Sticking firmly to their decades-long recipe for success, they deliver classic cuisine and unfussy hospitality. David won a Michelin star in 1992, which he retained for 20 consecutive years, becoming the second longest holder of the accolade in Britain. The food is hard to fault, if lacking the innovation and excitement that comes with Michelin recognition: comforting, classic French cuisine with British influence. Think ham and pea mousse; smoked haddock in cream sauce topped with cheese soufflé; Kentish lamb served with buttery asparagus and garden vegetables; and a Cassis-soaked summer pudding. Read expert review From £145per night The Dog at WinghamWingham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating A medieval pub in a rural village, run by an enterprising local family, that serves exceptionally good food and features eight attractive bedrooms. Virtually equidistant from Canterbury and Sandwich, it’s ideally located for exploring the Kentish city, countryside and coast. The kitchen is overseen by the young and talented Dan Johns, who has worked at Gary Rhodes’ Searcy’s at The Gherkin and Urban Coterie. The menu changes monthly to reflect seasonality and local produce. Imaginative starters such as fragrant Thai-style chicken salad and rich pork and pistachio terrine with pineapple jam are followed by melt-in-the-mouth Moroccan spiced lamb and crisp pork collar with chorizo dumplings. Read expert review From £86per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best pubs with rooms in Kent   Devon The Dartmoor InnOkehampton, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 16th-century coaching inn on the north-western edge of Dartmoor National Park is acclaimed for its fresh, seasonal cooking, but it’s worth bedding down for a stay in one of its three chic bedrooms. A blackboard heralds not only the breed of cattle, but also the name of the farmer it has come from. Dishes are pub classics, done to perfection: rib-eye steak and chips, confit of duck leg with toffee apple puree and roasted hazelnuts, and brisket of beef. Philip has a strong ethical policy, forging strong links with local artisan food producers, and ensures the beef has been grass fed and reared within a 20-mile radius. Breakfast is refreshingly original, with dainty portions of caramelised bananas or a daring cooked menu, including herb-crusted goat’s cheese, black pudding and bacon lardons. Read expert review From £65per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Lamb InnSandford, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating With open fires, beamed walls, deep sofas and award-winning food, this 16th-century inn in the village of Sandford is a pub of dreams for town-dwellers. Upstairs, seven bedrooms have big beds, soft linen and powerful showers, and there’s a pretty cobbled terrace at the rear. The Lamb Inn’s menu consistently attracts rave reviews. The produce is seasonal and locally sourced, mixing upmarket dishes with pub classics: shellfish bisque, mushroom ravioli, roasted pigeon with smoked bacon and savoy cabbage or steak and chips. The perfectly fluffy sticky toffee pudding is worth a visit alone. Landlord Mark is a fan of real ale and regularly rotates his cask brews to ensure they stay fresh. Read expert review From £69per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Masons ArmsBranscombe, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This dog-friendly 14th-century thatched inn, in Branscombe, on the Jurassic Coast, is one of Devon’s best. It prides itself on serving local, seasonal Devon fare on a traditional pub menu – it even has a 'food sourcing map' detailing exactly where the produce comes from. There’s steamed River Exe mussels and fries, steak and kidney shortcrust pie, rump steak and a seafood platter. Ales, hand-pumped from casks, are just as local. On a sunny day, the action moves outside to the pretty suntrap terrace. It's a 15-minute walk to Branscombe Beach, a lovely, long shingle cove from where you can pick up the South West Coastal Path. Read expert review From £75per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Salutation InnTopsham, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating Eat well and rest your head at this 18th-century coaching inn in chichi Topsham: a stylish option with a truly excellent restaurant, helmed by one of Gordon Ramsay's former protégés. Exquisite handmade petit-fours welcome guests on arrival – the first hint that your dining experience will be full of extra surprises. The wild mushroom appetiser comes accompanied by an umami-enhancing pinot noir, and the tomato gazpacho with local crab, served in a glass on ice, and followed by a rich rump of beef from Greendale Farm. Each modern dish is accompanied by diverse wines chosen by Stephen Edwardes – the unusual sake complements the beautiful strawberry dessert which is garnished with home-grown edible flowers. Read expert review From £145per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Devon   Cornwall The Gurnard's HeadSt Ives, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn offering outstanding food, fabulous sea and moorland views, situated close to St Ives and Land's End. Popular with walkers and couples of all ages seeking a low-key, restorative break in a wild coastal location. Locals come from miles around to dine here. The Scottish head chef, Bruce Rennie, cooks a short, inventive menu. Lunch may include beetroot risotto, octopus and white wine stew, or Merguez sausages with Puy lentils. The supper menu may include salmon and lobster tortellini, cod with pig’s trotter, and sole with Vermouth. The wine list focuses on Old World wines, notably from France, Italy and Portugal. Read expert review From £110per night Padstow TownhousePadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A handsome listed townhouse on Padstow's high street that has been superbly renovated and opened as a six-bedroom luxury guesthouse by chef Paul Ainsworth to complement his Michelin-starred restaurant, Paul Ainsworth at Number 6. Head there for amusingly-presented, delicately-flavoured meat and fish dishes and a fun and informal atmosphere, or to his even more informal restaurant, Rojanos, for superior pasta, pizza and hamburgers. Breakfast is served at the latter. The guesthouse owns an electric BMW in which guests can be transported if they don’t want to walk around. Read expert review From £280per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com St Petroc's HotelPadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A sociable, intimate townhouse with a labyrinth of gorgeously styled sitting and reading rooms – as well as a buzzy bistro. St Petroc’s Bistro opened along with the hotel in 1988. It’s a lovely room – with an engaging selection of original art on the walls – and a relaxing, happy place to eat at either lunch or dinner. Pride of place on the menu goes to the 30-day dry-aged steaks, but there are fish, chicken and vegetarian options as well – all of them classic Rick Stein recipes (try the grilled hake with Serrano ham, succotash and chives). Ruby’s Bar is the new Stein pub – a great place for a local beer or cocktail. Read expert review From £112per night Kota Restaurant with RoomsPorthleven, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating With a fantastic Asian-Cornish fusion restaurant downstairs, and Porthleven’s picturesque harbour on the doorstep, the Kota’s two simple, homey rooms are proof that sometimes substance can win over style. The vibe in the restaurant is casual, with a long room overlooking the harbour and a waterfront lawn on which you can dine in good weather. New Zealander Jude, who is part Maori, part Malay-Chinese, brings Asian spices and cooking styles to fresh, meticulously sourced Cornish produce – squid with green mango salad, scallops with miso dressing and seaweed salad, and Laksa with prawns, mussels and fish. There are also some very creative burgers – tempura fish with wasabi tartare, and satay chicken with Asian slaw. Read expert review From £75per night DriftwoodPortscatho, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating Sitting on a hill above the rugged coastline of the Roseland peninsula, Driftwood is nautically furnished in soft creams and blues. A Michelin-starred restaurant, private sea-facing terraces, and a private beach make this the perfect venue for pretty much everyone. There are wonderful coastal path walks for miles in each direction. This is Cornish cooking at its finest: unfussy and focused on bringing out the flavour of fresh fish and seafood and locally reared beef and lamb. Dinner in summer comprises a six-course tasting menu with complementary wines. For children there are early suppers with proper chef-made food. Read expert review From £250per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Coombeshead FarmLewannick, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating This is the joint venture from chef Tom Adams of London restaurant Pitt Cue and April Bloomfield, English born chef/proprietor of The Spotted Pig in New York. Both wanted to get back to the roots of food and hospitality and the result is this relaxed communal dining farmhouse b&b. Tom and his partner Lottie Mew live off the land and share their fresh, foraged, pickled and harvested produce with their guests. Tom cooks a three-course feast, kicking off with plates of delicious nibbles from 6.30pm onwards, which is shared at a communal table by all the guests. Tom’s own rare breed Mangalitza pigs feature large, plus perhaps a cep and walnut broth, lamb shoulder and mushroom porridge, with madeleine, whey and prune for pudding. Wines are unusual. Read expert review From £175per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Cornwall   Sussex The Barn at RoundhurstLurgashall, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating A rural South Downs retreat on a 250-acre organic farm with its own lakes. Home-reared food is a specialty. Converted outhouses with six rooms are set around a courtyard, just steps from a dramatic converted barn for dining and lounging. A four-course set menu with generous portions is available for guests and non-guests Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays; a light supper is provided for guests on other days. Meals highlight the farm’s own organic beef, lamb and pork and could include colourful heritage carrots and an exceptional triple chocolate mousse. Read expert review From £98per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com CrouchersChichester, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating An unassuming motel-like exterior belies a foodie haven a short drive from the Witterings. Relax on the patio of a garden-facing room, head to the beach, or explore the cultural and sporting highlights around Chichester but leave room for dinner in the impressive restaurant. Proximity to the coast ensures good seafood. The squid-ink pasta starter is light and delicate and a showy dessert of white chocolate and saffron mousse with edible flowers, caramel and orange ice-cream is a multi-sensory delight. A strong wine list includes an emphasis on the owners’ native South Africa. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Crab & LobsterWest Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating Herons can be seen on the doorstep of this modernised 350-year-old pub beside a bird sanctuary, where guests can stay in cosy bedrooms or an adjoining cottage. Tuck into locally caught seafood in the bar-restaurant and plan nature walks or trips to nearby beaches. The menu, as this gastropub’s name suggests, makes good use of locally caught seafood. Baked Selsey crab with a salad or crab cakes is a highlight. Meat, like rump of lamb (on an autumn menu with garlic Pommes Anna, butternut squash purée, confit tomatoes, baby leeks and Madeira jus) is also locally reared. There’s an extensive wine list and takeaway fish and chips. Read expert review From £160per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith Wingrove HouseAlfriston, South Downs, England 8Telegraph expert rating Yards from the South Downs Way and the half-timbered, candlelit pubs of Alfriston, this swish 19th-century boutique hotel with a modern country restaurant delivers roaring log fires, low-slung sofas and top-notch food, and draws city dwellers craving an easy country escape. Matthew Comben, formerly of the Hungry Monk in Jevington, heads up the kitchen and has brought with him the Monk's original banoffee pie recipe. Highlights from the seasonal menu include cauliflower fritters with Brighton blue cheese mayonnaise, and a soft beef fillet with tarragon. There's an impressive gin menu with 11 different options, including Brighton Gin, and a refreshingly reasonable wine list. Read expert review From £108per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best places and cities to visit in England – and where to stay   Cheshire The Roebuck InnMobberley, Cheshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This French-influenced bistro with rooms is perfect weekend break material, with lashings of character, great food and a beautifully designed garden. The bistro menu, tweaked with the seasons, is European in style, and everything comes in generous portions, whether it’s ‘small plates’ of cassoulet, caponata and crostini; mains such as saffron risotto, venison bourguignon and moules marinière; or puds of tarte au citron, profiteroles and crème caramel. On the drinks front, you’ll find an interesting selection of local ales, old-world wines and a vintage dresser filled with classic aperitifs and digestifs. Read expert review From £115per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • Britain's cosiest hotels for autumn   County Durham Lord Crewe ArmsBlanchland, Northumberland, England 9Telegraph expert rating A lord-of-the-manor building, in a pin-neat estate village, that oozes atmosphere at every stone-flagged turn. A reputation for honest, British cooking, plus its rural location, makes it popular with walkers and foodies as well as the country-sports fraternity. Expect punchy, robust, British cooking, rich with flavour and unusual combinations: devilled lamb’s kidneys on roasted cauliflower; grilled sea trout and mixed alliums; sea buckthorn posset. There’s an element of fun, too; eggy bread with fried bacon or Bloody Mary tomatoes on toast for breakfast. Some ingredients come from the kitchen garden. Eat on the terrace in the summer. The atmospheric, barrel-vaulted bar has local ales including a custom-made Lord Crewe Brew. Read expert review From £155per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Rose & CrownCounty Durham, England 9Telegraph expert rating A foodie destination country inn that has smartened up while still maintaining a sense of village pub: country-comfortable rooms; horse-brasses and dogs in the bar. Surrounded by the sheep-dotted fields and moors of the North Pennines, you come to eat, relax and then walk it off. The modern British menu shows confident cooking that lets the ingredients shine through; no fuss but definitely interesting: honey-glazed goat's cheese with beetroot, hazelnuts and gingerbread, perhaps, or pan-fried fillet of sea trout with roasted baby gem and crushed peas. There’s good local sourcing with Teesdale lamb rarely off the menu. Eat in the candle-lit dining room or buzzier bar; the latter offers three real ales and a good selection of single malts. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best country house hotels in Britain   Cities The Henrietta HotelCovent Garden, London, England 8Telegraph expert rating An 18-bedroom boutique address in one of Covent Garden’s most attractive streets, owned and run by the Paris-based Experimental Group, with a cocktail bar, Ollie Dabbous restaurant and quirky interior design by Dorothée Meilichzon. The food, is delicious – clean, clever and uncomplicated – with highlights that might include the sheeps’ milk curds with pistachio, beef tartare with nasturtium and rye, and wonderful freshly baked warm madeleines with Chantilly cream. Don't miss a cocktail, which can be chosen à la carte or with a consultation from the barman. Read expert review From £220per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Ginger PigHove, Brighton, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 11-bedroom guesthouse above Hove’s highly-acclaimed Ginger Pig Bar and Restaurant is ideal if you want a quieter seaside base. Spacious and elegantly understated rooms include thoughtful beach bags with towels and well-stocked minibars. Always buzzy, this sprawling gastropub serves up highly delicious grub and excellent Sunday roasts. Look out for seasonal specials like asparagus with brown crab and chipotle mayo, or seabream with samphire. The adjoining Orangerie is where breakfast is served (there’s an outdoor area for sunny days), offering imaginative dishes such as baked eggs with hummus, chorizo and peppers, Irish rock oysters and rarebit with roasted tomatoes and mushrooms. Read expert review From £80per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Simpsons RestaurantBirmingham, England 8Telegraph expert rating The cooking is superlative at this gastronomic powerhouse, which also offers three individually styled – and great value – rooms. Throw in the added draw of the Simpsons Cookery School and you pretty much have Michelin-starred, Brummie food nirvana. The winning team of owner Andreas Antona and chef director Luke Tipping, one of Britain’s finest sauciers, has weathered fashions and trends. The three-course à la carte menu features plump marinière-style mussels on a delicate, buttery skate wing, while refined hipster influences are showcased with a barbecued beef cheek with a rich, silky bone marrow sauce. The pastry section’s take on a Belgian Speculoos cookie, with caramelised white chocolate and coffee granite, is fabulous. Read expert review From £110per night The White Star TavernSouthampton, Hampshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating A characterful tavern with rooms on Southampton’s vibrant Oxford Street. The restaurant is a destination in itself, with a varied menu that caters to all comers. If you fancy a plate of fish and chips washed down with real ale, then you’ll get the crispest batter and a unique brew from Itchen Valley. But the real tour de force is the à la carte menu, where chef Matt Noonan serves up his creativity and innovation in dishes that linger long in the memory: a melt-in-the-mouth braised ox cheek with black bean glaze and oriental vegetables to start, perhaps, or a seared bass with a sauté of wild mushrooms, egg yolk ketchup, smoked and cured egg yolk, leek and fresh Dorset truffle as a main. The Death by Chocolate dessert is served up like a piece of street art and really is to die for. Read expert review From £105per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels for a UK city break   WALES Llys MeddygPembrokeshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating A cosy hotel in the small town of Newport, on the Pembrokeshire coast, offering colourful interiors, reasonable rates and an exceptional restaurant, which has gained a reputation in Pembrokeshire and beyond as one of the best and most reasonable fine dining establishments. Chef Daniel Jones does wonders with local produce – such as Newport bay crab and lobster, Preseli lamb, Welsh beef and West Wales cheeses – in two separate dining areas: the romantic basement-level Cellar Bar, which has a slate floor and leather settees, and a wood burning stove in an inglenook fireplace; and, on the ground floor, the recently refurbished main dining room. Ed smokes salmon in a shed in his house just next door. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Ynyshir Restaurant and RoomsPowys, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Queen Victoria once owned this handsome white painted house as a hidden retreat. The undulating grounds are lovely and lead to the RSPB Ynys Hir Nature Reserve at the head of the Dovey estuary. Current owner and professional artist Rob Reen is responsible for the vibrant interiors, their colours taking a lead from his equally bold canvasses that dominate the walls. In the kitchen, Gareth Ward, who trained with Sat Bains, is a rising star, a recipient of one Michelin star and gunning for a second. He prefers to serve a series of small, integrated dishes, and is always coming up with new ideas and loves surprises. The tasting menu at dinner might include simple plates such as Welsh wagyu, pork belly with 'river bacon' or pollock with black bean. Read expert review From £215per night Tyddyn LlanDenbighshire, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A modest Georgian house just outside Llandrillo, with a complementary extension using local slate and stone. The house was once a shooting lodge belonging to the Dukes of Westminster, but now places food centre stage. The views are spectacular, with the Vale of Edeyrnion’s meadows and the slopes of the Berwyn Mountains beyond. The dining room is decorated in Wedgewood blue with tall windows on three sides. Bryan Webb is considered one of Wales’s foremost chefs, with a long-held Michelin star and a commitment to local produce, such as melting Welsh black beef, and quality seasonal ingredients. The menu changes daily. Read expert review From £195per night The Old Rectory on the LakeSnowdonia, Tal-y-llyn, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A sun-trap hideaway on the shores of a huge lake, and at the foot of the mountain, Cadair Idris. It’s elegant and relaxing with free-standing roll-top baths, an outdoor hot tub and locally sourced food perfectly cooked to order in the restaurant. The food, courtesy of the self-trained chef, Ricky, is outstanding. There may be freshly-caught trout, or local Bala lamb on the menu, along with perfectly-cooked vegetables and perhaps Dauphinois potatoes. The chocolate fondant is a signature pudding. The terrace is the perfect place to enjoy the sunset over the lake with a Welsh gin and tonic. Read expert review From £110per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Harbourmaster HotelAberaeron, Cardigan Bay, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating Beach chic comes into its own at this forget-me-not-blue boutique hotel on Aberaeron’s harbour wall. And you won’t likely forget it with these killer sea views, glam rooms and imaginatively thought-out menus. The restaurant has a serious foodie bent in the evening – try to snag the cwtch (cubby hole) for intimate dining. Go for Carlingford oysters, a plump, sweet burst of the sea, and the perfect prelude for well-cooked Welsh fillet of steak, followed by an oozy chocolate fondant with salted caramel ice cream. For a buzzier vibe, head to the bar-lounge to nurse a Brecon gin or nibble bar snacks like crispy cockles with chilli vinegar. Read expert review From £185per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith FairyhillReynoldston, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Snuggled away in 24 acres of woodland near the Gower coast, Fairyhill enchants with more than just its name. Think Downton Abbey meets Watership Down with a pinch of 21st-century cool. It has carved out its name as a foodie retreat with good reason. The chef pulls off a daring, imaginative menu, taking a pride in local sourcing and garden-grown ingredients in dishes that are both robust and refined. Clean flavours sing of the seasons in dishes simple as gazpacho, pear and Pembroke crab, and goat's cheese mousse with courgette flower with beetroot gel. Mains like meltingly tender Welsh lamb served three ways and Serrano-wrapped monkfish with clams, samphire and fresh linguine strike the perfect balance. Read expert review From £135per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com JabajakCarmarthenshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Jabajak is a former drover’s farm, now a fine vineyard and boutique bolthole, serving home-grown food and wines with a slice of history, rustic elegance and first-class service. The restaurant has scooped awards for its locally sourced, home-grown approach. A drink in the lounge bar piques the appetite for dishes prepared with garden herbs, fruit, veg and edible flowers, ramped up flavour-wise by foraged ingredients such as nettles and wild garlic when in season. Starters including basil-marinated bruschetta with gooseberry and elderflower chutney prelude mains such as butter-soft Celtic steak with local Moody Mabel cheese. There are many nods to local produce at breakfast, too, and the cooked Welsh option with a side order of cockles is bang on the money. Read expert review From £130per night Rates provided by Booking.com   SCOTLAND The Three Chimneys and The House Over-ByDunvegan, Isle of Skye, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This destination restaurant with rooms is back doing what it does best, with a new chef, updated look and reinvigorated sense of discipline and purpose. The essential ingredients are there: attentive service, attractive rooms with mesmerising views and a talented young chef. Choose from a three-course à la carte menu or the epic Skye Showcase Menu, served at the ‘Kitchen Table’, right in the heart of the action. Dishes on the latter menu might include the likes of Dungvegan crab, seaweed and miso-cured halibut, Orbost Farm beef and pot-roasted young grouse. A road (albeit single-track and quiet) runs between the House Over-By and the shore of Loch Dunvegan, slightly eroding what would otherwise be a feeling of privacy, but not unduly distracting from the peaceful views. Read expert review From £345per night The Peat InnSt Andrews, Fife, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating A long-standing gastro-destination lying between the 'town and gown' of St Andrews and Fife’s East Neuk fishing villages, this is well worth a detour. It’s a short stagger from restaurant to homely split-level suites: a calm, comfortable place to sleep off the fabulous Michelin-starred food. The rustic-chic restaurant, all tender taupes with amber and deep sea-blue accents, is a fittingly sophisticated setting for the triumphant cooking. You come here for the food and you won’t leave disappointed. From the home-made butter to the unusually good petit-fours, everything is a reflection of chef Geoffrey Smeddle’s joyous approach to food, with dishes like a starter of smoked beef tartare with wasabi puree raising your eyebrows and your expectations simultaneously. Read expert review From £195per night The Taynuilt Etive Restaurant with RoomsTaynuilt, Argyll & Bute, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating This historic rural hotel has been reinvented as a restaurant with rooms with a young Scottish chef leading a bright and creative team. It's at the heart of a small community that makes an ideal base for exploring Argyll and the isles. The Etive restaurant is the axis here, a genuine foodie oasis and arguably the finest place to eat in the region. John McNulty works wonders with the ultra-local produce, whether it be the Mull Pig’s Heed or the salmon he smokes using local larch from Loch Awe. Sound provenance ripples through the Etive even as far as breakfast, where local fish stars. Read expert review From £79per night 21212Edinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating The four bedrooms above this Michelin-starred restaurant are no afterthought; there is a confident hand at work in rooms that are as striking as the food, displaying a sometimes surprising but always sensual contemporary/baroque style and unexpectedly leafy views. Michelin-starred chef Paul Kitching is a maverick who likes to tease flavours, building fantastic creations that sound impossible, but work, like silky pink trout served with artichokes, pasta, almonds, chickpeas, kidney beans, oriental mushrooms, warm coleslaw and feta cheese. He’s utterly serious but there’s an edge of play - such as a pre-dessert of porridge, milk and cinnamon poured from a china cow. Read expert review From £112per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith The Bridge Inn, RathoEdinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This 18-century coaching inn – now an award-winning gastropub with rooms – is on a leafy canal in a tranquil village just 20 minutes away from Edinburgh's city centre. Four pretty bedrooms are each individually decorated. The cooking is exceptional, with talented head chef Ben doing wonderful things with good Scottish fish and game, properly hung beef, and pork from their own fat and sassy pigs. They grow their own vegetables, herbs and fruit too, in an old walled garden a short walk away down the canal path. Breakfast is a fine indulgence. You can have a hair of the dog as well: Champagne, Prosecco, Buck’s Fizz or a Bloody Mary. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best castle hotels in Scotland Contributions from Ros Belford, Suzy Bennett, Sophie Butler, Gill Charlton, Kerry Christiani, Fiona Duncan, Suzanne King, Gabriella Le Breton, Linda Macdonald, Richard McComb, Robin McKelvie, Harriet O'Brien, Ben Parker, Helen Pickles, Louise Roddon, Cathy Stebbings, Sarah Stirling, Anna Turns, Debbie Ward and Antonia Windsor.

Britain's loveliest restaurants with rooms for autumn

What could be more appealing than the epicurean informality of an inn or restaurant with rooms? These wonderfully relaxed establishments combine an emphasis on great ingredients from the area with local charm and stylish panache. There’s an insider feel that you don’t get at a more formal hotel, and there’s a foodie enthusiasm that wouldn’t be exuded quite as joyfully at a larger enterprise. Autumn/winter is a particularly good time to seek out their gently indulgent accommodation and fabulous seasonal flavours – the likes of wild rabbit with foraged mushrooms, grouse and damsons, elderberries and more. Harriet O'Brien Our experts round up their favourite establishments in Britain, from the Cotswolds to Cornwall, Suffolk to Skye, for feasting – and then flopping.  ENGLAND Cotswolds The Wild RabbitKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Wild Rabbit is a haven of eco-elegance a few fields away from sister enterprise Daylesford, the organic farm shop, deli, spa (and more) of Carole Bamford. She transformed this 18th-century inn and it has been meticulously devised in quiet colours, stone and wood. It’s a beautiful posh pub, with food to match. The kitchen is masterminded by Tim Allen, who won the Wild Rabbit a Michelin star in October 2016. His cuisine takes diners on a taste adventure, with dishes such as haddock on leek and apple slaw, topped with an amazingly cooked egg – poached and lightly deep fried. Read expert review From £148per night The Feathered Nest Country InnOxfordshire, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fabulous food and a superb setting above the Evenlode valley make this old country inn a hedonistic haven. The owners describe it as a pub with a twist. They’ve created an elegant restaurant that has won armloads of awards since it opened, with three stylish and supremely comfy bedrooms. The exquisite food is almost on a par with sleek gastro establishments such as Tom Kerridge’s The Hand and Flowers in Marlow - and even Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons where head chef Kuba Winkowski previously worked. There’s a stupendous wine list, too. Among the choice of 200 or so is a wonderful range of South African wines. There’s also a bar menu featuring classics such as burgers of brilliant quality. Read expert review From £140per night The Wheatsheaf InnNorthleach, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A creeper-clad coaching inn turned arty, boutique haven. The Wheatsheaf is in a particularly pretty and enterprising little Cotswold town. The restaurant draws a regular local crowd and the emphasis is on the very best quality, from the menu ingredients to the room amenities. The sophisticated menu offers great flavour combinations, the likes of roast parsnip and fennel salad with chestnuts, and mutton and apple pie with creamed potatoes. If there’s space in the bar beforehand try an aperitif of Sloe Negroni, with sloe gin and Campari, or opt for a pint of Cotswold Old Hooky. Read expert review From £102per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Kingham PloughKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Kingham Plough is a treat of a foodie destinatio, with relaxing furnishings, genial staff and brilliantly conceived menus. Emily Watkins has won numerous awards for her modern British cuisine with a twist ‒ dishes are often based on old Cotswold recipes. Her food is also much inspired by local produce; the likes of Windrush Valley goat cheese and pork from Paddock Farm a few miles away. There’s a pleasingly short and sophisticated à la carte menu: starters might include slow braised oxtail with horseradish, and mains could feature venison wellington, with meat supplied from nearby Cornbury Park. There’s also a well-priced bar menu featuring gastro comfort food such as rabbit parfait. Read expert review From £145per night The Ebrington ArmsEbrington, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating This hidden treasure set in a gloriously unspoilt village is a modern day version of a country tavern – it’s at once a genuine pub that brews its own very smooth ales; a lovely restaurant with real local flavour; and a charming hotel with rural-chic bedrooms. Chef Ben Dulley offers short, understated menus which reflect his commitment to freshness, with many vegetables straight from surrounding Drinkwater Farm. Dishes are beautifully presented and packed with local flavour – the likes of hot-smoked Bibury trout salad, and Cotswold lamb with stuffed tomatoes. Wines are from independent growers, including the Cotswolds’ own Little Oak Vineyard. Read expert review From £165per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best Cotswolds pubs with rooms   Oxfordshire Artist Residence OxfordshireSouth Leigh, Oxfordshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A unique country pub with a bohemian twist and arty vibe, offering gorgeous quirky rooms, scrumptious meals and contemporary art. The food is as heart-warming as the dining room. Local game and meat, foraged herbs and flowers join vegetables from the garden. The menu could include the likes of smoky pigeon breast electrified by a pickled walnut with caramelised chicory, port jelly and smoked spring onions and plaice in seaweed butter, smoked cockles, sea vegetables and bisque. The wine list is small, selective and good value. Join locals for a pint at the bar, read the paper or play cards around the fire. Read expert review From £130per night • The best luxury hotels in Oxfordshire   Lake District L’EnclumeCartmel, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Simon Rogan's two-Michelin-starred restaurant plus handful of rooms stay true both to the simple village location and rich surrounding land. Rooms are modest but smartly furnished, the setting picture-box pretty while the food is an exemplar of local sourcing and creativity. This isn’t Blumenthal-style magic but simply 20 (tiny) courses of exceptional skill, balance and creativity: an egg shell containing a yolk in mushroom broth; confit cauliflower in a pea and calamint sauce; a finger of turbot in nasturtium butter, the dinkiest caramel mousse sitting on compressed apple. All is presented exquisitely but without fanfare on rustic pottery, handmade glass, even a pebble. The Coravin wine system allows you to try top-rank or small-producer wines. Read expert review From £129per night The Punch Bowl InnLake District, Cumbria, England 8Telegraph expert rating A smart but relaxed country inn, in a quiet corner of the Lake District, with a deserved reputation for its classy food. The ground floor is a semi open-plan series of dining rooms, bar and relaxed eating areas, separated by little steps. The cooking is smart-city-restaurant standard producing assured, modern British dishes that are interesting without being tricksy or fussy. No fancy canapés or pre-starters, just clean flavours. Starters might include black pudding with bubble and squeak or tomato salad with local crab and lobster while mains could be pork with ham hock croquette or cod with Morteau sausage. There's a wide-ranging wine list, plus a couple of local real ales. Read expert review From £130per night • The Lake District's best pubs and inns   Peak District The Samuel Fox Country InnHope Valley, Peak District, England 8Telegraph expert rating This stone-built inn – which is more of a restaurant with rooms than a standard country pub – has an ever-growing reputation. Come for a great dinner, stay over in one of four comfortable rooms and spend the next day exploring the glorious Peak District. The foodie credentials are strong: chef-patron James Duckett has worked with Albert Roux, Michel Roux, Marcus Wareing and Philip Howard, and done extended stints in Australia and Spain. Now he turns out some of the best food in the area: everything from a piquant, pretty-as-a-picture starter of soused sardines to the kind of iced chocolate cherry parfait that makes you wish you hadn’t shared with your other half. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Peak District   Yorkshire Crab Manor HotelThirsk, Yorkshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fun and exotic, individually themed rooms combined with a well-regarded seafood restaurant and an overall madcap sense of decoration make this a hugely popular choice for special occasions. The restaurant specialises in fish and seafood serving both classics – lobster thermidor, grilled Queen scallops – as well as more modern dishes such as sea trout with samphire. It's open for lunch and dinner, and for afternoon 'lighter' options (including moules mariniere), but there's nothing delicate about portion sizes. Half the fun is the setting: jolly bar, romantic dining room or brighter conservatory, all with a bonkers decoration that includes a suite of orchestral instruments. Breakfast is also a delight. Read expert review From £165per night The Star InnHarome, Helmsley, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant-with-rooms with chocolate-box, thatched-pub looks and a bucolic farming-village location. Bedrooms, across the road, have a comfy, hunting-lodge style. Whitby-born chef-owner Andrew Pern was one of the first champions of local sourcing - and why wouldn’t you be with his ‘back garden’: moorland game and pasture-fed meat, coastal fish, Yorkshire Wolds’ fruit and vegetables. He now has a huge kitchen garden at the back of the pub. His menus are punchy, robust yet skilfully balanced and as much about texture as taste: crab stick with seashore vegetables and avocado ice, perhaps followed by roasted lamb chop with truffled faggot or honey-roasted duck with tea-poached quail’s egg. Read expert review From £150per night The Timble InnNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 8Telegraph expert rating A food-driven village pub in a quiet, yet surprisingly well-connected location with bold, contemporary styling and smart bedrooms. Glorious views and walks are on the doorstep. A pub that does two sittings for Sunday lunch is serious about food, and has been awarded two AA rosettes for it. It’s ambitious stuff – wood pigeon with quail’s egg and black pudding; venison loin with celeriac remoulade and chestnuts. The seafood platter and chateaubriand steak are favourites. It's not really a beer pub but offers a wide-ranging wine list – including fine ones by the glass – plus local gins. Read expert review From £150per night The Yorke ArmsNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant with rooms in an off-the-beaten-track location; perfect for walking off the spoiling food. The food is why people come here – some helicopter in from London for chef-proprietor Frances Atkins’s flavour-intense cooking. It’s not fussy or tricksy, just skilled, imaginative and full of the unexpected – quail with lychee and jasmine; brill with fennel in turmeric broth, peach and curd tart. Choose the eight-course tasting menu and everything is a surprise. Much is home-grown; the huge kitchen garden produces a summer surplus. These are meals to savour (even the lunchtime bar menu includes devilled kidneys, and gratin of seared scallops). Read expert review From £345per night • The best luxury hotels in Yorkshire   Norfolk Morston HallNorfolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating A flint- and brick-built Jacobean country-house hotel, with large conservatory extensions that provide extra dining space. Inside, you’ll find open fires, squashy sofas and cosy corners in a hushed, fairly formal atmosphere. The food is the main reason to come to Morston Hall, the only restaurant with a Michelin star on this stretch of coast. Galton Blackiston’s cooking is rated highly by both visitors and locals: he offers a set dinner based on fresh, local ingredients, served at 8pm daily. Four courses usually include two meat dishes (perhaps confit of duck or beef fillet) and a fish course. Recommended wines are suggested to accompany the dishes – or you can choose from an extensive list. Read expert review From £340per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Norfolk   Suffolk The Great HouseLavenham, Suffolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating The five-bedroom hotel looks onto the market square of Lavenham, a well-preserved medieval village of timbered houses. It would be wrong to stay here without sampling the food, as this is primarily a restaurant – and a very good one at that. From a regularly changing menu, you might find starters of mussels with chilli, coriander and cream, tuna sashimi or wild mushroom ravioli, and main courses of pheasant supreme, grilled fillet of lamb with thyme sauce or roasted duck breast with grilled beetroot. Desserts could be dark chocolate terrine, millefeuille or maple syrup rice pudding. Read expert review From £99per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best spa hotels in Suffolk   Somerset The White PostYeovil, Somerset, England 8Telegraph expert rating At this cosy Victorian ‘pub-and-lodgings’, the elegant gastronomy is as much a pull as the rooms. Brett’s passion for foraging and elegant presentation seeps through. The best way to experience the dishes? The 10-course tasting menu, which pays homage to the West Country (pork done eight ways, served with local chilli and ginger cider) as well as international influences (spiced lentil dhal with gurnard, mango and coconut). The wine list is sufficient but it’s the local ales and ciders that stand out, particularly if you pair a pint of Dorset Knob bitter with the Sunday roast. Painted walls are interrupted only by the wide windows, long cardinal-coloured drapes and filament bulb lamps that, along with on-table candles, add just enough light during evening dining. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The most romantic hotels in Somerset   Dorset La FosseCranborne, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating Snug in the wave-like green hills of east Dorset, La Fosse at Cranborne is a peaceful bed and breakfast as well as popular restaurant. Run by husband and wife, this simple West Country retreat, embracing both modern and traditional, feels as far from the madding crowds as possible. Owner-chef Mark is a true locavore, sourcing as much from in and around the village as possible. His passion for local, inventive cuisine has seen him named best chef in Dorset. The colourful duck dish, replete with homegrown vegetables, is a highlight, drizzled in a piquant jus. Mark’s award-winning cheeseboard is part of the experience, so save some room. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Anchor InnSeatown, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Anchor Inn, sat beyond snaking lanes and tucked between scarped cliffs on the edge of a little known Dorset village, is a destination gastropub serving elevated British classics. It is also a boutique hideaway that cocoons guests amid the sound of rolling waves. If the weather is decent, expect a fight to secure a lunchtime spot, either tucked inside or al fresco. Menus from head chef Jean-Paul De Ronne — who previously worked under Masterchef winner Mat Follas — reveal commitment to seasonal fare from land and sea, such as the fresh crab salad using crustacea caught only metres away. Ales are all from Palmers, brewed four miles away, while an extensive cocktail list from former Hix bartender David Smith features a number of Dorset’s own spirits. Read expert review From £120per night • The best hotels in Dorset   Buckinghamshire The Mash InnRadnage, Buckinghamshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating Described by its owner Nick Mash as a ‘new generation inn’, The Mash Inn's aim is to remove the barriers between chef and diner. The open kitchen takes centre stage: a solid wood workstation groaning with ingredients and stacked plates, beneath a ceiling rack dripping with pots and pans, in front of an open fire for rotisserie cooking. Chef Jon Parry cooks up a storm, producing a delicious, earthy and inventive no frills tasting menu and a short à la carte menu. Much of the produce is from the garden or very local. Diners sit at individual tables or at a large communal table, which may sound daunting but such is the communal, friendly atmosphere that it’s a pleasure to do so. Read expert review From £100per night The Hand & FlowersMarlow, Buckinghamshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn with a Michelin-starred restaurant, enticing locals to dine, and couples for weekends or nights away. It's on busy West Street, just along the road from the house where Mary Shelley created Frankenstein. The chef-proprietor is Tom Kerridge, who gained a Michelin star within 10 months from a kitchen which was then the size of a large cupboard. These days he has a new, celadon green kitchen and a brigade of chefs. As restaurants go, it rocks. Expect crayfish scotch egg, slow cooked duck breast with duck fat chips and other earthy, deeply satisfying dishes that are also full of imaginative twists, served in a cosy and convivial dining room. Read expert review From £140per night • The best hotels in Buckinghamshire   Kent RocksaltFolkestone, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Rocksalt is the littoral culinary kingdom of Mark Sargeant of Claridge's fame. A microcosm of London sophistication in gritty Folkestone, it's a genuine dining destination. The recent addition of four bedrooms above "Sargey's" adjacent Smokehouse enables visitors to abandon themselves to gluttony. His dedication to local ingredients introduces diners to new treasures, such as meaty huss dogfish and tart sea buckthorn (oozing out of a dense chocolate mousse fondant), yet dishes are refreshingly clean and unpretentious. Hunks of bread, served with beef dripping, rich butter and home-roasted salt, and nuggets of treacly fudge and slices of colourful rock bookend a perfectly executed meal. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Wife of BathWye, Kent, England 9Telegraph expert rating Another addition to chef Mark Sargeant and Josh De Haan's portfolio of Kentish restaurants with rooms. With a superb Spanish restaurant and tiny tapas bar, its signature quirky style and authentic cuisine works surprisingly well in the bucolic setting. The restaurant serves impeccable fare: juicy scallops with spicy chorizo and earthy morcillo (black pudding); honey sweet melon smothered in Brindisa's finest Serrano ham; succulent Galician steaks with creamy aioli and fiery paprika potatoes; and hake with radishes, Seville orange and a buttery sauce laced with Gin Mare. Save space for pudding: the bitter chocolate tart with salt and olive oil is revelatory, as is ice-cream made with raisins soaked in PX sherry. Read expert review From £70per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Read's Restaurant With RoomsFaversham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Read's, housed in a Georgian mansion on the north Kentish coast, is a smart restaurant with six rooms, owned and run by acclaimed chef David Pitchford and his wife Rona. Sticking firmly to their decades-long recipe for success, they deliver classic cuisine and unfussy hospitality. David won a Michelin star in 1992, which he retained for 20 consecutive years, becoming the second longest holder of the accolade in Britain. The food is hard to fault, if lacking the innovation and excitement that comes with Michelin recognition: comforting, classic French cuisine with British influence. Think ham and pea mousse; smoked haddock in cream sauce topped with cheese soufflé; Kentish lamb served with buttery asparagus and garden vegetables; and a Cassis-soaked summer pudding. Read expert review From £145per night The Dog at WinghamWingham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating A medieval pub in a rural village, run by an enterprising local family, that serves exceptionally good food and features eight attractive bedrooms. Virtually equidistant from Canterbury and Sandwich, it’s ideally located for exploring the Kentish city, countryside and coast. The kitchen is overseen by the young and talented Dan Johns, who has worked at Gary Rhodes’ Searcy’s at The Gherkin and Urban Coterie. The menu changes monthly to reflect seasonality and local produce. Imaginative starters such as fragrant Thai-style chicken salad and rich pork and pistachio terrine with pineapple jam are followed by melt-in-the-mouth Moroccan spiced lamb and crisp pork collar with chorizo dumplings. Read expert review From £86per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best pubs with rooms in Kent   Devon The Dartmoor InnOkehampton, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 16th-century coaching inn on the north-western edge of Dartmoor National Park is acclaimed for its fresh, seasonal cooking, but it’s worth bedding down for a stay in one of its three chic bedrooms. A blackboard heralds not only the breed of cattle, but also the name of the farmer it has come from. Dishes are pub classics, done to perfection: rib-eye steak and chips, confit of duck leg with toffee apple puree and roasted hazelnuts, and brisket of beef. Philip has a strong ethical policy, forging strong links with local artisan food producers, and ensures the beef has been grass fed and reared within a 20-mile radius. Breakfast is refreshingly original, with dainty portions of caramelised bananas or a daring cooked menu, including herb-crusted goat’s cheese, black pudding and bacon lardons. Read expert review From £65per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Lamb InnSandford, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating With open fires, beamed walls, deep sofas and award-winning food, this 16th-century inn in the village of Sandford is a pub of dreams for town-dwellers. Upstairs, seven bedrooms have big beds, soft linen and powerful showers, and there’s a pretty cobbled terrace at the rear. The Lamb Inn’s menu consistently attracts rave reviews. The produce is seasonal and locally sourced, mixing upmarket dishes with pub classics: shellfish bisque, mushroom ravioli, roasted pigeon with smoked bacon and savoy cabbage or steak and chips. The perfectly fluffy sticky toffee pudding is worth a visit alone. Landlord Mark is a fan of real ale and regularly rotates his cask brews to ensure they stay fresh. Read expert review From £69per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Masons ArmsBranscombe, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This dog-friendly 14th-century thatched inn, in Branscombe, on the Jurassic Coast, is one of Devon’s best. It prides itself on serving local, seasonal Devon fare on a traditional pub menu – it even has a 'food sourcing map' detailing exactly where the produce comes from. There’s steamed River Exe mussels and fries, steak and kidney shortcrust pie, rump steak and a seafood platter. Ales, hand-pumped from casks, are just as local. On a sunny day, the action moves outside to the pretty suntrap terrace. It's a 15-minute walk to Branscombe Beach, a lovely, long shingle cove from where you can pick up the South West Coastal Path. Read expert review From £75per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Salutation InnTopsham, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating Eat well and rest your head at this 18th-century coaching inn in chichi Topsham: a stylish option with a truly excellent restaurant, helmed by one of Gordon Ramsay's former protégés. Exquisite handmade petit-fours welcome guests on arrival – the first hint that your dining experience will be full of extra surprises. The wild mushroom appetiser comes accompanied by an umami-enhancing pinot noir, and the tomato gazpacho with local crab, served in a glass on ice, and followed by a rich rump of beef from Greendale Farm. Each modern dish is accompanied by diverse wines chosen by Stephen Edwardes – the unusual sake complements the beautiful strawberry dessert which is garnished with home-grown edible flowers. Read expert review From £145per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Devon   Cornwall The Gurnard's HeadSt Ives, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn offering outstanding food, fabulous sea and moorland views, situated close to St Ives and Land's End. Popular with walkers and couples of all ages seeking a low-key, restorative break in a wild coastal location. Locals come from miles around to dine here. The Scottish head chef, Bruce Rennie, cooks a short, inventive menu. Lunch may include beetroot risotto, octopus and white wine stew, or Merguez sausages with Puy lentils. The supper menu may include salmon and lobster tortellini, cod with pig’s trotter, and sole with Vermouth. The wine list focuses on Old World wines, notably from France, Italy and Portugal. Read expert review From £110per night Padstow TownhousePadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A handsome listed townhouse on Padstow's high street that has been superbly renovated and opened as a six-bedroom luxury guesthouse by chef Paul Ainsworth to complement his Michelin-starred restaurant, Paul Ainsworth at Number 6. Head there for amusingly-presented, delicately-flavoured meat and fish dishes and a fun and informal atmosphere, or to his even more informal restaurant, Rojanos, for superior pasta, pizza and hamburgers. Breakfast is served at the latter. The guesthouse owns an electric BMW in which guests can be transported if they don’t want to walk around. Read expert review From £280per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com St Petroc's HotelPadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A sociable, intimate townhouse with a labyrinth of gorgeously styled sitting and reading rooms – as well as a buzzy bistro. St Petroc’s Bistro opened along with the hotel in 1988. It’s a lovely room – with an engaging selection of original art on the walls – and a relaxing, happy place to eat at either lunch or dinner. Pride of place on the menu goes to the 30-day dry-aged steaks, but there are fish, chicken and vegetarian options as well – all of them classic Rick Stein recipes (try the grilled hake with Serrano ham, succotash and chives). Ruby’s Bar is the new Stein pub – a great place for a local beer or cocktail. Read expert review From £112per night Kota Restaurant with RoomsPorthleven, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating With a fantastic Asian-Cornish fusion restaurant downstairs, and Porthleven’s picturesque harbour on the doorstep, the Kota’s two simple, homey rooms are proof that sometimes substance can win over style. The vibe in the restaurant is casual, with a long room overlooking the harbour and a waterfront lawn on which you can dine in good weather. New Zealander Jude, who is part Maori, part Malay-Chinese, brings Asian spices and cooking styles to fresh, meticulously sourced Cornish produce – squid with green mango salad, scallops with miso dressing and seaweed salad, and Laksa with prawns, mussels and fish. There are also some very creative burgers – tempura fish with wasabi tartare, and satay chicken with Asian slaw. Read expert review From £75per night DriftwoodPortscatho, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating Sitting on a hill above the rugged coastline of the Roseland peninsula, Driftwood is nautically furnished in soft creams and blues. A Michelin-starred restaurant, private sea-facing terraces, and a private beach make this the perfect venue for pretty much everyone. There are wonderful coastal path walks for miles in each direction. This is Cornish cooking at its finest: unfussy and focused on bringing out the flavour of fresh fish and seafood and locally reared beef and lamb. Dinner in summer comprises a six-course tasting menu with complementary wines. For children there are early suppers with proper chef-made food. Read expert review From £250per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Coombeshead FarmLewannick, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating This is the joint venture from chef Tom Adams of London restaurant Pitt Cue and April Bloomfield, English born chef/proprietor of The Spotted Pig in New York. Both wanted to get back to the roots of food and hospitality and the result is this relaxed communal dining farmhouse b&b. Tom and his partner Lottie Mew live off the land and share their fresh, foraged, pickled and harvested produce with their guests. Tom cooks a three-course feast, kicking off with plates of delicious nibbles from 6.30pm onwards, which is shared at a communal table by all the guests. Tom’s own rare breed Mangalitza pigs feature large, plus perhaps a cep and walnut broth, lamb shoulder and mushroom porridge, with madeleine, whey and prune for pudding. Wines are unusual. Read expert review From £175per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Cornwall   Sussex The Barn at RoundhurstLurgashall, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating A rural South Downs retreat on a 250-acre organic farm with its own lakes. Home-reared food is a specialty. Converted outhouses with six rooms are set around a courtyard, just steps from a dramatic converted barn for dining and lounging. A four-course set menu with generous portions is available for guests and non-guests Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays; a light supper is provided for guests on other days. Meals highlight the farm’s own organic beef, lamb and pork and could include colourful heritage carrots and an exceptional triple chocolate mousse. Read expert review From £98per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com CrouchersChichester, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating An unassuming motel-like exterior belies a foodie haven a short drive from the Witterings. Relax on the patio of a garden-facing room, head to the beach, or explore the cultural and sporting highlights around Chichester but leave room for dinner in the impressive restaurant. Proximity to the coast ensures good seafood. The squid-ink pasta starter is light and delicate and a showy dessert of white chocolate and saffron mousse with edible flowers, caramel and orange ice-cream is a multi-sensory delight. A strong wine list includes an emphasis on the owners’ native South Africa. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Crab & LobsterWest Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating Herons can be seen on the doorstep of this modernised 350-year-old pub beside a bird sanctuary, where guests can stay in cosy bedrooms or an adjoining cottage. Tuck into locally caught seafood in the bar-restaurant and plan nature walks or trips to nearby beaches. The menu, as this gastropub’s name suggests, makes good use of locally caught seafood. Baked Selsey crab with a salad or crab cakes is a highlight. Meat, like rump of lamb (on an autumn menu with garlic Pommes Anna, butternut squash purée, confit tomatoes, baby leeks and Madeira jus) is also locally reared. There’s an extensive wine list and takeaway fish and chips. Read expert review From £160per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith Wingrove HouseAlfriston, South Downs, England 8Telegraph expert rating Yards from the South Downs Way and the half-timbered, candlelit pubs of Alfriston, this swish 19th-century boutique hotel with a modern country restaurant delivers roaring log fires, low-slung sofas and top-notch food, and draws city dwellers craving an easy country escape. Matthew Comben, formerly of the Hungry Monk in Jevington, heads up the kitchen and has brought with him the Monk's original banoffee pie recipe. Highlights from the seasonal menu include cauliflower fritters with Brighton blue cheese mayonnaise, and a soft beef fillet with tarragon. There's an impressive gin menu with 11 different options, including Brighton Gin, and a refreshingly reasonable wine list. Read expert review From £108per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best places and cities to visit in England – and where to stay   Cheshire The Roebuck InnMobberley, Cheshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This French-influenced bistro with rooms is perfect weekend break material, with lashings of character, great food and a beautifully designed garden. The bistro menu, tweaked with the seasons, is European in style, and everything comes in generous portions, whether it’s ‘small plates’ of cassoulet, caponata and crostini; mains such as saffron risotto, venison bourguignon and moules marinière; or puds of tarte au citron, profiteroles and crème caramel. On the drinks front, you’ll find an interesting selection of local ales, old-world wines and a vintage dresser filled with classic aperitifs and digestifs. Read expert review From £115per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • Britain's cosiest hotels for autumn   County Durham Lord Crewe ArmsBlanchland, Northumberland, England 9Telegraph expert rating A lord-of-the-manor building, in a pin-neat estate village, that oozes atmosphere at every stone-flagged turn. A reputation for honest, British cooking, plus its rural location, makes it popular with walkers and foodies as well as the country-sports fraternity. Expect punchy, robust, British cooking, rich with flavour and unusual combinations: devilled lamb’s kidneys on roasted cauliflower; grilled sea trout and mixed alliums; sea buckthorn posset. There’s an element of fun, too; eggy bread with fried bacon or Bloody Mary tomatoes on toast for breakfast. Some ingredients come from the kitchen garden. Eat on the terrace in the summer. The atmospheric, barrel-vaulted bar has local ales including a custom-made Lord Crewe Brew. Read expert review From £155per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Rose & CrownCounty Durham, England 9Telegraph expert rating A foodie destination country inn that has smartened up while still maintaining a sense of village pub: country-comfortable rooms; horse-brasses and dogs in the bar. Surrounded by the sheep-dotted fields and moors of the North Pennines, you come to eat, relax and then walk it off. The modern British menu shows confident cooking that lets the ingredients shine through; no fuss but definitely interesting: honey-glazed goat's cheese with beetroot, hazelnuts and gingerbread, perhaps, or pan-fried fillet of sea trout with roasted baby gem and crushed peas. There’s good local sourcing with Teesdale lamb rarely off the menu. Eat in the candle-lit dining room or buzzier bar; the latter offers three real ales and a good selection of single malts. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best country house hotels in Britain   Cities The Henrietta HotelCovent Garden, London, England 8Telegraph expert rating An 18-bedroom boutique address in one of Covent Garden’s most attractive streets, owned and run by the Paris-based Experimental Group, with a cocktail bar, Ollie Dabbous restaurant and quirky interior design by Dorothée Meilichzon. The food, is delicious – clean, clever and uncomplicated – with highlights that might include the sheeps’ milk curds with pistachio, beef tartare with nasturtium and rye, and wonderful freshly baked warm madeleines with Chantilly cream. Don't miss a cocktail, which can be chosen à la carte or with a consultation from the barman. Read expert review From £220per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Ginger PigHove, Brighton, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 11-bedroom guesthouse above Hove’s highly-acclaimed Ginger Pig Bar and Restaurant is ideal if you want a quieter seaside base. Spacious and elegantly understated rooms include thoughtful beach bags with towels and well-stocked minibars. Always buzzy, this sprawling gastropub serves up highly delicious grub and excellent Sunday roasts. Look out for seasonal specials like asparagus with brown crab and chipotle mayo, or seabream with samphire. The adjoining Orangerie is where breakfast is served (there’s an outdoor area for sunny days), offering imaginative dishes such as baked eggs with hummus, chorizo and peppers, Irish rock oysters and rarebit with roasted tomatoes and mushrooms. Read expert review From £80per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Simpsons RestaurantBirmingham, England 8Telegraph expert rating The cooking is superlative at this gastronomic powerhouse, which also offers three individually styled – and great value – rooms. Throw in the added draw of the Simpsons Cookery School and you pretty much have Michelin-starred, Brummie food nirvana. The winning team of owner Andreas Antona and chef director Luke Tipping, one of Britain’s finest sauciers, has weathered fashions and trends. The three-course à la carte menu features plump marinière-style mussels on a delicate, buttery skate wing, while refined hipster influences are showcased with a barbecued beef cheek with a rich, silky bone marrow sauce. The pastry section’s take on a Belgian Speculoos cookie, with caramelised white chocolate and coffee granite, is fabulous. Read expert review From £110per night The White Star TavernSouthampton, Hampshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating A characterful tavern with rooms on Southampton’s vibrant Oxford Street. The restaurant is a destination in itself, with a varied menu that caters to all comers. If you fancy a plate of fish and chips washed down with real ale, then you’ll get the crispest batter and a unique brew from Itchen Valley. But the real tour de force is the à la carte menu, where chef Matt Noonan serves up his creativity and innovation in dishes that linger long in the memory: a melt-in-the-mouth braised ox cheek with black bean glaze and oriental vegetables to start, perhaps, or a seared bass with a sauté of wild mushrooms, egg yolk ketchup, smoked and cured egg yolk, leek and fresh Dorset truffle as a main. The Death by Chocolate dessert is served up like a piece of street art and really is to die for. Read expert review From £105per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels for a UK city break   WALES Llys MeddygPembrokeshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating A cosy hotel in the small town of Newport, on the Pembrokeshire coast, offering colourful interiors, reasonable rates and an exceptional restaurant, which has gained a reputation in Pembrokeshire and beyond as one of the best and most reasonable fine dining establishments. Chef Daniel Jones does wonders with local produce – such as Newport bay crab and lobster, Preseli lamb, Welsh beef and West Wales cheeses – in two separate dining areas: the romantic basement-level Cellar Bar, which has a slate floor and leather settees, and a wood burning stove in an inglenook fireplace; and, on the ground floor, the recently refurbished main dining room. Ed smokes salmon in a shed in his house just next door. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Ynyshir Restaurant and RoomsPowys, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Queen Victoria once owned this handsome white painted house as a hidden retreat. The undulating grounds are lovely and lead to the RSPB Ynys Hir Nature Reserve at the head of the Dovey estuary. Current owner and professional artist Rob Reen is responsible for the vibrant interiors, their colours taking a lead from his equally bold canvasses that dominate the walls. In the kitchen, Gareth Ward, who trained with Sat Bains, is a rising star, a recipient of one Michelin star and gunning for a second. He prefers to serve a series of small, integrated dishes, and is always coming up with new ideas and loves surprises. The tasting menu at dinner might include simple plates such as Welsh wagyu, pork belly with 'river bacon' or pollock with black bean. Read expert review From £215per night Tyddyn LlanDenbighshire, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A modest Georgian house just outside Llandrillo, with a complementary extension using local slate and stone. The house was once a shooting lodge belonging to the Dukes of Westminster, but now places food centre stage. The views are spectacular, with the Vale of Edeyrnion’s meadows and the slopes of the Berwyn Mountains beyond. The dining room is decorated in Wedgewood blue with tall windows on three sides. Bryan Webb is considered one of Wales’s foremost chefs, with a long-held Michelin star and a commitment to local produce, such as melting Welsh black beef, and quality seasonal ingredients. The menu changes daily. Read expert review From £195per night The Old Rectory on the LakeSnowdonia, Tal-y-llyn, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A sun-trap hideaway on the shores of a huge lake, and at the foot of the mountain, Cadair Idris. It’s elegant and relaxing with free-standing roll-top baths, an outdoor hot tub and locally sourced food perfectly cooked to order in the restaurant. The food, courtesy of the self-trained chef, Ricky, is outstanding. There may be freshly-caught trout, or local Bala lamb on the menu, along with perfectly-cooked vegetables and perhaps Dauphinois potatoes. The chocolate fondant is a signature pudding. The terrace is the perfect place to enjoy the sunset over the lake with a Welsh gin and tonic. Read expert review From £110per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Harbourmaster HotelAberaeron, Cardigan Bay, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating Beach chic comes into its own at this forget-me-not-blue boutique hotel on Aberaeron’s harbour wall. And you won’t likely forget it with these killer sea views, glam rooms and imaginatively thought-out menus. The restaurant has a serious foodie bent in the evening – try to snag the cwtch (cubby hole) for intimate dining. Go for Carlingford oysters, a plump, sweet burst of the sea, and the perfect prelude for well-cooked Welsh fillet of steak, followed by an oozy chocolate fondant with salted caramel ice cream. For a buzzier vibe, head to the bar-lounge to nurse a Brecon gin or nibble bar snacks like crispy cockles with chilli vinegar. Read expert review From £185per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith FairyhillReynoldston, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Snuggled away in 24 acres of woodland near the Gower coast, Fairyhill enchants with more than just its name. Think Downton Abbey meets Watership Down with a pinch of 21st-century cool. It has carved out its name as a foodie retreat with good reason. The chef pulls off a daring, imaginative menu, taking a pride in local sourcing and garden-grown ingredients in dishes that are both robust and refined. Clean flavours sing of the seasons in dishes simple as gazpacho, pear and Pembroke crab, and goat's cheese mousse with courgette flower with beetroot gel. Mains like meltingly tender Welsh lamb served three ways and Serrano-wrapped monkfish with clams, samphire and fresh linguine strike the perfect balance. Read expert review From £135per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com JabajakCarmarthenshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Jabajak is a former drover’s farm, now a fine vineyard and boutique bolthole, serving home-grown food and wines with a slice of history, rustic elegance and first-class service. The restaurant has scooped awards for its locally sourced, home-grown approach. A drink in the lounge bar piques the appetite for dishes prepared with garden herbs, fruit, veg and edible flowers, ramped up flavour-wise by foraged ingredients such as nettles and wild garlic when in season. Starters including basil-marinated bruschetta with gooseberry and elderflower chutney prelude mains such as butter-soft Celtic steak with local Moody Mabel cheese. There are many nods to local produce at breakfast, too, and the cooked Welsh option with a side order of cockles is bang on the money. Read expert review From £130per night Rates provided by Booking.com   SCOTLAND The Three Chimneys and The House Over-ByDunvegan, Isle of Skye, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This destination restaurant with rooms is back doing what it does best, with a new chef, updated look and reinvigorated sense of discipline and purpose. The essential ingredients are there: attentive service, attractive rooms with mesmerising views and a talented young chef. Choose from a three-course à la carte menu or the epic Skye Showcase Menu, served at the ‘Kitchen Table’, right in the heart of the action. Dishes on the latter menu might include the likes of Dungvegan crab, seaweed and miso-cured halibut, Orbost Farm beef and pot-roasted young grouse. A road (albeit single-track and quiet) runs between the House Over-By and the shore of Loch Dunvegan, slightly eroding what would otherwise be a feeling of privacy, but not unduly distracting from the peaceful views. Read expert review From £345per night The Peat InnSt Andrews, Fife, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating A long-standing gastro-destination lying between the 'town and gown' of St Andrews and Fife’s East Neuk fishing villages, this is well worth a detour. It’s a short stagger from restaurant to homely split-level suites: a calm, comfortable place to sleep off the fabulous Michelin-starred food. The rustic-chic restaurant, all tender taupes with amber and deep sea-blue accents, is a fittingly sophisticated setting for the triumphant cooking. You come here for the food and you won’t leave disappointed. From the home-made butter to the unusually good petit-fours, everything is a reflection of chef Geoffrey Smeddle’s joyous approach to food, with dishes like a starter of smoked beef tartare with wasabi puree raising your eyebrows and your expectations simultaneously. Read expert review From £195per night The Taynuilt Etive Restaurant with RoomsTaynuilt, Argyll & Bute, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating This historic rural hotel has been reinvented as a restaurant with rooms with a young Scottish chef leading a bright and creative team. It's at the heart of a small community that makes an ideal base for exploring Argyll and the isles. The Etive restaurant is the axis here, a genuine foodie oasis and arguably the finest place to eat in the region. John McNulty works wonders with the ultra-local produce, whether it be the Mull Pig’s Heed or the salmon he smokes using local larch from Loch Awe. Sound provenance ripples through the Etive even as far as breakfast, where local fish stars. Read expert review From £79per night 21212Edinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating The four bedrooms above this Michelin-starred restaurant are no afterthought; there is a confident hand at work in rooms that are as striking as the food, displaying a sometimes surprising but always sensual contemporary/baroque style and unexpectedly leafy views. Michelin-starred chef Paul Kitching is a maverick who likes to tease flavours, building fantastic creations that sound impossible, but work, like silky pink trout served with artichokes, pasta, almonds, chickpeas, kidney beans, oriental mushrooms, warm coleslaw and feta cheese. He’s utterly serious but there’s an edge of play - such as a pre-dessert of porridge, milk and cinnamon poured from a china cow. Read expert review From £112per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith The Bridge Inn, RathoEdinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This 18-century coaching inn – now an award-winning gastropub with rooms – is on a leafy canal in a tranquil village just 20 minutes away from Edinburgh's city centre. Four pretty bedrooms are each individually decorated. The cooking is exceptional, with talented head chef Ben doing wonderful things with good Scottish fish and game, properly hung beef, and pork from their own fat and sassy pigs. They grow their own vegetables, herbs and fruit too, in an old walled garden a short walk away down the canal path. Breakfast is a fine indulgence. You can have a hair of the dog as well: Champagne, Prosecco, Buck’s Fizz or a Bloody Mary. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best castle hotels in Scotland Contributions from Ros Belford, Suzy Bennett, Sophie Butler, Gill Charlton, Kerry Christiani, Fiona Duncan, Suzanne King, Gabriella Le Breton, Linda Macdonald, Richard McComb, Robin McKelvie, Harriet O'Brien, Ben Parker, Helen Pickles, Louise Roddon, Cathy Stebbings, Sarah Stirling, Anna Turns, Debbie Ward and Antonia Windsor.

Britain's loveliest restaurants with rooms for autumn

What could be more appealing than the epicurean informality of an inn or restaurant with rooms? These wonderfully relaxed establishments combine an emphasis on great ingredients from the area with local charm and stylish panache. There’s an insider feel that you don’t get at a more formal hotel, and there’s a foodie enthusiasm that wouldn’t be exuded quite as joyfully at a larger enterprise. Autumn/winter is a particularly good time to seek out their gently indulgent accommodation and fabulous seasonal flavours – the likes of wild rabbit with foraged mushrooms, grouse and damsons, elderberries and more. Harriet O'Brien Our experts round up their favourite establishments in Britain, from the Cotswolds to Cornwall, Suffolk to Skye, for feasting – and then flopping.  ENGLAND Cotswolds The Wild RabbitKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Wild Rabbit is a haven of eco-elegance a few fields away from sister enterprise Daylesford, the organic farm shop, deli, spa (and more) of Carole Bamford. She transformed this 18th-century inn and it has been meticulously devised in quiet colours, stone and wood. It’s a beautiful posh pub, with food to match. The kitchen is masterminded by Tim Allen, who won the Wild Rabbit a Michelin star in October 2016. His cuisine takes diners on a taste adventure, with dishes such as haddock on leek and apple slaw, topped with an amazingly cooked egg – poached and lightly deep fried. Read expert review From £148per night The Feathered Nest Country InnOxfordshire, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fabulous food and a superb setting above the Evenlode valley make this old country inn a hedonistic haven. The owners describe it as a pub with a twist. They’ve created an elegant restaurant that has won armloads of awards since it opened, with three stylish and supremely comfy bedrooms. The exquisite food is almost on a par with sleek gastro establishments such as Tom Kerridge’s The Hand and Flowers in Marlow - and even Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons where head chef Kuba Winkowski previously worked. There’s a stupendous wine list, too. Among the choice of 200 or so is a wonderful range of South African wines. There’s also a bar menu featuring classics such as burgers of brilliant quality. Read expert review From £140per night The Wheatsheaf InnNorthleach, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A creeper-clad coaching inn turned arty, boutique haven. The Wheatsheaf is in a particularly pretty and enterprising little Cotswold town. The restaurant draws a regular local crowd and the emphasis is on the very best quality, from the menu ingredients to the room amenities. The sophisticated menu offers great flavour combinations, the likes of roast parsnip and fennel salad with chestnuts, and mutton and apple pie with creamed potatoes. If there’s space in the bar beforehand try an aperitif of Sloe Negroni, with sloe gin and Campari, or opt for a pint of Cotswold Old Hooky. Read expert review From £102per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Kingham PloughKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Kingham Plough is a treat of a foodie destinatio, with relaxing furnishings, genial staff and brilliantly conceived menus. Emily Watkins has won numerous awards for her modern British cuisine with a twist ‒ dishes are often based on old Cotswold recipes. Her food is also much inspired by local produce; the likes of Windrush Valley goat cheese and pork from Paddock Farm a few miles away. There’s a pleasingly short and sophisticated à la carte menu: starters might include slow braised oxtail with horseradish, and mains could feature venison wellington, with meat supplied from nearby Cornbury Park. There’s also a well-priced bar menu featuring gastro comfort food such as rabbit parfait. Read expert review From £145per night The Ebrington ArmsEbrington, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating This hidden treasure set in a gloriously unspoilt village is a modern day version of a country tavern – it’s at once a genuine pub that brews its own very smooth ales; a lovely restaurant with real local flavour; and a charming hotel with rural-chic bedrooms. Chef Ben Dulley offers short, understated menus which reflect his commitment to freshness, with many vegetables straight from surrounding Drinkwater Farm. Dishes are beautifully presented and packed with local flavour – the likes of hot-smoked Bibury trout salad, and Cotswold lamb with stuffed tomatoes. Wines are from independent growers, including the Cotswolds’ own Little Oak Vineyard. Read expert review From £165per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best Cotswolds pubs with rooms   Oxfordshire Artist Residence OxfordshireSouth Leigh, Oxfordshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A unique country pub with a bohemian twist and arty vibe, offering gorgeous quirky rooms, scrumptious meals and contemporary art. The food is as heart-warming as the dining room. Local game and meat, foraged herbs and flowers join vegetables from the garden. The menu could include the likes of smoky pigeon breast electrified by a pickled walnut with caramelised chicory, port jelly and smoked spring onions and plaice in seaweed butter, smoked cockles, sea vegetables and bisque. The wine list is small, selective and good value. Join locals for a pint at the bar, read the paper or play cards around the fire. Read expert review From £130per night • The best luxury hotels in Oxfordshire   Lake District L’EnclumeCartmel, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Simon Rogan's two-Michelin-starred restaurant plus handful of rooms stay true both to the simple village location and rich surrounding land. Rooms are modest but smartly furnished, the setting picture-box pretty while the food is an exemplar of local sourcing and creativity. This isn’t Blumenthal-style magic but simply 20 (tiny) courses of exceptional skill, balance and creativity: an egg shell containing a yolk in mushroom broth; confit cauliflower in a pea and calamint sauce; a finger of turbot in nasturtium butter, the dinkiest caramel mousse sitting on compressed apple. All is presented exquisitely but without fanfare on rustic pottery, handmade glass, even a pebble. The Coravin wine system allows you to try top-rank or small-producer wines. Read expert review From £129per night The Punch Bowl InnLake District, Cumbria, England 8Telegraph expert rating A smart but relaxed country inn, in a quiet corner of the Lake District, with a deserved reputation for its classy food. The ground floor is a semi open-plan series of dining rooms, bar and relaxed eating areas, separated by little steps. The cooking is smart-city-restaurant standard producing assured, modern British dishes that are interesting without being tricksy or fussy. No fancy canapés or pre-starters, just clean flavours. Starters might include black pudding with bubble and squeak or tomato salad with local crab and lobster while mains could be pork with ham hock croquette or cod with Morteau sausage. There's a wide-ranging wine list, plus a couple of local real ales. Read expert review From £130per night • The Lake District's best pubs and inns   Peak District The Samuel Fox Country InnHope Valley, Peak District, England 8Telegraph expert rating This stone-built inn – which is more of a restaurant with rooms than a standard country pub – has an ever-growing reputation. Come for a great dinner, stay over in one of four comfortable rooms and spend the next day exploring the glorious Peak District. The foodie credentials are strong: chef-patron James Duckett has worked with Albert Roux, Michel Roux, Marcus Wareing and Philip Howard, and done extended stints in Australia and Spain. Now he turns out some of the best food in the area: everything from a piquant, pretty-as-a-picture starter of soused sardines to the kind of iced chocolate cherry parfait that makes you wish you hadn’t shared with your other half. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Peak District   Yorkshire Crab Manor HotelThirsk, Yorkshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fun and exotic, individually themed rooms combined with a well-regarded seafood restaurant and an overall madcap sense of decoration make this a hugely popular choice for special occasions. The restaurant specialises in fish and seafood serving both classics – lobster thermidor, grilled Queen scallops – as well as more modern dishes such as sea trout with samphire. It's open for lunch and dinner, and for afternoon 'lighter' options (including moules mariniere), but there's nothing delicate about portion sizes. Half the fun is the setting: jolly bar, romantic dining room or brighter conservatory, all with a bonkers decoration that includes a suite of orchestral instruments. Breakfast is also a delight. Read expert review From £165per night The Star InnHarome, Helmsley, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant-with-rooms with chocolate-box, thatched-pub looks and a bucolic farming-village location. Bedrooms, across the road, have a comfy, hunting-lodge style. Whitby-born chef-owner Andrew Pern was one of the first champions of local sourcing - and why wouldn’t you be with his ‘back garden’: moorland game and pasture-fed meat, coastal fish, Yorkshire Wolds’ fruit and vegetables. He now has a huge kitchen garden at the back of the pub. His menus are punchy, robust yet skilfully balanced and as much about texture as taste: crab stick with seashore vegetables and avocado ice, perhaps followed by roasted lamb chop with truffled faggot or honey-roasted duck with tea-poached quail’s egg. Read expert review From £150per night The Timble InnNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 8Telegraph expert rating A food-driven village pub in a quiet, yet surprisingly well-connected location with bold, contemporary styling and smart bedrooms. Glorious views and walks are on the doorstep. A pub that does two sittings for Sunday lunch is serious about food, and has been awarded two AA rosettes for it. It’s ambitious stuff – wood pigeon with quail’s egg and black pudding; venison loin with celeriac remoulade and chestnuts. The seafood platter and chateaubriand steak are favourites. It's not really a beer pub but offers a wide-ranging wine list – including fine ones by the glass – plus local gins. Read expert review From £150per night The Yorke ArmsNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant with rooms in an off-the-beaten-track location; perfect for walking off the spoiling food. The food is why people come here – some helicopter in from London for chef-proprietor Frances Atkins’s flavour-intense cooking. It’s not fussy or tricksy, just skilled, imaginative and full of the unexpected – quail with lychee and jasmine; brill with fennel in turmeric broth, peach and curd tart. Choose the eight-course tasting menu and everything is a surprise. Much is home-grown; the huge kitchen garden produces a summer surplus. These are meals to savour (even the lunchtime bar menu includes devilled kidneys, and gratin of seared scallops). Read expert review From £345per night • The best luxury hotels in Yorkshire   Norfolk Morston HallNorfolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating A flint- and brick-built Jacobean country-house hotel, with large conservatory extensions that provide extra dining space. Inside, you’ll find open fires, squashy sofas and cosy corners in a hushed, fairly formal atmosphere. The food is the main reason to come to Morston Hall, the only restaurant with a Michelin star on this stretch of coast. Galton Blackiston’s cooking is rated highly by both visitors and locals: he offers a set dinner based on fresh, local ingredients, served at 8pm daily. Four courses usually include two meat dishes (perhaps confit of duck or beef fillet) and a fish course. Recommended wines are suggested to accompany the dishes – or you can choose from an extensive list. Read expert review From £340per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Norfolk   Suffolk The Great HouseLavenham, Suffolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating The five-bedroom hotel looks onto the market square of Lavenham, a well-preserved medieval village of timbered houses. It would be wrong to stay here without sampling the food, as this is primarily a restaurant – and a very good one at that. From a regularly changing menu, you might find starters of mussels with chilli, coriander and cream, tuna sashimi or wild mushroom ravioli, and main courses of pheasant supreme, grilled fillet of lamb with thyme sauce or roasted duck breast with grilled beetroot. Desserts could be dark chocolate terrine, millefeuille or maple syrup rice pudding. Read expert review From £99per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best spa hotels in Suffolk   Somerset The White PostYeovil, Somerset, England 8Telegraph expert rating At this cosy Victorian ‘pub-and-lodgings’, the elegant gastronomy is as much a pull as the rooms. Brett’s passion for foraging and elegant presentation seeps through. The best way to experience the dishes? The 10-course tasting menu, which pays homage to the West Country (pork done eight ways, served with local chilli and ginger cider) as well as international influences (spiced lentil dhal with gurnard, mango and coconut). The wine list is sufficient but it’s the local ales and ciders that stand out, particularly if you pair a pint of Dorset Knob bitter with the Sunday roast. Painted walls are interrupted only by the wide windows, long cardinal-coloured drapes and filament bulb lamps that, along with on-table candles, add just enough light during evening dining. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The most romantic hotels in Somerset   Dorset La FosseCranborne, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating Snug in the wave-like green hills of east Dorset, La Fosse at Cranborne is a peaceful bed and breakfast as well as popular restaurant. Run by husband and wife, this simple West Country retreat, embracing both modern and traditional, feels as far from the madding crowds as possible. Owner-chef Mark is a true locavore, sourcing as much from in and around the village as possible. His passion for local, inventive cuisine has seen him named best chef in Dorset. The colourful duck dish, replete with homegrown vegetables, is a highlight, drizzled in a piquant jus. Mark’s award-winning cheeseboard is part of the experience, so save some room. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Anchor InnSeatown, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Anchor Inn, sat beyond snaking lanes and tucked between scarped cliffs on the edge of a little known Dorset village, is a destination gastropub serving elevated British classics. It is also a boutique hideaway that cocoons guests amid the sound of rolling waves. If the weather is decent, expect a fight to secure a lunchtime spot, either tucked inside or al fresco. Menus from head chef Jean-Paul De Ronne — who previously worked under Masterchef winner Mat Follas — reveal commitment to seasonal fare from land and sea, such as the fresh crab salad using crustacea caught only metres away. Ales are all from Palmers, brewed four miles away, while an extensive cocktail list from former Hix bartender David Smith features a number of Dorset’s own spirits. Read expert review From £120per night • The best hotels in Dorset   Buckinghamshire The Mash InnRadnage, Buckinghamshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating Described by its owner Nick Mash as a ‘new generation inn’, The Mash Inn's aim is to remove the barriers between chef and diner. The open kitchen takes centre stage: a solid wood workstation groaning with ingredients and stacked plates, beneath a ceiling rack dripping with pots and pans, in front of an open fire for rotisserie cooking. Chef Jon Parry cooks up a storm, producing a delicious, earthy and inventive no frills tasting menu and a short à la carte menu. Much of the produce is from the garden or very local. Diners sit at individual tables or at a large communal table, which may sound daunting but such is the communal, friendly atmosphere that it’s a pleasure to do so. Read expert review From £100per night The Hand & FlowersMarlow, Buckinghamshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn with a Michelin-starred restaurant, enticing locals to dine, and couples for weekends or nights away. It's on busy West Street, just along the road from the house where Mary Shelley created Frankenstein. The chef-proprietor is Tom Kerridge, who gained a Michelin star within 10 months from a kitchen which was then the size of a large cupboard. These days he has a new, celadon green kitchen and a brigade of chefs. As restaurants go, it rocks. Expect crayfish scotch egg, slow cooked duck breast with duck fat chips and other earthy, deeply satisfying dishes that are also full of imaginative twists, served in a cosy and convivial dining room. Read expert review From £140per night • The best hotels in Buckinghamshire   Kent RocksaltFolkestone, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Rocksalt is the littoral culinary kingdom of Mark Sargeant of Claridge's fame. A microcosm of London sophistication in gritty Folkestone, it's a genuine dining destination. The recent addition of four bedrooms above "Sargey's" adjacent Smokehouse enables visitors to abandon themselves to gluttony. His dedication to local ingredients introduces diners to new treasures, such as meaty huss dogfish and tart sea buckthorn (oozing out of a dense chocolate mousse fondant), yet dishes are refreshingly clean and unpretentious. Hunks of bread, served with beef dripping, rich butter and home-roasted salt, and nuggets of treacly fudge and slices of colourful rock bookend a perfectly executed meal. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Wife of BathWye, Kent, England 9Telegraph expert rating Another addition to chef Mark Sargeant and Josh De Haan's portfolio of Kentish restaurants with rooms. With a superb Spanish restaurant and tiny tapas bar, its signature quirky style and authentic cuisine works surprisingly well in the bucolic setting. The restaurant serves impeccable fare: juicy scallops with spicy chorizo and earthy morcillo (black pudding); honey sweet melon smothered in Brindisa's finest Serrano ham; succulent Galician steaks with creamy aioli and fiery paprika potatoes; and hake with radishes, Seville orange and a buttery sauce laced with Gin Mare. Save space for pudding: the bitter chocolate tart with salt and olive oil is revelatory, as is ice-cream made with raisins soaked in PX sherry. Read expert review From £70per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Read's Restaurant With RoomsFaversham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Read's, housed in a Georgian mansion on the north Kentish coast, is a smart restaurant with six rooms, owned and run by acclaimed chef David Pitchford and his wife Rona. Sticking firmly to their decades-long recipe for success, they deliver classic cuisine and unfussy hospitality. David won a Michelin star in 1992, which he retained for 20 consecutive years, becoming the second longest holder of the accolade in Britain. The food is hard to fault, if lacking the innovation and excitement that comes with Michelin recognition: comforting, classic French cuisine with British influence. Think ham and pea mousse; smoked haddock in cream sauce topped with cheese soufflé; Kentish lamb served with buttery asparagus and garden vegetables; and a Cassis-soaked summer pudding. Read expert review From £145per night The Dog at WinghamWingham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating A medieval pub in a rural village, run by an enterprising local family, that serves exceptionally good food and features eight attractive bedrooms. Virtually equidistant from Canterbury and Sandwich, it’s ideally located for exploring the Kentish city, countryside and coast. The kitchen is overseen by the young and talented Dan Johns, who has worked at Gary Rhodes’ Searcy’s at The Gherkin and Urban Coterie. The menu changes monthly to reflect seasonality and local produce. Imaginative starters such as fragrant Thai-style chicken salad and rich pork and pistachio terrine with pineapple jam are followed by melt-in-the-mouth Moroccan spiced lamb and crisp pork collar with chorizo dumplings. Read expert review From £86per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best pubs with rooms in Kent   Devon The Dartmoor InnOkehampton, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 16th-century coaching inn on the north-western edge of Dartmoor National Park is acclaimed for its fresh, seasonal cooking, but it’s worth bedding down for a stay in one of its three chic bedrooms. A blackboard heralds not only the breed of cattle, but also the name of the farmer it has come from. Dishes are pub classics, done to perfection: rib-eye steak and chips, confit of duck leg with toffee apple puree and roasted hazelnuts, and brisket of beef. Philip has a strong ethical policy, forging strong links with local artisan food producers, and ensures the beef has been grass fed and reared within a 20-mile radius. Breakfast is refreshingly original, with dainty portions of caramelised bananas or a daring cooked menu, including herb-crusted goat’s cheese, black pudding and bacon lardons. Read expert review From £65per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Lamb InnSandford, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating With open fires, beamed walls, deep sofas and award-winning food, this 16th-century inn in the village of Sandford is a pub of dreams for town-dwellers. Upstairs, seven bedrooms have big beds, soft linen and powerful showers, and there’s a pretty cobbled terrace at the rear. The Lamb Inn’s menu consistently attracts rave reviews. The produce is seasonal and locally sourced, mixing upmarket dishes with pub classics: shellfish bisque, mushroom ravioli, roasted pigeon with smoked bacon and savoy cabbage or steak and chips. The perfectly fluffy sticky toffee pudding is worth a visit alone. Landlord Mark is a fan of real ale and regularly rotates his cask brews to ensure they stay fresh. Read expert review From £69per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Masons ArmsBranscombe, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This dog-friendly 14th-century thatched inn, in Branscombe, on the Jurassic Coast, is one of Devon’s best. It prides itself on serving local, seasonal Devon fare on a traditional pub menu – it even has a 'food sourcing map' detailing exactly where the produce comes from. There’s steamed River Exe mussels and fries, steak and kidney shortcrust pie, rump steak and a seafood platter. Ales, hand-pumped from casks, are just as local. On a sunny day, the action moves outside to the pretty suntrap terrace. It's a 15-minute walk to Branscombe Beach, a lovely, long shingle cove from where you can pick up the South West Coastal Path. Read expert review From £75per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Salutation InnTopsham, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating Eat well and rest your head at this 18th-century coaching inn in chichi Topsham: a stylish option with a truly excellent restaurant, helmed by one of Gordon Ramsay's former protégés. Exquisite handmade petit-fours welcome guests on arrival – the first hint that your dining experience will be full of extra surprises. The wild mushroom appetiser comes accompanied by an umami-enhancing pinot noir, and the tomato gazpacho with local crab, served in a glass on ice, and followed by a rich rump of beef from Greendale Farm. Each modern dish is accompanied by diverse wines chosen by Stephen Edwardes – the unusual sake complements the beautiful strawberry dessert which is garnished with home-grown edible flowers. Read expert review From £145per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Devon   Cornwall The Gurnard's HeadSt Ives, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn offering outstanding food, fabulous sea and moorland views, situated close to St Ives and Land's End. Popular with walkers and couples of all ages seeking a low-key, restorative break in a wild coastal location. Locals come from miles around to dine here. The Scottish head chef, Bruce Rennie, cooks a short, inventive menu. Lunch may include beetroot risotto, octopus and white wine stew, or Merguez sausages with Puy lentils. The supper menu may include salmon and lobster tortellini, cod with pig’s trotter, and sole with Vermouth. The wine list focuses on Old World wines, notably from France, Italy and Portugal. Read expert review From £110per night Padstow TownhousePadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A handsome listed townhouse on Padstow's high street that has been superbly renovated and opened as a six-bedroom luxury guesthouse by chef Paul Ainsworth to complement his Michelin-starred restaurant, Paul Ainsworth at Number 6. Head there for amusingly-presented, delicately-flavoured meat and fish dishes and a fun and informal atmosphere, or to his even more informal restaurant, Rojanos, for superior pasta, pizza and hamburgers. Breakfast is served at the latter. The guesthouse owns an electric BMW in which guests can be transported if they don’t want to walk around. Read expert review From £280per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com St Petroc's HotelPadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A sociable, intimate townhouse with a labyrinth of gorgeously styled sitting and reading rooms – as well as a buzzy bistro. St Petroc’s Bistro opened along with the hotel in 1988. It’s a lovely room – with an engaging selection of original art on the walls – and a relaxing, happy place to eat at either lunch or dinner. Pride of place on the menu goes to the 30-day dry-aged steaks, but there are fish, chicken and vegetarian options as well – all of them classic Rick Stein recipes (try the grilled hake with Serrano ham, succotash and chives). Ruby’s Bar is the new Stein pub – a great place for a local beer or cocktail. Read expert review From £112per night Kota Restaurant with RoomsPorthleven, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating With a fantastic Asian-Cornish fusion restaurant downstairs, and Porthleven’s picturesque harbour on the doorstep, the Kota’s two simple, homey rooms are proof that sometimes substance can win over style. The vibe in the restaurant is casual, with a long room overlooking the harbour and a waterfront lawn on which you can dine in good weather. New Zealander Jude, who is part Maori, part Malay-Chinese, brings Asian spices and cooking styles to fresh, meticulously sourced Cornish produce – squid with green mango salad, scallops with miso dressing and seaweed salad, and Laksa with prawns, mussels and fish. There are also some very creative burgers – tempura fish with wasabi tartare, and satay chicken with Asian slaw. Read expert review From £75per night DriftwoodPortscatho, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating Sitting on a hill above the rugged coastline of the Roseland peninsula, Driftwood is nautically furnished in soft creams and blues. A Michelin-starred restaurant, private sea-facing terraces, and a private beach make this the perfect venue for pretty much everyone. There are wonderful coastal path walks for miles in each direction. This is Cornish cooking at its finest: unfussy and focused on bringing out the flavour of fresh fish and seafood and locally reared beef and lamb. Dinner in summer comprises a six-course tasting menu with complementary wines. For children there are early suppers with proper chef-made food. Read expert review From £250per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Coombeshead FarmLewannick, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating This is the joint venture from chef Tom Adams of London restaurant Pitt Cue and April Bloomfield, English born chef/proprietor of The Spotted Pig in New York. Both wanted to get back to the roots of food and hospitality and the result is this relaxed communal dining farmhouse b&b. Tom and his partner Lottie Mew live off the land and share their fresh, foraged, pickled and harvested produce with their guests. Tom cooks a three-course feast, kicking off with plates of delicious nibbles from 6.30pm onwards, which is shared at a communal table by all the guests. Tom’s own rare breed Mangalitza pigs feature large, plus perhaps a cep and walnut broth, lamb shoulder and mushroom porridge, with madeleine, whey and prune for pudding. Wines are unusual. Read expert review From £175per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Cornwall   Sussex The Barn at RoundhurstLurgashall, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating A rural South Downs retreat on a 250-acre organic farm with its own lakes. Home-reared food is a specialty. Converted outhouses with six rooms are set around a courtyard, just steps from a dramatic converted barn for dining and lounging. A four-course set menu with generous portions is available for guests and non-guests Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays; a light supper is provided for guests on other days. Meals highlight the farm’s own organic beef, lamb and pork and could include colourful heritage carrots and an exceptional triple chocolate mousse. Read expert review From £98per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com CrouchersChichester, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating An unassuming motel-like exterior belies a foodie haven a short drive from the Witterings. Relax on the patio of a garden-facing room, head to the beach, or explore the cultural and sporting highlights around Chichester but leave room for dinner in the impressive restaurant. Proximity to the coast ensures good seafood. The squid-ink pasta starter is light and delicate and a showy dessert of white chocolate and saffron mousse with edible flowers, caramel and orange ice-cream is a multi-sensory delight. A strong wine list includes an emphasis on the owners’ native South Africa. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Crab & LobsterWest Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating Herons can be seen on the doorstep of this modernised 350-year-old pub beside a bird sanctuary, where guests can stay in cosy bedrooms or an adjoining cottage. Tuck into locally caught seafood in the bar-restaurant and plan nature walks or trips to nearby beaches. The menu, as this gastropub’s name suggests, makes good use of locally caught seafood. Baked Selsey crab with a salad or crab cakes is a highlight. Meat, like rump of lamb (on an autumn menu with garlic Pommes Anna, butternut squash purée, confit tomatoes, baby leeks and Madeira jus) is also locally reared. There’s an extensive wine list and takeaway fish and chips. Read expert review From £160per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith Wingrove HouseAlfriston, South Downs, England 8Telegraph expert rating Yards from the South Downs Way and the half-timbered, candlelit pubs of Alfriston, this swish 19th-century boutique hotel with a modern country restaurant delivers roaring log fires, low-slung sofas and top-notch food, and draws city dwellers craving an easy country escape. Matthew Comben, formerly of the Hungry Monk in Jevington, heads up the kitchen and has brought with him the Monk's original banoffee pie recipe. Highlights from the seasonal menu include cauliflower fritters with Brighton blue cheese mayonnaise, and a soft beef fillet with tarragon. There's an impressive gin menu with 11 different options, including Brighton Gin, and a refreshingly reasonable wine list. Read expert review From £108per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best places and cities to visit in England – and where to stay   Cheshire The Roebuck InnMobberley, Cheshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This French-influenced bistro with rooms is perfect weekend break material, with lashings of character, great food and a beautifully designed garden. The bistro menu, tweaked with the seasons, is European in style, and everything comes in generous portions, whether it’s ‘small plates’ of cassoulet, caponata and crostini; mains such as saffron risotto, venison bourguignon and moules marinière; or puds of tarte au citron, profiteroles and crème caramel. On the drinks front, you’ll find an interesting selection of local ales, old-world wines and a vintage dresser filled with classic aperitifs and digestifs. Read expert review From £115per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • Britain's cosiest hotels for autumn   County Durham Lord Crewe ArmsBlanchland, Northumberland, England 9Telegraph expert rating A lord-of-the-manor building, in a pin-neat estate village, that oozes atmosphere at every stone-flagged turn. A reputation for honest, British cooking, plus its rural location, makes it popular with walkers and foodies as well as the country-sports fraternity. Expect punchy, robust, British cooking, rich with flavour and unusual combinations: devilled lamb’s kidneys on roasted cauliflower; grilled sea trout and mixed alliums; sea buckthorn posset. There’s an element of fun, too; eggy bread with fried bacon or Bloody Mary tomatoes on toast for breakfast. Some ingredients come from the kitchen garden. Eat on the terrace in the summer. The atmospheric, barrel-vaulted bar has local ales including a custom-made Lord Crewe Brew. Read expert review From £155per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Rose & CrownCounty Durham, England 9Telegraph expert rating A foodie destination country inn that has smartened up while still maintaining a sense of village pub: country-comfortable rooms; horse-brasses and dogs in the bar. Surrounded by the sheep-dotted fields and moors of the North Pennines, you come to eat, relax and then walk it off. The modern British menu shows confident cooking that lets the ingredients shine through; no fuss but definitely interesting: honey-glazed goat's cheese with beetroot, hazelnuts and gingerbread, perhaps, or pan-fried fillet of sea trout with roasted baby gem and crushed peas. There’s good local sourcing with Teesdale lamb rarely off the menu. Eat in the candle-lit dining room or buzzier bar; the latter offers three real ales and a good selection of single malts. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best country house hotels in Britain   Cities The Henrietta HotelCovent Garden, London, England 8Telegraph expert rating An 18-bedroom boutique address in one of Covent Garden’s most attractive streets, owned and run by the Paris-based Experimental Group, with a cocktail bar, Ollie Dabbous restaurant and quirky interior design by Dorothée Meilichzon. The food, is delicious – clean, clever and uncomplicated – with highlights that might include the sheeps’ milk curds with pistachio, beef tartare with nasturtium and rye, and wonderful freshly baked warm madeleines with Chantilly cream. Don't miss a cocktail, which can be chosen à la carte or with a consultation from the barman. Read expert review From £220per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Ginger PigHove, Brighton, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 11-bedroom guesthouse above Hove’s highly-acclaimed Ginger Pig Bar and Restaurant is ideal if you want a quieter seaside base. Spacious and elegantly understated rooms include thoughtful beach bags with towels and well-stocked minibars. Always buzzy, this sprawling gastropub serves up highly delicious grub and excellent Sunday roasts. Look out for seasonal specials like asparagus with brown crab and chipotle mayo, or seabream with samphire. The adjoining Orangerie is where breakfast is served (there’s an outdoor area for sunny days), offering imaginative dishes such as baked eggs with hummus, chorizo and peppers, Irish rock oysters and rarebit with roasted tomatoes and mushrooms. Read expert review From £80per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Simpsons RestaurantBirmingham, England 8Telegraph expert rating The cooking is superlative at this gastronomic powerhouse, which also offers three individually styled – and great value – rooms. Throw in the added draw of the Simpsons Cookery School and you pretty much have Michelin-starred, Brummie food nirvana. The winning team of owner Andreas Antona and chef director Luke Tipping, one of Britain’s finest sauciers, has weathered fashions and trends. The three-course à la carte menu features plump marinière-style mussels on a delicate, buttery skate wing, while refined hipster influences are showcased with a barbecued beef cheek with a rich, silky bone marrow sauce. The pastry section’s take on a Belgian Speculoos cookie, with caramelised white chocolate and coffee granite, is fabulous. Read expert review From £110per night The White Star TavernSouthampton, Hampshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating A characterful tavern with rooms on Southampton’s vibrant Oxford Street. The restaurant is a destination in itself, with a varied menu that caters to all comers. If you fancy a plate of fish and chips washed down with real ale, then you’ll get the crispest batter and a unique brew from Itchen Valley. But the real tour de force is the à la carte menu, where chef Matt Noonan serves up his creativity and innovation in dishes that linger long in the memory: a melt-in-the-mouth braised ox cheek with black bean glaze and oriental vegetables to start, perhaps, or a seared bass with a sauté of wild mushrooms, egg yolk ketchup, smoked and cured egg yolk, leek and fresh Dorset truffle as a main. The Death by Chocolate dessert is served up like a piece of street art and really is to die for. Read expert review From £105per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels for a UK city break   WALES Llys MeddygPembrokeshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating A cosy hotel in the small town of Newport, on the Pembrokeshire coast, offering colourful interiors, reasonable rates and an exceptional restaurant, which has gained a reputation in Pembrokeshire and beyond as one of the best and most reasonable fine dining establishments. Chef Daniel Jones does wonders with local produce – such as Newport bay crab and lobster, Preseli lamb, Welsh beef and West Wales cheeses – in two separate dining areas: the romantic basement-level Cellar Bar, which has a slate floor and leather settees, and a wood burning stove in an inglenook fireplace; and, on the ground floor, the recently refurbished main dining room. Ed smokes salmon in a shed in his house just next door. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Ynyshir Restaurant and RoomsPowys, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Queen Victoria once owned this handsome white painted house as a hidden retreat. The undulating grounds are lovely and lead to the RSPB Ynys Hir Nature Reserve at the head of the Dovey estuary. Current owner and professional artist Rob Reen is responsible for the vibrant interiors, their colours taking a lead from his equally bold canvasses that dominate the walls. In the kitchen, Gareth Ward, who trained with Sat Bains, is a rising star, a recipient of one Michelin star and gunning for a second. He prefers to serve a series of small, integrated dishes, and is always coming up with new ideas and loves surprises. The tasting menu at dinner might include simple plates such as Welsh wagyu, pork belly with 'river bacon' or pollock with black bean. Read expert review From £215per night Tyddyn LlanDenbighshire, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A modest Georgian house just outside Llandrillo, with a complementary extension using local slate and stone. The house was once a shooting lodge belonging to the Dukes of Westminster, but now places food centre stage. The views are spectacular, with the Vale of Edeyrnion’s meadows and the slopes of the Berwyn Mountains beyond. The dining room is decorated in Wedgewood blue with tall windows on three sides. Bryan Webb is considered one of Wales’s foremost chefs, with a long-held Michelin star and a commitment to local produce, such as melting Welsh black beef, and quality seasonal ingredients. The menu changes daily. Read expert review From £195per night The Old Rectory on the LakeSnowdonia, Tal-y-llyn, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A sun-trap hideaway on the shores of a huge lake, and at the foot of the mountain, Cadair Idris. It’s elegant and relaxing with free-standing roll-top baths, an outdoor hot tub and locally sourced food perfectly cooked to order in the restaurant. The food, courtesy of the self-trained chef, Ricky, is outstanding. There may be freshly-caught trout, or local Bala lamb on the menu, along with perfectly-cooked vegetables and perhaps Dauphinois potatoes. The chocolate fondant is a signature pudding. The terrace is the perfect place to enjoy the sunset over the lake with a Welsh gin and tonic. Read expert review From £110per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Harbourmaster HotelAberaeron, Cardigan Bay, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating Beach chic comes into its own at this forget-me-not-blue boutique hotel on Aberaeron’s harbour wall. And you won’t likely forget it with these killer sea views, glam rooms and imaginatively thought-out menus. The restaurant has a serious foodie bent in the evening – try to snag the cwtch (cubby hole) for intimate dining. Go for Carlingford oysters, a plump, sweet burst of the sea, and the perfect prelude for well-cooked Welsh fillet of steak, followed by an oozy chocolate fondant with salted caramel ice cream. For a buzzier vibe, head to the bar-lounge to nurse a Brecon gin or nibble bar snacks like crispy cockles with chilli vinegar. Read expert review From £185per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith FairyhillReynoldston, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Snuggled away in 24 acres of woodland near the Gower coast, Fairyhill enchants with more than just its name. Think Downton Abbey meets Watership Down with a pinch of 21st-century cool. It has carved out its name as a foodie retreat with good reason. The chef pulls off a daring, imaginative menu, taking a pride in local sourcing and garden-grown ingredients in dishes that are both robust and refined. Clean flavours sing of the seasons in dishes simple as gazpacho, pear and Pembroke crab, and goat's cheese mousse with courgette flower with beetroot gel. Mains like meltingly tender Welsh lamb served three ways and Serrano-wrapped monkfish with clams, samphire and fresh linguine strike the perfect balance. Read expert review From £135per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com JabajakCarmarthenshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Jabajak is a former drover’s farm, now a fine vineyard and boutique bolthole, serving home-grown food and wines with a slice of history, rustic elegance and first-class service. The restaurant has scooped awards for its locally sourced, home-grown approach. A drink in the lounge bar piques the appetite for dishes prepared with garden herbs, fruit, veg and edible flowers, ramped up flavour-wise by foraged ingredients such as nettles and wild garlic when in season. Starters including basil-marinated bruschetta with gooseberry and elderflower chutney prelude mains such as butter-soft Celtic steak with local Moody Mabel cheese. There are many nods to local produce at breakfast, too, and the cooked Welsh option with a side order of cockles is bang on the money. Read expert review From £130per night Rates provided by Booking.com   SCOTLAND The Three Chimneys and The House Over-ByDunvegan, Isle of Skye, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This destination restaurant with rooms is back doing what it does best, with a new chef, updated look and reinvigorated sense of discipline and purpose. The essential ingredients are there: attentive service, attractive rooms with mesmerising views and a talented young chef. Choose from a three-course à la carte menu or the epic Skye Showcase Menu, served at the ‘Kitchen Table’, right in the heart of the action. Dishes on the latter menu might include the likes of Dungvegan crab, seaweed and miso-cured halibut, Orbost Farm beef and pot-roasted young grouse. A road (albeit single-track and quiet) runs between the House Over-By and the shore of Loch Dunvegan, slightly eroding what would otherwise be a feeling of privacy, but not unduly distracting from the peaceful views. Read expert review From £345per night The Peat InnSt Andrews, Fife, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating A long-standing gastro-destination lying between the 'town and gown' of St Andrews and Fife’s East Neuk fishing villages, this is well worth a detour. It’s a short stagger from restaurant to homely split-level suites: a calm, comfortable place to sleep off the fabulous Michelin-starred food. The rustic-chic restaurant, all tender taupes with amber and deep sea-blue accents, is a fittingly sophisticated setting for the triumphant cooking. You come here for the food and you won’t leave disappointed. From the home-made butter to the unusually good petit-fours, everything is a reflection of chef Geoffrey Smeddle’s joyous approach to food, with dishes like a starter of smoked beef tartare with wasabi puree raising your eyebrows and your expectations simultaneously. Read expert review From £195per night The Taynuilt Etive Restaurant with RoomsTaynuilt, Argyll & Bute, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating This historic rural hotel has been reinvented as a restaurant with rooms with a young Scottish chef leading a bright and creative team. It's at the heart of a small community that makes an ideal base for exploring Argyll and the isles. The Etive restaurant is the axis here, a genuine foodie oasis and arguably the finest place to eat in the region. John McNulty works wonders with the ultra-local produce, whether it be the Mull Pig’s Heed or the salmon he smokes using local larch from Loch Awe. Sound provenance ripples through the Etive even as far as breakfast, where local fish stars. Read expert review From £79per night 21212Edinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating The four bedrooms above this Michelin-starred restaurant are no afterthought; there is a confident hand at work in rooms that are as striking as the food, displaying a sometimes surprising but always sensual contemporary/baroque style and unexpectedly leafy views. Michelin-starred chef Paul Kitching is a maverick who likes to tease flavours, building fantastic creations that sound impossible, but work, like silky pink trout served with artichokes, pasta, almonds, chickpeas, kidney beans, oriental mushrooms, warm coleslaw and feta cheese. He’s utterly serious but there’s an edge of play - such as a pre-dessert of porridge, milk and cinnamon poured from a china cow. Read expert review From £112per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith The Bridge Inn, RathoEdinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This 18-century coaching inn – now an award-winning gastropub with rooms – is on a leafy canal in a tranquil village just 20 minutes away from Edinburgh's city centre. Four pretty bedrooms are each individually decorated. The cooking is exceptional, with talented head chef Ben doing wonderful things with good Scottish fish and game, properly hung beef, and pork from their own fat and sassy pigs. They grow their own vegetables, herbs and fruit too, in an old walled garden a short walk away down the canal path. Breakfast is a fine indulgence. You can have a hair of the dog as well: Champagne, Prosecco, Buck’s Fizz or a Bloody Mary. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best castle hotels in Scotland Contributions from Ros Belford, Suzy Bennett, Sophie Butler, Gill Charlton, Kerry Christiani, Fiona Duncan, Suzanne King, Gabriella Le Breton, Linda Macdonald, Richard McComb, Robin McKelvie, Harriet O'Brien, Ben Parker, Helen Pickles, Louise Roddon, Cathy Stebbings, Sarah Stirling, Anna Turns, Debbie Ward and Antonia Windsor.

Britain's loveliest restaurants with rooms for autumn

What could be more appealing than the epicurean informality of an inn or restaurant with rooms? These wonderfully relaxed establishments combine an emphasis on great ingredients from the area with local charm and stylish panache. There’s an insider feel that you don’t get at a more formal hotel, and there’s a foodie enthusiasm that wouldn’t be exuded quite as joyfully at a larger enterprise. Autumn/winter is a particularly good time to seek out their gently indulgent accommodation and fabulous seasonal flavours – the likes of wild rabbit with foraged mushrooms, grouse and damsons, elderberries and more. Harriet O'Brien Our experts round up their favourite establishments in Britain, from the Cotswolds to Cornwall, Suffolk to Skye, for feasting – and then flopping.  ENGLAND Cotswolds The Wild RabbitKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Wild Rabbit is a haven of eco-elegance a few fields away from sister enterprise Daylesford, the organic farm shop, deli, spa (and more) of Carole Bamford. She transformed this 18th-century inn and it has been meticulously devised in quiet colours, stone and wood. It’s a beautiful posh pub, with food to match. The kitchen is masterminded by Tim Allen, who won the Wild Rabbit a Michelin star in October 2016. His cuisine takes diners on a taste adventure, with dishes such as haddock on leek and apple slaw, topped with an amazingly cooked egg – poached and lightly deep fried. Read expert review From £148per night The Feathered Nest Country InnOxfordshire, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fabulous food and a superb setting above the Evenlode valley make this old country inn a hedonistic haven. The owners describe it as a pub with a twist. They’ve created an elegant restaurant that has won armloads of awards since it opened, with three stylish and supremely comfy bedrooms. The exquisite food is almost on a par with sleek gastro establishments such as Tom Kerridge’s The Hand and Flowers in Marlow - and even Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons where head chef Kuba Winkowski previously worked. There’s a stupendous wine list, too. Among the choice of 200 or so is a wonderful range of South African wines. There’s also a bar menu featuring classics such as burgers of brilliant quality. Read expert review From £140per night The Wheatsheaf InnNorthleach, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A creeper-clad coaching inn turned arty, boutique haven. The Wheatsheaf is in a particularly pretty and enterprising little Cotswold town. The restaurant draws a regular local crowd and the emphasis is on the very best quality, from the menu ingredients to the room amenities. The sophisticated menu offers great flavour combinations, the likes of roast parsnip and fennel salad with chestnuts, and mutton and apple pie with creamed potatoes. If there’s space in the bar beforehand try an aperitif of Sloe Negroni, with sloe gin and Campari, or opt for a pint of Cotswold Old Hooky. Read expert review From £102per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Kingham PloughKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Kingham Plough is a treat of a foodie destinatio, with relaxing furnishings, genial staff and brilliantly conceived menus. Emily Watkins has won numerous awards for her modern British cuisine with a twist ‒ dishes are often based on old Cotswold recipes. Her food is also much inspired by local produce; the likes of Windrush Valley goat cheese and pork from Paddock Farm a few miles away. There’s a pleasingly short and sophisticated à la carte menu: starters might include slow braised oxtail with horseradish, and mains could feature venison wellington, with meat supplied from nearby Cornbury Park. There’s also a well-priced bar menu featuring gastro comfort food such as rabbit parfait. Read expert review From £145per night The Ebrington ArmsEbrington, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating This hidden treasure set in a gloriously unspoilt village is a modern day version of a country tavern – it’s at once a genuine pub that brews its own very smooth ales; a lovely restaurant with real local flavour; and a charming hotel with rural-chic bedrooms. Chef Ben Dulley offers short, understated menus which reflect his commitment to freshness, with many vegetables straight from surrounding Drinkwater Farm. Dishes are beautifully presented and packed with local flavour – the likes of hot-smoked Bibury trout salad, and Cotswold lamb with stuffed tomatoes. Wines are from independent growers, including the Cotswolds’ own Little Oak Vineyard. Read expert review From £165per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best Cotswolds pubs with rooms   Oxfordshire Artist Residence OxfordshireSouth Leigh, Oxfordshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A unique country pub with a bohemian twist and arty vibe, offering gorgeous quirky rooms, scrumptious meals and contemporary art. The food is as heart-warming as the dining room. Local game and meat, foraged herbs and flowers join vegetables from the garden. The menu could include the likes of smoky pigeon breast electrified by a pickled walnut with caramelised chicory, port jelly and smoked spring onions and plaice in seaweed butter, smoked cockles, sea vegetables and bisque. The wine list is small, selective and good value. Join locals for a pint at the bar, read the paper or play cards around the fire. Read expert review From £130per night • The best luxury hotels in Oxfordshire   Lake District L’EnclumeCartmel, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Simon Rogan's two-Michelin-starred restaurant plus handful of rooms stay true both to the simple village location and rich surrounding land. Rooms are modest but smartly furnished, the setting picture-box pretty while the food is an exemplar of local sourcing and creativity. This isn’t Blumenthal-style magic but simply 20 (tiny) courses of exceptional skill, balance and creativity: an egg shell containing a yolk in mushroom broth; confit cauliflower in a pea and calamint sauce; a finger of turbot in nasturtium butter, the dinkiest caramel mousse sitting on compressed apple. All is presented exquisitely but without fanfare on rustic pottery, handmade glass, even a pebble. The Coravin wine system allows you to try top-rank or small-producer wines. Read expert review From £129per night The Punch Bowl InnLake District, Cumbria, England 8Telegraph expert rating A smart but relaxed country inn, in a quiet corner of the Lake District, with a deserved reputation for its classy food. The ground floor is a semi open-plan series of dining rooms, bar and relaxed eating areas, separated by little steps. The cooking is smart-city-restaurant standard producing assured, modern British dishes that are interesting without being tricksy or fussy. No fancy canapés or pre-starters, just clean flavours. Starters might include black pudding with bubble and squeak or tomato salad with local crab and lobster while mains could be pork with ham hock croquette or cod with Morteau sausage. There's a wide-ranging wine list, plus a couple of local real ales. Read expert review From £130per night • The Lake District's best pubs and inns   Peak District The Samuel Fox Country InnHope Valley, Peak District, England 8Telegraph expert rating This stone-built inn – which is more of a restaurant with rooms than a standard country pub – has an ever-growing reputation. Come for a great dinner, stay over in one of four comfortable rooms and spend the next day exploring the glorious Peak District. The foodie credentials are strong: chef-patron James Duckett has worked with Albert Roux, Michel Roux, Marcus Wareing and Philip Howard, and done extended stints in Australia and Spain. Now he turns out some of the best food in the area: everything from a piquant, pretty-as-a-picture starter of soused sardines to the kind of iced chocolate cherry parfait that makes you wish you hadn’t shared with your other half. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Peak District   Yorkshire Crab Manor HotelThirsk, Yorkshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fun and exotic, individually themed rooms combined with a well-regarded seafood restaurant and an overall madcap sense of decoration make this a hugely popular choice for special occasions. The restaurant specialises in fish and seafood serving both classics – lobster thermidor, grilled Queen scallops – as well as more modern dishes such as sea trout with samphire. It's open for lunch and dinner, and for afternoon 'lighter' options (including moules mariniere), but there's nothing delicate about portion sizes. Half the fun is the setting: jolly bar, romantic dining room or brighter conservatory, all with a bonkers decoration that includes a suite of orchestral instruments. Breakfast is also a delight. Read expert review From £165per night The Star InnHarome, Helmsley, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant-with-rooms with chocolate-box, thatched-pub looks and a bucolic farming-village location. Bedrooms, across the road, have a comfy, hunting-lodge style. Whitby-born chef-owner Andrew Pern was one of the first champions of local sourcing - and why wouldn’t you be with his ‘back garden’: moorland game and pasture-fed meat, coastal fish, Yorkshire Wolds’ fruit and vegetables. He now has a huge kitchen garden at the back of the pub. His menus are punchy, robust yet skilfully balanced and as much about texture as taste: crab stick with seashore vegetables and avocado ice, perhaps followed by roasted lamb chop with truffled faggot or honey-roasted duck with tea-poached quail’s egg. Read expert review From £150per night The Timble InnNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 8Telegraph expert rating A food-driven village pub in a quiet, yet surprisingly well-connected location with bold, contemporary styling and smart bedrooms. Glorious views and walks are on the doorstep. A pub that does two sittings for Sunday lunch is serious about food, and has been awarded two AA rosettes for it. It’s ambitious stuff – wood pigeon with quail’s egg and black pudding; venison loin with celeriac remoulade and chestnuts. The seafood platter and chateaubriand steak are favourites. It's not really a beer pub but offers a wide-ranging wine list – including fine ones by the glass – plus local gins. Read expert review From £150per night The Yorke ArmsNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant with rooms in an off-the-beaten-track location; perfect for walking off the spoiling food. The food is why people come here – some helicopter in from London for chef-proprietor Frances Atkins’s flavour-intense cooking. It’s not fussy or tricksy, just skilled, imaginative and full of the unexpected – quail with lychee and jasmine; brill with fennel in turmeric broth, peach and curd tart. Choose the eight-course tasting menu and everything is a surprise. Much is home-grown; the huge kitchen garden produces a summer surplus. These are meals to savour (even the lunchtime bar menu includes devilled kidneys, and gratin of seared scallops). Read expert review From £345per night • The best luxury hotels in Yorkshire   Norfolk Morston HallNorfolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating A flint- and brick-built Jacobean country-house hotel, with large conservatory extensions that provide extra dining space. Inside, you’ll find open fires, squashy sofas and cosy corners in a hushed, fairly formal atmosphere. The food is the main reason to come to Morston Hall, the only restaurant with a Michelin star on this stretch of coast. Galton Blackiston’s cooking is rated highly by both visitors and locals: he offers a set dinner based on fresh, local ingredients, served at 8pm daily. Four courses usually include two meat dishes (perhaps confit of duck or beef fillet) and a fish course. Recommended wines are suggested to accompany the dishes – or you can choose from an extensive list. Read expert review From £340per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Norfolk   Suffolk The Great HouseLavenham, Suffolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating The five-bedroom hotel looks onto the market square of Lavenham, a well-preserved medieval village of timbered houses. It would be wrong to stay here without sampling the food, as this is primarily a restaurant – and a very good one at that. From a regularly changing menu, you might find starters of mussels with chilli, coriander and cream, tuna sashimi or wild mushroom ravioli, and main courses of pheasant supreme, grilled fillet of lamb with thyme sauce or roasted duck breast with grilled beetroot. Desserts could be dark chocolate terrine, millefeuille or maple syrup rice pudding. Read expert review From £99per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best spa hotels in Suffolk   Somerset The White PostYeovil, Somerset, England 8Telegraph expert rating At this cosy Victorian ‘pub-and-lodgings’, the elegant gastronomy is as much a pull as the rooms. Brett’s passion for foraging and elegant presentation seeps through. The best way to experience the dishes? The 10-course tasting menu, which pays homage to the West Country (pork done eight ways, served with local chilli and ginger cider) as well as international influences (spiced lentil dhal with gurnard, mango and coconut). The wine list is sufficient but it’s the local ales and ciders that stand out, particularly if you pair a pint of Dorset Knob bitter with the Sunday roast. Painted walls are interrupted only by the wide windows, long cardinal-coloured drapes and filament bulb lamps that, along with on-table candles, add just enough light during evening dining. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The most romantic hotels in Somerset   Dorset La FosseCranborne, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating Snug in the wave-like green hills of east Dorset, La Fosse at Cranborne is a peaceful bed and breakfast as well as popular restaurant. Run by husband and wife, this simple West Country retreat, embracing both modern and traditional, feels as far from the madding crowds as possible. Owner-chef Mark is a true locavore, sourcing as much from in and around the village as possible. His passion for local, inventive cuisine has seen him named best chef in Dorset. The colourful duck dish, replete with homegrown vegetables, is a highlight, drizzled in a piquant jus. Mark’s award-winning cheeseboard is part of the experience, so save some room. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Anchor InnSeatown, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Anchor Inn, sat beyond snaking lanes and tucked between scarped cliffs on the edge of a little known Dorset village, is a destination gastropub serving elevated British classics. It is also a boutique hideaway that cocoons guests amid the sound of rolling waves. If the weather is decent, expect a fight to secure a lunchtime spot, either tucked inside or al fresco. Menus from head chef Jean-Paul De Ronne — who previously worked under Masterchef winner Mat Follas — reveal commitment to seasonal fare from land and sea, such as the fresh crab salad using crustacea caught only metres away. Ales are all from Palmers, brewed four miles away, while an extensive cocktail list from former Hix bartender David Smith features a number of Dorset’s own spirits. Read expert review From £120per night • The best hotels in Dorset   Buckinghamshire The Mash InnRadnage, Buckinghamshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating Described by its owner Nick Mash as a ‘new generation inn’, The Mash Inn's aim is to remove the barriers between chef and diner. The open kitchen takes centre stage: a solid wood workstation groaning with ingredients and stacked plates, beneath a ceiling rack dripping with pots and pans, in front of an open fire for rotisserie cooking. Chef Jon Parry cooks up a storm, producing a delicious, earthy and inventive no frills tasting menu and a short à la carte menu. Much of the produce is from the garden or very local. Diners sit at individual tables or at a large communal table, which may sound daunting but such is the communal, friendly atmosphere that it’s a pleasure to do so. Read expert review From £100per night The Hand & FlowersMarlow, Buckinghamshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn with a Michelin-starred restaurant, enticing locals to dine, and couples for weekends or nights away. It's on busy West Street, just along the road from the house where Mary Shelley created Frankenstein. The chef-proprietor is Tom Kerridge, who gained a Michelin star within 10 months from a kitchen which was then the size of a large cupboard. These days he has a new, celadon green kitchen and a brigade of chefs. As restaurants go, it rocks. Expect crayfish scotch egg, slow cooked duck breast with duck fat chips and other earthy, deeply satisfying dishes that are also full of imaginative twists, served in a cosy and convivial dining room. Read expert review From £140per night • The best hotels in Buckinghamshire   Kent RocksaltFolkestone, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Rocksalt is the littoral culinary kingdom of Mark Sargeant of Claridge's fame. A microcosm of London sophistication in gritty Folkestone, it's a genuine dining destination. The recent addition of four bedrooms above "Sargey's" adjacent Smokehouse enables visitors to abandon themselves to gluttony. His dedication to local ingredients introduces diners to new treasures, such as meaty huss dogfish and tart sea buckthorn (oozing out of a dense chocolate mousse fondant), yet dishes are refreshingly clean and unpretentious. Hunks of bread, served with beef dripping, rich butter and home-roasted salt, and nuggets of treacly fudge and slices of colourful rock bookend a perfectly executed meal. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Wife of BathWye, Kent, England 9Telegraph expert rating Another addition to chef Mark Sargeant and Josh De Haan's portfolio of Kentish restaurants with rooms. With a superb Spanish restaurant and tiny tapas bar, its signature quirky style and authentic cuisine works surprisingly well in the bucolic setting. The restaurant serves impeccable fare: juicy scallops with spicy chorizo and earthy morcillo (black pudding); honey sweet melon smothered in Brindisa's finest Serrano ham; succulent Galician steaks with creamy aioli and fiery paprika potatoes; and hake with radishes, Seville orange and a buttery sauce laced with Gin Mare. Save space for pudding: the bitter chocolate tart with salt and olive oil is revelatory, as is ice-cream made with raisins soaked in PX sherry. Read expert review From £70per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Read's Restaurant With RoomsFaversham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Read's, housed in a Georgian mansion on the north Kentish coast, is a smart restaurant with six rooms, owned and run by acclaimed chef David Pitchford and his wife Rona. Sticking firmly to their decades-long recipe for success, they deliver classic cuisine and unfussy hospitality. David won a Michelin star in 1992, which he retained for 20 consecutive years, becoming the second longest holder of the accolade in Britain. The food is hard to fault, if lacking the innovation and excitement that comes with Michelin recognition: comforting, classic French cuisine with British influence. Think ham and pea mousse; smoked haddock in cream sauce topped with cheese soufflé; Kentish lamb served with buttery asparagus and garden vegetables; and a Cassis-soaked summer pudding. Read expert review From £145per night The Dog at WinghamWingham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating A medieval pub in a rural village, run by an enterprising local family, that serves exceptionally good food and features eight attractive bedrooms. Virtually equidistant from Canterbury and Sandwich, it’s ideally located for exploring the Kentish city, countryside and coast. The kitchen is overseen by the young and talented Dan Johns, who has worked at Gary Rhodes’ Searcy’s at The Gherkin and Urban Coterie. The menu changes monthly to reflect seasonality and local produce. Imaginative starters such as fragrant Thai-style chicken salad and rich pork and pistachio terrine with pineapple jam are followed by melt-in-the-mouth Moroccan spiced lamb and crisp pork collar with chorizo dumplings. Read expert review From £86per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best pubs with rooms in Kent   Devon The Dartmoor InnOkehampton, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 16th-century coaching inn on the north-western edge of Dartmoor National Park is acclaimed for its fresh, seasonal cooking, but it’s worth bedding down for a stay in one of its three chic bedrooms. A blackboard heralds not only the breed of cattle, but also the name of the farmer it has come from. Dishes are pub classics, done to perfection: rib-eye steak and chips, confit of duck leg with toffee apple puree and roasted hazelnuts, and brisket of beef. Philip has a strong ethical policy, forging strong links with local artisan food producers, and ensures the beef has been grass fed and reared within a 20-mile radius. Breakfast is refreshingly original, with dainty portions of caramelised bananas or a daring cooked menu, including herb-crusted goat’s cheese, black pudding and bacon lardons. Read expert review From £65per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Lamb InnSandford, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating With open fires, beamed walls, deep sofas and award-winning food, this 16th-century inn in the village of Sandford is a pub of dreams for town-dwellers. Upstairs, seven bedrooms have big beds, soft linen and powerful showers, and there’s a pretty cobbled terrace at the rear. The Lamb Inn’s menu consistently attracts rave reviews. The produce is seasonal and locally sourced, mixing upmarket dishes with pub classics: shellfish bisque, mushroom ravioli, roasted pigeon with smoked bacon and savoy cabbage or steak and chips. The perfectly fluffy sticky toffee pudding is worth a visit alone. Landlord Mark is a fan of real ale and regularly rotates his cask brews to ensure they stay fresh. Read expert review From £69per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Masons ArmsBranscombe, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This dog-friendly 14th-century thatched inn, in Branscombe, on the Jurassic Coast, is one of Devon’s best. It prides itself on serving local, seasonal Devon fare on a traditional pub menu – it even has a 'food sourcing map' detailing exactly where the produce comes from. There’s steamed River Exe mussels and fries, steak and kidney shortcrust pie, rump steak and a seafood platter. Ales, hand-pumped from casks, are just as local. On a sunny day, the action moves outside to the pretty suntrap terrace. It's a 15-minute walk to Branscombe Beach, a lovely, long shingle cove from where you can pick up the South West Coastal Path. Read expert review From £75per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Salutation InnTopsham, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating Eat well and rest your head at this 18th-century coaching inn in chichi Topsham: a stylish option with a truly excellent restaurant, helmed by one of Gordon Ramsay's former protégés. Exquisite handmade petit-fours welcome guests on arrival – the first hint that your dining experience will be full of extra surprises. The wild mushroom appetiser comes accompanied by an umami-enhancing pinot noir, and the tomato gazpacho with local crab, served in a glass on ice, and followed by a rich rump of beef from Greendale Farm. Each modern dish is accompanied by diverse wines chosen by Stephen Edwardes – the unusual sake complements the beautiful strawberry dessert which is garnished with home-grown edible flowers. Read expert review From £145per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Devon   Cornwall The Gurnard's HeadSt Ives, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn offering outstanding food, fabulous sea and moorland views, situated close to St Ives and Land's End. Popular with walkers and couples of all ages seeking a low-key, restorative break in a wild coastal location. Locals come from miles around to dine here. The Scottish head chef, Bruce Rennie, cooks a short, inventive menu. Lunch may include beetroot risotto, octopus and white wine stew, or Merguez sausages with Puy lentils. The supper menu may include salmon and lobster tortellini, cod with pig’s trotter, and sole with Vermouth. The wine list focuses on Old World wines, notably from France, Italy and Portugal. Read expert review From £110per night Padstow TownhousePadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A handsome listed townhouse on Padstow's high street that has been superbly renovated and opened as a six-bedroom luxury guesthouse by chef Paul Ainsworth to complement his Michelin-starred restaurant, Paul Ainsworth at Number 6. Head there for amusingly-presented, delicately-flavoured meat and fish dishes and a fun and informal atmosphere, or to his even more informal restaurant, Rojanos, for superior pasta, pizza and hamburgers. Breakfast is served at the latter. The guesthouse owns an electric BMW in which guests can be transported if they don’t want to walk around. Read expert review From £280per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com St Petroc's HotelPadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A sociable, intimate townhouse with a labyrinth of gorgeously styled sitting and reading rooms – as well as a buzzy bistro. St Petroc’s Bistro opened along with the hotel in 1988. It’s a lovely room – with an engaging selection of original art on the walls – and a relaxing, happy place to eat at either lunch or dinner. Pride of place on the menu goes to the 30-day dry-aged steaks, but there are fish, chicken and vegetarian options as well – all of them classic Rick Stein recipes (try the grilled hake with Serrano ham, succotash and chives). Ruby’s Bar is the new Stein pub – a great place for a local beer or cocktail. Read expert review From £112per night Kota Restaurant with RoomsPorthleven, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating With a fantastic Asian-Cornish fusion restaurant downstairs, and Porthleven’s picturesque harbour on the doorstep, the Kota’s two simple, homey rooms are proof that sometimes substance can win over style. The vibe in the restaurant is casual, with a long room overlooking the harbour and a waterfront lawn on which you can dine in good weather. New Zealander Jude, who is part Maori, part Malay-Chinese, brings Asian spices and cooking styles to fresh, meticulously sourced Cornish produce – squid with green mango salad, scallops with miso dressing and seaweed salad, and Laksa with prawns, mussels and fish. There are also some very creative burgers – tempura fish with wasabi tartare, and satay chicken with Asian slaw. Read expert review From £75per night DriftwoodPortscatho, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating Sitting on a hill above the rugged coastline of the Roseland peninsula, Driftwood is nautically furnished in soft creams and blues. A Michelin-starred restaurant, private sea-facing terraces, and a private beach make this the perfect venue for pretty much everyone. There are wonderful coastal path walks for miles in each direction. This is Cornish cooking at its finest: unfussy and focused on bringing out the flavour of fresh fish and seafood and locally reared beef and lamb. Dinner in summer comprises a six-course tasting menu with complementary wines. For children there are early suppers with proper chef-made food. Read expert review From £250per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Coombeshead FarmLewannick, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating This is the joint venture from chef Tom Adams of London restaurant Pitt Cue and April Bloomfield, English born chef/proprietor of The Spotted Pig in New York. Both wanted to get back to the roots of food and hospitality and the result is this relaxed communal dining farmhouse b&b. Tom and his partner Lottie Mew live off the land and share their fresh, foraged, pickled and harvested produce with their guests. Tom cooks a three-course feast, kicking off with plates of delicious nibbles from 6.30pm onwards, which is shared at a communal table by all the guests. Tom’s own rare breed Mangalitza pigs feature large, plus perhaps a cep and walnut broth, lamb shoulder and mushroom porridge, with madeleine, whey and prune for pudding. Wines are unusual. Read expert review From £175per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Cornwall   Sussex The Barn at RoundhurstLurgashall, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating A rural South Downs retreat on a 250-acre organic farm with its own lakes. Home-reared food is a specialty. Converted outhouses with six rooms are set around a courtyard, just steps from a dramatic converted barn for dining and lounging. A four-course set menu with generous portions is available for guests and non-guests Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays; a light supper is provided for guests on other days. Meals highlight the farm’s own organic beef, lamb and pork and could include colourful heritage carrots and an exceptional triple chocolate mousse. Read expert review From £98per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com CrouchersChichester, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating An unassuming motel-like exterior belies a foodie haven a short drive from the Witterings. Relax on the patio of a garden-facing room, head to the beach, or explore the cultural and sporting highlights around Chichester but leave room for dinner in the impressive restaurant. Proximity to the coast ensures good seafood. The squid-ink pasta starter is light and delicate and a showy dessert of white chocolate and saffron mousse with edible flowers, caramel and orange ice-cream is a multi-sensory delight. A strong wine list includes an emphasis on the owners’ native South Africa. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Crab & LobsterWest Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating Herons can be seen on the doorstep of this modernised 350-year-old pub beside a bird sanctuary, where guests can stay in cosy bedrooms or an adjoining cottage. Tuck into locally caught seafood in the bar-restaurant and plan nature walks or trips to nearby beaches. The menu, as this gastropub’s name suggests, makes good use of locally caught seafood. Baked Selsey crab with a salad or crab cakes is a highlight. Meat, like rump of lamb (on an autumn menu with garlic Pommes Anna, butternut squash purée, confit tomatoes, baby leeks and Madeira jus) is also locally reared. There’s an extensive wine list and takeaway fish and chips. Read expert review From £160per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith Wingrove HouseAlfriston, South Downs, England 8Telegraph expert rating Yards from the South Downs Way and the half-timbered, candlelit pubs of Alfriston, this swish 19th-century boutique hotel with a modern country restaurant delivers roaring log fires, low-slung sofas and top-notch food, and draws city dwellers craving an easy country escape. Matthew Comben, formerly of the Hungry Monk in Jevington, heads up the kitchen and has brought with him the Monk's original banoffee pie recipe. Highlights from the seasonal menu include cauliflower fritters with Brighton blue cheese mayonnaise, and a soft beef fillet with tarragon. There's an impressive gin menu with 11 different options, including Brighton Gin, and a refreshingly reasonable wine list. Read expert review From £108per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best places and cities to visit in England – and where to stay   Cheshire The Roebuck InnMobberley, Cheshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This French-influenced bistro with rooms is perfect weekend break material, with lashings of character, great food and a beautifully designed garden. The bistro menu, tweaked with the seasons, is European in style, and everything comes in generous portions, whether it’s ‘small plates’ of cassoulet, caponata and crostini; mains such as saffron risotto, venison bourguignon and moules marinière; or puds of tarte au citron, profiteroles and crème caramel. On the drinks front, you’ll find an interesting selection of local ales, old-world wines and a vintage dresser filled with classic aperitifs and digestifs. Read expert review From £115per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • Britain's cosiest hotels for autumn   County Durham Lord Crewe ArmsBlanchland, Northumberland, England 9Telegraph expert rating A lord-of-the-manor building, in a pin-neat estate village, that oozes atmosphere at every stone-flagged turn. A reputation for honest, British cooking, plus its rural location, makes it popular with walkers and foodies as well as the country-sports fraternity. Expect punchy, robust, British cooking, rich with flavour and unusual combinations: devilled lamb’s kidneys on roasted cauliflower; grilled sea trout and mixed alliums; sea buckthorn posset. There’s an element of fun, too; eggy bread with fried bacon or Bloody Mary tomatoes on toast for breakfast. Some ingredients come from the kitchen garden. Eat on the terrace in the summer. The atmospheric, barrel-vaulted bar has local ales including a custom-made Lord Crewe Brew. Read expert review From £155per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Rose & CrownCounty Durham, England 9Telegraph expert rating A foodie destination country inn that has smartened up while still maintaining a sense of village pub: country-comfortable rooms; horse-brasses and dogs in the bar. Surrounded by the sheep-dotted fields and moors of the North Pennines, you come to eat, relax and then walk it off. The modern British menu shows confident cooking that lets the ingredients shine through; no fuss but definitely interesting: honey-glazed goat's cheese with beetroot, hazelnuts and gingerbread, perhaps, or pan-fried fillet of sea trout with roasted baby gem and crushed peas. There’s good local sourcing with Teesdale lamb rarely off the menu. Eat in the candle-lit dining room or buzzier bar; the latter offers three real ales and a good selection of single malts. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best country house hotels in Britain   Cities The Henrietta HotelCovent Garden, London, England 8Telegraph expert rating An 18-bedroom boutique address in one of Covent Garden’s most attractive streets, owned and run by the Paris-based Experimental Group, with a cocktail bar, Ollie Dabbous restaurant and quirky interior design by Dorothée Meilichzon. The food, is delicious – clean, clever and uncomplicated – with highlights that might include the sheeps’ milk curds with pistachio, beef tartare with nasturtium and rye, and wonderful freshly baked warm madeleines with Chantilly cream. Don't miss a cocktail, which can be chosen à la carte or with a consultation from the barman. Read expert review From £220per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Ginger PigHove, Brighton, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 11-bedroom guesthouse above Hove’s highly-acclaimed Ginger Pig Bar and Restaurant is ideal if you want a quieter seaside base. Spacious and elegantly understated rooms include thoughtful beach bags with towels and well-stocked minibars. Always buzzy, this sprawling gastropub serves up highly delicious grub and excellent Sunday roasts. Look out for seasonal specials like asparagus with brown crab and chipotle mayo, or seabream with samphire. The adjoining Orangerie is where breakfast is served (there’s an outdoor area for sunny days), offering imaginative dishes such as baked eggs with hummus, chorizo and peppers, Irish rock oysters and rarebit with roasted tomatoes and mushrooms. Read expert review From £80per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Simpsons RestaurantBirmingham, England 8Telegraph expert rating The cooking is superlative at this gastronomic powerhouse, which also offers three individually styled – and great value – rooms. Throw in the added draw of the Simpsons Cookery School and you pretty much have Michelin-starred, Brummie food nirvana. The winning team of owner Andreas Antona and chef director Luke Tipping, one of Britain’s finest sauciers, has weathered fashions and trends. The three-course à la carte menu features plump marinière-style mussels on a delicate, buttery skate wing, while refined hipster influences are showcased with a barbecued beef cheek with a rich, silky bone marrow sauce. The pastry section’s take on a Belgian Speculoos cookie, with caramelised white chocolate and coffee granite, is fabulous. Read expert review From £110per night The White Star TavernSouthampton, Hampshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating A characterful tavern with rooms on Southampton’s vibrant Oxford Street. The restaurant is a destination in itself, with a varied menu that caters to all comers. If you fancy a plate of fish and chips washed down with real ale, then you’ll get the crispest batter and a unique brew from Itchen Valley. But the real tour de force is the à la carte menu, where chef Matt Noonan serves up his creativity and innovation in dishes that linger long in the memory: a melt-in-the-mouth braised ox cheek with black bean glaze and oriental vegetables to start, perhaps, or a seared bass with a sauté of wild mushrooms, egg yolk ketchup, smoked and cured egg yolk, leek and fresh Dorset truffle as a main. The Death by Chocolate dessert is served up like a piece of street art and really is to die for. Read expert review From £105per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels for a UK city break   WALES Llys MeddygPembrokeshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating A cosy hotel in the small town of Newport, on the Pembrokeshire coast, offering colourful interiors, reasonable rates and an exceptional restaurant, which has gained a reputation in Pembrokeshire and beyond as one of the best and most reasonable fine dining establishments. Chef Daniel Jones does wonders with local produce – such as Newport bay crab and lobster, Preseli lamb, Welsh beef and West Wales cheeses – in two separate dining areas: the romantic basement-level Cellar Bar, which has a slate floor and leather settees, and a wood burning stove in an inglenook fireplace; and, on the ground floor, the recently refurbished main dining room. Ed smokes salmon in a shed in his house just next door. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Ynyshir Restaurant and RoomsPowys, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Queen Victoria once owned this handsome white painted house as a hidden retreat. The undulating grounds are lovely and lead to the RSPB Ynys Hir Nature Reserve at the head of the Dovey estuary. Current owner and professional artist Rob Reen is responsible for the vibrant interiors, their colours taking a lead from his equally bold canvasses that dominate the walls. In the kitchen, Gareth Ward, who trained with Sat Bains, is a rising star, a recipient of one Michelin star and gunning for a second. He prefers to serve a series of small, integrated dishes, and is always coming up with new ideas and loves surprises. The tasting menu at dinner might include simple plates such as Welsh wagyu, pork belly with 'river bacon' or pollock with black bean. Read expert review From £215per night Tyddyn LlanDenbighshire, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A modest Georgian house just outside Llandrillo, with a complementary extension using local slate and stone. The house was once a shooting lodge belonging to the Dukes of Westminster, but now places food centre stage. The views are spectacular, with the Vale of Edeyrnion’s meadows and the slopes of the Berwyn Mountains beyond. The dining room is decorated in Wedgewood blue with tall windows on three sides. Bryan Webb is considered one of Wales’s foremost chefs, with a long-held Michelin star and a commitment to local produce, such as melting Welsh black beef, and quality seasonal ingredients. The menu changes daily. Read expert review From £195per night The Old Rectory on the LakeSnowdonia, Tal-y-llyn, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A sun-trap hideaway on the shores of a huge lake, and at the foot of the mountain, Cadair Idris. It’s elegant and relaxing with free-standing roll-top baths, an outdoor hot tub and locally sourced food perfectly cooked to order in the restaurant. The food, courtesy of the self-trained chef, Ricky, is outstanding. There may be freshly-caught trout, or local Bala lamb on the menu, along with perfectly-cooked vegetables and perhaps Dauphinois potatoes. The chocolate fondant is a signature pudding. The terrace is the perfect place to enjoy the sunset over the lake with a Welsh gin and tonic. Read expert review From £110per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Harbourmaster HotelAberaeron, Cardigan Bay, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating Beach chic comes into its own at this forget-me-not-blue boutique hotel on Aberaeron’s harbour wall. And you won’t likely forget it with these killer sea views, glam rooms and imaginatively thought-out menus. The restaurant has a serious foodie bent in the evening – try to snag the cwtch (cubby hole) for intimate dining. Go for Carlingford oysters, a plump, sweet burst of the sea, and the perfect prelude for well-cooked Welsh fillet of steak, followed by an oozy chocolate fondant with salted caramel ice cream. For a buzzier vibe, head to the bar-lounge to nurse a Brecon gin or nibble bar snacks like crispy cockles with chilli vinegar. Read expert review From £185per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith FairyhillReynoldston, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Snuggled away in 24 acres of woodland near the Gower coast, Fairyhill enchants with more than just its name. Think Downton Abbey meets Watership Down with a pinch of 21st-century cool. It has carved out its name as a foodie retreat with good reason. The chef pulls off a daring, imaginative menu, taking a pride in local sourcing and garden-grown ingredients in dishes that are both robust and refined. Clean flavours sing of the seasons in dishes simple as gazpacho, pear and Pembroke crab, and goat's cheese mousse with courgette flower with beetroot gel. Mains like meltingly tender Welsh lamb served three ways and Serrano-wrapped monkfish with clams, samphire and fresh linguine strike the perfect balance. Read expert review From £135per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com JabajakCarmarthenshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Jabajak is a former drover’s farm, now a fine vineyard and boutique bolthole, serving home-grown food and wines with a slice of history, rustic elegance and first-class service. The restaurant has scooped awards for its locally sourced, home-grown approach. A drink in the lounge bar piques the appetite for dishes prepared with garden herbs, fruit, veg and edible flowers, ramped up flavour-wise by foraged ingredients such as nettles and wild garlic when in season. Starters including basil-marinated bruschetta with gooseberry and elderflower chutney prelude mains such as butter-soft Celtic steak with local Moody Mabel cheese. There are many nods to local produce at breakfast, too, and the cooked Welsh option with a side order of cockles is bang on the money. Read expert review From £130per night Rates provided by Booking.com   SCOTLAND The Three Chimneys and The House Over-ByDunvegan, Isle of Skye, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This destination restaurant with rooms is back doing what it does best, with a new chef, updated look and reinvigorated sense of discipline and purpose. The essential ingredients are there: attentive service, attractive rooms with mesmerising views and a talented young chef. Choose from a three-course à la carte menu or the epic Skye Showcase Menu, served at the ‘Kitchen Table’, right in the heart of the action. Dishes on the latter menu might include the likes of Dungvegan crab, seaweed and miso-cured halibut, Orbost Farm beef and pot-roasted young grouse. A road (albeit single-track and quiet) runs between the House Over-By and the shore of Loch Dunvegan, slightly eroding what would otherwise be a feeling of privacy, but not unduly distracting from the peaceful views. Read expert review From £345per night The Peat InnSt Andrews, Fife, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating A long-standing gastro-destination lying between the 'town and gown' of St Andrews and Fife’s East Neuk fishing villages, this is well worth a detour. It’s a short stagger from restaurant to homely split-level suites: a calm, comfortable place to sleep off the fabulous Michelin-starred food. The rustic-chic restaurant, all tender taupes with amber and deep sea-blue accents, is a fittingly sophisticated setting for the triumphant cooking. You come here for the food and you won’t leave disappointed. From the home-made butter to the unusually good petit-fours, everything is a reflection of chef Geoffrey Smeddle’s joyous approach to food, with dishes like a starter of smoked beef tartare with wasabi puree raising your eyebrows and your expectations simultaneously. Read expert review From £195per night The Taynuilt Etive Restaurant with RoomsTaynuilt, Argyll & Bute, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating This historic rural hotel has been reinvented as a restaurant with rooms with a young Scottish chef leading a bright and creative team. It's at the heart of a small community that makes an ideal base for exploring Argyll and the isles. The Etive restaurant is the axis here, a genuine foodie oasis and arguably the finest place to eat in the region. John McNulty works wonders with the ultra-local produce, whether it be the Mull Pig’s Heed or the salmon he smokes using local larch from Loch Awe. Sound provenance ripples through the Etive even as far as breakfast, where local fish stars. Read expert review From £79per night 21212Edinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating The four bedrooms above this Michelin-starred restaurant are no afterthought; there is a confident hand at work in rooms that are as striking as the food, displaying a sometimes surprising but always sensual contemporary/baroque style and unexpectedly leafy views. Michelin-starred chef Paul Kitching is a maverick who likes to tease flavours, building fantastic creations that sound impossible, but work, like silky pink trout served with artichokes, pasta, almonds, chickpeas, kidney beans, oriental mushrooms, warm coleslaw and feta cheese. He’s utterly serious but there’s an edge of play - such as a pre-dessert of porridge, milk and cinnamon poured from a china cow. Read expert review From £112per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith The Bridge Inn, RathoEdinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This 18-century coaching inn – now an award-winning gastropub with rooms – is on a leafy canal in a tranquil village just 20 minutes away from Edinburgh's city centre. Four pretty bedrooms are each individually decorated. The cooking is exceptional, with talented head chef Ben doing wonderful things with good Scottish fish and game, properly hung beef, and pork from their own fat and sassy pigs. They grow their own vegetables, herbs and fruit too, in an old walled garden a short walk away down the canal path. Breakfast is a fine indulgence. You can have a hair of the dog as well: Champagne, Prosecco, Buck’s Fizz or a Bloody Mary. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best castle hotels in Scotland Contributions from Ros Belford, Suzy Bennett, Sophie Butler, Gill Charlton, Kerry Christiani, Fiona Duncan, Suzanne King, Gabriella Le Breton, Linda Macdonald, Richard McComb, Robin McKelvie, Harriet O'Brien, Ben Parker, Helen Pickles, Louise Roddon, Cathy Stebbings, Sarah Stirling, Anna Turns, Debbie Ward and Antonia Windsor.

Britain's loveliest restaurants with rooms for autumn

What could be more appealing than the epicurean informality of an inn or restaurant with rooms? These wonderfully relaxed establishments combine an emphasis on great ingredients from the area with local charm and stylish panache. There’s an insider feel that you don’t get at a more formal hotel, and there’s a foodie enthusiasm that wouldn’t be exuded quite as joyfully at a larger enterprise. Autumn/winter is a particularly good time to seek out their gently indulgent accommodation and fabulous seasonal flavours – the likes of wild rabbit with foraged mushrooms, grouse and damsons, elderberries and more. Harriet O'Brien Our experts round up their favourite establishments in Britain, from the Cotswolds to Cornwall, Suffolk to Skye, for feasting – and then flopping.  ENGLAND Cotswolds The Wild RabbitKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Wild Rabbit is a haven of eco-elegance a few fields away from sister enterprise Daylesford, the organic farm shop, deli, spa (and more) of Carole Bamford. She transformed this 18th-century inn and it has been meticulously devised in quiet colours, stone and wood. It’s a beautiful posh pub, with food to match. The kitchen is masterminded by Tim Allen, who won the Wild Rabbit a Michelin star in October 2016. His cuisine takes diners on a taste adventure, with dishes such as haddock on leek and apple slaw, topped with an amazingly cooked egg – poached and lightly deep fried. Read expert review From £148per night The Feathered Nest Country InnOxfordshire, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fabulous food and a superb setting above the Evenlode valley make this old country inn a hedonistic haven. The owners describe it as a pub with a twist. They’ve created an elegant restaurant that has won armloads of awards since it opened, with three stylish and supremely comfy bedrooms. The exquisite food is almost on a par with sleek gastro establishments such as Tom Kerridge’s The Hand and Flowers in Marlow - and even Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons where head chef Kuba Winkowski previously worked. There’s a stupendous wine list, too. Among the choice of 200 or so is a wonderful range of South African wines. There’s also a bar menu featuring classics such as burgers of brilliant quality. Read expert review From £140per night The Wheatsheaf InnNorthleach, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A creeper-clad coaching inn turned arty, boutique haven. The Wheatsheaf is in a particularly pretty and enterprising little Cotswold town. The restaurant draws a regular local crowd and the emphasis is on the very best quality, from the menu ingredients to the room amenities. The sophisticated menu offers great flavour combinations, the likes of roast parsnip and fennel salad with chestnuts, and mutton and apple pie with creamed potatoes. If there’s space in the bar beforehand try an aperitif of Sloe Negroni, with sloe gin and Campari, or opt for a pint of Cotswold Old Hooky. Read expert review From £102per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Kingham PloughKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Kingham Plough is a treat of a foodie destinatio, with relaxing furnishings, genial staff and brilliantly conceived menus. Emily Watkins has won numerous awards for her modern British cuisine with a twist ‒ dishes are often based on old Cotswold recipes. Her food is also much inspired by local produce; the likes of Windrush Valley goat cheese and pork from Paddock Farm a few miles away. There’s a pleasingly short and sophisticated à la carte menu: starters might include slow braised oxtail with horseradish, and mains could feature venison wellington, with meat supplied from nearby Cornbury Park. There’s also a well-priced bar menu featuring gastro comfort food such as rabbit parfait. Read expert review From £145per night The Ebrington ArmsEbrington, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating This hidden treasure set in a gloriously unspoilt village is a modern day version of a country tavern – it’s at once a genuine pub that brews its own very smooth ales; a lovely restaurant with real local flavour; and a charming hotel with rural-chic bedrooms. Chef Ben Dulley offers short, understated menus which reflect his commitment to freshness, with many vegetables straight from surrounding Drinkwater Farm. Dishes are beautifully presented and packed with local flavour – the likes of hot-smoked Bibury trout salad, and Cotswold lamb with stuffed tomatoes. Wines are from independent growers, including the Cotswolds’ own Little Oak Vineyard. Read expert review From £165per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best Cotswolds pubs with rooms   Oxfordshire Artist Residence OxfordshireSouth Leigh, Oxfordshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A unique country pub with a bohemian twist and arty vibe, offering gorgeous quirky rooms, scrumptious meals and contemporary art. The food is as heart-warming as the dining room. Local game and meat, foraged herbs and flowers join vegetables from the garden. The menu could include the likes of smoky pigeon breast electrified by a pickled walnut with caramelised chicory, port jelly and smoked spring onions and plaice in seaweed butter, smoked cockles, sea vegetables and bisque. The wine list is small, selective and good value. Join locals for a pint at the bar, read the paper or play cards around the fire. Read expert review From £130per night • The best luxury hotels in Oxfordshire   Lake District L’EnclumeCartmel, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Simon Rogan's two-Michelin-starred restaurant plus handful of rooms stay true both to the simple village location and rich surrounding land. Rooms are modest but smartly furnished, the setting picture-box pretty while the food is an exemplar of local sourcing and creativity. This isn’t Blumenthal-style magic but simply 20 (tiny) courses of exceptional skill, balance and creativity: an egg shell containing a yolk in mushroom broth; confit cauliflower in a pea and calamint sauce; a finger of turbot in nasturtium butter, the dinkiest caramel mousse sitting on compressed apple. All is presented exquisitely but without fanfare on rustic pottery, handmade glass, even a pebble. The Coravin wine system allows you to try top-rank or small-producer wines. Read expert review From £129per night The Punch Bowl InnLake District, Cumbria, England 8Telegraph expert rating A smart but relaxed country inn, in a quiet corner of the Lake District, with a deserved reputation for its classy food. The ground floor is a semi open-plan series of dining rooms, bar and relaxed eating areas, separated by little steps. The cooking is smart-city-restaurant standard producing assured, modern British dishes that are interesting without being tricksy or fussy. No fancy canapés or pre-starters, just clean flavours. Starters might include black pudding with bubble and squeak or tomato salad with local crab and lobster while mains could be pork with ham hock croquette or cod with Morteau sausage. There's a wide-ranging wine list, plus a couple of local real ales. Read expert review From £130per night • The Lake District's best pubs and inns   Peak District The Samuel Fox Country InnHope Valley, Peak District, England 8Telegraph expert rating This stone-built inn – which is more of a restaurant with rooms than a standard country pub – has an ever-growing reputation. Come for a great dinner, stay over in one of four comfortable rooms and spend the next day exploring the glorious Peak District. The foodie credentials are strong: chef-patron James Duckett has worked with Albert Roux, Michel Roux, Marcus Wareing and Philip Howard, and done extended stints in Australia and Spain. Now he turns out some of the best food in the area: everything from a piquant, pretty-as-a-picture starter of soused sardines to the kind of iced chocolate cherry parfait that makes you wish you hadn’t shared with your other half. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Peak District   Yorkshire Crab Manor HotelThirsk, Yorkshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fun and exotic, individually themed rooms combined with a well-regarded seafood restaurant and an overall madcap sense of decoration make this a hugely popular choice for special occasions. The restaurant specialises in fish and seafood serving both classics – lobster thermidor, grilled Queen scallops – as well as more modern dishes such as sea trout with samphire. It's open for lunch and dinner, and for afternoon 'lighter' options (including moules mariniere), but there's nothing delicate about portion sizes. Half the fun is the setting: jolly bar, romantic dining room or brighter conservatory, all with a bonkers decoration that includes a suite of orchestral instruments. Breakfast is also a delight. Read expert review From £165per night The Star InnHarome, Helmsley, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant-with-rooms with chocolate-box, thatched-pub looks and a bucolic farming-village location. Bedrooms, across the road, have a comfy, hunting-lodge style. Whitby-born chef-owner Andrew Pern was one of the first champions of local sourcing - and why wouldn’t you be with his ‘back garden’: moorland game and pasture-fed meat, coastal fish, Yorkshire Wolds’ fruit and vegetables. He now has a huge kitchen garden at the back of the pub. His menus are punchy, robust yet skilfully balanced and as much about texture as taste: crab stick with seashore vegetables and avocado ice, perhaps followed by roasted lamb chop with truffled faggot or honey-roasted duck with tea-poached quail’s egg. Read expert review From £150per night The Timble InnNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 8Telegraph expert rating A food-driven village pub in a quiet, yet surprisingly well-connected location with bold, contemporary styling and smart bedrooms. Glorious views and walks are on the doorstep. A pub that does two sittings for Sunday lunch is serious about food, and has been awarded two AA rosettes for it. It’s ambitious stuff – wood pigeon with quail’s egg and black pudding; venison loin with celeriac remoulade and chestnuts. The seafood platter and chateaubriand steak are favourites. It's not really a beer pub but offers a wide-ranging wine list – including fine ones by the glass – plus local gins. Read expert review From £150per night The Yorke ArmsNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant with rooms in an off-the-beaten-track location; perfect for walking off the spoiling food. The food is why people come here – some helicopter in from London for chef-proprietor Frances Atkins’s flavour-intense cooking. It’s not fussy or tricksy, just skilled, imaginative and full of the unexpected – quail with lychee and jasmine; brill with fennel in turmeric broth, peach and curd tart. Choose the eight-course tasting menu and everything is a surprise. Much is home-grown; the huge kitchen garden produces a summer surplus. These are meals to savour (even the lunchtime bar menu includes devilled kidneys, and gratin of seared scallops). Read expert review From £345per night • The best luxury hotels in Yorkshire   Norfolk Morston HallNorfolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating A flint- and brick-built Jacobean country-house hotel, with large conservatory extensions that provide extra dining space. Inside, you’ll find open fires, squashy sofas and cosy corners in a hushed, fairly formal atmosphere. The food is the main reason to come to Morston Hall, the only restaurant with a Michelin star on this stretch of coast. Galton Blackiston’s cooking is rated highly by both visitors and locals: he offers a set dinner based on fresh, local ingredients, served at 8pm daily. Four courses usually include two meat dishes (perhaps confit of duck or beef fillet) and a fish course. Recommended wines are suggested to accompany the dishes – or you can choose from an extensive list. Read expert review From £340per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Norfolk   Suffolk The Great HouseLavenham, Suffolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating The five-bedroom hotel looks onto the market square of Lavenham, a well-preserved medieval village of timbered houses. It would be wrong to stay here without sampling the food, as this is primarily a restaurant – and a very good one at that. From a regularly changing menu, you might find starters of mussels with chilli, coriander and cream, tuna sashimi or wild mushroom ravioli, and main courses of pheasant supreme, grilled fillet of lamb with thyme sauce or roasted duck breast with grilled beetroot. Desserts could be dark chocolate terrine, millefeuille or maple syrup rice pudding. Read expert review From £99per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best spa hotels in Suffolk   Somerset The White PostYeovil, Somerset, England 8Telegraph expert rating At this cosy Victorian ‘pub-and-lodgings’, the elegant gastronomy is as much a pull as the rooms. Brett’s passion for foraging and elegant presentation seeps through. The best way to experience the dishes? The 10-course tasting menu, which pays homage to the West Country (pork done eight ways, served with local chilli and ginger cider) as well as international influences (spiced lentil dhal with gurnard, mango and coconut). The wine list is sufficient but it’s the local ales and ciders that stand out, particularly if you pair a pint of Dorset Knob bitter with the Sunday roast. Painted walls are interrupted only by the wide windows, long cardinal-coloured drapes and filament bulb lamps that, along with on-table candles, add just enough light during evening dining. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The most romantic hotels in Somerset   Dorset La FosseCranborne, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating Snug in the wave-like green hills of east Dorset, La Fosse at Cranborne is a peaceful bed and breakfast as well as popular restaurant. Run by husband and wife, this simple West Country retreat, embracing both modern and traditional, feels as far from the madding crowds as possible. Owner-chef Mark is a true locavore, sourcing as much from in and around the village as possible. His passion for local, inventive cuisine has seen him named best chef in Dorset. The colourful duck dish, replete with homegrown vegetables, is a highlight, drizzled in a piquant jus. Mark’s award-winning cheeseboard is part of the experience, so save some room. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Anchor InnSeatown, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Anchor Inn, sat beyond snaking lanes and tucked between scarped cliffs on the edge of a little known Dorset village, is a destination gastropub serving elevated British classics. It is also a boutique hideaway that cocoons guests amid the sound of rolling waves. If the weather is decent, expect a fight to secure a lunchtime spot, either tucked inside or al fresco. Menus from head chef Jean-Paul De Ronne — who previously worked under Masterchef winner Mat Follas — reveal commitment to seasonal fare from land and sea, such as the fresh crab salad using crustacea caught only metres away. Ales are all from Palmers, brewed four miles away, while an extensive cocktail list from former Hix bartender David Smith features a number of Dorset’s own spirits. Read expert review From £120per night • The best hotels in Dorset   Buckinghamshire The Mash InnRadnage, Buckinghamshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating Described by its owner Nick Mash as a ‘new generation inn’, The Mash Inn's aim is to remove the barriers between chef and diner. The open kitchen takes centre stage: a solid wood workstation groaning with ingredients and stacked plates, beneath a ceiling rack dripping with pots and pans, in front of an open fire for rotisserie cooking. Chef Jon Parry cooks up a storm, producing a delicious, earthy and inventive no frills tasting menu and a short à la carte menu. Much of the produce is from the garden or very local. Diners sit at individual tables or at a large communal table, which may sound daunting but such is the communal, friendly atmosphere that it’s a pleasure to do so. Read expert review From £100per night The Hand & FlowersMarlow, Buckinghamshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn with a Michelin-starred restaurant, enticing locals to dine, and couples for weekends or nights away. It's on busy West Street, just along the road from the house where Mary Shelley created Frankenstein. The chef-proprietor is Tom Kerridge, who gained a Michelin star within 10 months from a kitchen which was then the size of a large cupboard. These days he has a new, celadon green kitchen and a brigade of chefs. As restaurants go, it rocks. Expect crayfish scotch egg, slow cooked duck breast with duck fat chips and other earthy, deeply satisfying dishes that are also full of imaginative twists, served in a cosy and convivial dining room. Read expert review From £140per night • The best hotels in Buckinghamshire   Kent RocksaltFolkestone, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Rocksalt is the littoral culinary kingdom of Mark Sargeant of Claridge's fame. A microcosm of London sophistication in gritty Folkestone, it's a genuine dining destination. The recent addition of four bedrooms above "Sargey's" adjacent Smokehouse enables visitors to abandon themselves to gluttony. His dedication to local ingredients introduces diners to new treasures, such as meaty huss dogfish and tart sea buckthorn (oozing out of a dense chocolate mousse fondant), yet dishes are refreshingly clean and unpretentious. Hunks of bread, served with beef dripping, rich butter and home-roasted salt, and nuggets of treacly fudge and slices of colourful rock bookend a perfectly executed meal. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Wife of BathWye, Kent, England 9Telegraph expert rating Another addition to chef Mark Sargeant and Josh De Haan's portfolio of Kentish restaurants with rooms. With a superb Spanish restaurant and tiny tapas bar, its signature quirky style and authentic cuisine works surprisingly well in the bucolic setting. The restaurant serves impeccable fare: juicy scallops with spicy chorizo and earthy morcillo (black pudding); honey sweet melon smothered in Brindisa's finest Serrano ham; succulent Galician steaks with creamy aioli and fiery paprika potatoes; and hake with radishes, Seville orange and a buttery sauce laced with Gin Mare. Save space for pudding: the bitter chocolate tart with salt and olive oil is revelatory, as is ice-cream made with raisins soaked in PX sherry. Read expert review From £70per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Read's Restaurant With RoomsFaversham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Read's, housed in a Georgian mansion on the north Kentish coast, is a smart restaurant with six rooms, owned and run by acclaimed chef David Pitchford and his wife Rona. Sticking firmly to their decades-long recipe for success, they deliver classic cuisine and unfussy hospitality. David won a Michelin star in 1992, which he retained for 20 consecutive years, becoming the second longest holder of the accolade in Britain. The food is hard to fault, if lacking the innovation and excitement that comes with Michelin recognition: comforting, classic French cuisine with British influence. Think ham and pea mousse; smoked haddock in cream sauce topped with cheese soufflé; Kentish lamb served with buttery asparagus and garden vegetables; and a Cassis-soaked summer pudding. Read expert review From £145per night The Dog at WinghamWingham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating A medieval pub in a rural village, run by an enterprising local family, that serves exceptionally good food and features eight attractive bedrooms. Virtually equidistant from Canterbury and Sandwich, it’s ideally located for exploring the Kentish city, countryside and coast. The kitchen is overseen by the young and talented Dan Johns, who has worked at Gary Rhodes’ Searcy’s at The Gherkin and Urban Coterie. The menu changes monthly to reflect seasonality and local produce. Imaginative starters such as fragrant Thai-style chicken salad and rich pork and pistachio terrine with pineapple jam are followed by melt-in-the-mouth Moroccan spiced lamb and crisp pork collar with chorizo dumplings. Read expert review From £86per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best pubs with rooms in Kent   Devon The Dartmoor InnOkehampton, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 16th-century coaching inn on the north-western edge of Dartmoor National Park is acclaimed for its fresh, seasonal cooking, but it’s worth bedding down for a stay in one of its three chic bedrooms. A blackboard heralds not only the breed of cattle, but also the name of the farmer it has come from. Dishes are pub classics, done to perfection: rib-eye steak and chips, confit of duck leg with toffee apple puree and roasted hazelnuts, and brisket of beef. Philip has a strong ethical policy, forging strong links with local artisan food producers, and ensures the beef has been grass fed and reared within a 20-mile radius. Breakfast is refreshingly original, with dainty portions of caramelised bananas or a daring cooked menu, including herb-crusted goat’s cheese, black pudding and bacon lardons. Read expert review From £65per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Lamb InnSandford, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating With open fires, beamed walls, deep sofas and award-winning food, this 16th-century inn in the village of Sandford is a pub of dreams for town-dwellers. Upstairs, seven bedrooms have big beds, soft linen and powerful showers, and there’s a pretty cobbled terrace at the rear. The Lamb Inn’s menu consistently attracts rave reviews. The produce is seasonal and locally sourced, mixing upmarket dishes with pub classics: shellfish bisque, mushroom ravioli, roasted pigeon with smoked bacon and savoy cabbage or steak and chips. The perfectly fluffy sticky toffee pudding is worth a visit alone. Landlord Mark is a fan of real ale and regularly rotates his cask brews to ensure they stay fresh. Read expert review From £69per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Masons ArmsBranscombe, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This dog-friendly 14th-century thatched inn, in Branscombe, on the Jurassic Coast, is one of Devon’s best. It prides itself on serving local, seasonal Devon fare on a traditional pub menu – it even has a 'food sourcing map' detailing exactly where the produce comes from. There’s steamed River Exe mussels and fries, steak and kidney shortcrust pie, rump steak and a seafood platter. Ales, hand-pumped from casks, are just as local. On a sunny day, the action moves outside to the pretty suntrap terrace. It's a 15-minute walk to Branscombe Beach, a lovely, long shingle cove from where you can pick up the South West Coastal Path. Read expert review From £75per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Salutation InnTopsham, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating Eat well and rest your head at this 18th-century coaching inn in chichi Topsham: a stylish option with a truly excellent restaurant, helmed by one of Gordon Ramsay's former protégés. Exquisite handmade petit-fours welcome guests on arrival – the first hint that your dining experience will be full of extra surprises. The wild mushroom appetiser comes accompanied by an umami-enhancing pinot noir, and the tomato gazpacho with local crab, served in a glass on ice, and followed by a rich rump of beef from Greendale Farm. Each modern dish is accompanied by diverse wines chosen by Stephen Edwardes – the unusual sake complements the beautiful strawberry dessert which is garnished with home-grown edible flowers. Read expert review From £145per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Devon   Cornwall The Gurnard's HeadSt Ives, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn offering outstanding food, fabulous sea and moorland views, situated close to St Ives and Land's End. Popular with walkers and couples of all ages seeking a low-key, restorative break in a wild coastal location. Locals come from miles around to dine here. The Scottish head chef, Bruce Rennie, cooks a short, inventive menu. Lunch may include beetroot risotto, octopus and white wine stew, or Merguez sausages with Puy lentils. The supper menu may include salmon and lobster tortellini, cod with pig’s trotter, and sole with Vermouth. The wine list focuses on Old World wines, notably from France, Italy and Portugal. Read expert review From £110per night Padstow TownhousePadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A handsome listed townhouse on Padstow's high street that has been superbly renovated and opened as a six-bedroom luxury guesthouse by chef Paul Ainsworth to complement his Michelin-starred restaurant, Paul Ainsworth at Number 6. Head there for amusingly-presented, delicately-flavoured meat and fish dishes and a fun and informal atmosphere, or to his even more informal restaurant, Rojanos, for superior pasta, pizza and hamburgers. Breakfast is served at the latter. The guesthouse owns an electric BMW in which guests can be transported if they don’t want to walk around. Read expert review From £280per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com St Petroc's HotelPadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A sociable, intimate townhouse with a labyrinth of gorgeously styled sitting and reading rooms – as well as a buzzy bistro. St Petroc’s Bistro opened along with the hotel in 1988. It’s a lovely room – with an engaging selection of original art on the walls – and a relaxing, happy place to eat at either lunch or dinner. Pride of place on the menu goes to the 30-day dry-aged steaks, but there are fish, chicken and vegetarian options as well – all of them classic Rick Stein recipes (try the grilled hake with Serrano ham, succotash and chives). Ruby’s Bar is the new Stein pub – a great place for a local beer or cocktail. Read expert review From £112per night Kota Restaurant with RoomsPorthleven, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating With a fantastic Asian-Cornish fusion restaurant downstairs, and Porthleven’s picturesque harbour on the doorstep, the Kota’s two simple, homey rooms are proof that sometimes substance can win over style. The vibe in the restaurant is casual, with a long room overlooking the harbour and a waterfront lawn on which you can dine in good weather. New Zealander Jude, who is part Maori, part Malay-Chinese, brings Asian spices and cooking styles to fresh, meticulously sourced Cornish produce – squid with green mango salad, scallops with miso dressing and seaweed salad, and Laksa with prawns, mussels and fish. There are also some very creative burgers – tempura fish with wasabi tartare, and satay chicken with Asian slaw. Read expert review From £75per night DriftwoodPortscatho, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating Sitting on a hill above the rugged coastline of the Roseland peninsula, Driftwood is nautically furnished in soft creams and blues. A Michelin-starred restaurant, private sea-facing terraces, and a private beach make this the perfect venue for pretty much everyone. There are wonderful coastal path walks for miles in each direction. This is Cornish cooking at its finest: unfussy and focused on bringing out the flavour of fresh fish and seafood and locally reared beef and lamb. Dinner in summer comprises a six-course tasting menu with complementary wines. For children there are early suppers with proper chef-made food. Read expert review From £250per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Coombeshead FarmLewannick, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating This is the joint venture from chef Tom Adams of London restaurant Pitt Cue and April Bloomfield, English born chef/proprietor of The Spotted Pig in New York. Both wanted to get back to the roots of food and hospitality and the result is this relaxed communal dining farmhouse b&b. Tom and his partner Lottie Mew live off the land and share their fresh, foraged, pickled and harvested produce with their guests. Tom cooks a three-course feast, kicking off with plates of delicious nibbles from 6.30pm onwards, which is shared at a communal table by all the guests. Tom’s own rare breed Mangalitza pigs feature large, plus perhaps a cep and walnut broth, lamb shoulder and mushroom porridge, with madeleine, whey and prune for pudding. Wines are unusual. Read expert review From £175per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Cornwall   Sussex The Barn at RoundhurstLurgashall, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating A rural South Downs retreat on a 250-acre organic farm with its own lakes. Home-reared food is a specialty. Converted outhouses with six rooms are set around a courtyard, just steps from a dramatic converted barn for dining and lounging. A four-course set menu with generous portions is available for guests and non-guests Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays; a light supper is provided for guests on other days. Meals highlight the farm’s own organic beef, lamb and pork and could include colourful heritage carrots and an exceptional triple chocolate mousse. Read expert review From £98per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com CrouchersChichester, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating An unassuming motel-like exterior belies a foodie haven a short drive from the Witterings. Relax on the patio of a garden-facing room, head to the beach, or explore the cultural and sporting highlights around Chichester but leave room for dinner in the impressive restaurant. Proximity to the coast ensures good seafood. The squid-ink pasta starter is light and delicate and a showy dessert of white chocolate and saffron mousse with edible flowers, caramel and orange ice-cream is a multi-sensory delight. A strong wine list includes an emphasis on the owners’ native South Africa. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Crab & LobsterWest Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating Herons can be seen on the doorstep of this modernised 350-year-old pub beside a bird sanctuary, where guests can stay in cosy bedrooms or an adjoining cottage. Tuck into locally caught seafood in the bar-restaurant and plan nature walks or trips to nearby beaches. The menu, as this gastropub’s name suggests, makes good use of locally caught seafood. Baked Selsey crab with a salad or crab cakes is a highlight. Meat, like rump of lamb (on an autumn menu with garlic Pommes Anna, butternut squash purée, confit tomatoes, baby leeks and Madeira jus) is also locally reared. There’s an extensive wine list and takeaway fish and chips. Read expert review From £160per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith Wingrove HouseAlfriston, South Downs, England 8Telegraph expert rating Yards from the South Downs Way and the half-timbered, candlelit pubs of Alfriston, this swish 19th-century boutique hotel with a modern country restaurant delivers roaring log fires, low-slung sofas and top-notch food, and draws city dwellers craving an easy country escape. Matthew Comben, formerly of the Hungry Monk in Jevington, heads up the kitchen and has brought with him the Monk's original banoffee pie recipe. Highlights from the seasonal menu include cauliflower fritters with Brighton blue cheese mayonnaise, and a soft beef fillet with tarragon. There's an impressive gin menu with 11 different options, including Brighton Gin, and a refreshingly reasonable wine list. Read expert review From £108per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best places and cities to visit in England – and where to stay   Cheshire The Roebuck InnMobberley, Cheshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This French-influenced bistro with rooms is perfect weekend break material, with lashings of character, great food and a beautifully designed garden. The bistro menu, tweaked with the seasons, is European in style, and everything comes in generous portions, whether it’s ‘small plates’ of cassoulet, caponata and crostini; mains such as saffron risotto, venison bourguignon and moules marinière; or puds of tarte au citron, profiteroles and crème caramel. On the drinks front, you’ll find an interesting selection of local ales, old-world wines and a vintage dresser filled with classic aperitifs and digestifs. Read expert review From £115per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • Britain's cosiest hotels for autumn   County Durham Lord Crewe ArmsBlanchland, Northumberland, England 9Telegraph expert rating A lord-of-the-manor building, in a pin-neat estate village, that oozes atmosphere at every stone-flagged turn. A reputation for honest, British cooking, plus its rural location, makes it popular with walkers and foodies as well as the country-sports fraternity. Expect punchy, robust, British cooking, rich with flavour and unusual combinations: devilled lamb’s kidneys on roasted cauliflower; grilled sea trout and mixed alliums; sea buckthorn posset. There’s an element of fun, too; eggy bread with fried bacon or Bloody Mary tomatoes on toast for breakfast. Some ingredients come from the kitchen garden. Eat on the terrace in the summer. The atmospheric, barrel-vaulted bar has local ales including a custom-made Lord Crewe Brew. Read expert review From £155per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Rose & CrownCounty Durham, England 9Telegraph expert rating A foodie destination country inn that has smartened up while still maintaining a sense of village pub: country-comfortable rooms; horse-brasses and dogs in the bar. Surrounded by the sheep-dotted fields and moors of the North Pennines, you come to eat, relax and then walk it off. The modern British menu shows confident cooking that lets the ingredients shine through; no fuss but definitely interesting: honey-glazed goat's cheese with beetroot, hazelnuts and gingerbread, perhaps, or pan-fried fillet of sea trout with roasted baby gem and crushed peas. There’s good local sourcing with Teesdale lamb rarely off the menu. Eat in the candle-lit dining room or buzzier bar; the latter offers three real ales and a good selection of single malts. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best country house hotels in Britain   Cities The Henrietta HotelCovent Garden, London, England 8Telegraph expert rating An 18-bedroom boutique address in one of Covent Garden’s most attractive streets, owned and run by the Paris-based Experimental Group, with a cocktail bar, Ollie Dabbous restaurant and quirky interior design by Dorothée Meilichzon. The food, is delicious – clean, clever and uncomplicated – with highlights that might include the sheeps’ milk curds with pistachio, beef tartare with nasturtium and rye, and wonderful freshly baked warm madeleines with Chantilly cream. Don't miss a cocktail, which can be chosen à la carte or with a consultation from the barman. Read expert review From £220per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Ginger PigHove, Brighton, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 11-bedroom guesthouse above Hove’s highly-acclaimed Ginger Pig Bar and Restaurant is ideal if you want a quieter seaside base. Spacious and elegantly understated rooms include thoughtful beach bags with towels and well-stocked minibars. Always buzzy, this sprawling gastropub serves up highly delicious grub and excellent Sunday roasts. Look out for seasonal specials like asparagus with brown crab and chipotle mayo, or seabream with samphire. The adjoining Orangerie is where breakfast is served (there’s an outdoor area for sunny days), offering imaginative dishes such as baked eggs with hummus, chorizo and peppers, Irish rock oysters and rarebit with roasted tomatoes and mushrooms. Read expert review From £80per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Simpsons RestaurantBirmingham, England 8Telegraph expert rating The cooking is superlative at this gastronomic powerhouse, which also offers three individually styled – and great value – rooms. Throw in the added draw of the Simpsons Cookery School and you pretty much have Michelin-starred, Brummie food nirvana. The winning team of owner Andreas Antona and chef director Luke Tipping, one of Britain’s finest sauciers, has weathered fashions and trends. The three-course à la carte menu features plump marinière-style mussels on a delicate, buttery skate wing, while refined hipster influences are showcased with a barbecued beef cheek with a rich, silky bone marrow sauce. The pastry section’s take on a Belgian Speculoos cookie, with caramelised white chocolate and coffee granite, is fabulous. Read expert review From £110per night The White Star TavernSouthampton, Hampshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating A characterful tavern with rooms on Southampton’s vibrant Oxford Street. The restaurant is a destination in itself, with a varied menu that caters to all comers. If you fancy a plate of fish and chips washed down with real ale, then you’ll get the crispest batter and a unique brew from Itchen Valley. But the real tour de force is the à la carte menu, where chef Matt Noonan serves up his creativity and innovation in dishes that linger long in the memory: a melt-in-the-mouth braised ox cheek with black bean glaze and oriental vegetables to start, perhaps, or a seared bass with a sauté of wild mushrooms, egg yolk ketchup, smoked and cured egg yolk, leek and fresh Dorset truffle as a main. The Death by Chocolate dessert is served up like a piece of street art and really is to die for. Read expert review From £105per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels for a UK city break   WALES Llys MeddygPembrokeshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating A cosy hotel in the small town of Newport, on the Pembrokeshire coast, offering colourful interiors, reasonable rates and an exceptional restaurant, which has gained a reputation in Pembrokeshire and beyond as one of the best and most reasonable fine dining establishments. Chef Daniel Jones does wonders with local produce – such as Newport bay crab and lobster, Preseli lamb, Welsh beef and West Wales cheeses – in two separate dining areas: the romantic basement-level Cellar Bar, which has a slate floor and leather settees, and a wood burning stove in an inglenook fireplace; and, on the ground floor, the recently refurbished main dining room. Ed smokes salmon in a shed in his house just next door. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Ynyshir Restaurant and RoomsPowys, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Queen Victoria once owned this handsome white painted house as a hidden retreat. The undulating grounds are lovely and lead to the RSPB Ynys Hir Nature Reserve at the head of the Dovey estuary. Current owner and professional artist Rob Reen is responsible for the vibrant interiors, their colours taking a lead from his equally bold canvasses that dominate the walls. In the kitchen, Gareth Ward, who trained with Sat Bains, is a rising star, a recipient of one Michelin star and gunning for a second. He prefers to serve a series of small, integrated dishes, and is always coming up with new ideas and loves surprises. The tasting menu at dinner might include simple plates such as Welsh wagyu, pork belly with 'river bacon' or pollock with black bean. Read expert review From £215per night Tyddyn LlanDenbighshire, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A modest Georgian house just outside Llandrillo, with a complementary extension using local slate and stone. The house was once a shooting lodge belonging to the Dukes of Westminster, but now places food centre stage. The views are spectacular, with the Vale of Edeyrnion’s meadows and the slopes of the Berwyn Mountains beyond. The dining room is decorated in Wedgewood blue with tall windows on three sides. Bryan Webb is considered one of Wales’s foremost chefs, with a long-held Michelin star and a commitment to local produce, such as melting Welsh black beef, and quality seasonal ingredients. The menu changes daily. Read expert review From £195per night The Old Rectory on the LakeSnowdonia, Tal-y-llyn, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A sun-trap hideaway on the shores of a huge lake, and at the foot of the mountain, Cadair Idris. It’s elegant and relaxing with free-standing roll-top baths, an outdoor hot tub and locally sourced food perfectly cooked to order in the restaurant. The food, courtesy of the self-trained chef, Ricky, is outstanding. There may be freshly-caught trout, or local Bala lamb on the menu, along with perfectly-cooked vegetables and perhaps Dauphinois potatoes. The chocolate fondant is a signature pudding. The terrace is the perfect place to enjoy the sunset over the lake with a Welsh gin and tonic. Read expert review From £110per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Harbourmaster HotelAberaeron, Cardigan Bay, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating Beach chic comes into its own at this forget-me-not-blue boutique hotel on Aberaeron’s harbour wall. And you won’t likely forget it with these killer sea views, glam rooms and imaginatively thought-out menus. The restaurant has a serious foodie bent in the evening – try to snag the cwtch (cubby hole) for intimate dining. Go for Carlingford oysters, a plump, sweet burst of the sea, and the perfect prelude for well-cooked Welsh fillet of steak, followed by an oozy chocolate fondant with salted caramel ice cream. For a buzzier vibe, head to the bar-lounge to nurse a Brecon gin or nibble bar snacks like crispy cockles with chilli vinegar. Read expert review From £185per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith FairyhillReynoldston, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Snuggled away in 24 acres of woodland near the Gower coast, Fairyhill enchants with more than just its name. Think Downton Abbey meets Watership Down with a pinch of 21st-century cool. It has carved out its name as a foodie retreat with good reason. The chef pulls off a daring, imaginative menu, taking a pride in local sourcing and garden-grown ingredients in dishes that are both robust and refined. Clean flavours sing of the seasons in dishes simple as gazpacho, pear and Pembroke crab, and goat's cheese mousse with courgette flower with beetroot gel. Mains like meltingly tender Welsh lamb served three ways and Serrano-wrapped monkfish with clams, samphire and fresh linguine strike the perfect balance. Read expert review From £135per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com JabajakCarmarthenshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Jabajak is a former drover’s farm, now a fine vineyard and boutique bolthole, serving home-grown food and wines with a slice of history, rustic elegance and first-class service. The restaurant has scooped awards for its locally sourced, home-grown approach. A drink in the lounge bar piques the appetite for dishes prepared with garden herbs, fruit, veg and edible flowers, ramped up flavour-wise by foraged ingredients such as nettles and wild garlic when in season. Starters including basil-marinated bruschetta with gooseberry and elderflower chutney prelude mains such as butter-soft Celtic steak with local Moody Mabel cheese. There are many nods to local produce at breakfast, too, and the cooked Welsh option with a side order of cockles is bang on the money. Read expert review From £130per night Rates provided by Booking.com   SCOTLAND The Three Chimneys and The House Over-ByDunvegan, Isle of Skye, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This destination restaurant with rooms is back doing what it does best, with a new chef, updated look and reinvigorated sense of discipline and purpose. The essential ingredients are there: attentive service, attractive rooms with mesmerising views and a talented young chef. Choose from a three-course à la carte menu or the epic Skye Showcase Menu, served at the ‘Kitchen Table’, right in the heart of the action. Dishes on the latter menu might include the likes of Dungvegan crab, seaweed and miso-cured halibut, Orbost Farm beef and pot-roasted young grouse. A road (albeit single-track and quiet) runs between the House Over-By and the shore of Loch Dunvegan, slightly eroding what would otherwise be a feeling of privacy, but not unduly distracting from the peaceful views. Read expert review From £345per night The Peat InnSt Andrews, Fife, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating A long-standing gastro-destination lying between the 'town and gown' of St Andrews and Fife’s East Neuk fishing villages, this is well worth a detour. It’s a short stagger from restaurant to homely split-level suites: a calm, comfortable place to sleep off the fabulous Michelin-starred food. The rustic-chic restaurant, all tender taupes with amber and deep sea-blue accents, is a fittingly sophisticated setting for the triumphant cooking. You come here for the food and you won’t leave disappointed. From the home-made butter to the unusually good petit-fours, everything is a reflection of chef Geoffrey Smeddle’s joyous approach to food, with dishes like a starter of smoked beef tartare with wasabi puree raising your eyebrows and your expectations simultaneously. Read expert review From £195per night The Taynuilt Etive Restaurant with RoomsTaynuilt, Argyll & Bute, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating This historic rural hotel has been reinvented as a restaurant with rooms with a young Scottish chef leading a bright and creative team. It's at the heart of a small community that makes an ideal base for exploring Argyll and the isles. The Etive restaurant is the axis here, a genuine foodie oasis and arguably the finest place to eat in the region. John McNulty works wonders with the ultra-local produce, whether it be the Mull Pig’s Heed or the salmon he smokes using local larch from Loch Awe. Sound provenance ripples through the Etive even as far as breakfast, where local fish stars. Read expert review From £79per night 21212Edinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating The four bedrooms above this Michelin-starred restaurant are no afterthought; there is a confident hand at work in rooms that are as striking as the food, displaying a sometimes surprising but always sensual contemporary/baroque style and unexpectedly leafy views. Michelin-starred chef Paul Kitching is a maverick who likes to tease flavours, building fantastic creations that sound impossible, but work, like silky pink trout served with artichokes, pasta, almonds, chickpeas, kidney beans, oriental mushrooms, warm coleslaw and feta cheese. He’s utterly serious but there’s an edge of play - such as a pre-dessert of porridge, milk and cinnamon poured from a china cow. Read expert review From £112per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith The Bridge Inn, RathoEdinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This 18-century coaching inn – now an award-winning gastropub with rooms – is on a leafy canal in a tranquil village just 20 minutes away from Edinburgh's city centre. Four pretty bedrooms are each individually decorated. The cooking is exceptional, with talented head chef Ben doing wonderful things with good Scottish fish and game, properly hung beef, and pork from their own fat and sassy pigs. They grow their own vegetables, herbs and fruit too, in an old walled garden a short walk away down the canal path. Breakfast is a fine indulgence. You can have a hair of the dog as well: Champagne, Prosecco, Buck’s Fizz or a Bloody Mary. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best castle hotels in Scotland Contributions from Ros Belford, Suzy Bennett, Sophie Butler, Gill Charlton, Kerry Christiani, Fiona Duncan, Suzanne King, Gabriella Le Breton, Linda Macdonald, Richard McComb, Robin McKelvie, Harriet O'Brien, Ben Parker, Helen Pickles, Louise Roddon, Cathy Stebbings, Sarah Stirling, Anna Turns, Debbie Ward and Antonia Windsor.

Britain's loveliest restaurants with rooms for autumn

What could be more appealing than the epicurean informality of an inn or restaurant with rooms? These wonderfully relaxed establishments combine an emphasis on great ingredients from the area with local charm and stylish panache. There’s an insider feel that you don’t get at a more formal hotel, and there’s a foodie enthusiasm that wouldn’t be exuded quite as joyfully at a larger enterprise. Autumn/winter is a particularly good time to seek out their gently indulgent accommodation and fabulous seasonal flavours – the likes of wild rabbit with foraged mushrooms, grouse and damsons, elderberries and more. Harriet O'Brien Our experts round up their favourite establishments in Britain, from the Cotswolds to Cornwall, Suffolk to Skye, for feasting – and then flopping.  ENGLAND Cotswolds The Wild RabbitKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Wild Rabbit is a haven of eco-elegance a few fields away from sister enterprise Daylesford, the organic farm shop, deli, spa (and more) of Carole Bamford. She transformed this 18th-century inn and it has been meticulously devised in quiet colours, stone and wood. It’s a beautiful posh pub, with food to match. The kitchen is masterminded by Tim Allen, who won the Wild Rabbit a Michelin star in October 2016. His cuisine takes diners on a taste adventure, with dishes such as haddock on leek and apple slaw, topped with an amazingly cooked egg – poached and lightly deep fried. Read expert review From £148per night The Feathered Nest Country InnOxfordshire, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fabulous food and a superb setting above the Evenlode valley make this old country inn a hedonistic haven. The owners describe it as a pub with a twist. They’ve created an elegant restaurant that has won armloads of awards since it opened, with three stylish and supremely comfy bedrooms. The exquisite food is almost on a par with sleek gastro establishments such as Tom Kerridge’s The Hand and Flowers in Marlow - and even Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons where head chef Kuba Winkowski previously worked. There’s a stupendous wine list, too. Among the choice of 200 or so is a wonderful range of South African wines. There’s also a bar menu featuring classics such as burgers of brilliant quality. Read expert review From £140per night The Wheatsheaf InnNorthleach, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A creeper-clad coaching inn turned arty, boutique haven. The Wheatsheaf is in a particularly pretty and enterprising little Cotswold town. The restaurant draws a regular local crowd and the emphasis is on the very best quality, from the menu ingredients to the room amenities. The sophisticated menu offers great flavour combinations, the likes of roast parsnip and fennel salad with chestnuts, and mutton and apple pie with creamed potatoes. If there’s space in the bar beforehand try an aperitif of Sloe Negroni, with sloe gin and Campari, or opt for a pint of Cotswold Old Hooky. Read expert review From £102per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Kingham PloughKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Kingham Plough is a treat of a foodie destinatio, with relaxing furnishings, genial staff and brilliantly conceived menus. Emily Watkins has won numerous awards for her modern British cuisine with a twist ‒ dishes are often based on old Cotswold recipes. Her food is also much inspired by local produce; the likes of Windrush Valley goat cheese and pork from Paddock Farm a few miles away. There’s a pleasingly short and sophisticated à la carte menu: starters might include slow braised oxtail with horseradish, and mains could feature venison wellington, with meat supplied from nearby Cornbury Park. There’s also a well-priced bar menu featuring gastro comfort food such as rabbit parfait. Read expert review From £145per night The Ebrington ArmsEbrington, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating This hidden treasure set in a gloriously unspoilt village is a modern day version of a country tavern – it’s at once a genuine pub that brews its own very smooth ales; a lovely restaurant with real local flavour; and a charming hotel with rural-chic bedrooms. Chef Ben Dulley offers short, understated menus which reflect his commitment to freshness, with many vegetables straight from surrounding Drinkwater Farm. Dishes are beautifully presented and packed with local flavour – the likes of hot-smoked Bibury trout salad, and Cotswold lamb with stuffed tomatoes. Wines are from independent growers, including the Cotswolds’ own Little Oak Vineyard. Read expert review From £165per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best Cotswolds pubs with rooms   Oxfordshire Artist Residence OxfordshireSouth Leigh, Oxfordshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A unique country pub with a bohemian twist and arty vibe, offering gorgeous quirky rooms, scrumptious meals and contemporary art. The food is as heart-warming as the dining room. Local game and meat, foraged herbs and flowers join vegetables from the garden. The menu could include the likes of smoky pigeon breast electrified by a pickled walnut with caramelised chicory, port jelly and smoked spring onions and plaice in seaweed butter, smoked cockles, sea vegetables and bisque. The wine list is small, selective and good value. Join locals for a pint at the bar, read the paper or play cards around the fire. Read expert review From £130per night • The best luxury hotels in Oxfordshire   Lake District L’EnclumeCartmel, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Simon Rogan's two-Michelin-starred restaurant plus handful of rooms stay true both to the simple village location and rich surrounding land. Rooms are modest but smartly furnished, the setting picture-box pretty while the food is an exemplar of local sourcing and creativity. This isn’t Blumenthal-style magic but simply 20 (tiny) courses of exceptional skill, balance and creativity: an egg shell containing a yolk in mushroom broth; confit cauliflower in a pea and calamint sauce; a finger of turbot in nasturtium butter, the dinkiest caramel mousse sitting on compressed apple. All is presented exquisitely but without fanfare on rustic pottery, handmade glass, even a pebble. The Coravin wine system allows you to try top-rank or small-producer wines. Read expert review From £129per night The Punch Bowl InnLake District, Cumbria, England 8Telegraph expert rating A smart but relaxed country inn, in a quiet corner of the Lake District, with a deserved reputation for its classy food. The ground floor is a semi open-plan series of dining rooms, bar and relaxed eating areas, separated by little steps. The cooking is smart-city-restaurant standard producing assured, modern British dishes that are interesting without being tricksy or fussy. No fancy canapés or pre-starters, just clean flavours. Starters might include black pudding with bubble and squeak or tomato salad with local crab and lobster while mains could be pork with ham hock croquette or cod with Morteau sausage. There's a wide-ranging wine list, plus a couple of local real ales. Read expert review From £130per night • The Lake District's best pubs and inns   Peak District The Samuel Fox Country InnHope Valley, Peak District, England 8Telegraph expert rating This stone-built inn – which is more of a restaurant with rooms than a standard country pub – has an ever-growing reputation. Come for a great dinner, stay over in one of four comfortable rooms and spend the next day exploring the glorious Peak District. The foodie credentials are strong: chef-patron James Duckett has worked with Albert Roux, Michel Roux, Marcus Wareing and Philip Howard, and done extended stints in Australia and Spain. Now he turns out some of the best food in the area: everything from a piquant, pretty-as-a-picture starter of soused sardines to the kind of iced chocolate cherry parfait that makes you wish you hadn’t shared with your other half. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Peak District   Yorkshire Crab Manor HotelThirsk, Yorkshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fun and exotic, individually themed rooms combined with a well-regarded seafood restaurant and an overall madcap sense of decoration make this a hugely popular choice for special occasions. The restaurant specialises in fish and seafood serving both classics – lobster thermidor, grilled Queen scallops – as well as more modern dishes such as sea trout with samphire. It's open for lunch and dinner, and for afternoon 'lighter' options (including moules mariniere), but there's nothing delicate about portion sizes. Half the fun is the setting: jolly bar, romantic dining room or brighter conservatory, all with a bonkers decoration that includes a suite of orchestral instruments. Breakfast is also a delight. Read expert review From £165per night The Star InnHarome, Helmsley, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant-with-rooms with chocolate-box, thatched-pub looks and a bucolic farming-village location. Bedrooms, across the road, have a comfy, hunting-lodge style. Whitby-born chef-owner Andrew Pern was one of the first champions of local sourcing - and why wouldn’t you be with his ‘back garden’: moorland game and pasture-fed meat, coastal fish, Yorkshire Wolds’ fruit and vegetables. He now has a huge kitchen garden at the back of the pub. His menus are punchy, robust yet skilfully balanced and as much about texture as taste: crab stick with seashore vegetables and avocado ice, perhaps followed by roasted lamb chop with truffled faggot or honey-roasted duck with tea-poached quail’s egg. Read expert review From £150per night The Timble InnNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 8Telegraph expert rating A food-driven village pub in a quiet, yet surprisingly well-connected location with bold, contemporary styling and smart bedrooms. Glorious views and walks are on the doorstep. A pub that does two sittings for Sunday lunch is serious about food, and has been awarded two AA rosettes for it. It’s ambitious stuff – wood pigeon with quail’s egg and black pudding; venison loin with celeriac remoulade and chestnuts. The seafood platter and chateaubriand steak are favourites. It's not really a beer pub but offers a wide-ranging wine list – including fine ones by the glass – plus local gins. Read expert review From £150per night The Yorke ArmsNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant with rooms in an off-the-beaten-track location; perfect for walking off the spoiling food. The food is why people come here – some helicopter in from London for chef-proprietor Frances Atkins’s flavour-intense cooking. It’s not fussy or tricksy, just skilled, imaginative and full of the unexpected – quail with lychee and jasmine; brill with fennel in turmeric broth, peach and curd tart. Choose the eight-course tasting menu and everything is a surprise. Much is home-grown; the huge kitchen garden produces a summer surplus. These are meals to savour (even the lunchtime bar menu includes devilled kidneys, and gratin of seared scallops). Read expert review From £345per night • The best luxury hotels in Yorkshire   Norfolk Morston HallNorfolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating A flint- and brick-built Jacobean country-house hotel, with large conservatory extensions that provide extra dining space. Inside, you’ll find open fires, squashy sofas and cosy corners in a hushed, fairly formal atmosphere. The food is the main reason to come to Morston Hall, the only restaurant with a Michelin star on this stretch of coast. Galton Blackiston’s cooking is rated highly by both visitors and locals: he offers a set dinner based on fresh, local ingredients, served at 8pm daily. Four courses usually include two meat dishes (perhaps confit of duck or beef fillet) and a fish course. Recommended wines are suggested to accompany the dishes – or you can choose from an extensive list. Read expert review From £340per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Norfolk   Suffolk The Great HouseLavenham, Suffolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating The five-bedroom hotel looks onto the market square of Lavenham, a well-preserved medieval village of timbered houses. It would be wrong to stay here without sampling the food, as this is primarily a restaurant – and a very good one at that. From a regularly changing menu, you might find starters of mussels with chilli, coriander and cream, tuna sashimi or wild mushroom ravioli, and main courses of pheasant supreme, grilled fillet of lamb with thyme sauce or roasted duck breast with grilled beetroot. Desserts could be dark chocolate terrine, millefeuille or maple syrup rice pudding. Read expert review From £99per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best spa hotels in Suffolk   Somerset The White PostYeovil, Somerset, England 8Telegraph expert rating At this cosy Victorian ‘pub-and-lodgings’, the elegant gastronomy is as much a pull as the rooms. Brett’s passion for foraging and elegant presentation seeps through. The best way to experience the dishes? The 10-course tasting menu, which pays homage to the West Country (pork done eight ways, served with local chilli and ginger cider) as well as international influences (spiced lentil dhal with gurnard, mango and coconut). The wine list is sufficient but it’s the local ales and ciders that stand out, particularly if you pair a pint of Dorset Knob bitter with the Sunday roast. Painted walls are interrupted only by the wide windows, long cardinal-coloured drapes and filament bulb lamps that, along with on-table candles, add just enough light during evening dining. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The most romantic hotels in Somerset   Dorset La FosseCranborne, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating Snug in the wave-like green hills of east Dorset, La Fosse at Cranborne is a peaceful bed and breakfast as well as popular restaurant. Run by husband and wife, this simple West Country retreat, embracing both modern and traditional, feels as far from the madding crowds as possible. Owner-chef Mark is a true locavore, sourcing as much from in and around the village as possible. His passion for local, inventive cuisine has seen him named best chef in Dorset. The colourful duck dish, replete with homegrown vegetables, is a highlight, drizzled in a piquant jus. Mark’s award-winning cheeseboard is part of the experience, so save some room. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Anchor InnSeatown, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Anchor Inn, sat beyond snaking lanes and tucked between scarped cliffs on the edge of a little known Dorset village, is a destination gastropub serving elevated British classics. It is also a boutique hideaway that cocoons guests amid the sound of rolling waves. If the weather is decent, expect a fight to secure a lunchtime spot, either tucked inside or al fresco. Menus from head chef Jean-Paul De Ronne — who previously worked under Masterchef winner Mat Follas — reveal commitment to seasonal fare from land and sea, such as the fresh crab salad using crustacea caught only metres away. Ales are all from Palmers, brewed four miles away, while an extensive cocktail list from former Hix bartender David Smith features a number of Dorset’s own spirits. Read expert review From £120per night • The best hotels in Dorset   Buckinghamshire The Mash InnRadnage, Buckinghamshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating Described by its owner Nick Mash as a ‘new generation inn’, The Mash Inn's aim is to remove the barriers between chef and diner. The open kitchen takes centre stage: a solid wood workstation groaning with ingredients and stacked plates, beneath a ceiling rack dripping with pots and pans, in front of an open fire for rotisserie cooking. Chef Jon Parry cooks up a storm, producing a delicious, earthy and inventive no frills tasting menu and a short à la carte menu. Much of the produce is from the garden or very local. Diners sit at individual tables or at a large communal table, which may sound daunting but such is the communal, friendly atmosphere that it’s a pleasure to do so. Read expert review From £100per night The Hand & FlowersMarlow, Buckinghamshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn with a Michelin-starred restaurant, enticing locals to dine, and couples for weekends or nights away. It's on busy West Street, just along the road from the house where Mary Shelley created Frankenstein. The chef-proprietor is Tom Kerridge, who gained a Michelin star within 10 months from a kitchen which was then the size of a large cupboard. These days he has a new, celadon green kitchen and a brigade of chefs. As restaurants go, it rocks. Expect crayfish scotch egg, slow cooked duck breast with duck fat chips and other earthy, deeply satisfying dishes that are also full of imaginative twists, served in a cosy and convivial dining room. Read expert review From £140per night • The best hotels in Buckinghamshire   Kent RocksaltFolkestone, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Rocksalt is the littoral culinary kingdom of Mark Sargeant of Claridge's fame. A microcosm of London sophistication in gritty Folkestone, it's a genuine dining destination. The recent addition of four bedrooms above "Sargey's" adjacent Smokehouse enables visitors to abandon themselves to gluttony. His dedication to local ingredients introduces diners to new treasures, such as meaty huss dogfish and tart sea buckthorn (oozing out of a dense chocolate mousse fondant), yet dishes are refreshingly clean and unpretentious. Hunks of bread, served with beef dripping, rich butter and home-roasted salt, and nuggets of treacly fudge and slices of colourful rock bookend a perfectly executed meal. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Wife of BathWye, Kent, England 9Telegraph expert rating Another addition to chef Mark Sargeant and Josh De Haan's portfolio of Kentish restaurants with rooms. With a superb Spanish restaurant and tiny tapas bar, its signature quirky style and authentic cuisine works surprisingly well in the bucolic setting. The restaurant serves impeccable fare: juicy scallops with spicy chorizo and earthy morcillo (black pudding); honey sweet melon smothered in Brindisa's finest Serrano ham; succulent Galician steaks with creamy aioli and fiery paprika potatoes; and hake with radishes, Seville orange and a buttery sauce laced with Gin Mare. Save space for pudding: the bitter chocolate tart with salt and olive oil is revelatory, as is ice-cream made with raisins soaked in PX sherry. Read expert review From £70per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Read's Restaurant With RoomsFaversham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Read's, housed in a Georgian mansion on the north Kentish coast, is a smart restaurant with six rooms, owned and run by acclaimed chef David Pitchford and his wife Rona. Sticking firmly to their decades-long recipe for success, they deliver classic cuisine and unfussy hospitality. David won a Michelin star in 1992, which he retained for 20 consecutive years, becoming the second longest holder of the accolade in Britain. The food is hard to fault, if lacking the innovation and excitement that comes with Michelin recognition: comforting, classic French cuisine with British influence. Think ham and pea mousse; smoked haddock in cream sauce topped with cheese soufflé; Kentish lamb served with buttery asparagus and garden vegetables; and a Cassis-soaked summer pudding. Read expert review From £145per night The Dog at WinghamWingham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating A medieval pub in a rural village, run by an enterprising local family, that serves exceptionally good food and features eight attractive bedrooms. Virtually equidistant from Canterbury and Sandwich, it’s ideally located for exploring the Kentish city, countryside and coast. The kitchen is overseen by the young and talented Dan Johns, who has worked at Gary Rhodes’ Searcy’s at The Gherkin and Urban Coterie. The menu changes monthly to reflect seasonality and local produce. Imaginative starters such as fragrant Thai-style chicken salad and rich pork and pistachio terrine with pineapple jam are followed by melt-in-the-mouth Moroccan spiced lamb and crisp pork collar with chorizo dumplings. Read expert review From £86per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best pubs with rooms in Kent   Devon The Dartmoor InnOkehampton, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 16th-century coaching inn on the north-western edge of Dartmoor National Park is acclaimed for its fresh, seasonal cooking, but it’s worth bedding down for a stay in one of its three chic bedrooms. A blackboard heralds not only the breed of cattle, but also the name of the farmer it has come from. Dishes are pub classics, done to perfection: rib-eye steak and chips, confit of duck leg with toffee apple puree and roasted hazelnuts, and brisket of beef. Philip has a strong ethical policy, forging strong links with local artisan food producers, and ensures the beef has been grass fed and reared within a 20-mile radius. Breakfast is refreshingly original, with dainty portions of caramelised bananas or a daring cooked menu, including herb-crusted goat’s cheese, black pudding and bacon lardons. Read expert review From £65per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Lamb InnSandford, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating With open fires, beamed walls, deep sofas and award-winning food, this 16th-century inn in the village of Sandford is a pub of dreams for town-dwellers. Upstairs, seven bedrooms have big beds, soft linen and powerful showers, and there’s a pretty cobbled terrace at the rear. The Lamb Inn’s menu consistently attracts rave reviews. The produce is seasonal and locally sourced, mixing upmarket dishes with pub classics: shellfish bisque, mushroom ravioli, roasted pigeon with smoked bacon and savoy cabbage or steak and chips. The perfectly fluffy sticky toffee pudding is worth a visit alone. Landlord Mark is a fan of real ale and regularly rotates his cask brews to ensure they stay fresh. Read expert review From £69per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Masons ArmsBranscombe, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This dog-friendly 14th-century thatched inn, in Branscombe, on the Jurassic Coast, is one of Devon’s best. It prides itself on serving local, seasonal Devon fare on a traditional pub menu – it even has a 'food sourcing map' detailing exactly where the produce comes from. There’s steamed River Exe mussels and fries, steak and kidney shortcrust pie, rump steak and a seafood platter. Ales, hand-pumped from casks, are just as local. On a sunny day, the action moves outside to the pretty suntrap terrace. It's a 15-minute walk to Branscombe Beach, a lovely, long shingle cove from where you can pick up the South West Coastal Path. Read expert review From £75per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Salutation InnTopsham, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating Eat well and rest your head at this 18th-century coaching inn in chichi Topsham: a stylish option with a truly excellent restaurant, helmed by one of Gordon Ramsay's former protégés. Exquisite handmade petit-fours welcome guests on arrival – the first hint that your dining experience will be full of extra surprises. The wild mushroom appetiser comes accompanied by an umami-enhancing pinot noir, and the tomato gazpacho with local crab, served in a glass on ice, and followed by a rich rump of beef from Greendale Farm. Each modern dish is accompanied by diverse wines chosen by Stephen Edwardes – the unusual sake complements the beautiful strawberry dessert which is garnished with home-grown edible flowers. Read expert review From £145per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Devon   Cornwall The Gurnard's HeadSt Ives, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn offering outstanding food, fabulous sea and moorland views, situated close to St Ives and Land's End. Popular with walkers and couples of all ages seeking a low-key, restorative break in a wild coastal location. Locals come from miles around to dine here. The Scottish head chef, Bruce Rennie, cooks a short, inventive menu. Lunch may include beetroot risotto, octopus and white wine stew, or Merguez sausages with Puy lentils. The supper menu may include salmon and lobster tortellini, cod with pig’s trotter, and sole with Vermouth. The wine list focuses on Old World wines, notably from France, Italy and Portugal. Read expert review From £110per night Padstow TownhousePadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A handsome listed townhouse on Padstow's high street that has been superbly renovated and opened as a six-bedroom luxury guesthouse by chef Paul Ainsworth to complement his Michelin-starred restaurant, Paul Ainsworth at Number 6. Head there for amusingly-presented, delicately-flavoured meat and fish dishes and a fun and informal atmosphere, or to his even more informal restaurant, Rojanos, for superior pasta, pizza and hamburgers. Breakfast is served at the latter. The guesthouse owns an electric BMW in which guests can be transported if they don’t want to walk around. Read expert review From £280per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com St Petroc's HotelPadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A sociable, intimate townhouse with a labyrinth of gorgeously styled sitting and reading rooms – as well as a buzzy bistro. St Petroc’s Bistro opened along with the hotel in 1988. It’s a lovely room – with an engaging selection of original art on the walls – and a relaxing, happy place to eat at either lunch or dinner. Pride of place on the menu goes to the 30-day dry-aged steaks, but there are fish, chicken and vegetarian options as well – all of them classic Rick Stein recipes (try the grilled hake with Serrano ham, succotash and chives). Ruby’s Bar is the new Stein pub – a great place for a local beer or cocktail. Read expert review From £112per night Kota Restaurant with RoomsPorthleven, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating With a fantastic Asian-Cornish fusion restaurant downstairs, and Porthleven’s picturesque harbour on the doorstep, the Kota’s two simple, homey rooms are proof that sometimes substance can win over style. The vibe in the restaurant is casual, with a long room overlooking the harbour and a waterfront lawn on which you can dine in good weather. New Zealander Jude, who is part Maori, part Malay-Chinese, brings Asian spices and cooking styles to fresh, meticulously sourced Cornish produce – squid with green mango salad, scallops with miso dressing and seaweed salad, and Laksa with prawns, mussels and fish. There are also some very creative burgers – tempura fish with wasabi tartare, and satay chicken with Asian slaw. Read expert review From £75per night DriftwoodPortscatho, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating Sitting on a hill above the rugged coastline of the Roseland peninsula, Driftwood is nautically furnished in soft creams and blues. A Michelin-starred restaurant, private sea-facing terraces, and a private beach make this the perfect venue for pretty much everyone. There are wonderful coastal path walks for miles in each direction. This is Cornish cooking at its finest: unfussy and focused on bringing out the flavour of fresh fish and seafood and locally reared beef and lamb. Dinner in summer comprises a six-course tasting menu with complementary wines. For children there are early suppers with proper chef-made food. Read expert review From £250per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Coombeshead FarmLewannick, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating This is the joint venture from chef Tom Adams of London restaurant Pitt Cue and April Bloomfield, English born chef/proprietor of The Spotted Pig in New York. Both wanted to get back to the roots of food and hospitality and the result is this relaxed communal dining farmhouse b&b. Tom and his partner Lottie Mew live off the land and share their fresh, foraged, pickled and harvested produce with their guests. Tom cooks a three-course feast, kicking off with plates of delicious nibbles from 6.30pm onwards, which is shared at a communal table by all the guests. Tom’s own rare breed Mangalitza pigs feature large, plus perhaps a cep and walnut broth, lamb shoulder and mushroom porridge, with madeleine, whey and prune for pudding. Wines are unusual. Read expert review From £175per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Cornwall   Sussex The Barn at RoundhurstLurgashall, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating A rural South Downs retreat on a 250-acre organic farm with its own lakes. Home-reared food is a specialty. Converted outhouses with six rooms are set around a courtyard, just steps from a dramatic converted barn for dining and lounging. A four-course set menu with generous portions is available for guests and non-guests Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays; a light supper is provided for guests on other days. Meals highlight the farm’s own organic beef, lamb and pork and could include colourful heritage carrots and an exceptional triple chocolate mousse. Read expert review From £98per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com CrouchersChichester, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating An unassuming motel-like exterior belies a foodie haven a short drive from the Witterings. Relax on the patio of a garden-facing room, head to the beach, or explore the cultural and sporting highlights around Chichester but leave room for dinner in the impressive restaurant. Proximity to the coast ensures good seafood. The squid-ink pasta starter is light and delicate and a showy dessert of white chocolate and saffron mousse with edible flowers, caramel and orange ice-cream is a multi-sensory delight. A strong wine list includes an emphasis on the owners’ native South Africa. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Crab & LobsterWest Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating Herons can be seen on the doorstep of this modernised 350-year-old pub beside a bird sanctuary, where guests can stay in cosy bedrooms or an adjoining cottage. Tuck into locally caught seafood in the bar-restaurant and plan nature walks or trips to nearby beaches. The menu, as this gastropub’s name suggests, makes good use of locally caught seafood. Baked Selsey crab with a salad or crab cakes is a highlight. Meat, like rump of lamb (on an autumn menu with garlic Pommes Anna, butternut squash purée, confit tomatoes, baby leeks and Madeira jus) is also locally reared. There’s an extensive wine list and takeaway fish and chips. Read expert review From £160per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith Wingrove HouseAlfriston, South Downs, England 8Telegraph expert rating Yards from the South Downs Way and the half-timbered, candlelit pubs of Alfriston, this swish 19th-century boutique hotel with a modern country restaurant delivers roaring log fires, low-slung sofas and top-notch food, and draws city dwellers craving an easy country escape. Matthew Comben, formerly of the Hungry Monk in Jevington, heads up the kitchen and has brought with him the Monk's original banoffee pie recipe. Highlights from the seasonal menu include cauliflower fritters with Brighton blue cheese mayonnaise, and a soft beef fillet with tarragon. There's an impressive gin menu with 11 different options, including Brighton Gin, and a refreshingly reasonable wine list. Read expert review From £108per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best places and cities to visit in England – and where to stay   Cheshire The Roebuck InnMobberley, Cheshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This French-influenced bistro with rooms is perfect weekend break material, with lashings of character, great food and a beautifully designed garden. The bistro menu, tweaked with the seasons, is European in style, and everything comes in generous portions, whether it’s ‘small plates’ of cassoulet, caponata and crostini; mains such as saffron risotto, venison bourguignon and moules marinière; or puds of tarte au citron, profiteroles and crème caramel. On the drinks front, you’ll find an interesting selection of local ales, old-world wines and a vintage dresser filled with classic aperitifs and digestifs. Read expert review From £115per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • Britain's cosiest hotels for autumn   County Durham Lord Crewe ArmsBlanchland, Northumberland, England 9Telegraph expert rating A lord-of-the-manor building, in a pin-neat estate village, that oozes atmosphere at every stone-flagged turn. A reputation for honest, British cooking, plus its rural location, makes it popular with walkers and foodies as well as the country-sports fraternity. Expect punchy, robust, British cooking, rich with flavour and unusual combinations: devilled lamb’s kidneys on roasted cauliflower; grilled sea trout and mixed alliums; sea buckthorn posset. There’s an element of fun, too; eggy bread with fried bacon or Bloody Mary tomatoes on toast for breakfast. Some ingredients come from the kitchen garden. Eat on the terrace in the summer. The atmospheric, barrel-vaulted bar has local ales including a custom-made Lord Crewe Brew. Read expert review From £155per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Rose & CrownCounty Durham, England 9Telegraph expert rating A foodie destination country inn that has smartened up while still maintaining a sense of village pub: country-comfortable rooms; horse-brasses and dogs in the bar. Surrounded by the sheep-dotted fields and moors of the North Pennines, you come to eat, relax and then walk it off. The modern British menu shows confident cooking that lets the ingredients shine through; no fuss but definitely interesting: honey-glazed goat's cheese with beetroot, hazelnuts and gingerbread, perhaps, or pan-fried fillet of sea trout with roasted baby gem and crushed peas. There’s good local sourcing with Teesdale lamb rarely off the menu. Eat in the candle-lit dining room or buzzier bar; the latter offers three real ales and a good selection of single malts. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best country house hotels in Britain   Cities The Henrietta HotelCovent Garden, London, England 8Telegraph expert rating An 18-bedroom boutique address in one of Covent Garden’s most attractive streets, owned and run by the Paris-based Experimental Group, with a cocktail bar, Ollie Dabbous restaurant and quirky interior design by Dorothée Meilichzon. The food, is delicious – clean, clever and uncomplicated – with highlights that might include the sheeps’ milk curds with pistachio, beef tartare with nasturtium and rye, and wonderful freshly baked warm madeleines with Chantilly cream. Don't miss a cocktail, which can be chosen à la carte or with a consultation from the barman. Read expert review From £220per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Ginger PigHove, Brighton, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 11-bedroom guesthouse above Hove’s highly-acclaimed Ginger Pig Bar and Restaurant is ideal if you want a quieter seaside base. Spacious and elegantly understated rooms include thoughtful beach bags with towels and well-stocked minibars. Always buzzy, this sprawling gastropub serves up highly delicious grub and excellent Sunday roasts. Look out for seasonal specials like asparagus with brown crab and chipotle mayo, or seabream with samphire. The adjoining Orangerie is where breakfast is served (there’s an outdoor area for sunny days), offering imaginative dishes such as baked eggs with hummus, chorizo and peppers, Irish rock oysters and rarebit with roasted tomatoes and mushrooms. Read expert review From £80per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Simpsons RestaurantBirmingham, England 8Telegraph expert rating The cooking is superlative at this gastronomic powerhouse, which also offers three individually styled – and great value – rooms. Throw in the added draw of the Simpsons Cookery School and you pretty much have Michelin-starred, Brummie food nirvana. The winning team of owner Andreas Antona and chef director Luke Tipping, one of Britain’s finest sauciers, has weathered fashions and trends. The three-course à la carte menu features plump marinière-style mussels on a delicate, buttery skate wing, while refined hipster influences are showcased with a barbecued beef cheek with a rich, silky bone marrow sauce. The pastry section’s take on a Belgian Speculoos cookie, with caramelised white chocolate and coffee granite, is fabulous. Read expert review From £110per night The White Star TavernSouthampton, Hampshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating A characterful tavern with rooms on Southampton’s vibrant Oxford Street. The restaurant is a destination in itself, with a varied menu that caters to all comers. If you fancy a plate of fish and chips washed down with real ale, then you’ll get the crispest batter and a unique brew from Itchen Valley. But the real tour de force is the à la carte menu, where chef Matt Noonan serves up his creativity and innovation in dishes that linger long in the memory: a melt-in-the-mouth braised ox cheek with black bean glaze and oriental vegetables to start, perhaps, or a seared bass with a sauté of wild mushrooms, egg yolk ketchup, smoked and cured egg yolk, leek and fresh Dorset truffle as a main. The Death by Chocolate dessert is served up like a piece of street art and really is to die for. Read expert review From £105per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels for a UK city break   WALES Llys MeddygPembrokeshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating A cosy hotel in the small town of Newport, on the Pembrokeshire coast, offering colourful interiors, reasonable rates and an exceptional restaurant, which has gained a reputation in Pembrokeshire and beyond as one of the best and most reasonable fine dining establishments. Chef Daniel Jones does wonders with local produce – such as Newport bay crab and lobster, Preseli lamb, Welsh beef and West Wales cheeses – in two separate dining areas: the romantic basement-level Cellar Bar, which has a slate floor and leather settees, and a wood burning stove in an inglenook fireplace; and, on the ground floor, the recently refurbished main dining room. Ed smokes salmon in a shed in his house just next door. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Ynyshir Restaurant and RoomsPowys, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Queen Victoria once owned this handsome white painted house as a hidden retreat. The undulating grounds are lovely and lead to the RSPB Ynys Hir Nature Reserve at the head of the Dovey estuary. Current owner and professional artist Rob Reen is responsible for the vibrant interiors, their colours taking a lead from his equally bold canvasses that dominate the walls. In the kitchen, Gareth Ward, who trained with Sat Bains, is a rising star, a recipient of one Michelin star and gunning for a second. He prefers to serve a series of small, integrated dishes, and is always coming up with new ideas and loves surprises. The tasting menu at dinner might include simple plates such as Welsh wagyu, pork belly with 'river bacon' or pollock with black bean. Read expert review From £215per night Tyddyn LlanDenbighshire, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A modest Georgian house just outside Llandrillo, with a complementary extension using local slate and stone. The house was once a shooting lodge belonging to the Dukes of Westminster, but now places food centre stage. The views are spectacular, with the Vale of Edeyrnion’s meadows and the slopes of the Berwyn Mountains beyond. The dining room is decorated in Wedgewood blue with tall windows on three sides. Bryan Webb is considered one of Wales’s foremost chefs, with a long-held Michelin star and a commitment to local produce, such as melting Welsh black beef, and quality seasonal ingredients. The menu changes daily. Read expert review From £195per night The Old Rectory on the LakeSnowdonia, Tal-y-llyn, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A sun-trap hideaway on the shores of a huge lake, and at the foot of the mountain, Cadair Idris. It’s elegant and relaxing with free-standing roll-top baths, an outdoor hot tub and locally sourced food perfectly cooked to order in the restaurant. The food, courtesy of the self-trained chef, Ricky, is outstanding. There may be freshly-caught trout, or local Bala lamb on the menu, along with perfectly-cooked vegetables and perhaps Dauphinois potatoes. The chocolate fondant is a signature pudding. The terrace is the perfect place to enjoy the sunset over the lake with a Welsh gin and tonic. Read expert review From £110per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Harbourmaster HotelAberaeron, Cardigan Bay, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating Beach chic comes into its own at this forget-me-not-blue boutique hotel on Aberaeron’s harbour wall. And you won’t likely forget it with these killer sea views, glam rooms and imaginatively thought-out menus. The restaurant has a serious foodie bent in the evening – try to snag the cwtch (cubby hole) for intimate dining. Go for Carlingford oysters, a plump, sweet burst of the sea, and the perfect prelude for well-cooked Welsh fillet of steak, followed by an oozy chocolate fondant with salted caramel ice cream. For a buzzier vibe, head to the bar-lounge to nurse a Brecon gin or nibble bar snacks like crispy cockles with chilli vinegar. Read expert review From £185per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith FairyhillReynoldston, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Snuggled away in 24 acres of woodland near the Gower coast, Fairyhill enchants with more than just its name. Think Downton Abbey meets Watership Down with a pinch of 21st-century cool. It has carved out its name as a foodie retreat with good reason. The chef pulls off a daring, imaginative menu, taking a pride in local sourcing and garden-grown ingredients in dishes that are both robust and refined. Clean flavours sing of the seasons in dishes simple as gazpacho, pear and Pembroke crab, and goat's cheese mousse with courgette flower with beetroot gel. Mains like meltingly tender Welsh lamb served three ways and Serrano-wrapped monkfish with clams, samphire and fresh linguine strike the perfect balance. Read expert review From £135per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com JabajakCarmarthenshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Jabajak is a former drover’s farm, now a fine vineyard and boutique bolthole, serving home-grown food and wines with a slice of history, rustic elegance and first-class service. The restaurant has scooped awards for its locally sourced, home-grown approach. A drink in the lounge bar piques the appetite for dishes prepared with garden herbs, fruit, veg and edible flowers, ramped up flavour-wise by foraged ingredients such as nettles and wild garlic when in season. Starters including basil-marinated bruschetta with gooseberry and elderflower chutney prelude mains such as butter-soft Celtic steak with local Moody Mabel cheese. There are many nods to local produce at breakfast, too, and the cooked Welsh option with a side order of cockles is bang on the money. Read expert review From £130per night Rates provided by Booking.com   SCOTLAND The Three Chimneys and The House Over-ByDunvegan, Isle of Skye, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This destination restaurant with rooms is back doing what it does best, with a new chef, updated look and reinvigorated sense of discipline and purpose. The essential ingredients are there: attentive service, attractive rooms with mesmerising views and a talented young chef. Choose from a three-course à la carte menu or the epic Skye Showcase Menu, served at the ‘Kitchen Table’, right in the heart of the action. Dishes on the latter menu might include the likes of Dungvegan crab, seaweed and miso-cured halibut, Orbost Farm beef and pot-roasted young grouse. A road (albeit single-track and quiet) runs between the House Over-By and the shore of Loch Dunvegan, slightly eroding what would otherwise be a feeling of privacy, but not unduly distracting from the peaceful views. Read expert review From £345per night The Peat InnSt Andrews, Fife, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating A long-standing gastro-destination lying between the 'town and gown' of St Andrews and Fife’s East Neuk fishing villages, this is well worth a detour. It’s a short stagger from restaurant to homely split-level suites: a calm, comfortable place to sleep off the fabulous Michelin-starred food. The rustic-chic restaurant, all tender taupes with amber and deep sea-blue accents, is a fittingly sophisticated setting for the triumphant cooking. You come here for the food and you won’t leave disappointed. From the home-made butter to the unusually good petit-fours, everything is a reflection of chef Geoffrey Smeddle’s joyous approach to food, with dishes like a starter of smoked beef tartare with wasabi puree raising your eyebrows and your expectations simultaneously. Read expert review From £195per night The Taynuilt Etive Restaurant with RoomsTaynuilt, Argyll & Bute, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating This historic rural hotel has been reinvented as a restaurant with rooms with a young Scottish chef leading a bright and creative team. It's at the heart of a small community that makes an ideal base for exploring Argyll and the isles. The Etive restaurant is the axis here, a genuine foodie oasis and arguably the finest place to eat in the region. John McNulty works wonders with the ultra-local produce, whether it be the Mull Pig’s Heed or the salmon he smokes using local larch from Loch Awe. Sound provenance ripples through the Etive even as far as breakfast, where local fish stars. Read expert review From £79per night 21212Edinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating The four bedrooms above this Michelin-starred restaurant are no afterthought; there is a confident hand at work in rooms that are as striking as the food, displaying a sometimes surprising but always sensual contemporary/baroque style and unexpectedly leafy views. Michelin-starred chef Paul Kitching is a maverick who likes to tease flavours, building fantastic creations that sound impossible, but work, like silky pink trout served with artichokes, pasta, almonds, chickpeas, kidney beans, oriental mushrooms, warm coleslaw and feta cheese. He’s utterly serious but there’s an edge of play - such as a pre-dessert of porridge, milk and cinnamon poured from a china cow. Read expert review From £112per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith The Bridge Inn, RathoEdinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This 18-century coaching inn – now an award-winning gastropub with rooms – is on a leafy canal in a tranquil village just 20 minutes away from Edinburgh's city centre. Four pretty bedrooms are each individually decorated. The cooking is exceptional, with talented head chef Ben doing wonderful things with good Scottish fish and game, properly hung beef, and pork from their own fat and sassy pigs. They grow their own vegetables, herbs and fruit too, in an old walled garden a short walk away down the canal path. Breakfast is a fine indulgence. You can have a hair of the dog as well: Champagne, Prosecco, Buck’s Fizz or a Bloody Mary. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best castle hotels in Scotland Contributions from Ros Belford, Suzy Bennett, Sophie Butler, Gill Charlton, Kerry Christiani, Fiona Duncan, Suzanne King, Gabriella Le Breton, Linda Macdonald, Richard McComb, Robin McKelvie, Harriet O'Brien, Ben Parker, Helen Pickles, Louise Roddon, Cathy Stebbings, Sarah Stirling, Anna Turns, Debbie Ward and Antonia Windsor.

Britain's loveliest restaurants with rooms for autumn

What could be more appealing than the epicurean informality of an inn or restaurant with rooms? These wonderfully relaxed establishments combine an emphasis on great ingredients from the area with local charm and stylish panache. There’s an insider feel that you don’t get at a more formal hotel, and there’s a foodie enthusiasm that wouldn’t be exuded quite as joyfully at a larger enterprise. Autumn/winter is a particularly good time to seek out their gently indulgent accommodation and fabulous seasonal flavours – the likes of wild rabbit with foraged mushrooms, grouse and damsons, elderberries and more. Harriet O'Brien Our experts round up their favourite establishments in Britain, from the Cotswolds to Cornwall, Suffolk to Skye, for feasting – and then flopping.  ENGLAND Cotswolds The Wild RabbitKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Wild Rabbit is a haven of eco-elegance a few fields away from sister enterprise Daylesford, the organic farm shop, deli, spa (and more) of Carole Bamford. She transformed this 18th-century inn and it has been meticulously devised in quiet colours, stone and wood. It’s a beautiful posh pub, with food to match. The kitchen is masterminded by Tim Allen, who won the Wild Rabbit a Michelin star in October 2016. His cuisine takes diners on a taste adventure, with dishes such as haddock on leek and apple slaw, topped with an amazingly cooked egg – poached and lightly deep fried. Read expert review From £148per night The Feathered Nest Country InnOxfordshire, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fabulous food and a superb setting above the Evenlode valley make this old country inn a hedonistic haven. The owners describe it as a pub with a twist. They’ve created an elegant restaurant that has won armloads of awards since it opened, with three stylish and supremely comfy bedrooms. The exquisite food is almost on a par with sleek gastro establishments such as Tom Kerridge’s The Hand and Flowers in Marlow - and even Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons where head chef Kuba Winkowski previously worked. There’s a stupendous wine list, too. Among the choice of 200 or so is a wonderful range of South African wines. There’s also a bar menu featuring classics such as burgers of brilliant quality. Read expert review From £140per night The Wheatsheaf InnNorthleach, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A creeper-clad coaching inn turned arty, boutique haven. The Wheatsheaf is in a particularly pretty and enterprising little Cotswold town. The restaurant draws a regular local crowd and the emphasis is on the very best quality, from the menu ingredients to the room amenities. The sophisticated menu offers great flavour combinations, the likes of roast parsnip and fennel salad with chestnuts, and mutton and apple pie with creamed potatoes. If there’s space in the bar beforehand try an aperitif of Sloe Negroni, with sloe gin and Campari, or opt for a pint of Cotswold Old Hooky. Read expert review From £102per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Kingham PloughKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Kingham Plough is a treat of a foodie destinatio, with relaxing furnishings, genial staff and brilliantly conceived menus. Emily Watkins has won numerous awards for her modern British cuisine with a twist ‒ dishes are often based on old Cotswold recipes. Her food is also much inspired by local produce; the likes of Windrush Valley goat cheese and pork from Paddock Farm a few miles away. There’s a pleasingly short and sophisticated à la carte menu: starters might include slow braised oxtail with horseradish, and mains could feature venison wellington, with meat supplied from nearby Cornbury Park. There’s also a well-priced bar menu featuring gastro comfort food such as rabbit parfait. Read expert review From £145per night The Ebrington ArmsEbrington, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating This hidden treasure set in a gloriously unspoilt village is a modern day version of a country tavern – it’s at once a genuine pub that brews its own very smooth ales; a lovely restaurant with real local flavour; and a charming hotel with rural-chic bedrooms. Chef Ben Dulley offers short, understated menus which reflect his commitment to freshness, with many vegetables straight from surrounding Drinkwater Farm. Dishes are beautifully presented and packed with local flavour – the likes of hot-smoked Bibury trout salad, and Cotswold lamb with stuffed tomatoes. Wines are from independent growers, including the Cotswolds’ own Little Oak Vineyard. Read expert review From £165per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best Cotswolds pubs with rooms   Oxfordshire Artist Residence OxfordshireSouth Leigh, Oxfordshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A unique country pub with a bohemian twist and arty vibe, offering gorgeous quirky rooms, scrumptious meals and contemporary art. The food is as heart-warming as the dining room. Local game and meat, foraged herbs and flowers join vegetables from the garden. The menu could include the likes of smoky pigeon breast electrified by a pickled walnut with caramelised chicory, port jelly and smoked spring onions and plaice in seaweed butter, smoked cockles, sea vegetables and bisque. The wine list is small, selective and good value. Join locals for a pint at the bar, read the paper or play cards around the fire. Read expert review From £130per night • The best luxury hotels in Oxfordshire   Lake District L’EnclumeCartmel, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Simon Rogan's two-Michelin-starred restaurant plus handful of rooms stay true both to the simple village location and rich surrounding land. Rooms are modest but smartly furnished, the setting picture-box pretty while the food is an exemplar of local sourcing and creativity. This isn’t Blumenthal-style magic but simply 20 (tiny) courses of exceptional skill, balance and creativity: an egg shell containing a yolk in mushroom broth; confit cauliflower in a pea and calamint sauce; a finger of turbot in nasturtium butter, the dinkiest caramel mousse sitting on compressed apple. All is presented exquisitely but without fanfare on rustic pottery, handmade glass, even a pebble. The Coravin wine system allows you to try top-rank or small-producer wines. Read expert review From £129per night The Punch Bowl InnLake District, Cumbria, England 8Telegraph expert rating A smart but relaxed country inn, in a quiet corner of the Lake District, with a deserved reputation for its classy food. The ground floor is a semi open-plan series of dining rooms, bar and relaxed eating areas, separated by little steps. The cooking is smart-city-restaurant standard producing assured, modern British dishes that are interesting without being tricksy or fussy. No fancy canapés or pre-starters, just clean flavours. Starters might include black pudding with bubble and squeak or tomato salad with local crab and lobster while mains could be pork with ham hock croquette or cod with Morteau sausage. There's a wide-ranging wine list, plus a couple of local real ales. Read expert review From £130per night • The Lake District's best pubs and inns   Peak District The Samuel Fox Country InnHope Valley, Peak District, England 8Telegraph expert rating This stone-built inn – which is more of a restaurant with rooms than a standard country pub – has an ever-growing reputation. Come for a great dinner, stay over in one of four comfortable rooms and spend the next day exploring the glorious Peak District. The foodie credentials are strong: chef-patron James Duckett has worked with Albert Roux, Michel Roux, Marcus Wareing and Philip Howard, and done extended stints in Australia and Spain. Now he turns out some of the best food in the area: everything from a piquant, pretty-as-a-picture starter of soused sardines to the kind of iced chocolate cherry parfait that makes you wish you hadn’t shared with your other half. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Peak District   Yorkshire Crab Manor HotelThirsk, Yorkshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fun and exotic, individually themed rooms combined with a well-regarded seafood restaurant and an overall madcap sense of decoration make this a hugely popular choice for special occasions. The restaurant specialises in fish and seafood serving both classics – lobster thermidor, grilled Queen scallops – as well as more modern dishes such as sea trout with samphire. It's open for lunch and dinner, and for afternoon 'lighter' options (including moules mariniere), but there's nothing delicate about portion sizes. Half the fun is the setting: jolly bar, romantic dining room or brighter conservatory, all with a bonkers decoration that includes a suite of orchestral instruments. Breakfast is also a delight. Read expert review From £165per night The Star InnHarome, Helmsley, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant-with-rooms with chocolate-box, thatched-pub looks and a bucolic farming-village location. Bedrooms, across the road, have a comfy, hunting-lodge style. Whitby-born chef-owner Andrew Pern was one of the first champions of local sourcing - and why wouldn’t you be with his ‘back garden’: moorland game and pasture-fed meat, coastal fish, Yorkshire Wolds’ fruit and vegetables. He now has a huge kitchen garden at the back of the pub. His menus are punchy, robust yet skilfully balanced and as much about texture as taste: crab stick with seashore vegetables and avocado ice, perhaps followed by roasted lamb chop with truffled faggot or honey-roasted duck with tea-poached quail’s egg. Read expert review From £150per night The Timble InnNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 8Telegraph expert rating A food-driven village pub in a quiet, yet surprisingly well-connected location with bold, contemporary styling and smart bedrooms. Glorious views and walks are on the doorstep. A pub that does two sittings for Sunday lunch is serious about food, and has been awarded two AA rosettes for it. It’s ambitious stuff – wood pigeon with quail’s egg and black pudding; venison loin with celeriac remoulade and chestnuts. The seafood platter and chateaubriand steak are favourites. It's not really a beer pub but offers a wide-ranging wine list – including fine ones by the glass – plus local gins. Read expert review From £150per night The Yorke ArmsNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant with rooms in an off-the-beaten-track location; perfect for walking off the spoiling food. The food is why people come here – some helicopter in from London for chef-proprietor Frances Atkins’s flavour-intense cooking. It’s not fussy or tricksy, just skilled, imaginative and full of the unexpected – quail with lychee and jasmine; brill with fennel in turmeric broth, peach and curd tart. Choose the eight-course tasting menu and everything is a surprise. Much is home-grown; the huge kitchen garden produces a summer surplus. These are meals to savour (even the lunchtime bar menu includes devilled kidneys, and gratin of seared scallops). Read expert review From £345per night • The best luxury hotels in Yorkshire   Norfolk Morston HallNorfolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating A flint- and brick-built Jacobean country-house hotel, with large conservatory extensions that provide extra dining space. Inside, you’ll find open fires, squashy sofas and cosy corners in a hushed, fairly formal atmosphere. The food is the main reason to come to Morston Hall, the only restaurant with a Michelin star on this stretch of coast. Galton Blackiston’s cooking is rated highly by both visitors and locals: he offers a set dinner based on fresh, local ingredients, served at 8pm daily. Four courses usually include two meat dishes (perhaps confit of duck or beef fillet) and a fish course. Recommended wines are suggested to accompany the dishes – or you can choose from an extensive list. Read expert review From £340per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Norfolk   Suffolk The Great HouseLavenham, Suffolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating The five-bedroom hotel looks onto the market square of Lavenham, a well-preserved medieval village of timbered houses. It would be wrong to stay here without sampling the food, as this is primarily a restaurant – and a very good one at that. From a regularly changing menu, you might find starters of mussels with chilli, coriander and cream, tuna sashimi or wild mushroom ravioli, and main courses of pheasant supreme, grilled fillet of lamb with thyme sauce or roasted duck breast with grilled beetroot. Desserts could be dark chocolate terrine, millefeuille or maple syrup rice pudding. Read expert review From £99per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best spa hotels in Suffolk   Somerset The White PostYeovil, Somerset, England 8Telegraph expert rating At this cosy Victorian ‘pub-and-lodgings’, the elegant gastronomy is as much a pull as the rooms. Brett’s passion for foraging and elegant presentation seeps through. The best way to experience the dishes? The 10-course tasting menu, which pays homage to the West Country (pork done eight ways, served with local chilli and ginger cider) as well as international influences (spiced lentil dhal with gurnard, mango and coconut). The wine list is sufficient but it’s the local ales and ciders that stand out, particularly if you pair a pint of Dorset Knob bitter with the Sunday roast. Painted walls are interrupted only by the wide windows, long cardinal-coloured drapes and filament bulb lamps that, along with on-table candles, add just enough light during evening dining. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The most romantic hotels in Somerset   Dorset La FosseCranborne, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating Snug in the wave-like green hills of east Dorset, La Fosse at Cranborne is a peaceful bed and breakfast as well as popular restaurant. Run by husband and wife, this simple West Country retreat, embracing both modern and traditional, feels as far from the madding crowds as possible. Owner-chef Mark is a true locavore, sourcing as much from in and around the village as possible. His passion for local, inventive cuisine has seen him named best chef in Dorset. The colourful duck dish, replete with homegrown vegetables, is a highlight, drizzled in a piquant jus. Mark’s award-winning cheeseboard is part of the experience, so save some room. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Anchor InnSeatown, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Anchor Inn, sat beyond snaking lanes and tucked between scarped cliffs on the edge of a little known Dorset village, is a destination gastropub serving elevated British classics. It is also a boutique hideaway that cocoons guests amid the sound of rolling waves. If the weather is decent, expect a fight to secure a lunchtime spot, either tucked inside or al fresco. Menus from head chef Jean-Paul De Ronne — who previously worked under Masterchef winner Mat Follas — reveal commitment to seasonal fare from land and sea, such as the fresh crab salad using crustacea caught only metres away. Ales are all from Palmers, brewed four miles away, while an extensive cocktail list from former Hix bartender David Smith features a number of Dorset’s own spirits. Read expert review From £120per night • The best hotels in Dorset   Buckinghamshire The Mash InnRadnage, Buckinghamshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating Described by its owner Nick Mash as a ‘new generation inn’, The Mash Inn's aim is to remove the barriers between chef and diner. The open kitchen takes centre stage: a solid wood workstation groaning with ingredients and stacked plates, beneath a ceiling rack dripping with pots and pans, in front of an open fire for rotisserie cooking. Chef Jon Parry cooks up a storm, producing a delicious, earthy and inventive no frills tasting menu and a short à la carte menu. Much of the produce is from the garden or very local. Diners sit at individual tables or at a large communal table, which may sound daunting but such is the communal, friendly atmosphere that it’s a pleasure to do so. Read expert review From £100per night The Hand & FlowersMarlow, Buckinghamshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn with a Michelin-starred restaurant, enticing locals to dine, and couples for weekends or nights away. It's on busy West Street, just along the road from the house where Mary Shelley created Frankenstein. The chef-proprietor is Tom Kerridge, who gained a Michelin star within 10 months from a kitchen which was then the size of a large cupboard. These days he has a new, celadon green kitchen and a brigade of chefs. As restaurants go, it rocks. Expect crayfish scotch egg, slow cooked duck breast with duck fat chips and other earthy, deeply satisfying dishes that are also full of imaginative twists, served in a cosy and convivial dining room. Read expert review From £140per night • The best hotels in Buckinghamshire   Kent RocksaltFolkestone, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Rocksalt is the littoral culinary kingdom of Mark Sargeant of Claridge's fame. A microcosm of London sophistication in gritty Folkestone, it's a genuine dining destination. The recent addition of four bedrooms above "Sargey's" adjacent Smokehouse enables visitors to abandon themselves to gluttony. His dedication to local ingredients introduces diners to new treasures, such as meaty huss dogfish and tart sea buckthorn (oozing out of a dense chocolate mousse fondant), yet dishes are refreshingly clean and unpretentious. Hunks of bread, served with beef dripping, rich butter and home-roasted salt, and nuggets of treacly fudge and slices of colourful rock bookend a perfectly executed meal. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Wife of BathWye, Kent, England 9Telegraph expert rating Another addition to chef Mark Sargeant and Josh De Haan's portfolio of Kentish restaurants with rooms. With a superb Spanish restaurant and tiny tapas bar, its signature quirky style and authentic cuisine works surprisingly well in the bucolic setting. The restaurant serves impeccable fare: juicy scallops with spicy chorizo and earthy morcillo (black pudding); honey sweet melon smothered in Brindisa's finest Serrano ham; succulent Galician steaks with creamy aioli and fiery paprika potatoes; and hake with radishes, Seville orange and a buttery sauce laced with Gin Mare. Save space for pudding: the bitter chocolate tart with salt and olive oil is revelatory, as is ice-cream made with raisins soaked in PX sherry. Read expert review From £70per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Read's Restaurant With RoomsFaversham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Read's, housed in a Georgian mansion on the north Kentish coast, is a smart restaurant with six rooms, owned and run by acclaimed chef David Pitchford and his wife Rona. Sticking firmly to their decades-long recipe for success, they deliver classic cuisine and unfussy hospitality. David won a Michelin star in 1992, which he retained for 20 consecutive years, becoming the second longest holder of the accolade in Britain. The food is hard to fault, if lacking the innovation and excitement that comes with Michelin recognition: comforting, classic French cuisine with British influence. Think ham and pea mousse; smoked haddock in cream sauce topped with cheese soufflé; Kentish lamb served with buttery asparagus and garden vegetables; and a Cassis-soaked summer pudding. Read expert review From £145per night The Dog at WinghamWingham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating A medieval pub in a rural village, run by an enterprising local family, that serves exceptionally good food and features eight attractive bedrooms. Virtually equidistant from Canterbury and Sandwich, it’s ideally located for exploring the Kentish city, countryside and coast. The kitchen is overseen by the young and talented Dan Johns, who has worked at Gary Rhodes’ Searcy’s at The Gherkin and Urban Coterie. The menu changes monthly to reflect seasonality and local produce. Imaginative starters such as fragrant Thai-style chicken salad and rich pork and pistachio terrine with pineapple jam are followed by melt-in-the-mouth Moroccan spiced lamb and crisp pork collar with chorizo dumplings. Read expert review From £86per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best pubs with rooms in Kent   Devon The Dartmoor InnOkehampton, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 16th-century coaching inn on the north-western edge of Dartmoor National Park is acclaimed for its fresh, seasonal cooking, but it’s worth bedding down for a stay in one of its three chic bedrooms. A blackboard heralds not only the breed of cattle, but also the name of the farmer it has come from. Dishes are pub classics, done to perfection: rib-eye steak and chips, confit of duck leg with toffee apple puree and roasted hazelnuts, and brisket of beef. Philip has a strong ethical policy, forging strong links with local artisan food producers, and ensures the beef has been grass fed and reared within a 20-mile radius. Breakfast is refreshingly original, with dainty portions of caramelised bananas or a daring cooked menu, including herb-crusted goat’s cheese, black pudding and bacon lardons. Read expert review From £65per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Lamb InnSandford, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating With open fires, beamed walls, deep sofas and award-winning food, this 16th-century inn in the village of Sandford is a pub of dreams for town-dwellers. Upstairs, seven bedrooms have big beds, soft linen and powerful showers, and there’s a pretty cobbled terrace at the rear. The Lamb Inn’s menu consistently attracts rave reviews. The produce is seasonal and locally sourced, mixing upmarket dishes with pub classics: shellfish bisque, mushroom ravioli, roasted pigeon with smoked bacon and savoy cabbage or steak and chips. The perfectly fluffy sticky toffee pudding is worth a visit alone. Landlord Mark is a fan of real ale and regularly rotates his cask brews to ensure they stay fresh. Read expert review From £69per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Masons ArmsBranscombe, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This dog-friendly 14th-century thatched inn, in Branscombe, on the Jurassic Coast, is one of Devon’s best. It prides itself on serving local, seasonal Devon fare on a traditional pub menu – it even has a 'food sourcing map' detailing exactly where the produce comes from. There’s steamed River Exe mussels and fries, steak and kidney shortcrust pie, rump steak and a seafood platter. Ales, hand-pumped from casks, are just as local. On a sunny day, the action moves outside to the pretty suntrap terrace. It's a 15-minute walk to Branscombe Beach, a lovely, long shingle cove from where you can pick up the South West Coastal Path. Read expert review From £75per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Salutation InnTopsham, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating Eat well and rest your head at this 18th-century coaching inn in chichi Topsham: a stylish option with a truly excellent restaurant, helmed by one of Gordon Ramsay's former protégés. Exquisite handmade petit-fours welcome guests on arrival – the first hint that your dining experience will be full of extra surprises. The wild mushroom appetiser comes accompanied by an umami-enhancing pinot noir, and the tomato gazpacho with local crab, served in a glass on ice, and followed by a rich rump of beef from Greendale Farm. Each modern dish is accompanied by diverse wines chosen by Stephen Edwardes – the unusual sake complements the beautiful strawberry dessert which is garnished with home-grown edible flowers. Read expert review From £145per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Devon   Cornwall The Gurnard's HeadSt Ives, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn offering outstanding food, fabulous sea and moorland views, situated close to St Ives and Land's End. Popular with walkers and couples of all ages seeking a low-key, restorative break in a wild coastal location. Locals come from miles around to dine here. The Scottish head chef, Bruce Rennie, cooks a short, inventive menu. Lunch may include beetroot risotto, octopus and white wine stew, or Merguez sausages with Puy lentils. The supper menu may include salmon and lobster tortellini, cod with pig’s trotter, and sole with Vermouth. The wine list focuses on Old World wines, notably from France, Italy and Portugal. Read expert review From £110per night Padstow TownhousePadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A handsome listed townhouse on Padstow's high street that has been superbly renovated and opened as a six-bedroom luxury guesthouse by chef Paul Ainsworth to complement his Michelin-starred restaurant, Paul Ainsworth at Number 6. Head there for amusingly-presented, delicately-flavoured meat and fish dishes and a fun and informal atmosphere, or to his even more informal restaurant, Rojanos, for superior pasta, pizza and hamburgers. Breakfast is served at the latter. The guesthouse owns an electric BMW in which guests can be transported if they don’t want to walk around. Read expert review From £280per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com St Petroc's HotelPadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A sociable, intimate townhouse with a labyrinth of gorgeously styled sitting and reading rooms – as well as a buzzy bistro. St Petroc’s Bistro opened along with the hotel in 1988. It’s a lovely room – with an engaging selection of original art on the walls – and a relaxing, happy place to eat at either lunch or dinner. Pride of place on the menu goes to the 30-day dry-aged steaks, but there are fish, chicken and vegetarian options as well – all of them classic Rick Stein recipes (try the grilled hake with Serrano ham, succotash and chives). Ruby’s Bar is the new Stein pub – a great place for a local beer or cocktail. Read expert review From £112per night Kota Restaurant with RoomsPorthleven, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating With a fantastic Asian-Cornish fusion restaurant downstairs, and Porthleven’s picturesque harbour on the doorstep, the Kota’s two simple, homey rooms are proof that sometimes substance can win over style. The vibe in the restaurant is casual, with a long room overlooking the harbour and a waterfront lawn on which you can dine in good weather. New Zealander Jude, who is part Maori, part Malay-Chinese, brings Asian spices and cooking styles to fresh, meticulously sourced Cornish produce – squid with green mango salad, scallops with miso dressing and seaweed salad, and Laksa with prawns, mussels and fish. There are also some very creative burgers – tempura fish with wasabi tartare, and satay chicken with Asian slaw. Read expert review From £75per night DriftwoodPortscatho, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating Sitting on a hill above the rugged coastline of the Roseland peninsula, Driftwood is nautically furnished in soft creams and blues. A Michelin-starred restaurant, private sea-facing terraces, and a private beach make this the perfect venue for pretty much everyone. There are wonderful coastal path walks for miles in each direction. This is Cornish cooking at its finest: unfussy and focused on bringing out the flavour of fresh fish and seafood and locally reared beef and lamb. Dinner in summer comprises a six-course tasting menu with complementary wines. For children there are early suppers with proper chef-made food. Read expert review From £250per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Coombeshead FarmLewannick, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating This is the joint venture from chef Tom Adams of London restaurant Pitt Cue and April Bloomfield, English born chef/proprietor of The Spotted Pig in New York. Both wanted to get back to the roots of food and hospitality and the result is this relaxed communal dining farmhouse b&b. Tom and his partner Lottie Mew live off the land and share their fresh, foraged, pickled and harvested produce with their guests. Tom cooks a three-course feast, kicking off with plates of delicious nibbles from 6.30pm onwards, which is shared at a communal table by all the guests. Tom’s own rare breed Mangalitza pigs feature large, plus perhaps a cep and walnut broth, lamb shoulder and mushroom porridge, with madeleine, whey and prune for pudding. Wines are unusual. Read expert review From £175per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Cornwall   Sussex The Barn at RoundhurstLurgashall, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating A rural South Downs retreat on a 250-acre organic farm with its own lakes. Home-reared food is a specialty. Converted outhouses with six rooms are set around a courtyard, just steps from a dramatic converted barn for dining and lounging. A four-course set menu with generous portions is available for guests and non-guests Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays; a light supper is provided for guests on other days. Meals highlight the farm’s own organic beef, lamb and pork and could include colourful heritage carrots and an exceptional triple chocolate mousse. Read expert review From £98per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com CrouchersChichester, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating An unassuming motel-like exterior belies a foodie haven a short drive from the Witterings. Relax on the patio of a garden-facing room, head to the beach, or explore the cultural and sporting highlights around Chichester but leave room for dinner in the impressive restaurant. Proximity to the coast ensures good seafood. The squid-ink pasta starter is light and delicate and a showy dessert of white chocolate and saffron mousse with edible flowers, caramel and orange ice-cream is a multi-sensory delight. A strong wine list includes an emphasis on the owners’ native South Africa. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Crab & LobsterWest Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating Herons can be seen on the doorstep of this modernised 350-year-old pub beside a bird sanctuary, where guests can stay in cosy bedrooms or an adjoining cottage. Tuck into locally caught seafood in the bar-restaurant and plan nature walks or trips to nearby beaches. The menu, as this gastropub’s name suggests, makes good use of locally caught seafood. Baked Selsey crab with a salad or crab cakes is a highlight. Meat, like rump of lamb (on an autumn menu with garlic Pommes Anna, butternut squash purée, confit tomatoes, baby leeks and Madeira jus) is also locally reared. There’s an extensive wine list and takeaway fish and chips. Read expert review From £160per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith Wingrove HouseAlfriston, South Downs, England 8Telegraph expert rating Yards from the South Downs Way and the half-timbered, candlelit pubs of Alfriston, this swish 19th-century boutique hotel with a modern country restaurant delivers roaring log fires, low-slung sofas and top-notch food, and draws city dwellers craving an easy country escape. Matthew Comben, formerly of the Hungry Monk in Jevington, heads up the kitchen and has brought with him the Monk's original banoffee pie recipe. Highlights from the seasonal menu include cauliflower fritters with Brighton blue cheese mayonnaise, and a soft beef fillet with tarragon. There's an impressive gin menu with 11 different options, including Brighton Gin, and a refreshingly reasonable wine list. Read expert review From £108per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best places and cities to visit in England – and where to stay   Cheshire The Roebuck InnMobberley, Cheshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This French-influenced bistro with rooms is perfect weekend break material, with lashings of character, great food and a beautifully designed garden. The bistro menu, tweaked with the seasons, is European in style, and everything comes in generous portions, whether it’s ‘small plates’ of cassoulet, caponata and crostini; mains such as saffron risotto, venison bourguignon and moules marinière; or puds of tarte au citron, profiteroles and crème caramel. On the drinks front, you’ll find an interesting selection of local ales, old-world wines and a vintage dresser filled with classic aperitifs and digestifs. Read expert review From £115per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • Britain's cosiest hotels for autumn   County Durham Lord Crewe ArmsBlanchland, Northumberland, England 9Telegraph expert rating A lord-of-the-manor building, in a pin-neat estate village, that oozes atmosphere at every stone-flagged turn. A reputation for honest, British cooking, plus its rural location, makes it popular with walkers and foodies as well as the country-sports fraternity. Expect punchy, robust, British cooking, rich with flavour and unusual combinations: devilled lamb’s kidneys on roasted cauliflower; grilled sea trout and mixed alliums; sea buckthorn posset. There’s an element of fun, too; eggy bread with fried bacon or Bloody Mary tomatoes on toast for breakfast. Some ingredients come from the kitchen garden. Eat on the terrace in the summer. The atmospheric, barrel-vaulted bar has local ales including a custom-made Lord Crewe Brew. Read expert review From £155per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Rose & CrownCounty Durham, England 9Telegraph expert rating A foodie destination country inn that has smartened up while still maintaining a sense of village pub: country-comfortable rooms; horse-brasses and dogs in the bar. Surrounded by the sheep-dotted fields and moors of the North Pennines, you come to eat, relax and then walk it off. The modern British menu shows confident cooking that lets the ingredients shine through; no fuss but definitely interesting: honey-glazed goat's cheese with beetroot, hazelnuts and gingerbread, perhaps, or pan-fried fillet of sea trout with roasted baby gem and crushed peas. There’s good local sourcing with Teesdale lamb rarely off the menu. Eat in the candle-lit dining room or buzzier bar; the latter offers three real ales and a good selection of single malts. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best country house hotels in Britain   Cities The Henrietta HotelCovent Garden, London, England 8Telegraph expert rating An 18-bedroom boutique address in one of Covent Garden’s most attractive streets, owned and run by the Paris-based Experimental Group, with a cocktail bar, Ollie Dabbous restaurant and quirky interior design by Dorothée Meilichzon. The food, is delicious – clean, clever and uncomplicated – with highlights that might include the sheeps’ milk curds with pistachio, beef tartare with nasturtium and rye, and wonderful freshly baked warm madeleines with Chantilly cream. Don't miss a cocktail, which can be chosen à la carte or with a consultation from the barman. Read expert review From £220per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Ginger PigHove, Brighton, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 11-bedroom guesthouse above Hove’s highly-acclaimed Ginger Pig Bar and Restaurant is ideal if you want a quieter seaside base. Spacious and elegantly understated rooms include thoughtful beach bags with towels and well-stocked minibars. Always buzzy, this sprawling gastropub serves up highly delicious grub and excellent Sunday roasts. Look out for seasonal specials like asparagus with brown crab and chipotle mayo, or seabream with samphire. The adjoining Orangerie is where breakfast is served (there’s an outdoor area for sunny days), offering imaginative dishes such as baked eggs with hummus, chorizo and peppers, Irish rock oysters and rarebit with roasted tomatoes and mushrooms. Read expert review From £80per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Simpsons RestaurantBirmingham, England 8Telegraph expert rating The cooking is superlative at this gastronomic powerhouse, which also offers three individually styled – and great value – rooms. Throw in the added draw of the Simpsons Cookery School and you pretty much have Michelin-starred, Brummie food nirvana. The winning team of owner Andreas Antona and chef director Luke Tipping, one of Britain’s finest sauciers, has weathered fashions and trends. The three-course à la carte menu features plump marinière-style mussels on a delicate, buttery skate wing, while refined hipster influences are showcased with a barbecued beef cheek with a rich, silky bone marrow sauce. The pastry section’s take on a Belgian Speculoos cookie, with caramelised white chocolate and coffee granite, is fabulous. Read expert review From £110per night The White Star TavernSouthampton, Hampshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating A characterful tavern with rooms on Southampton’s vibrant Oxford Street. The restaurant is a destination in itself, with a varied menu that caters to all comers. If you fancy a plate of fish and chips washed down with real ale, then you’ll get the crispest batter and a unique brew from Itchen Valley. But the real tour de force is the à la carte menu, where chef Matt Noonan serves up his creativity and innovation in dishes that linger long in the memory: a melt-in-the-mouth braised ox cheek with black bean glaze and oriental vegetables to start, perhaps, or a seared bass with a sauté of wild mushrooms, egg yolk ketchup, smoked and cured egg yolk, leek and fresh Dorset truffle as a main. The Death by Chocolate dessert is served up like a piece of street art and really is to die for. Read expert review From £105per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels for a UK city break   WALES Llys MeddygPembrokeshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating A cosy hotel in the small town of Newport, on the Pembrokeshire coast, offering colourful interiors, reasonable rates and an exceptional restaurant, which has gained a reputation in Pembrokeshire and beyond as one of the best and most reasonable fine dining establishments. Chef Daniel Jones does wonders with local produce – such as Newport bay crab and lobster, Preseli lamb, Welsh beef and West Wales cheeses – in two separate dining areas: the romantic basement-level Cellar Bar, which has a slate floor and leather settees, and a wood burning stove in an inglenook fireplace; and, on the ground floor, the recently refurbished main dining room. Ed smokes salmon in a shed in his house just next door. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Ynyshir Restaurant and RoomsPowys, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Queen Victoria once owned this handsome white painted house as a hidden retreat. The undulating grounds are lovely and lead to the RSPB Ynys Hir Nature Reserve at the head of the Dovey estuary. Current owner and professional artist Rob Reen is responsible for the vibrant interiors, their colours taking a lead from his equally bold canvasses that dominate the walls. In the kitchen, Gareth Ward, who trained with Sat Bains, is a rising star, a recipient of one Michelin star and gunning for a second. He prefers to serve a series of small, integrated dishes, and is always coming up with new ideas and loves surprises. The tasting menu at dinner might include simple plates such as Welsh wagyu, pork belly with 'river bacon' or pollock with black bean. Read expert review From £215per night Tyddyn LlanDenbighshire, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A modest Georgian house just outside Llandrillo, with a complementary extension using local slate and stone. The house was once a shooting lodge belonging to the Dukes of Westminster, but now places food centre stage. The views are spectacular, with the Vale of Edeyrnion’s meadows and the slopes of the Berwyn Mountains beyond. The dining room is decorated in Wedgewood blue with tall windows on three sides. Bryan Webb is considered one of Wales’s foremost chefs, with a long-held Michelin star and a commitment to local produce, such as melting Welsh black beef, and quality seasonal ingredients. The menu changes daily. Read expert review From £195per night The Old Rectory on the LakeSnowdonia, Tal-y-llyn, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A sun-trap hideaway on the shores of a huge lake, and at the foot of the mountain, Cadair Idris. It’s elegant and relaxing with free-standing roll-top baths, an outdoor hot tub and locally sourced food perfectly cooked to order in the restaurant. The food, courtesy of the self-trained chef, Ricky, is outstanding. There may be freshly-caught trout, or local Bala lamb on the menu, along with perfectly-cooked vegetables and perhaps Dauphinois potatoes. The chocolate fondant is a signature pudding. The terrace is the perfect place to enjoy the sunset over the lake with a Welsh gin and tonic. Read expert review From £110per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Harbourmaster HotelAberaeron, Cardigan Bay, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating Beach chic comes into its own at this forget-me-not-blue boutique hotel on Aberaeron’s harbour wall. And you won’t likely forget it with these killer sea views, glam rooms and imaginatively thought-out menus. The restaurant has a serious foodie bent in the evening – try to snag the cwtch (cubby hole) for intimate dining. Go for Carlingford oysters, a plump, sweet burst of the sea, and the perfect prelude for well-cooked Welsh fillet of steak, followed by an oozy chocolate fondant with salted caramel ice cream. For a buzzier vibe, head to the bar-lounge to nurse a Brecon gin or nibble bar snacks like crispy cockles with chilli vinegar. Read expert review From £185per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith FairyhillReynoldston, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Snuggled away in 24 acres of woodland near the Gower coast, Fairyhill enchants with more than just its name. Think Downton Abbey meets Watership Down with a pinch of 21st-century cool. It has carved out its name as a foodie retreat with good reason. The chef pulls off a daring, imaginative menu, taking a pride in local sourcing and garden-grown ingredients in dishes that are both robust and refined. Clean flavours sing of the seasons in dishes simple as gazpacho, pear and Pembroke crab, and goat's cheese mousse with courgette flower with beetroot gel. Mains like meltingly tender Welsh lamb served three ways and Serrano-wrapped monkfish with clams, samphire and fresh linguine strike the perfect balance. Read expert review From £135per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com JabajakCarmarthenshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Jabajak is a former drover’s farm, now a fine vineyard and boutique bolthole, serving home-grown food and wines with a slice of history, rustic elegance and first-class service. The restaurant has scooped awards for its locally sourced, home-grown approach. A drink in the lounge bar piques the appetite for dishes prepared with garden herbs, fruit, veg and edible flowers, ramped up flavour-wise by foraged ingredients such as nettles and wild garlic when in season. Starters including basil-marinated bruschetta with gooseberry and elderflower chutney prelude mains such as butter-soft Celtic steak with local Moody Mabel cheese. There are many nods to local produce at breakfast, too, and the cooked Welsh option with a side order of cockles is bang on the money. Read expert review From £130per night Rates provided by Booking.com   SCOTLAND The Three Chimneys and The House Over-ByDunvegan, Isle of Skye, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This destination restaurant with rooms is back doing what it does best, with a new chef, updated look and reinvigorated sense of discipline and purpose. The essential ingredients are there: attentive service, attractive rooms with mesmerising views and a talented young chef. Choose from a three-course à la carte menu or the epic Skye Showcase Menu, served at the ‘Kitchen Table’, right in the heart of the action. Dishes on the latter menu might include the likes of Dungvegan crab, seaweed and miso-cured halibut, Orbost Farm beef and pot-roasted young grouse. A road (albeit single-track and quiet) runs between the House Over-By and the shore of Loch Dunvegan, slightly eroding what would otherwise be a feeling of privacy, but not unduly distracting from the peaceful views. Read expert review From £345per night The Peat InnSt Andrews, Fife, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating A long-standing gastro-destination lying between the 'town and gown' of St Andrews and Fife’s East Neuk fishing villages, this is well worth a detour. It’s a short stagger from restaurant to homely split-level suites: a calm, comfortable place to sleep off the fabulous Michelin-starred food. The rustic-chic restaurant, all tender taupes with amber and deep sea-blue accents, is a fittingly sophisticated setting for the triumphant cooking. You come here for the food and you won’t leave disappointed. From the home-made butter to the unusually good petit-fours, everything is a reflection of chef Geoffrey Smeddle’s joyous approach to food, with dishes like a starter of smoked beef tartare with wasabi puree raising your eyebrows and your expectations simultaneously. Read expert review From £195per night The Taynuilt Etive Restaurant with RoomsTaynuilt, Argyll & Bute, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating This historic rural hotel has been reinvented as a restaurant with rooms with a young Scottish chef leading a bright and creative team. It's at the heart of a small community that makes an ideal base for exploring Argyll and the isles. The Etive restaurant is the axis here, a genuine foodie oasis and arguably the finest place to eat in the region. John McNulty works wonders with the ultra-local produce, whether it be the Mull Pig’s Heed or the salmon he smokes using local larch from Loch Awe. Sound provenance ripples through the Etive even as far as breakfast, where local fish stars. Read expert review From £79per night 21212Edinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating The four bedrooms above this Michelin-starred restaurant are no afterthought; there is a confident hand at work in rooms that are as striking as the food, displaying a sometimes surprising but always sensual contemporary/baroque style and unexpectedly leafy views. Michelin-starred chef Paul Kitching is a maverick who likes to tease flavours, building fantastic creations that sound impossible, but work, like silky pink trout served with artichokes, pasta, almonds, chickpeas, kidney beans, oriental mushrooms, warm coleslaw and feta cheese. He’s utterly serious but there’s an edge of play - such as a pre-dessert of porridge, milk and cinnamon poured from a china cow. Read expert review From £112per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith The Bridge Inn, RathoEdinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This 18-century coaching inn – now an award-winning gastropub with rooms – is on a leafy canal in a tranquil village just 20 minutes away from Edinburgh's city centre. Four pretty bedrooms are each individually decorated. The cooking is exceptional, with talented head chef Ben doing wonderful things with good Scottish fish and game, properly hung beef, and pork from their own fat and sassy pigs. They grow their own vegetables, herbs and fruit too, in an old walled garden a short walk away down the canal path. Breakfast is a fine indulgence. You can have a hair of the dog as well: Champagne, Prosecco, Buck’s Fizz or a Bloody Mary. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best castle hotels in Scotland Contributions from Ros Belford, Suzy Bennett, Sophie Butler, Gill Charlton, Kerry Christiani, Fiona Duncan, Suzanne King, Gabriella Le Breton, Linda Macdonald, Richard McComb, Robin McKelvie, Harriet O'Brien, Ben Parker, Helen Pickles, Louise Roddon, Cathy Stebbings, Sarah Stirling, Anna Turns, Debbie Ward and Antonia Windsor.

Britain's loveliest restaurants with rooms for autumn

What could be more appealing than the epicurean informality of an inn or restaurant with rooms? These wonderfully relaxed establishments combine an emphasis on great ingredients from the area with local charm and stylish panache. There’s an insider feel that you don’t get at a more formal hotel, and there’s a foodie enthusiasm that wouldn’t be exuded quite as joyfully at a larger enterprise. Autumn/winter is a particularly good time to seek out their gently indulgent accommodation and fabulous seasonal flavours – the likes of wild rabbit with foraged mushrooms, grouse and damsons, elderberries and more. Harriet O'Brien Our experts round up their favourite establishments in Britain, from the Cotswolds to Cornwall, Suffolk to Skye, for feasting – and then flopping.  ENGLAND Cotswolds The Wild RabbitKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Wild Rabbit is a haven of eco-elegance a few fields away from sister enterprise Daylesford, the organic farm shop, deli, spa (and more) of Carole Bamford. She transformed this 18th-century inn and it has been meticulously devised in quiet colours, stone and wood. It’s a beautiful posh pub, with food to match. The kitchen is masterminded by Tim Allen, who won the Wild Rabbit a Michelin star in October 2016. His cuisine takes diners on a taste adventure, with dishes such as haddock on leek and apple slaw, topped with an amazingly cooked egg – poached and lightly deep fried. Read expert review From £148per night The Feathered Nest Country InnOxfordshire, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fabulous food and a superb setting above the Evenlode valley make this old country inn a hedonistic haven. The owners describe it as a pub with a twist. They’ve created an elegant restaurant that has won armloads of awards since it opened, with three stylish and supremely comfy bedrooms. The exquisite food is almost on a par with sleek gastro establishments such as Tom Kerridge’s The Hand and Flowers in Marlow - and even Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons where head chef Kuba Winkowski previously worked. There’s a stupendous wine list, too. Among the choice of 200 or so is a wonderful range of South African wines. There’s also a bar menu featuring classics such as burgers of brilliant quality. Read expert review From £140per night The Wheatsheaf InnNorthleach, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A creeper-clad coaching inn turned arty, boutique haven. The Wheatsheaf is in a particularly pretty and enterprising little Cotswold town. The restaurant draws a regular local crowd and the emphasis is on the very best quality, from the menu ingredients to the room amenities. The sophisticated menu offers great flavour combinations, the likes of roast parsnip and fennel salad with chestnuts, and mutton and apple pie with creamed potatoes. If there’s space in the bar beforehand try an aperitif of Sloe Negroni, with sloe gin and Campari, or opt for a pint of Cotswold Old Hooky. Read expert review From £102per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Kingham PloughKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Kingham Plough is a treat of a foodie destinatio, with relaxing furnishings, genial staff and brilliantly conceived menus. Emily Watkins has won numerous awards for her modern British cuisine with a twist ‒ dishes are often based on old Cotswold recipes. Her food is also much inspired by local produce; the likes of Windrush Valley goat cheese and pork from Paddock Farm a few miles away. There’s a pleasingly short and sophisticated à la carte menu: starters might include slow braised oxtail with horseradish, and mains could feature venison wellington, with meat supplied from nearby Cornbury Park. There’s also a well-priced bar menu featuring gastro comfort food such as rabbit parfait. Read expert review From £145per night The Ebrington ArmsEbrington, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating This hidden treasure set in a gloriously unspoilt village is a modern day version of a country tavern – it’s at once a genuine pub that brews its own very smooth ales; a lovely restaurant with real local flavour; and a charming hotel with rural-chic bedrooms. Chef Ben Dulley offers short, understated menus which reflect his commitment to freshness, with many vegetables straight from surrounding Drinkwater Farm. Dishes are beautifully presented and packed with local flavour – the likes of hot-smoked Bibury trout salad, and Cotswold lamb with stuffed tomatoes. Wines are from independent growers, including the Cotswolds’ own Little Oak Vineyard. Read expert review From £165per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best Cotswolds pubs with rooms   Oxfordshire Artist Residence OxfordshireSouth Leigh, Oxfordshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A unique country pub with a bohemian twist and arty vibe, offering gorgeous quirky rooms, scrumptious meals and contemporary art. The food is as heart-warming as the dining room. Local game and meat, foraged herbs and flowers join vegetables from the garden. The menu could include the likes of smoky pigeon breast electrified by a pickled walnut with caramelised chicory, port jelly and smoked spring onions and plaice in seaweed butter, smoked cockles, sea vegetables and bisque. The wine list is small, selective and good value. Join locals for a pint at the bar, read the paper or play cards around the fire. Read expert review From £130per night • The best luxury hotels in Oxfordshire   Lake District L’EnclumeCartmel, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Simon Rogan's two-Michelin-starred restaurant plus handful of rooms stay true both to the simple village location and rich surrounding land. Rooms are modest but smartly furnished, the setting picture-box pretty while the food is an exemplar of local sourcing and creativity. This isn’t Blumenthal-style magic but simply 20 (tiny) courses of exceptional skill, balance and creativity: an egg shell containing a yolk in mushroom broth; confit cauliflower in a pea and calamint sauce; a finger of turbot in nasturtium butter, the dinkiest caramel mousse sitting on compressed apple. All is presented exquisitely but without fanfare on rustic pottery, handmade glass, even a pebble. The Coravin wine system allows you to try top-rank or small-producer wines. Read expert review From £129per night The Punch Bowl InnLake District, Cumbria, England 8Telegraph expert rating A smart but relaxed country inn, in a quiet corner of the Lake District, with a deserved reputation for its classy food. The ground floor is a semi open-plan series of dining rooms, bar and relaxed eating areas, separated by little steps. The cooking is smart-city-restaurant standard producing assured, modern British dishes that are interesting without being tricksy or fussy. No fancy canapés or pre-starters, just clean flavours. Starters might include black pudding with bubble and squeak or tomato salad with local crab and lobster while mains could be pork with ham hock croquette or cod with Morteau sausage. There's a wide-ranging wine list, plus a couple of local real ales. Read expert review From £130per night • The Lake District's best pubs and inns   Peak District The Samuel Fox Country InnHope Valley, Peak District, England 8Telegraph expert rating This stone-built inn – which is more of a restaurant with rooms than a standard country pub – has an ever-growing reputation. Come for a great dinner, stay over in one of four comfortable rooms and spend the next day exploring the glorious Peak District. The foodie credentials are strong: chef-patron James Duckett has worked with Albert Roux, Michel Roux, Marcus Wareing and Philip Howard, and done extended stints in Australia and Spain. Now he turns out some of the best food in the area: everything from a piquant, pretty-as-a-picture starter of soused sardines to the kind of iced chocolate cherry parfait that makes you wish you hadn’t shared with your other half. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Peak District   Yorkshire Crab Manor HotelThirsk, Yorkshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fun and exotic, individually themed rooms combined with a well-regarded seafood restaurant and an overall madcap sense of decoration make this a hugely popular choice for special occasions. The restaurant specialises in fish and seafood serving both classics – lobster thermidor, grilled Queen scallops – as well as more modern dishes such as sea trout with samphire. It's open for lunch and dinner, and for afternoon 'lighter' options (including moules mariniere), but there's nothing delicate about portion sizes. Half the fun is the setting: jolly bar, romantic dining room or brighter conservatory, all with a bonkers decoration that includes a suite of orchestral instruments. Breakfast is also a delight. Read expert review From £165per night The Star InnHarome, Helmsley, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant-with-rooms with chocolate-box, thatched-pub looks and a bucolic farming-village location. Bedrooms, across the road, have a comfy, hunting-lodge style. Whitby-born chef-owner Andrew Pern was one of the first champions of local sourcing - and why wouldn’t you be with his ‘back garden’: moorland game and pasture-fed meat, coastal fish, Yorkshire Wolds’ fruit and vegetables. He now has a huge kitchen garden at the back of the pub. His menus are punchy, robust yet skilfully balanced and as much about texture as taste: crab stick with seashore vegetables and avocado ice, perhaps followed by roasted lamb chop with truffled faggot or honey-roasted duck with tea-poached quail’s egg. Read expert review From £150per night The Timble InnNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 8Telegraph expert rating A food-driven village pub in a quiet, yet surprisingly well-connected location with bold, contemporary styling and smart bedrooms. Glorious views and walks are on the doorstep. A pub that does two sittings for Sunday lunch is serious about food, and has been awarded two AA rosettes for it. It’s ambitious stuff – wood pigeon with quail’s egg and black pudding; venison loin with celeriac remoulade and chestnuts. The seafood platter and chateaubriand steak are favourites. It's not really a beer pub but offers a wide-ranging wine list – including fine ones by the glass – plus local gins. Read expert review From £150per night The Yorke ArmsNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant with rooms in an off-the-beaten-track location; perfect for walking off the spoiling food. The food is why people come here – some helicopter in from London for chef-proprietor Frances Atkins’s flavour-intense cooking. It’s not fussy or tricksy, just skilled, imaginative and full of the unexpected – quail with lychee and jasmine; brill with fennel in turmeric broth, peach and curd tart. Choose the eight-course tasting menu and everything is a surprise. Much is home-grown; the huge kitchen garden produces a summer surplus. These are meals to savour (even the lunchtime bar menu includes devilled kidneys, and gratin of seared scallops). Read expert review From £345per night • The best luxury hotels in Yorkshire   Norfolk Morston HallNorfolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating A flint- and brick-built Jacobean country-house hotel, with large conservatory extensions that provide extra dining space. Inside, you’ll find open fires, squashy sofas and cosy corners in a hushed, fairly formal atmosphere. The food is the main reason to come to Morston Hall, the only restaurant with a Michelin star on this stretch of coast. Galton Blackiston’s cooking is rated highly by both visitors and locals: he offers a set dinner based on fresh, local ingredients, served at 8pm daily. Four courses usually include two meat dishes (perhaps confit of duck or beef fillet) and a fish course. Recommended wines are suggested to accompany the dishes – or you can choose from an extensive list. Read expert review From £340per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Norfolk   Suffolk The Great HouseLavenham, Suffolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating The five-bedroom hotel looks onto the market square of Lavenham, a well-preserved medieval village of timbered houses. It would be wrong to stay here without sampling the food, as this is primarily a restaurant – and a very good one at that. From a regularly changing menu, you might find starters of mussels with chilli, coriander and cream, tuna sashimi or wild mushroom ravioli, and main courses of pheasant supreme, grilled fillet of lamb with thyme sauce or roasted duck breast with grilled beetroot. Desserts could be dark chocolate terrine, millefeuille or maple syrup rice pudding. Read expert review From £99per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best spa hotels in Suffolk   Somerset The White PostYeovil, Somerset, England 8Telegraph expert rating At this cosy Victorian ‘pub-and-lodgings’, the elegant gastronomy is as much a pull as the rooms. Brett’s passion for foraging and elegant presentation seeps through. The best way to experience the dishes? The 10-course tasting menu, which pays homage to the West Country (pork done eight ways, served with local chilli and ginger cider) as well as international influences (spiced lentil dhal with gurnard, mango and coconut). The wine list is sufficient but it’s the local ales and ciders that stand out, particularly if you pair a pint of Dorset Knob bitter with the Sunday roast. Painted walls are interrupted only by the wide windows, long cardinal-coloured drapes and filament bulb lamps that, along with on-table candles, add just enough light during evening dining. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The most romantic hotels in Somerset   Dorset La FosseCranborne, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating Snug in the wave-like green hills of east Dorset, La Fosse at Cranborne is a peaceful bed and breakfast as well as popular restaurant. Run by husband and wife, this simple West Country retreat, embracing both modern and traditional, feels as far from the madding crowds as possible. Owner-chef Mark is a true locavore, sourcing as much from in and around the village as possible. His passion for local, inventive cuisine has seen him named best chef in Dorset. The colourful duck dish, replete with homegrown vegetables, is a highlight, drizzled in a piquant jus. Mark’s award-winning cheeseboard is part of the experience, so save some room. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Anchor InnSeatown, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Anchor Inn, sat beyond snaking lanes and tucked between scarped cliffs on the edge of a little known Dorset village, is a destination gastropub serving elevated British classics. It is also a boutique hideaway that cocoons guests amid the sound of rolling waves. If the weather is decent, expect a fight to secure a lunchtime spot, either tucked inside or al fresco. Menus from head chef Jean-Paul De Ronne — who previously worked under Masterchef winner Mat Follas — reveal commitment to seasonal fare from land and sea, such as the fresh crab salad using crustacea caught only metres away. Ales are all from Palmers, brewed four miles away, while an extensive cocktail list from former Hix bartender David Smith features a number of Dorset’s own spirits. Read expert review From £120per night • The best hotels in Dorset   Buckinghamshire The Mash InnRadnage, Buckinghamshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating Described by its owner Nick Mash as a ‘new generation inn’, The Mash Inn's aim is to remove the barriers between chef and diner. The open kitchen takes centre stage: a solid wood workstation groaning with ingredients and stacked plates, beneath a ceiling rack dripping with pots and pans, in front of an open fire for rotisserie cooking. Chef Jon Parry cooks up a storm, producing a delicious, earthy and inventive no frills tasting menu and a short à la carte menu. Much of the produce is from the garden or very local. Diners sit at individual tables or at a large communal table, which may sound daunting but such is the communal, friendly atmosphere that it’s a pleasure to do so. Read expert review From £100per night The Hand & FlowersMarlow, Buckinghamshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn with a Michelin-starred restaurant, enticing locals to dine, and couples for weekends or nights away. It's on busy West Street, just along the road from the house where Mary Shelley created Frankenstein. The chef-proprietor is Tom Kerridge, who gained a Michelin star within 10 months from a kitchen which was then the size of a large cupboard. These days he has a new, celadon green kitchen and a brigade of chefs. As restaurants go, it rocks. Expect crayfish scotch egg, slow cooked duck breast with duck fat chips and other earthy, deeply satisfying dishes that are also full of imaginative twists, served in a cosy and convivial dining room. Read expert review From £140per night • The best hotels in Buckinghamshire   Kent RocksaltFolkestone, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Rocksalt is the littoral culinary kingdom of Mark Sargeant of Claridge's fame. A microcosm of London sophistication in gritty Folkestone, it's a genuine dining destination. The recent addition of four bedrooms above "Sargey's" adjacent Smokehouse enables visitors to abandon themselves to gluttony. His dedication to local ingredients introduces diners to new treasures, such as meaty huss dogfish and tart sea buckthorn (oozing out of a dense chocolate mousse fondant), yet dishes are refreshingly clean and unpretentious. Hunks of bread, served with beef dripping, rich butter and home-roasted salt, and nuggets of treacly fudge and slices of colourful rock bookend a perfectly executed meal. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Wife of BathWye, Kent, England 9Telegraph expert rating Another addition to chef Mark Sargeant and Josh De Haan's portfolio of Kentish restaurants with rooms. With a superb Spanish restaurant and tiny tapas bar, its signature quirky style and authentic cuisine works surprisingly well in the bucolic setting. The restaurant serves impeccable fare: juicy scallops with spicy chorizo and earthy morcillo (black pudding); honey sweet melon smothered in Brindisa's finest Serrano ham; succulent Galician steaks with creamy aioli and fiery paprika potatoes; and hake with radishes, Seville orange and a buttery sauce laced with Gin Mare. Save space for pudding: the bitter chocolate tart with salt and olive oil is revelatory, as is ice-cream made with raisins soaked in PX sherry. Read expert review From £70per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Read's Restaurant With RoomsFaversham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Read's, housed in a Georgian mansion on the north Kentish coast, is a smart restaurant with six rooms, owned and run by acclaimed chef David Pitchford and his wife Rona. Sticking firmly to their decades-long recipe for success, they deliver classic cuisine and unfussy hospitality. David won a Michelin star in 1992, which he retained for 20 consecutive years, becoming the second longest holder of the accolade in Britain. The food is hard to fault, if lacking the innovation and excitement that comes with Michelin recognition: comforting, classic French cuisine with British influence. Think ham and pea mousse; smoked haddock in cream sauce topped with cheese soufflé; Kentish lamb served with buttery asparagus and garden vegetables; and a Cassis-soaked summer pudding. Read expert review From £145per night The Dog at WinghamWingham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating A medieval pub in a rural village, run by an enterprising local family, that serves exceptionally good food and features eight attractive bedrooms. Virtually equidistant from Canterbury and Sandwich, it’s ideally located for exploring the Kentish city, countryside and coast. The kitchen is overseen by the young and talented Dan Johns, who has worked at Gary Rhodes’ Searcy’s at The Gherkin and Urban Coterie. The menu changes monthly to reflect seasonality and local produce. Imaginative starters such as fragrant Thai-style chicken salad and rich pork and pistachio terrine with pineapple jam are followed by melt-in-the-mouth Moroccan spiced lamb and crisp pork collar with chorizo dumplings. Read expert review From £86per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best pubs with rooms in Kent   Devon The Dartmoor InnOkehampton, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 16th-century coaching inn on the north-western edge of Dartmoor National Park is acclaimed for its fresh, seasonal cooking, but it’s worth bedding down for a stay in one of its three chic bedrooms. A blackboard heralds not only the breed of cattle, but also the name of the farmer it has come from. Dishes are pub classics, done to perfection: rib-eye steak and chips, confit of duck leg with toffee apple puree and roasted hazelnuts, and brisket of beef. Philip has a strong ethical policy, forging strong links with local artisan food producers, and ensures the beef has been grass fed and reared within a 20-mile radius. Breakfast is refreshingly original, with dainty portions of caramelised bananas or a daring cooked menu, including herb-crusted goat’s cheese, black pudding and bacon lardons. Read expert review From £65per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Lamb InnSandford, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating With open fires, beamed walls, deep sofas and award-winning food, this 16th-century inn in the village of Sandford is a pub of dreams for town-dwellers. Upstairs, seven bedrooms have big beds, soft linen and powerful showers, and there’s a pretty cobbled terrace at the rear. The Lamb Inn’s menu consistently attracts rave reviews. The produce is seasonal and locally sourced, mixing upmarket dishes with pub classics: shellfish bisque, mushroom ravioli, roasted pigeon with smoked bacon and savoy cabbage or steak and chips. The perfectly fluffy sticky toffee pudding is worth a visit alone. Landlord Mark is a fan of real ale and regularly rotates his cask brews to ensure they stay fresh. Read expert review From £69per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Masons ArmsBranscombe, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This dog-friendly 14th-century thatched inn, in Branscombe, on the Jurassic Coast, is one of Devon’s best. It prides itself on serving local, seasonal Devon fare on a traditional pub menu – it even has a 'food sourcing map' detailing exactly where the produce comes from. There’s steamed River Exe mussels and fries, steak and kidney shortcrust pie, rump steak and a seafood platter. Ales, hand-pumped from casks, are just as local. On a sunny day, the action moves outside to the pretty suntrap terrace. It's a 15-minute walk to Branscombe Beach, a lovely, long shingle cove from where you can pick up the South West Coastal Path. Read expert review From £75per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Salutation InnTopsham, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating Eat well and rest your head at this 18th-century coaching inn in chichi Topsham: a stylish option with a truly excellent restaurant, helmed by one of Gordon Ramsay's former protégés. Exquisite handmade petit-fours welcome guests on arrival – the first hint that your dining experience will be full of extra surprises. The wild mushroom appetiser comes accompanied by an umami-enhancing pinot noir, and the tomato gazpacho with local crab, served in a glass on ice, and followed by a rich rump of beef from Greendale Farm. Each modern dish is accompanied by diverse wines chosen by Stephen Edwardes – the unusual sake complements the beautiful strawberry dessert which is garnished with home-grown edible flowers. Read expert review From £145per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Devon   Cornwall The Gurnard's HeadSt Ives, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn offering outstanding food, fabulous sea and moorland views, situated close to St Ives and Land's End. Popular with walkers and couples of all ages seeking a low-key, restorative break in a wild coastal location. Locals come from miles around to dine here. The Scottish head chef, Bruce Rennie, cooks a short, inventive menu. Lunch may include beetroot risotto, octopus and white wine stew, or Merguez sausages with Puy lentils. The supper menu may include salmon and lobster tortellini, cod with pig’s trotter, and sole with Vermouth. The wine list focuses on Old World wines, notably from France, Italy and Portugal. Read expert review From £110per night Padstow TownhousePadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A handsome listed townhouse on Padstow's high street that has been superbly renovated and opened as a six-bedroom luxury guesthouse by chef Paul Ainsworth to complement his Michelin-starred restaurant, Paul Ainsworth at Number 6. Head there for amusingly-presented, delicately-flavoured meat and fish dishes and a fun and informal atmosphere, or to his even more informal restaurant, Rojanos, for superior pasta, pizza and hamburgers. Breakfast is served at the latter. The guesthouse owns an electric BMW in which guests can be transported if they don’t want to walk around. Read expert review From £280per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com St Petroc's HotelPadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A sociable, intimate townhouse with a labyrinth of gorgeously styled sitting and reading rooms – as well as a buzzy bistro. St Petroc’s Bistro opened along with the hotel in 1988. It’s a lovely room – with an engaging selection of original art on the walls – and a relaxing, happy place to eat at either lunch or dinner. Pride of place on the menu goes to the 30-day dry-aged steaks, but there are fish, chicken and vegetarian options as well – all of them classic Rick Stein recipes (try the grilled hake with Serrano ham, succotash and chives). Ruby’s Bar is the new Stein pub – a great place for a local beer or cocktail. Read expert review From £112per night Kota Restaurant with RoomsPorthleven, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating With a fantastic Asian-Cornish fusion restaurant downstairs, and Porthleven’s picturesque harbour on the doorstep, the Kota’s two simple, homey rooms are proof that sometimes substance can win over style. The vibe in the restaurant is casual, with a long room overlooking the harbour and a waterfront lawn on which you can dine in good weather. New Zealander Jude, who is part Maori, part Malay-Chinese, brings Asian spices and cooking styles to fresh, meticulously sourced Cornish produce – squid with green mango salad, scallops with miso dressing and seaweed salad, and Laksa with prawns, mussels and fish. There are also some very creative burgers – tempura fish with wasabi tartare, and satay chicken with Asian slaw. Read expert review From £75per night DriftwoodPortscatho, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating Sitting on a hill above the rugged coastline of the Roseland peninsula, Driftwood is nautically furnished in soft creams and blues. A Michelin-starred restaurant, private sea-facing terraces, and a private beach make this the perfect venue for pretty much everyone. There are wonderful coastal path walks for miles in each direction. This is Cornish cooking at its finest: unfussy and focused on bringing out the flavour of fresh fish and seafood and locally reared beef and lamb. Dinner in summer comprises a six-course tasting menu with complementary wines. For children there are early suppers with proper chef-made food. Read expert review From £250per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Coombeshead FarmLewannick, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating This is the joint venture from chef Tom Adams of London restaurant Pitt Cue and April Bloomfield, English born chef/proprietor of The Spotted Pig in New York. Both wanted to get back to the roots of food and hospitality and the result is this relaxed communal dining farmhouse b&b. Tom and his partner Lottie Mew live off the land and share their fresh, foraged, pickled and harvested produce with their guests. Tom cooks a three-course feast, kicking off with plates of delicious nibbles from 6.30pm onwards, which is shared at a communal table by all the guests. Tom’s own rare breed Mangalitza pigs feature large, plus perhaps a cep and walnut broth, lamb shoulder and mushroom porridge, with madeleine, whey and prune for pudding. Wines are unusual. Read expert review From £175per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Cornwall   Sussex The Barn at RoundhurstLurgashall, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating A rural South Downs retreat on a 250-acre organic farm with its own lakes. Home-reared food is a specialty. Converted outhouses with six rooms are set around a courtyard, just steps from a dramatic converted barn for dining and lounging. A four-course set menu with generous portions is available for guests and non-guests Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays; a light supper is provided for guests on other days. Meals highlight the farm’s own organic beef, lamb and pork and could include colourful heritage carrots and an exceptional triple chocolate mousse. Read expert review From £98per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com CrouchersChichester, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating An unassuming motel-like exterior belies a foodie haven a short drive from the Witterings. Relax on the patio of a garden-facing room, head to the beach, or explore the cultural and sporting highlights around Chichester but leave room for dinner in the impressive restaurant. Proximity to the coast ensures good seafood. The squid-ink pasta starter is light and delicate and a showy dessert of white chocolate and saffron mousse with edible flowers, caramel and orange ice-cream is a multi-sensory delight. A strong wine list includes an emphasis on the owners’ native South Africa. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Crab & LobsterWest Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating Herons can be seen on the doorstep of this modernised 350-year-old pub beside a bird sanctuary, where guests can stay in cosy bedrooms or an adjoining cottage. Tuck into locally caught seafood in the bar-restaurant and plan nature walks or trips to nearby beaches. The menu, as this gastropub’s name suggests, makes good use of locally caught seafood. Baked Selsey crab with a salad or crab cakes is a highlight. Meat, like rump of lamb (on an autumn menu with garlic Pommes Anna, butternut squash purée, confit tomatoes, baby leeks and Madeira jus) is also locally reared. There’s an extensive wine list and takeaway fish and chips. Read expert review From £160per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith Wingrove HouseAlfriston, South Downs, England 8Telegraph expert rating Yards from the South Downs Way and the half-timbered, candlelit pubs of Alfriston, this swish 19th-century boutique hotel with a modern country restaurant delivers roaring log fires, low-slung sofas and top-notch food, and draws city dwellers craving an easy country escape. Matthew Comben, formerly of the Hungry Monk in Jevington, heads up the kitchen and has brought with him the Monk's original banoffee pie recipe. Highlights from the seasonal menu include cauliflower fritters with Brighton blue cheese mayonnaise, and a soft beef fillet with tarragon. There's an impressive gin menu with 11 different options, including Brighton Gin, and a refreshingly reasonable wine list. Read expert review From £108per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best places and cities to visit in England – and where to stay   Cheshire The Roebuck InnMobberley, Cheshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This French-influenced bistro with rooms is perfect weekend break material, with lashings of character, great food and a beautifully designed garden. The bistro menu, tweaked with the seasons, is European in style, and everything comes in generous portions, whether it’s ‘small plates’ of cassoulet, caponata and crostini; mains such as saffron risotto, venison bourguignon and moules marinière; or puds of tarte au citron, profiteroles and crème caramel. On the drinks front, you’ll find an interesting selection of local ales, old-world wines and a vintage dresser filled with classic aperitifs and digestifs. Read expert review From £115per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • Britain's cosiest hotels for autumn   County Durham Lord Crewe ArmsBlanchland, Northumberland, England 9Telegraph expert rating A lord-of-the-manor building, in a pin-neat estate village, that oozes atmosphere at every stone-flagged turn. A reputation for honest, British cooking, plus its rural location, makes it popular with walkers and foodies as well as the country-sports fraternity. Expect punchy, robust, British cooking, rich with flavour and unusual combinations: devilled lamb’s kidneys on roasted cauliflower; grilled sea trout and mixed alliums; sea buckthorn posset. There’s an element of fun, too; eggy bread with fried bacon or Bloody Mary tomatoes on toast for breakfast. Some ingredients come from the kitchen garden. Eat on the terrace in the summer. The atmospheric, barrel-vaulted bar has local ales including a custom-made Lord Crewe Brew. Read expert review From £155per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Rose & CrownCounty Durham, England 9Telegraph expert rating A foodie destination country inn that has smartened up while still maintaining a sense of village pub: country-comfortable rooms; horse-brasses and dogs in the bar. Surrounded by the sheep-dotted fields and moors of the North Pennines, you come to eat, relax and then walk it off. The modern British menu shows confident cooking that lets the ingredients shine through; no fuss but definitely interesting: honey-glazed goat's cheese with beetroot, hazelnuts and gingerbread, perhaps, or pan-fried fillet of sea trout with roasted baby gem and crushed peas. There’s good local sourcing with Teesdale lamb rarely off the menu. Eat in the candle-lit dining room or buzzier bar; the latter offers three real ales and a good selection of single malts. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best country house hotels in Britain   Cities The Henrietta HotelCovent Garden, London, England 8Telegraph expert rating An 18-bedroom boutique address in one of Covent Garden’s most attractive streets, owned and run by the Paris-based Experimental Group, with a cocktail bar, Ollie Dabbous restaurant and quirky interior design by Dorothée Meilichzon. The food, is delicious – clean, clever and uncomplicated – with highlights that might include the sheeps’ milk curds with pistachio, beef tartare with nasturtium and rye, and wonderful freshly baked warm madeleines with Chantilly cream. Don't miss a cocktail, which can be chosen à la carte or with a consultation from the barman. Read expert review From £220per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Ginger PigHove, Brighton, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 11-bedroom guesthouse above Hove’s highly-acclaimed Ginger Pig Bar and Restaurant is ideal if you want a quieter seaside base. Spacious and elegantly understated rooms include thoughtful beach bags with towels and well-stocked minibars. Always buzzy, this sprawling gastropub serves up highly delicious grub and excellent Sunday roasts. Look out for seasonal specials like asparagus with brown crab and chipotle mayo, or seabream with samphire. The adjoining Orangerie is where breakfast is served (there’s an outdoor area for sunny days), offering imaginative dishes such as baked eggs with hummus, chorizo and peppers, Irish rock oysters and rarebit with roasted tomatoes and mushrooms. Read expert review From £80per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Simpsons RestaurantBirmingham, England 8Telegraph expert rating The cooking is superlative at this gastronomic powerhouse, which also offers three individually styled – and great value – rooms. Throw in the added draw of the Simpsons Cookery School and you pretty much have Michelin-starred, Brummie food nirvana. The winning team of owner Andreas Antona and chef director Luke Tipping, one of Britain’s finest sauciers, has weathered fashions and trends. The three-course à la carte menu features plump marinière-style mussels on a delicate, buttery skate wing, while refined hipster influences are showcased with a barbecued beef cheek with a rich, silky bone marrow sauce. The pastry section’s take on a Belgian Speculoos cookie, with caramelised white chocolate and coffee granite, is fabulous. Read expert review From £110per night The White Star TavernSouthampton, Hampshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating A characterful tavern with rooms on Southampton’s vibrant Oxford Street. The restaurant is a destination in itself, with a varied menu that caters to all comers. If you fancy a plate of fish and chips washed down with real ale, then you’ll get the crispest batter and a unique brew from Itchen Valley. But the real tour de force is the à la carte menu, where chef Matt Noonan serves up his creativity and innovation in dishes that linger long in the memory: a melt-in-the-mouth braised ox cheek with black bean glaze and oriental vegetables to start, perhaps, or a seared bass with a sauté of wild mushrooms, egg yolk ketchup, smoked and cured egg yolk, leek and fresh Dorset truffle as a main. The Death by Chocolate dessert is served up like a piece of street art and really is to die for. Read expert review From £105per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels for a UK city break   WALES Llys MeddygPembrokeshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating A cosy hotel in the small town of Newport, on the Pembrokeshire coast, offering colourful interiors, reasonable rates and an exceptional restaurant, which has gained a reputation in Pembrokeshire and beyond as one of the best and most reasonable fine dining establishments. Chef Daniel Jones does wonders with local produce – such as Newport bay crab and lobster, Preseli lamb, Welsh beef and West Wales cheeses – in two separate dining areas: the romantic basement-level Cellar Bar, which has a slate floor and leather settees, and a wood burning stove in an inglenook fireplace; and, on the ground floor, the recently refurbished main dining room. Ed smokes salmon in a shed in his house just next door. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Ynyshir Restaurant and RoomsPowys, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Queen Victoria once owned this handsome white painted house as a hidden retreat. The undulating grounds are lovely and lead to the RSPB Ynys Hir Nature Reserve at the head of the Dovey estuary. Current owner and professional artist Rob Reen is responsible for the vibrant interiors, their colours taking a lead from his equally bold canvasses that dominate the walls. In the kitchen, Gareth Ward, who trained with Sat Bains, is a rising star, a recipient of one Michelin star and gunning for a second. He prefers to serve a series of small, integrated dishes, and is always coming up with new ideas and loves surprises. The tasting menu at dinner might include simple plates such as Welsh wagyu, pork belly with 'river bacon' or pollock with black bean. Read expert review From £215per night Tyddyn LlanDenbighshire, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A modest Georgian house just outside Llandrillo, with a complementary extension using local slate and stone. The house was once a shooting lodge belonging to the Dukes of Westminster, but now places food centre stage. The views are spectacular, with the Vale of Edeyrnion’s meadows and the slopes of the Berwyn Mountains beyond. The dining room is decorated in Wedgewood blue with tall windows on three sides. Bryan Webb is considered one of Wales’s foremost chefs, with a long-held Michelin star and a commitment to local produce, such as melting Welsh black beef, and quality seasonal ingredients. The menu changes daily. Read expert review From £195per night The Old Rectory on the LakeSnowdonia, Tal-y-llyn, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A sun-trap hideaway on the shores of a huge lake, and at the foot of the mountain, Cadair Idris. It’s elegant and relaxing with free-standing roll-top baths, an outdoor hot tub and locally sourced food perfectly cooked to order in the restaurant. The food, courtesy of the self-trained chef, Ricky, is outstanding. There may be freshly-caught trout, or local Bala lamb on the menu, along with perfectly-cooked vegetables and perhaps Dauphinois potatoes. The chocolate fondant is a signature pudding. The terrace is the perfect place to enjoy the sunset over the lake with a Welsh gin and tonic. Read expert review From £110per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Harbourmaster HotelAberaeron, Cardigan Bay, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating Beach chic comes into its own at this forget-me-not-blue boutique hotel on Aberaeron’s harbour wall. And you won’t likely forget it with these killer sea views, glam rooms and imaginatively thought-out menus. The restaurant has a serious foodie bent in the evening – try to snag the cwtch (cubby hole) for intimate dining. Go for Carlingford oysters, a plump, sweet burst of the sea, and the perfect prelude for well-cooked Welsh fillet of steak, followed by an oozy chocolate fondant with salted caramel ice cream. For a buzzier vibe, head to the bar-lounge to nurse a Brecon gin or nibble bar snacks like crispy cockles with chilli vinegar. Read expert review From £185per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith FairyhillReynoldston, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Snuggled away in 24 acres of woodland near the Gower coast, Fairyhill enchants with more than just its name. Think Downton Abbey meets Watership Down with a pinch of 21st-century cool. It has carved out its name as a foodie retreat with good reason. The chef pulls off a daring, imaginative menu, taking a pride in local sourcing and garden-grown ingredients in dishes that are both robust and refined. Clean flavours sing of the seasons in dishes simple as gazpacho, pear and Pembroke crab, and goat's cheese mousse with courgette flower with beetroot gel. Mains like meltingly tender Welsh lamb served three ways and Serrano-wrapped monkfish with clams, samphire and fresh linguine strike the perfect balance. Read expert review From £135per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com JabajakCarmarthenshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Jabajak is a former drover’s farm, now a fine vineyard and boutique bolthole, serving home-grown food and wines with a slice of history, rustic elegance and first-class service. The restaurant has scooped awards for its locally sourced, home-grown approach. A drink in the lounge bar piques the appetite for dishes prepared with garden herbs, fruit, veg and edible flowers, ramped up flavour-wise by foraged ingredients such as nettles and wild garlic when in season. Starters including basil-marinated bruschetta with gooseberry and elderflower chutney prelude mains such as butter-soft Celtic steak with local Moody Mabel cheese. There are many nods to local produce at breakfast, too, and the cooked Welsh option with a side order of cockles is bang on the money. Read expert review From £130per night Rates provided by Booking.com   SCOTLAND The Three Chimneys and The House Over-ByDunvegan, Isle of Skye, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This destination restaurant with rooms is back doing what it does best, with a new chef, updated look and reinvigorated sense of discipline and purpose. The essential ingredients are there: attentive service, attractive rooms with mesmerising views and a talented young chef. Choose from a three-course à la carte menu or the epic Skye Showcase Menu, served at the ‘Kitchen Table’, right in the heart of the action. Dishes on the latter menu might include the likes of Dungvegan crab, seaweed and miso-cured halibut, Orbost Farm beef and pot-roasted young grouse. A road (albeit single-track and quiet) runs between the House Over-By and the shore of Loch Dunvegan, slightly eroding what would otherwise be a feeling of privacy, but not unduly distracting from the peaceful views. Read expert review From £345per night The Peat InnSt Andrews, Fife, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating A long-standing gastro-destination lying between the 'town and gown' of St Andrews and Fife’s East Neuk fishing villages, this is well worth a detour. It’s a short stagger from restaurant to homely split-level suites: a calm, comfortable place to sleep off the fabulous Michelin-starred food. The rustic-chic restaurant, all tender taupes with amber and deep sea-blue accents, is a fittingly sophisticated setting for the triumphant cooking. You come here for the food and you won’t leave disappointed. From the home-made butter to the unusually good petit-fours, everything is a reflection of chef Geoffrey Smeddle’s joyous approach to food, with dishes like a starter of smoked beef tartare with wasabi puree raising your eyebrows and your expectations simultaneously. Read expert review From £195per night The Taynuilt Etive Restaurant with RoomsTaynuilt, Argyll & Bute, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating This historic rural hotel has been reinvented as a restaurant with rooms with a young Scottish chef leading a bright and creative team. It's at the heart of a small community that makes an ideal base for exploring Argyll and the isles. The Etive restaurant is the axis here, a genuine foodie oasis and arguably the finest place to eat in the region. John McNulty works wonders with the ultra-local produce, whether it be the Mull Pig’s Heed or the salmon he smokes using local larch from Loch Awe. Sound provenance ripples through the Etive even as far as breakfast, where local fish stars. Read expert review From £79per night 21212Edinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating The four bedrooms above this Michelin-starred restaurant are no afterthought; there is a confident hand at work in rooms that are as striking as the food, displaying a sometimes surprising but always sensual contemporary/baroque style and unexpectedly leafy views. Michelin-starred chef Paul Kitching is a maverick who likes to tease flavours, building fantastic creations that sound impossible, but work, like silky pink trout served with artichokes, pasta, almonds, chickpeas, kidney beans, oriental mushrooms, warm coleslaw and feta cheese. He’s utterly serious but there’s an edge of play - such as a pre-dessert of porridge, milk and cinnamon poured from a china cow. Read expert review From £112per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith The Bridge Inn, RathoEdinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This 18-century coaching inn – now an award-winning gastropub with rooms – is on a leafy canal in a tranquil village just 20 minutes away from Edinburgh's city centre. Four pretty bedrooms are each individually decorated. The cooking is exceptional, with talented head chef Ben doing wonderful things with good Scottish fish and game, properly hung beef, and pork from their own fat and sassy pigs. They grow their own vegetables, herbs and fruit too, in an old walled garden a short walk away down the canal path. Breakfast is a fine indulgence. You can have a hair of the dog as well: Champagne, Prosecco, Buck’s Fizz or a Bloody Mary. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best castle hotels in Scotland Contributions from Ros Belford, Suzy Bennett, Sophie Butler, Gill Charlton, Kerry Christiani, Fiona Duncan, Suzanne King, Gabriella Le Breton, Linda Macdonald, Richard McComb, Robin McKelvie, Harriet O'Brien, Ben Parker, Helen Pickles, Louise Roddon, Cathy Stebbings, Sarah Stirling, Anna Turns, Debbie Ward and Antonia Windsor.

Britain's loveliest restaurants with rooms for autumn

What could be more appealing than the epicurean informality of an inn or restaurant with rooms? These wonderfully relaxed establishments combine an emphasis on great ingredients from the area with local charm and stylish panache. There’s an insider feel that you don’t get at a more formal hotel, and there’s a foodie enthusiasm that wouldn’t be exuded quite as joyfully at a larger enterprise. Autumn/winter is a particularly good time to seek out their gently indulgent accommodation and fabulous seasonal flavours – the likes of wild rabbit with foraged mushrooms, grouse and damsons, elderberries and more. Harriet O'Brien Our experts round up their favourite establishments in Britain, from the Cotswolds to Cornwall, Suffolk to Skye, for feasting – and then flopping.  ENGLAND Cotswolds The Wild RabbitKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Wild Rabbit is a haven of eco-elegance a few fields away from sister enterprise Daylesford, the organic farm shop, deli, spa (and more) of Carole Bamford. She transformed this 18th-century inn and it has been meticulously devised in quiet colours, stone and wood. It’s a beautiful posh pub, with food to match. The kitchen is masterminded by Tim Allen, who won the Wild Rabbit a Michelin star in October 2016. His cuisine takes diners on a taste adventure, with dishes such as haddock on leek and apple slaw, topped with an amazingly cooked egg – poached and lightly deep fried. Read expert review From £148per night The Feathered Nest Country InnOxfordshire, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fabulous food and a superb setting above the Evenlode valley make this old country inn a hedonistic haven. The owners describe it as a pub with a twist. They’ve created an elegant restaurant that has won armloads of awards since it opened, with three stylish and supremely comfy bedrooms. The exquisite food is almost on a par with sleek gastro establishments such as Tom Kerridge’s The Hand and Flowers in Marlow - and even Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons where head chef Kuba Winkowski previously worked. There’s a stupendous wine list, too. Among the choice of 200 or so is a wonderful range of South African wines. There’s also a bar menu featuring classics such as burgers of brilliant quality. Read expert review From £140per night The Wheatsheaf InnNorthleach, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A creeper-clad coaching inn turned arty, boutique haven. The Wheatsheaf is in a particularly pretty and enterprising little Cotswold town. The restaurant draws a regular local crowd and the emphasis is on the very best quality, from the menu ingredients to the room amenities. The sophisticated menu offers great flavour combinations, the likes of roast parsnip and fennel salad with chestnuts, and mutton and apple pie with creamed potatoes. If there’s space in the bar beforehand try an aperitif of Sloe Negroni, with sloe gin and Campari, or opt for a pint of Cotswold Old Hooky. Read expert review From £102per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Kingham PloughKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Kingham Plough is a treat of a foodie destinatio, with relaxing furnishings, genial staff and brilliantly conceived menus. Emily Watkins has won numerous awards for her modern British cuisine with a twist ‒ dishes are often based on old Cotswold recipes. Her food is also much inspired by local produce; the likes of Windrush Valley goat cheese and pork from Paddock Farm a few miles away. There’s a pleasingly short and sophisticated à la carte menu: starters might include slow braised oxtail with horseradish, and mains could feature venison wellington, with meat supplied from nearby Cornbury Park. There’s also a well-priced bar menu featuring gastro comfort food such as rabbit parfait. Read expert review From £145per night The Ebrington ArmsEbrington, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating This hidden treasure set in a gloriously unspoilt village is a modern day version of a country tavern – it’s at once a genuine pub that brews its own very smooth ales; a lovely restaurant with real local flavour; and a charming hotel with rural-chic bedrooms. Chef Ben Dulley offers short, understated menus which reflect his commitment to freshness, with many vegetables straight from surrounding Drinkwater Farm. Dishes are beautifully presented and packed with local flavour – the likes of hot-smoked Bibury trout salad, and Cotswold lamb with stuffed tomatoes. Wines are from independent growers, including the Cotswolds’ own Little Oak Vineyard. Read expert review From £165per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best Cotswolds pubs with rooms   Oxfordshire Artist Residence OxfordshireSouth Leigh, Oxfordshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A unique country pub with a bohemian twist and arty vibe, offering gorgeous quirky rooms, scrumptious meals and contemporary art. The food is as heart-warming as the dining room. Local game and meat, foraged herbs and flowers join vegetables from the garden. The menu could include the likes of smoky pigeon breast electrified by a pickled walnut with caramelised chicory, port jelly and smoked spring onions and plaice in seaweed butter, smoked cockles, sea vegetables and bisque. The wine list is small, selective and good value. Join locals for a pint at the bar, read the paper or play cards around the fire. Read expert review From £130per night • The best luxury hotels in Oxfordshire   Lake District L’EnclumeCartmel, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Simon Rogan's two-Michelin-starred restaurant plus handful of rooms stay true both to the simple village location and rich surrounding land. Rooms are modest but smartly furnished, the setting picture-box pretty while the food is an exemplar of local sourcing and creativity. This isn’t Blumenthal-style magic but simply 20 (tiny) courses of exceptional skill, balance and creativity: an egg shell containing a yolk in mushroom broth; confit cauliflower in a pea and calamint sauce; a finger of turbot in nasturtium butter, the dinkiest caramel mousse sitting on compressed apple. All is presented exquisitely but without fanfare on rustic pottery, handmade glass, even a pebble. The Coravin wine system allows you to try top-rank or small-producer wines. Read expert review From £129per night The Punch Bowl InnLake District, Cumbria, England 8Telegraph expert rating A smart but relaxed country inn, in a quiet corner of the Lake District, with a deserved reputation for its classy food. The ground floor is a semi open-plan series of dining rooms, bar and relaxed eating areas, separated by little steps. The cooking is smart-city-restaurant standard producing assured, modern British dishes that are interesting without being tricksy or fussy. No fancy canapés or pre-starters, just clean flavours. Starters might include black pudding with bubble and squeak or tomato salad with local crab and lobster while mains could be pork with ham hock croquette or cod with Morteau sausage. There's a wide-ranging wine list, plus a couple of local real ales. Read expert review From £130per night • The Lake District's best pubs and inns   Peak District The Samuel Fox Country InnHope Valley, Peak District, England 8Telegraph expert rating This stone-built inn – which is more of a restaurant with rooms than a standard country pub – has an ever-growing reputation. Come for a great dinner, stay over in one of four comfortable rooms and spend the next day exploring the glorious Peak District. The foodie credentials are strong: chef-patron James Duckett has worked with Albert Roux, Michel Roux, Marcus Wareing and Philip Howard, and done extended stints in Australia and Spain. Now he turns out some of the best food in the area: everything from a piquant, pretty-as-a-picture starter of soused sardines to the kind of iced chocolate cherry parfait that makes you wish you hadn’t shared with your other half. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Peak District   Yorkshire Crab Manor HotelThirsk, Yorkshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fun and exotic, individually themed rooms combined with a well-regarded seafood restaurant and an overall madcap sense of decoration make this a hugely popular choice for special occasions. The restaurant specialises in fish and seafood serving both classics – lobster thermidor, grilled Queen scallops – as well as more modern dishes such as sea trout with samphire. It's open for lunch and dinner, and for afternoon 'lighter' options (including moules mariniere), but there's nothing delicate about portion sizes. Half the fun is the setting: jolly bar, romantic dining room or brighter conservatory, all with a bonkers decoration that includes a suite of orchestral instruments. Breakfast is also a delight. Read expert review From £165per night The Star InnHarome, Helmsley, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant-with-rooms with chocolate-box, thatched-pub looks and a bucolic farming-village location. Bedrooms, across the road, have a comfy, hunting-lodge style. Whitby-born chef-owner Andrew Pern was one of the first champions of local sourcing - and why wouldn’t you be with his ‘back garden’: moorland game and pasture-fed meat, coastal fish, Yorkshire Wolds’ fruit and vegetables. He now has a huge kitchen garden at the back of the pub. His menus are punchy, robust yet skilfully balanced and as much about texture as taste: crab stick with seashore vegetables and avocado ice, perhaps followed by roasted lamb chop with truffled faggot or honey-roasted duck with tea-poached quail’s egg. Read expert review From £150per night The Timble InnNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 8Telegraph expert rating A food-driven village pub in a quiet, yet surprisingly well-connected location with bold, contemporary styling and smart bedrooms. Glorious views and walks are on the doorstep. A pub that does two sittings for Sunday lunch is serious about food, and has been awarded two AA rosettes for it. It’s ambitious stuff – wood pigeon with quail’s egg and black pudding; venison loin with celeriac remoulade and chestnuts. The seafood platter and chateaubriand steak are favourites. It's not really a beer pub but offers a wide-ranging wine list – including fine ones by the glass – plus local gins. Read expert review From £150per night The Yorke ArmsNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant with rooms in an off-the-beaten-track location; perfect for walking off the spoiling food. The food is why people come here – some helicopter in from London for chef-proprietor Frances Atkins’s flavour-intense cooking. It’s not fussy or tricksy, just skilled, imaginative and full of the unexpected – quail with lychee and jasmine; brill with fennel in turmeric broth, peach and curd tart. Choose the eight-course tasting menu and everything is a surprise. Much is home-grown; the huge kitchen garden produces a summer surplus. These are meals to savour (even the lunchtime bar menu includes devilled kidneys, and gratin of seared scallops). Read expert review From £345per night • The best luxury hotels in Yorkshire   Norfolk Morston HallNorfolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating A flint- and brick-built Jacobean country-house hotel, with large conservatory extensions that provide extra dining space. Inside, you’ll find open fires, squashy sofas and cosy corners in a hushed, fairly formal atmosphere. The food is the main reason to come to Morston Hall, the only restaurant with a Michelin star on this stretch of coast. Galton Blackiston’s cooking is rated highly by both visitors and locals: he offers a set dinner based on fresh, local ingredients, served at 8pm daily. Four courses usually include two meat dishes (perhaps confit of duck or beef fillet) and a fish course. Recommended wines are suggested to accompany the dishes – or you can choose from an extensive list. Read expert review From £340per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Norfolk   Suffolk The Great HouseLavenham, Suffolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating The five-bedroom hotel looks onto the market square of Lavenham, a well-preserved medieval village of timbered houses. It would be wrong to stay here without sampling the food, as this is primarily a restaurant – and a very good one at that. From a regularly changing menu, you might find starters of mussels with chilli, coriander and cream, tuna sashimi or wild mushroom ravioli, and main courses of pheasant supreme, grilled fillet of lamb with thyme sauce or roasted duck breast with grilled beetroot. Desserts could be dark chocolate terrine, millefeuille or maple syrup rice pudding. Read expert review From £99per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best spa hotels in Suffolk   Somerset The White PostYeovil, Somerset, England 8Telegraph expert rating At this cosy Victorian ‘pub-and-lodgings’, the elegant gastronomy is as much a pull as the rooms. Brett’s passion for foraging and elegant presentation seeps through. The best way to experience the dishes? The 10-course tasting menu, which pays homage to the West Country (pork done eight ways, served with local chilli and ginger cider) as well as international influences (spiced lentil dhal with gurnard, mango and coconut). The wine list is sufficient but it’s the local ales and ciders that stand out, particularly if you pair a pint of Dorset Knob bitter with the Sunday roast. Painted walls are interrupted only by the wide windows, long cardinal-coloured drapes and filament bulb lamps that, along with on-table candles, add just enough light during evening dining. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The most romantic hotels in Somerset   Dorset La FosseCranborne, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating Snug in the wave-like green hills of east Dorset, La Fosse at Cranborne is a peaceful bed and breakfast as well as popular restaurant. Run by husband and wife, this simple West Country retreat, embracing both modern and traditional, feels as far from the madding crowds as possible. Owner-chef Mark is a true locavore, sourcing as much from in and around the village as possible. His passion for local, inventive cuisine has seen him named best chef in Dorset. The colourful duck dish, replete with homegrown vegetables, is a highlight, drizzled in a piquant jus. Mark’s award-winning cheeseboard is part of the experience, so save some room. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Anchor InnSeatown, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Anchor Inn, sat beyond snaking lanes and tucked between scarped cliffs on the edge of a little known Dorset village, is a destination gastropub serving elevated British classics. It is also a boutique hideaway that cocoons guests amid the sound of rolling waves. If the weather is decent, expect a fight to secure a lunchtime spot, either tucked inside or al fresco. Menus from head chef Jean-Paul De Ronne — who previously worked under Masterchef winner Mat Follas — reveal commitment to seasonal fare from land and sea, such as the fresh crab salad using crustacea caught only metres away. Ales are all from Palmers, brewed four miles away, while an extensive cocktail list from former Hix bartender David Smith features a number of Dorset’s own spirits. Read expert review From £120per night • The best hotels in Dorset   Buckinghamshire The Mash InnRadnage, Buckinghamshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating Described by its owner Nick Mash as a ‘new generation inn’, The Mash Inn's aim is to remove the barriers between chef and diner. The open kitchen takes centre stage: a solid wood workstation groaning with ingredients and stacked plates, beneath a ceiling rack dripping with pots and pans, in front of an open fire for rotisserie cooking. Chef Jon Parry cooks up a storm, producing a delicious, earthy and inventive no frills tasting menu and a short à la carte menu. Much of the produce is from the garden or very local. Diners sit at individual tables or at a large communal table, which may sound daunting but such is the communal, friendly atmosphere that it’s a pleasure to do so. Read expert review From £100per night The Hand & FlowersMarlow, Buckinghamshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn with a Michelin-starred restaurant, enticing locals to dine, and couples for weekends or nights away. It's on busy West Street, just along the road from the house where Mary Shelley created Frankenstein. The chef-proprietor is Tom Kerridge, who gained a Michelin star within 10 months from a kitchen which was then the size of a large cupboard. These days he has a new, celadon green kitchen and a brigade of chefs. As restaurants go, it rocks. Expect crayfish scotch egg, slow cooked duck breast with duck fat chips and other earthy, deeply satisfying dishes that are also full of imaginative twists, served in a cosy and convivial dining room. Read expert review From £140per night • The best hotels in Buckinghamshire   Kent RocksaltFolkestone, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Rocksalt is the littoral culinary kingdom of Mark Sargeant of Claridge's fame. A microcosm of London sophistication in gritty Folkestone, it's a genuine dining destination. The recent addition of four bedrooms above "Sargey's" adjacent Smokehouse enables visitors to abandon themselves to gluttony. His dedication to local ingredients introduces diners to new treasures, such as meaty huss dogfish and tart sea buckthorn (oozing out of a dense chocolate mousse fondant), yet dishes are refreshingly clean and unpretentious. Hunks of bread, served with beef dripping, rich butter and home-roasted salt, and nuggets of treacly fudge and slices of colourful rock bookend a perfectly executed meal. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Wife of BathWye, Kent, England 9Telegraph expert rating Another addition to chef Mark Sargeant and Josh De Haan's portfolio of Kentish restaurants with rooms. With a superb Spanish restaurant and tiny tapas bar, its signature quirky style and authentic cuisine works surprisingly well in the bucolic setting. The restaurant serves impeccable fare: juicy scallops with spicy chorizo and earthy morcillo (black pudding); honey sweet melon smothered in Brindisa's finest Serrano ham; succulent Galician steaks with creamy aioli and fiery paprika potatoes; and hake with radishes, Seville orange and a buttery sauce laced with Gin Mare. Save space for pudding: the bitter chocolate tart with salt and olive oil is revelatory, as is ice-cream made with raisins soaked in PX sherry. Read expert review From £70per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Read's Restaurant With RoomsFaversham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Read's, housed in a Georgian mansion on the north Kentish coast, is a smart restaurant with six rooms, owned and run by acclaimed chef David Pitchford and his wife Rona. Sticking firmly to their decades-long recipe for success, they deliver classic cuisine and unfussy hospitality. David won a Michelin star in 1992, which he retained for 20 consecutive years, becoming the second longest holder of the accolade in Britain. The food is hard to fault, if lacking the innovation and excitement that comes with Michelin recognition: comforting, classic French cuisine with British influence. Think ham and pea mousse; smoked haddock in cream sauce topped with cheese soufflé; Kentish lamb served with buttery asparagus and garden vegetables; and a Cassis-soaked summer pudding. Read expert review From £145per night The Dog at WinghamWingham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating A medieval pub in a rural village, run by an enterprising local family, that serves exceptionally good food and features eight attractive bedrooms. Virtually equidistant from Canterbury and Sandwich, it’s ideally located for exploring the Kentish city, countryside and coast. The kitchen is overseen by the young and talented Dan Johns, who has worked at Gary Rhodes’ Searcy’s at The Gherkin and Urban Coterie. The menu changes monthly to reflect seasonality and local produce. Imaginative starters such as fragrant Thai-style chicken salad and rich pork and pistachio terrine with pineapple jam are followed by melt-in-the-mouth Moroccan spiced lamb and crisp pork collar with chorizo dumplings. Read expert review From £86per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best pubs with rooms in Kent   Devon The Dartmoor InnOkehampton, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 16th-century coaching inn on the north-western edge of Dartmoor National Park is acclaimed for its fresh, seasonal cooking, but it’s worth bedding down for a stay in one of its three chic bedrooms. A blackboard heralds not only the breed of cattle, but also the name of the farmer it has come from. Dishes are pub classics, done to perfection: rib-eye steak and chips, confit of duck leg with toffee apple puree and roasted hazelnuts, and brisket of beef. Philip has a strong ethical policy, forging strong links with local artisan food producers, and ensures the beef has been grass fed and reared within a 20-mile radius. Breakfast is refreshingly original, with dainty portions of caramelised bananas or a daring cooked menu, including herb-crusted goat’s cheese, black pudding and bacon lardons. Read expert review From £65per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Lamb InnSandford, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating With open fires, beamed walls, deep sofas and award-winning food, this 16th-century inn in the village of Sandford is a pub of dreams for town-dwellers. Upstairs, seven bedrooms have big beds, soft linen and powerful showers, and there’s a pretty cobbled terrace at the rear. The Lamb Inn’s menu consistently attracts rave reviews. The produce is seasonal and locally sourced, mixing upmarket dishes with pub classics: shellfish bisque, mushroom ravioli, roasted pigeon with smoked bacon and savoy cabbage or steak and chips. The perfectly fluffy sticky toffee pudding is worth a visit alone. Landlord Mark is a fan of real ale and regularly rotates his cask brews to ensure they stay fresh. Read expert review From £69per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Masons ArmsBranscombe, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This dog-friendly 14th-century thatched inn, in Branscombe, on the Jurassic Coast, is one of Devon’s best. It prides itself on serving local, seasonal Devon fare on a traditional pub menu – it even has a 'food sourcing map' detailing exactly where the produce comes from. There’s steamed River Exe mussels and fries, steak and kidney shortcrust pie, rump steak and a seafood platter. Ales, hand-pumped from casks, are just as local. On a sunny day, the action moves outside to the pretty suntrap terrace. It's a 15-minute walk to Branscombe Beach, a lovely, long shingle cove from where you can pick up the South West Coastal Path. Read expert review From £75per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Salutation InnTopsham, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating Eat well and rest your head at this 18th-century coaching inn in chichi Topsham: a stylish option with a truly excellent restaurant, helmed by one of Gordon Ramsay's former protégés. Exquisite handmade petit-fours welcome guests on arrival – the first hint that your dining experience will be full of extra surprises. The wild mushroom appetiser comes accompanied by an umami-enhancing pinot noir, and the tomato gazpacho with local crab, served in a glass on ice, and followed by a rich rump of beef from Greendale Farm. Each modern dish is accompanied by diverse wines chosen by Stephen Edwardes – the unusual sake complements the beautiful strawberry dessert which is garnished with home-grown edible flowers. Read expert review From £145per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Devon   Cornwall The Gurnard's HeadSt Ives, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn offering outstanding food, fabulous sea and moorland views, situated close to St Ives and Land's End. Popular with walkers and couples of all ages seeking a low-key, restorative break in a wild coastal location. Locals come from miles around to dine here. The Scottish head chef, Bruce Rennie, cooks a short, inventive menu. Lunch may include beetroot risotto, octopus and white wine stew, or Merguez sausages with Puy lentils. The supper menu may include salmon and lobster tortellini, cod with pig’s trotter, and sole with Vermouth. The wine list focuses on Old World wines, notably from France, Italy and Portugal. Read expert review From £110per night Padstow TownhousePadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A handsome listed townhouse on Padstow's high street that has been superbly renovated and opened as a six-bedroom luxury guesthouse by chef Paul Ainsworth to complement his Michelin-starred restaurant, Paul Ainsworth at Number 6. Head there for amusingly-presented, delicately-flavoured meat and fish dishes and a fun and informal atmosphere, or to his even more informal restaurant, Rojanos, for superior pasta, pizza and hamburgers. Breakfast is served at the latter. The guesthouse owns an electric BMW in which guests can be transported if they don’t want to walk around. Read expert review From £280per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com St Petroc's HotelPadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A sociable, intimate townhouse with a labyrinth of gorgeously styled sitting and reading rooms – as well as a buzzy bistro. St Petroc’s Bistro opened along with the hotel in 1988. It’s a lovely room – with an engaging selection of original art on the walls – and a relaxing, happy place to eat at either lunch or dinner. Pride of place on the menu goes to the 30-day dry-aged steaks, but there are fish, chicken and vegetarian options as well – all of them classic Rick Stein recipes (try the grilled hake with Serrano ham, succotash and chives). Ruby’s Bar is the new Stein pub – a great place for a local beer or cocktail. Read expert review From £112per night Kota Restaurant with RoomsPorthleven, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating With a fantastic Asian-Cornish fusion restaurant downstairs, and Porthleven’s picturesque harbour on the doorstep, the Kota’s two simple, homey rooms are proof that sometimes substance can win over style. The vibe in the restaurant is casual, with a long room overlooking the harbour and a waterfront lawn on which you can dine in good weather. New Zealander Jude, who is part Maori, part Malay-Chinese, brings Asian spices and cooking styles to fresh, meticulously sourced Cornish produce – squid with green mango salad, scallops with miso dressing and seaweed salad, and Laksa with prawns, mussels and fish. There are also some very creative burgers – tempura fish with wasabi tartare, and satay chicken with Asian slaw. Read expert review From £75per night DriftwoodPortscatho, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating Sitting on a hill above the rugged coastline of the Roseland peninsula, Driftwood is nautically furnished in soft creams and blues. A Michelin-starred restaurant, private sea-facing terraces, and a private beach make this the perfect venue for pretty much everyone. There are wonderful coastal path walks for miles in each direction. This is Cornish cooking at its finest: unfussy and focused on bringing out the flavour of fresh fish and seafood and locally reared beef and lamb. Dinner in summer comprises a six-course tasting menu with complementary wines. For children there are early suppers with proper chef-made food. Read expert review From £250per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Coombeshead FarmLewannick, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating This is the joint venture from chef Tom Adams of London restaurant Pitt Cue and April Bloomfield, English born chef/proprietor of The Spotted Pig in New York. Both wanted to get back to the roots of food and hospitality and the result is this relaxed communal dining farmhouse b&b. Tom and his partner Lottie Mew live off the land and share their fresh, foraged, pickled and harvested produce with their guests. Tom cooks a three-course feast, kicking off with plates of delicious nibbles from 6.30pm onwards, which is shared at a communal table by all the guests. Tom’s own rare breed Mangalitza pigs feature large, plus perhaps a cep and walnut broth, lamb shoulder and mushroom porridge, with madeleine, whey and prune for pudding. Wines are unusual. Read expert review From £175per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Cornwall   Sussex The Barn at RoundhurstLurgashall, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating A rural South Downs retreat on a 250-acre organic farm with its own lakes. Home-reared food is a specialty. Converted outhouses with six rooms are set around a courtyard, just steps from a dramatic converted barn for dining and lounging. A four-course set menu with generous portions is available for guests and non-guests Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays; a light supper is provided for guests on other days. Meals highlight the farm’s own organic beef, lamb and pork and could include colourful heritage carrots and an exceptional triple chocolate mousse. Read expert review From £98per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com CrouchersChichester, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating An unassuming motel-like exterior belies a foodie haven a short drive from the Witterings. Relax on the patio of a garden-facing room, head to the beach, or explore the cultural and sporting highlights around Chichester but leave room for dinner in the impressive restaurant. Proximity to the coast ensures good seafood. The squid-ink pasta starter is light and delicate and a showy dessert of white chocolate and saffron mousse with edible flowers, caramel and orange ice-cream is a multi-sensory delight. A strong wine list includes an emphasis on the owners’ native South Africa. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Crab & LobsterWest Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating Herons can be seen on the doorstep of this modernised 350-year-old pub beside a bird sanctuary, where guests can stay in cosy bedrooms or an adjoining cottage. Tuck into locally caught seafood in the bar-restaurant and plan nature walks or trips to nearby beaches. The menu, as this gastropub’s name suggests, makes good use of locally caught seafood. Baked Selsey crab with a salad or crab cakes is a highlight. Meat, like rump of lamb (on an autumn menu with garlic Pommes Anna, butternut squash purée, confit tomatoes, baby leeks and Madeira jus) is also locally reared. There’s an extensive wine list and takeaway fish and chips. Read expert review From £160per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith Wingrove HouseAlfriston, South Downs, England 8Telegraph expert rating Yards from the South Downs Way and the half-timbered, candlelit pubs of Alfriston, this swish 19th-century boutique hotel with a modern country restaurant delivers roaring log fires, low-slung sofas and top-notch food, and draws city dwellers craving an easy country escape. Matthew Comben, formerly of the Hungry Monk in Jevington, heads up the kitchen and has brought with him the Monk's original banoffee pie recipe. Highlights from the seasonal menu include cauliflower fritters with Brighton blue cheese mayonnaise, and a soft beef fillet with tarragon. There's an impressive gin menu with 11 different options, including Brighton Gin, and a refreshingly reasonable wine list. Read expert review From £108per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best places and cities to visit in England – and where to stay   Cheshire The Roebuck InnMobberley, Cheshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This French-influenced bistro with rooms is perfect weekend break material, with lashings of character, great food and a beautifully designed garden. The bistro menu, tweaked with the seasons, is European in style, and everything comes in generous portions, whether it’s ‘small plates’ of cassoulet, caponata and crostini; mains such as saffron risotto, venison bourguignon and moules marinière; or puds of tarte au citron, profiteroles and crème caramel. On the drinks front, you’ll find an interesting selection of local ales, old-world wines and a vintage dresser filled with classic aperitifs and digestifs. Read expert review From £115per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • Britain's cosiest hotels for autumn   County Durham Lord Crewe ArmsBlanchland, Northumberland, England 9Telegraph expert rating A lord-of-the-manor building, in a pin-neat estate village, that oozes atmosphere at every stone-flagged turn. A reputation for honest, British cooking, plus its rural location, makes it popular with walkers and foodies as well as the country-sports fraternity. Expect punchy, robust, British cooking, rich with flavour and unusual combinations: devilled lamb’s kidneys on roasted cauliflower; grilled sea trout and mixed alliums; sea buckthorn posset. There’s an element of fun, too; eggy bread with fried bacon or Bloody Mary tomatoes on toast for breakfast. Some ingredients come from the kitchen garden. Eat on the terrace in the summer. The atmospheric, barrel-vaulted bar has local ales including a custom-made Lord Crewe Brew. Read expert review From £155per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Rose & CrownCounty Durham, England 9Telegraph expert rating A foodie destination country inn that has smartened up while still maintaining a sense of village pub: country-comfortable rooms; horse-brasses and dogs in the bar. Surrounded by the sheep-dotted fields and moors of the North Pennines, you come to eat, relax and then walk it off. The modern British menu shows confident cooking that lets the ingredients shine through; no fuss but definitely interesting: honey-glazed goat's cheese with beetroot, hazelnuts and gingerbread, perhaps, or pan-fried fillet of sea trout with roasted baby gem and crushed peas. There’s good local sourcing with Teesdale lamb rarely off the menu. Eat in the candle-lit dining room or buzzier bar; the latter offers three real ales and a good selection of single malts. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best country house hotels in Britain   Cities The Henrietta HotelCovent Garden, London, England 8Telegraph expert rating An 18-bedroom boutique address in one of Covent Garden’s most attractive streets, owned and run by the Paris-based Experimental Group, with a cocktail bar, Ollie Dabbous restaurant and quirky interior design by Dorothée Meilichzon. The food, is delicious – clean, clever and uncomplicated – with highlights that might include the sheeps’ milk curds with pistachio, beef tartare with nasturtium and rye, and wonderful freshly baked warm madeleines with Chantilly cream. Don't miss a cocktail, which can be chosen à la carte or with a consultation from the barman. Read expert review From £220per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Ginger PigHove, Brighton, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 11-bedroom guesthouse above Hove’s highly-acclaimed Ginger Pig Bar and Restaurant is ideal if you want a quieter seaside base. Spacious and elegantly understated rooms include thoughtful beach bags with towels and well-stocked minibars. Always buzzy, this sprawling gastropub serves up highly delicious grub and excellent Sunday roasts. Look out for seasonal specials like asparagus with brown crab and chipotle mayo, or seabream with samphire. The adjoining Orangerie is where breakfast is served (there’s an outdoor area for sunny days), offering imaginative dishes such as baked eggs with hummus, chorizo and peppers, Irish rock oysters and rarebit with roasted tomatoes and mushrooms. Read expert review From £80per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Simpsons RestaurantBirmingham, England 8Telegraph expert rating The cooking is superlative at this gastronomic powerhouse, which also offers three individually styled – and great value – rooms. Throw in the added draw of the Simpsons Cookery School and you pretty much have Michelin-starred, Brummie food nirvana. The winning team of owner Andreas Antona and chef director Luke Tipping, one of Britain’s finest sauciers, has weathered fashions and trends. The three-course à la carte menu features plump marinière-style mussels on a delicate, buttery skate wing, while refined hipster influences are showcased with a barbecued beef cheek with a rich, silky bone marrow sauce. The pastry section’s take on a Belgian Speculoos cookie, with caramelised white chocolate and coffee granite, is fabulous. Read expert review From £110per night The White Star TavernSouthampton, Hampshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating A characterful tavern with rooms on Southampton’s vibrant Oxford Street. The restaurant is a destination in itself, with a varied menu that caters to all comers. If you fancy a plate of fish and chips washed down with real ale, then you’ll get the crispest batter and a unique brew from Itchen Valley. But the real tour de force is the à la carte menu, where chef Matt Noonan serves up his creativity and innovation in dishes that linger long in the memory: a melt-in-the-mouth braised ox cheek with black bean glaze and oriental vegetables to start, perhaps, or a seared bass with a sauté of wild mushrooms, egg yolk ketchup, smoked and cured egg yolk, leek and fresh Dorset truffle as a main. The Death by Chocolate dessert is served up like a piece of street art and really is to die for. Read expert review From £105per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels for a UK city break   WALES Llys MeddygPembrokeshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating A cosy hotel in the small town of Newport, on the Pembrokeshire coast, offering colourful interiors, reasonable rates and an exceptional restaurant, which has gained a reputation in Pembrokeshire and beyond as one of the best and most reasonable fine dining establishments. Chef Daniel Jones does wonders with local produce – such as Newport bay crab and lobster, Preseli lamb, Welsh beef and West Wales cheeses – in two separate dining areas: the romantic basement-level Cellar Bar, which has a slate floor and leather settees, and a wood burning stove in an inglenook fireplace; and, on the ground floor, the recently refurbished main dining room. Ed smokes salmon in a shed in his house just next door. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Ynyshir Restaurant and RoomsPowys, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Queen Victoria once owned this handsome white painted house as a hidden retreat. The undulating grounds are lovely and lead to the RSPB Ynys Hir Nature Reserve at the head of the Dovey estuary. Current owner and professional artist Rob Reen is responsible for the vibrant interiors, their colours taking a lead from his equally bold canvasses that dominate the walls. In the kitchen, Gareth Ward, who trained with Sat Bains, is a rising star, a recipient of one Michelin star and gunning for a second. He prefers to serve a series of small, integrated dishes, and is always coming up with new ideas and loves surprises. The tasting menu at dinner might include simple plates such as Welsh wagyu, pork belly with 'river bacon' or pollock with black bean. Read expert review From £215per night Tyddyn LlanDenbighshire, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A modest Georgian house just outside Llandrillo, with a complementary extension using local slate and stone. The house was once a shooting lodge belonging to the Dukes of Westminster, but now places food centre stage. The views are spectacular, with the Vale of Edeyrnion’s meadows and the slopes of the Berwyn Mountains beyond. The dining room is decorated in Wedgewood blue with tall windows on three sides. Bryan Webb is considered one of Wales’s foremost chefs, with a long-held Michelin star and a commitment to local produce, such as melting Welsh black beef, and quality seasonal ingredients. The menu changes daily. Read expert review From £195per night The Old Rectory on the LakeSnowdonia, Tal-y-llyn, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A sun-trap hideaway on the shores of a huge lake, and at the foot of the mountain, Cadair Idris. It’s elegant and relaxing with free-standing roll-top baths, an outdoor hot tub and locally sourced food perfectly cooked to order in the restaurant. The food, courtesy of the self-trained chef, Ricky, is outstanding. There may be freshly-caught trout, or local Bala lamb on the menu, along with perfectly-cooked vegetables and perhaps Dauphinois potatoes. The chocolate fondant is a signature pudding. The terrace is the perfect place to enjoy the sunset over the lake with a Welsh gin and tonic. Read expert review From £110per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Harbourmaster HotelAberaeron, Cardigan Bay, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating Beach chic comes into its own at this forget-me-not-blue boutique hotel on Aberaeron’s harbour wall. And you won’t likely forget it with these killer sea views, glam rooms and imaginatively thought-out menus. The restaurant has a serious foodie bent in the evening – try to snag the cwtch (cubby hole) for intimate dining. Go for Carlingford oysters, a plump, sweet burst of the sea, and the perfect prelude for well-cooked Welsh fillet of steak, followed by an oozy chocolate fondant with salted caramel ice cream. For a buzzier vibe, head to the bar-lounge to nurse a Brecon gin or nibble bar snacks like crispy cockles with chilli vinegar. Read expert review From £185per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith FairyhillReynoldston, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Snuggled away in 24 acres of woodland near the Gower coast, Fairyhill enchants with more than just its name. Think Downton Abbey meets Watership Down with a pinch of 21st-century cool. It has carved out its name as a foodie retreat with good reason. The chef pulls off a daring, imaginative menu, taking a pride in local sourcing and garden-grown ingredients in dishes that are both robust and refined. Clean flavours sing of the seasons in dishes simple as gazpacho, pear and Pembroke crab, and goat's cheese mousse with courgette flower with beetroot gel. Mains like meltingly tender Welsh lamb served three ways and Serrano-wrapped monkfish with clams, samphire and fresh linguine strike the perfect balance. Read expert review From £135per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com JabajakCarmarthenshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Jabajak is a former drover’s farm, now a fine vineyard and boutique bolthole, serving home-grown food and wines with a slice of history, rustic elegance and first-class service. The restaurant has scooped awards for its locally sourced, home-grown approach. A drink in the lounge bar piques the appetite for dishes prepared with garden herbs, fruit, veg and edible flowers, ramped up flavour-wise by foraged ingredients such as nettles and wild garlic when in season. Starters including basil-marinated bruschetta with gooseberry and elderflower chutney prelude mains such as butter-soft Celtic steak with local Moody Mabel cheese. There are many nods to local produce at breakfast, too, and the cooked Welsh option with a side order of cockles is bang on the money. Read expert review From £130per night Rates provided by Booking.com   SCOTLAND The Three Chimneys and The House Over-ByDunvegan, Isle of Skye, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This destination restaurant with rooms is back doing what it does best, with a new chef, updated look and reinvigorated sense of discipline and purpose. The essential ingredients are there: attentive service, attractive rooms with mesmerising views and a talented young chef. Choose from a three-course à la carte menu or the epic Skye Showcase Menu, served at the ‘Kitchen Table’, right in the heart of the action. Dishes on the latter menu might include the likes of Dungvegan crab, seaweed and miso-cured halibut, Orbost Farm beef and pot-roasted young grouse. A road (albeit single-track and quiet) runs between the House Over-By and the shore of Loch Dunvegan, slightly eroding what would otherwise be a feeling of privacy, but not unduly distracting from the peaceful views. Read expert review From £345per night The Peat InnSt Andrews, Fife, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating A long-standing gastro-destination lying between the 'town and gown' of St Andrews and Fife’s East Neuk fishing villages, this is well worth a detour. It’s a short stagger from restaurant to homely split-level suites: a calm, comfortable place to sleep off the fabulous Michelin-starred food. The rustic-chic restaurant, all tender taupes with amber and deep sea-blue accents, is a fittingly sophisticated setting for the triumphant cooking. You come here for the food and you won’t leave disappointed. From the home-made butter to the unusually good petit-fours, everything is a reflection of chef Geoffrey Smeddle’s joyous approach to food, with dishes like a starter of smoked beef tartare with wasabi puree raising your eyebrows and your expectations simultaneously. Read expert review From £195per night The Taynuilt Etive Restaurant with RoomsTaynuilt, Argyll & Bute, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating This historic rural hotel has been reinvented as a restaurant with rooms with a young Scottish chef leading a bright and creative team. It's at the heart of a small community that makes an ideal base for exploring Argyll and the isles. The Etive restaurant is the axis here, a genuine foodie oasis and arguably the finest place to eat in the region. John McNulty works wonders with the ultra-local produce, whether it be the Mull Pig’s Heed or the salmon he smokes using local larch from Loch Awe. Sound provenance ripples through the Etive even as far as breakfast, where local fish stars. Read expert review From £79per night 21212Edinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating The four bedrooms above this Michelin-starred restaurant are no afterthought; there is a confident hand at work in rooms that are as striking as the food, displaying a sometimes surprising but always sensual contemporary/baroque style and unexpectedly leafy views. Michelin-starred chef Paul Kitching is a maverick who likes to tease flavours, building fantastic creations that sound impossible, but work, like silky pink trout served with artichokes, pasta, almonds, chickpeas, kidney beans, oriental mushrooms, warm coleslaw and feta cheese. He’s utterly serious but there’s an edge of play - such as a pre-dessert of porridge, milk and cinnamon poured from a china cow. Read expert review From £112per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith The Bridge Inn, RathoEdinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This 18-century coaching inn – now an award-winning gastropub with rooms – is on a leafy canal in a tranquil village just 20 minutes away from Edinburgh's city centre. Four pretty bedrooms are each individually decorated. The cooking is exceptional, with talented head chef Ben doing wonderful things with good Scottish fish and game, properly hung beef, and pork from their own fat and sassy pigs. They grow their own vegetables, herbs and fruit too, in an old walled garden a short walk away down the canal path. Breakfast is a fine indulgence. You can have a hair of the dog as well: Champagne, Prosecco, Buck’s Fizz or a Bloody Mary. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best castle hotels in Scotland Contributions from Ros Belford, Suzy Bennett, Sophie Butler, Gill Charlton, Kerry Christiani, Fiona Duncan, Suzanne King, Gabriella Le Breton, Linda Macdonald, Richard McComb, Robin McKelvie, Harriet O'Brien, Ben Parker, Helen Pickles, Louise Roddon, Cathy Stebbings, Sarah Stirling, Anna Turns, Debbie Ward and Antonia Windsor.

Britain's loveliest restaurants with rooms for autumn

What could be more appealing than the epicurean informality of an inn or restaurant with rooms? These wonderfully relaxed establishments combine an emphasis on great ingredients from the area with local charm and stylish panache. There’s an insider feel that you don’t get at a more formal hotel, and there’s a foodie enthusiasm that wouldn’t be exuded quite as joyfully at a larger enterprise. Autumn/winter is a particularly good time to seek out their gently indulgent accommodation and fabulous seasonal flavours – the likes of wild rabbit with foraged mushrooms, grouse and damsons, elderberries and more. Harriet O'Brien Our experts round up their favourite establishments in Britain, from the Cotswolds to Cornwall, Suffolk to Skye, for feasting – and then flopping.  ENGLAND Cotswolds The Wild RabbitKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Wild Rabbit is a haven of eco-elegance a few fields away from sister enterprise Daylesford, the organic farm shop, deli, spa (and more) of Carole Bamford. She transformed this 18th-century inn and it has been meticulously devised in quiet colours, stone and wood. It’s a beautiful posh pub, with food to match. The kitchen is masterminded by Tim Allen, who won the Wild Rabbit a Michelin star in October 2016. His cuisine takes diners on a taste adventure, with dishes such as haddock on leek and apple slaw, topped with an amazingly cooked egg – poached and lightly deep fried. Read expert review From £148per night The Feathered Nest Country InnOxfordshire, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fabulous food and a superb setting above the Evenlode valley make this old country inn a hedonistic haven. The owners describe it as a pub with a twist. They’ve created an elegant restaurant that has won armloads of awards since it opened, with three stylish and supremely comfy bedrooms. The exquisite food is almost on a par with sleek gastro establishments such as Tom Kerridge’s The Hand and Flowers in Marlow - and even Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons where head chef Kuba Winkowski previously worked. There’s a stupendous wine list, too. Among the choice of 200 or so is a wonderful range of South African wines. There’s also a bar menu featuring classics such as burgers of brilliant quality. Read expert review From £140per night The Wheatsheaf InnNorthleach, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A creeper-clad coaching inn turned arty, boutique haven. The Wheatsheaf is in a particularly pretty and enterprising little Cotswold town. The restaurant draws a regular local crowd and the emphasis is on the very best quality, from the menu ingredients to the room amenities. The sophisticated menu offers great flavour combinations, the likes of roast parsnip and fennel salad with chestnuts, and mutton and apple pie with creamed potatoes. If there’s space in the bar beforehand try an aperitif of Sloe Negroni, with sloe gin and Campari, or opt for a pint of Cotswold Old Hooky. Read expert review From £102per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Kingham PloughKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Kingham Plough is a treat of a foodie destinatio, with relaxing furnishings, genial staff and brilliantly conceived menus. Emily Watkins has won numerous awards for her modern British cuisine with a twist ‒ dishes are often based on old Cotswold recipes. Her food is also much inspired by local produce; the likes of Windrush Valley goat cheese and pork from Paddock Farm a few miles away. There’s a pleasingly short and sophisticated à la carte menu: starters might include slow braised oxtail with horseradish, and mains could feature venison wellington, with meat supplied from nearby Cornbury Park. There’s also a well-priced bar menu featuring gastro comfort food such as rabbit parfait. Read expert review From £145per night The Ebrington ArmsEbrington, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating This hidden treasure set in a gloriously unspoilt village is a modern day version of a country tavern – it’s at once a genuine pub that brews its own very smooth ales; a lovely restaurant with real local flavour; and a charming hotel with rural-chic bedrooms. Chef Ben Dulley offers short, understated menus which reflect his commitment to freshness, with many vegetables straight from surrounding Drinkwater Farm. Dishes are beautifully presented and packed with local flavour – the likes of hot-smoked Bibury trout salad, and Cotswold lamb with stuffed tomatoes. Wines are from independent growers, including the Cotswolds’ own Little Oak Vineyard. Read expert review From £165per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best Cotswolds pubs with rooms   Oxfordshire Artist Residence OxfordshireSouth Leigh, Oxfordshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A unique country pub with a bohemian twist and arty vibe, offering gorgeous quirky rooms, scrumptious meals and contemporary art. The food is as heart-warming as the dining room. Local game and meat, foraged herbs and flowers join vegetables from the garden. The menu could include the likes of smoky pigeon breast electrified by a pickled walnut with caramelised chicory, port jelly and smoked spring onions and plaice in seaweed butter, smoked cockles, sea vegetables and bisque. The wine list is small, selective and good value. Join locals for a pint at the bar, read the paper or play cards around the fire. Read expert review From £130per night • The best luxury hotels in Oxfordshire   Lake District L’EnclumeCartmel, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Simon Rogan's two-Michelin-starred restaurant plus handful of rooms stay true both to the simple village location and rich surrounding land. Rooms are modest but smartly furnished, the setting picture-box pretty while the food is an exemplar of local sourcing and creativity. This isn’t Blumenthal-style magic but simply 20 (tiny) courses of exceptional skill, balance and creativity: an egg shell containing a yolk in mushroom broth; confit cauliflower in a pea and calamint sauce; a finger of turbot in nasturtium butter, the dinkiest caramel mousse sitting on compressed apple. All is presented exquisitely but without fanfare on rustic pottery, handmade glass, even a pebble. The Coravin wine system allows you to try top-rank or small-producer wines. Read expert review From £129per night The Punch Bowl InnLake District, Cumbria, England 8Telegraph expert rating A smart but relaxed country inn, in a quiet corner of the Lake District, with a deserved reputation for its classy food. The ground floor is a semi open-plan series of dining rooms, bar and relaxed eating areas, separated by little steps. The cooking is smart-city-restaurant standard producing assured, modern British dishes that are interesting without being tricksy or fussy. No fancy canapés or pre-starters, just clean flavours. Starters might include black pudding with bubble and squeak or tomato salad with local crab and lobster while mains could be pork with ham hock croquette or cod with Morteau sausage. There's a wide-ranging wine list, plus a couple of local real ales. Read expert review From £130per night • The Lake District's best pubs and inns   Peak District The Samuel Fox Country InnHope Valley, Peak District, England 8Telegraph expert rating This stone-built inn – which is more of a restaurant with rooms than a standard country pub – has an ever-growing reputation. Come for a great dinner, stay over in one of four comfortable rooms and spend the next day exploring the glorious Peak District. The foodie credentials are strong: chef-patron James Duckett has worked with Albert Roux, Michel Roux, Marcus Wareing and Philip Howard, and done extended stints in Australia and Spain. Now he turns out some of the best food in the area: everything from a piquant, pretty-as-a-picture starter of soused sardines to the kind of iced chocolate cherry parfait that makes you wish you hadn’t shared with your other half. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Peak District   Yorkshire Crab Manor HotelThirsk, Yorkshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fun and exotic, individually themed rooms combined with a well-regarded seafood restaurant and an overall madcap sense of decoration make this a hugely popular choice for special occasions. The restaurant specialises in fish and seafood serving both classics – lobster thermidor, grilled Queen scallops – as well as more modern dishes such as sea trout with samphire. It's open for lunch and dinner, and for afternoon 'lighter' options (including moules mariniere), but there's nothing delicate about portion sizes. Half the fun is the setting: jolly bar, romantic dining room or brighter conservatory, all with a bonkers decoration that includes a suite of orchestral instruments. Breakfast is also a delight. Read expert review From £165per night The Star InnHarome, Helmsley, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant-with-rooms with chocolate-box, thatched-pub looks and a bucolic farming-village location. Bedrooms, across the road, have a comfy, hunting-lodge style. Whitby-born chef-owner Andrew Pern was one of the first champions of local sourcing - and why wouldn’t you be with his ‘back garden’: moorland game and pasture-fed meat, coastal fish, Yorkshire Wolds’ fruit and vegetables. He now has a huge kitchen garden at the back of the pub. His menus are punchy, robust yet skilfully balanced and as much about texture as taste: crab stick with seashore vegetables and avocado ice, perhaps followed by roasted lamb chop with truffled faggot or honey-roasted duck with tea-poached quail’s egg. Read expert review From £150per night The Timble InnNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 8Telegraph expert rating A food-driven village pub in a quiet, yet surprisingly well-connected location with bold, contemporary styling and smart bedrooms. Glorious views and walks are on the doorstep. A pub that does two sittings for Sunday lunch is serious about food, and has been awarded two AA rosettes for it. It’s ambitious stuff – wood pigeon with quail’s egg and black pudding; venison loin with celeriac remoulade and chestnuts. The seafood platter and chateaubriand steak are favourites. It's not really a beer pub but offers a wide-ranging wine list – including fine ones by the glass – plus local gins. Read expert review From £150per night The Yorke ArmsNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant with rooms in an off-the-beaten-track location; perfect for walking off the spoiling food. The food is why people come here – some helicopter in from London for chef-proprietor Frances Atkins’s flavour-intense cooking. It’s not fussy or tricksy, just skilled, imaginative and full of the unexpected – quail with lychee and jasmine; brill with fennel in turmeric broth, peach and curd tart. Choose the eight-course tasting menu and everything is a surprise. Much is home-grown; the huge kitchen garden produces a summer surplus. These are meals to savour (even the lunchtime bar menu includes devilled kidneys, and gratin of seared scallops). Read expert review From £345per night • The best luxury hotels in Yorkshire   Norfolk Morston HallNorfolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating A flint- and brick-built Jacobean country-house hotel, with large conservatory extensions that provide extra dining space. Inside, you’ll find open fires, squashy sofas and cosy corners in a hushed, fairly formal atmosphere. The food is the main reason to come to Morston Hall, the only restaurant with a Michelin star on this stretch of coast. Galton Blackiston’s cooking is rated highly by both visitors and locals: he offers a set dinner based on fresh, local ingredients, served at 8pm daily. Four courses usually include two meat dishes (perhaps confit of duck or beef fillet) and a fish course. Recommended wines are suggested to accompany the dishes – or you can choose from an extensive list. Read expert review From £340per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Norfolk   Suffolk The Great HouseLavenham, Suffolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating The five-bedroom hotel looks onto the market square of Lavenham, a well-preserved medieval village of timbered houses. It would be wrong to stay here without sampling the food, as this is primarily a restaurant – and a very good one at that. From a regularly changing menu, you might find starters of mussels with chilli, coriander and cream, tuna sashimi or wild mushroom ravioli, and main courses of pheasant supreme, grilled fillet of lamb with thyme sauce or roasted duck breast with grilled beetroot. Desserts could be dark chocolate terrine, millefeuille or maple syrup rice pudding. Read expert review From £99per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best spa hotels in Suffolk   Somerset The White PostYeovil, Somerset, England 8Telegraph expert rating At this cosy Victorian ‘pub-and-lodgings’, the elegant gastronomy is as much a pull as the rooms. Brett’s passion for foraging and elegant presentation seeps through. The best way to experience the dishes? The 10-course tasting menu, which pays homage to the West Country (pork done eight ways, served with local chilli and ginger cider) as well as international influences (spiced lentil dhal with gurnard, mango and coconut). The wine list is sufficient but it’s the local ales and ciders that stand out, particularly if you pair a pint of Dorset Knob bitter with the Sunday roast. Painted walls are interrupted only by the wide windows, long cardinal-coloured drapes and filament bulb lamps that, along with on-table candles, add just enough light during evening dining. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The most romantic hotels in Somerset   Dorset La FosseCranborne, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating Snug in the wave-like green hills of east Dorset, La Fosse at Cranborne is a peaceful bed and breakfast as well as popular restaurant. Run by husband and wife, this simple West Country retreat, embracing both modern and traditional, feels as far from the madding crowds as possible. Owner-chef Mark is a true locavore, sourcing as much from in and around the village as possible. His passion for local, inventive cuisine has seen him named best chef in Dorset. The colourful duck dish, replete with homegrown vegetables, is a highlight, drizzled in a piquant jus. Mark’s award-winning cheeseboard is part of the experience, so save some room. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Anchor InnSeatown, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Anchor Inn, sat beyond snaking lanes and tucked between scarped cliffs on the edge of a little known Dorset village, is a destination gastropub serving elevated British classics. It is also a boutique hideaway that cocoons guests amid the sound of rolling waves. If the weather is decent, expect a fight to secure a lunchtime spot, either tucked inside or al fresco. Menus from head chef Jean-Paul De Ronne — who previously worked under Masterchef winner Mat Follas — reveal commitment to seasonal fare from land and sea, such as the fresh crab salad using crustacea caught only metres away. Ales are all from Palmers, brewed four miles away, while an extensive cocktail list from former Hix bartender David Smith features a number of Dorset’s own spirits. Read expert review From £120per night • The best hotels in Dorset   Buckinghamshire The Mash InnRadnage, Buckinghamshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating Described by its owner Nick Mash as a ‘new generation inn’, The Mash Inn's aim is to remove the barriers between chef and diner. The open kitchen takes centre stage: a solid wood workstation groaning with ingredients and stacked plates, beneath a ceiling rack dripping with pots and pans, in front of an open fire for rotisserie cooking. Chef Jon Parry cooks up a storm, producing a delicious, earthy and inventive no frills tasting menu and a short à la carte menu. Much of the produce is from the garden or very local. Diners sit at individual tables or at a large communal table, which may sound daunting but such is the communal, friendly atmosphere that it’s a pleasure to do so. Read expert review From £100per night The Hand & FlowersMarlow, Buckinghamshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn with a Michelin-starred restaurant, enticing locals to dine, and couples for weekends or nights away. It's on busy West Street, just along the road from the house where Mary Shelley created Frankenstein. The chef-proprietor is Tom Kerridge, who gained a Michelin star within 10 months from a kitchen which was then the size of a large cupboard. These days he has a new, celadon green kitchen and a brigade of chefs. As restaurants go, it rocks. Expect crayfish scotch egg, slow cooked duck breast with duck fat chips and other earthy, deeply satisfying dishes that are also full of imaginative twists, served in a cosy and convivial dining room. Read expert review From £140per night • The best hotels in Buckinghamshire   Kent RocksaltFolkestone, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Rocksalt is the littoral culinary kingdom of Mark Sargeant of Claridge's fame. A microcosm of London sophistication in gritty Folkestone, it's a genuine dining destination. The recent addition of four bedrooms above "Sargey's" adjacent Smokehouse enables visitors to abandon themselves to gluttony. His dedication to local ingredients introduces diners to new treasures, such as meaty huss dogfish and tart sea buckthorn (oozing out of a dense chocolate mousse fondant), yet dishes are refreshingly clean and unpretentious. Hunks of bread, served with beef dripping, rich butter and home-roasted salt, and nuggets of treacly fudge and slices of colourful rock bookend a perfectly executed meal. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Wife of BathWye, Kent, England 9Telegraph expert rating Another addition to chef Mark Sargeant and Josh De Haan's portfolio of Kentish restaurants with rooms. With a superb Spanish restaurant and tiny tapas bar, its signature quirky style and authentic cuisine works surprisingly well in the bucolic setting. The restaurant serves impeccable fare: juicy scallops with spicy chorizo and earthy morcillo (black pudding); honey sweet melon smothered in Brindisa's finest Serrano ham; succulent Galician steaks with creamy aioli and fiery paprika potatoes; and hake with radishes, Seville orange and a buttery sauce laced with Gin Mare. Save space for pudding: the bitter chocolate tart with salt and olive oil is revelatory, as is ice-cream made with raisins soaked in PX sherry. Read expert review From £70per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Read's Restaurant With RoomsFaversham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Read's, housed in a Georgian mansion on the north Kentish coast, is a smart restaurant with six rooms, owned and run by acclaimed chef David Pitchford and his wife Rona. Sticking firmly to their decades-long recipe for success, they deliver classic cuisine and unfussy hospitality. David won a Michelin star in 1992, which he retained for 20 consecutive years, becoming the second longest holder of the accolade in Britain. The food is hard to fault, if lacking the innovation and excitement that comes with Michelin recognition: comforting, classic French cuisine with British influence. Think ham and pea mousse; smoked haddock in cream sauce topped with cheese soufflé; Kentish lamb served with buttery asparagus and garden vegetables; and a Cassis-soaked summer pudding. Read expert review From £145per night The Dog at WinghamWingham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating A medieval pub in a rural village, run by an enterprising local family, that serves exceptionally good food and features eight attractive bedrooms. Virtually equidistant from Canterbury and Sandwich, it’s ideally located for exploring the Kentish city, countryside and coast. The kitchen is overseen by the young and talented Dan Johns, who has worked at Gary Rhodes’ Searcy’s at The Gherkin and Urban Coterie. The menu changes monthly to reflect seasonality and local produce. Imaginative starters such as fragrant Thai-style chicken salad and rich pork and pistachio terrine with pineapple jam are followed by melt-in-the-mouth Moroccan spiced lamb and crisp pork collar with chorizo dumplings. Read expert review From £86per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best pubs with rooms in Kent   Devon The Dartmoor InnOkehampton, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 16th-century coaching inn on the north-western edge of Dartmoor National Park is acclaimed for its fresh, seasonal cooking, but it’s worth bedding down for a stay in one of its three chic bedrooms. A blackboard heralds not only the breed of cattle, but also the name of the farmer it has come from. Dishes are pub classics, done to perfection: rib-eye steak and chips, confit of duck leg with toffee apple puree and roasted hazelnuts, and brisket of beef. Philip has a strong ethical policy, forging strong links with local artisan food producers, and ensures the beef has been grass fed and reared within a 20-mile radius. Breakfast is refreshingly original, with dainty portions of caramelised bananas or a daring cooked menu, including herb-crusted goat’s cheese, black pudding and bacon lardons. Read expert review From £65per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Lamb InnSandford, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating With open fires, beamed walls, deep sofas and award-winning food, this 16th-century inn in the village of Sandford is a pub of dreams for town-dwellers. Upstairs, seven bedrooms have big beds, soft linen and powerful showers, and there’s a pretty cobbled terrace at the rear. The Lamb Inn’s menu consistently attracts rave reviews. The produce is seasonal and locally sourced, mixing upmarket dishes with pub classics: shellfish bisque, mushroom ravioli, roasted pigeon with smoked bacon and savoy cabbage or steak and chips. The perfectly fluffy sticky toffee pudding is worth a visit alone. Landlord Mark is a fan of real ale and regularly rotates his cask brews to ensure they stay fresh. Read expert review From £69per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Masons ArmsBranscombe, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This dog-friendly 14th-century thatched inn, in Branscombe, on the Jurassic Coast, is one of Devon’s best. It prides itself on serving local, seasonal Devon fare on a traditional pub menu – it even has a 'food sourcing map' detailing exactly where the produce comes from. There’s steamed River Exe mussels and fries, steak and kidney shortcrust pie, rump steak and a seafood platter. Ales, hand-pumped from casks, are just as local. On a sunny day, the action moves outside to the pretty suntrap terrace. It's a 15-minute walk to Branscombe Beach, a lovely, long shingle cove from where you can pick up the South West Coastal Path. Read expert review From £75per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Salutation InnTopsham, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating Eat well and rest your head at this 18th-century coaching inn in chichi Topsham: a stylish option with a truly excellent restaurant, helmed by one of Gordon Ramsay's former protégés. Exquisite handmade petit-fours welcome guests on arrival – the first hint that your dining experience will be full of extra surprises. The wild mushroom appetiser comes accompanied by an umami-enhancing pinot noir, and the tomato gazpacho with local crab, served in a glass on ice, and followed by a rich rump of beef from Greendale Farm. Each modern dish is accompanied by diverse wines chosen by Stephen Edwardes – the unusual sake complements the beautiful strawberry dessert which is garnished with home-grown edible flowers. Read expert review From £145per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Devon   Cornwall The Gurnard's HeadSt Ives, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn offering outstanding food, fabulous sea and moorland views, situated close to St Ives and Land's End. Popular with walkers and couples of all ages seeking a low-key, restorative break in a wild coastal location. Locals come from miles around to dine here. The Scottish head chef, Bruce Rennie, cooks a short, inventive menu. Lunch may include beetroot risotto, octopus and white wine stew, or Merguez sausages with Puy lentils. The supper menu may include salmon and lobster tortellini, cod with pig’s trotter, and sole with Vermouth. The wine list focuses on Old World wines, notably from France, Italy and Portugal. Read expert review From £110per night Padstow TownhousePadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A handsome listed townhouse on Padstow's high street that has been superbly renovated and opened as a six-bedroom luxury guesthouse by chef Paul Ainsworth to complement his Michelin-starred restaurant, Paul Ainsworth at Number 6. Head there for amusingly-presented, delicately-flavoured meat and fish dishes and a fun and informal atmosphere, or to his even more informal restaurant, Rojanos, for superior pasta, pizza and hamburgers. Breakfast is served at the latter. The guesthouse owns an electric BMW in which guests can be transported if they don’t want to walk around. Read expert review From £280per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com St Petroc's HotelPadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A sociable, intimate townhouse with a labyrinth of gorgeously styled sitting and reading rooms – as well as a buzzy bistro. St Petroc’s Bistro opened along with the hotel in 1988. It’s a lovely room – with an engaging selection of original art on the walls – and a relaxing, happy place to eat at either lunch or dinner. Pride of place on the menu goes to the 30-day dry-aged steaks, but there are fish, chicken and vegetarian options as well – all of them classic Rick Stein recipes (try the grilled hake with Serrano ham, succotash and chives). Ruby’s Bar is the new Stein pub – a great place for a local beer or cocktail. Read expert review From £112per night Kota Restaurant with RoomsPorthleven, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating With a fantastic Asian-Cornish fusion restaurant downstairs, and Porthleven’s picturesque harbour on the doorstep, the Kota’s two simple, homey rooms are proof that sometimes substance can win over style. The vibe in the restaurant is casual, with a long room overlooking the harbour and a waterfront lawn on which you can dine in good weather. New Zealander Jude, who is part Maori, part Malay-Chinese, brings Asian spices and cooking styles to fresh, meticulously sourced Cornish produce – squid with green mango salad, scallops with miso dressing and seaweed salad, and Laksa with prawns, mussels and fish. There are also some very creative burgers – tempura fish with wasabi tartare, and satay chicken with Asian slaw. Read expert review From £75per night DriftwoodPortscatho, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating Sitting on a hill above the rugged coastline of the Roseland peninsula, Driftwood is nautically furnished in soft creams and blues. A Michelin-starred restaurant, private sea-facing terraces, and a private beach make this the perfect venue for pretty much everyone. There are wonderful coastal path walks for miles in each direction. This is Cornish cooking at its finest: unfussy and focused on bringing out the flavour of fresh fish and seafood and locally reared beef and lamb. Dinner in summer comprises a six-course tasting menu with complementary wines. For children there are early suppers with proper chef-made food. Read expert review From £250per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Coombeshead FarmLewannick, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating This is the joint venture from chef Tom Adams of London restaurant Pitt Cue and April Bloomfield, English born chef/proprietor of The Spotted Pig in New York. Both wanted to get back to the roots of food and hospitality and the result is this relaxed communal dining farmhouse b&b. Tom and his partner Lottie Mew live off the land and share their fresh, foraged, pickled and harvested produce with their guests. Tom cooks a three-course feast, kicking off with plates of delicious nibbles from 6.30pm onwards, which is shared at a communal table by all the guests. Tom’s own rare breed Mangalitza pigs feature large, plus perhaps a cep and walnut broth, lamb shoulder and mushroom porridge, with madeleine, whey and prune for pudding. Wines are unusual. Read expert review From £175per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Cornwall   Sussex The Barn at RoundhurstLurgashall, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating A rural South Downs retreat on a 250-acre organic farm with its own lakes. Home-reared food is a specialty. Converted outhouses with six rooms are set around a courtyard, just steps from a dramatic converted barn for dining and lounging. A four-course set menu with generous portions is available for guests and non-guests Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays; a light supper is provided for guests on other days. Meals highlight the farm’s own organic beef, lamb and pork and could include colourful heritage carrots and an exceptional triple chocolate mousse. Read expert review From £98per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com CrouchersChichester, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating An unassuming motel-like exterior belies a foodie haven a short drive from the Witterings. Relax on the patio of a garden-facing room, head to the beach, or explore the cultural and sporting highlights around Chichester but leave room for dinner in the impressive restaurant. Proximity to the coast ensures good seafood. The squid-ink pasta starter is light and delicate and a showy dessert of white chocolate and saffron mousse with edible flowers, caramel and orange ice-cream is a multi-sensory delight. A strong wine list includes an emphasis on the owners’ native South Africa. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Crab & LobsterWest Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating Herons can be seen on the doorstep of this modernised 350-year-old pub beside a bird sanctuary, where guests can stay in cosy bedrooms or an adjoining cottage. Tuck into locally caught seafood in the bar-restaurant and plan nature walks or trips to nearby beaches. The menu, as this gastropub’s name suggests, makes good use of locally caught seafood. Baked Selsey crab with a salad or crab cakes is a highlight. Meat, like rump of lamb (on an autumn menu with garlic Pommes Anna, butternut squash purée, confit tomatoes, baby leeks and Madeira jus) is also locally reared. There’s an extensive wine list and takeaway fish and chips. Read expert review From £160per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith Wingrove HouseAlfriston, South Downs, England 8Telegraph expert rating Yards from the South Downs Way and the half-timbered, candlelit pubs of Alfriston, this swish 19th-century boutique hotel with a modern country restaurant delivers roaring log fires, low-slung sofas and top-notch food, and draws city dwellers craving an easy country escape. Matthew Comben, formerly of the Hungry Monk in Jevington, heads up the kitchen and has brought with him the Monk's original banoffee pie recipe. Highlights from the seasonal menu include cauliflower fritters with Brighton blue cheese mayonnaise, and a soft beef fillet with tarragon. There's an impressive gin menu with 11 different options, including Brighton Gin, and a refreshingly reasonable wine list. Read expert review From £108per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best places and cities to visit in England – and where to stay   Cheshire The Roebuck InnMobberley, Cheshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This French-influenced bistro with rooms is perfect weekend break material, with lashings of character, great food and a beautifully designed garden. The bistro menu, tweaked with the seasons, is European in style, and everything comes in generous portions, whether it’s ‘small plates’ of cassoulet, caponata and crostini; mains such as saffron risotto, venison bourguignon and moules marinière; or puds of tarte au citron, profiteroles and crème caramel. On the drinks front, you’ll find an interesting selection of local ales, old-world wines and a vintage dresser filled with classic aperitifs and digestifs. Read expert review From £115per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • Britain's cosiest hotels for autumn   County Durham Lord Crewe ArmsBlanchland, Northumberland, England 9Telegraph expert rating A lord-of-the-manor building, in a pin-neat estate village, that oozes atmosphere at every stone-flagged turn. A reputation for honest, British cooking, plus its rural location, makes it popular with walkers and foodies as well as the country-sports fraternity. Expect punchy, robust, British cooking, rich with flavour and unusual combinations: devilled lamb’s kidneys on roasted cauliflower; grilled sea trout and mixed alliums; sea buckthorn posset. There’s an element of fun, too; eggy bread with fried bacon or Bloody Mary tomatoes on toast for breakfast. Some ingredients come from the kitchen garden. Eat on the terrace in the summer. The atmospheric, barrel-vaulted bar has local ales including a custom-made Lord Crewe Brew. Read expert review From £155per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Rose & CrownCounty Durham, England 9Telegraph expert rating A foodie destination country inn that has smartened up while still maintaining a sense of village pub: country-comfortable rooms; horse-brasses and dogs in the bar. Surrounded by the sheep-dotted fields and moors of the North Pennines, you come to eat, relax and then walk it off. The modern British menu shows confident cooking that lets the ingredients shine through; no fuss but definitely interesting: honey-glazed goat's cheese with beetroot, hazelnuts and gingerbread, perhaps, or pan-fried fillet of sea trout with roasted baby gem and crushed peas. There’s good local sourcing with Teesdale lamb rarely off the menu. Eat in the candle-lit dining room or buzzier bar; the latter offers three real ales and a good selection of single malts. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best country house hotels in Britain   Cities The Henrietta HotelCovent Garden, London, England 8Telegraph expert rating An 18-bedroom boutique address in one of Covent Garden’s most attractive streets, owned and run by the Paris-based Experimental Group, with a cocktail bar, Ollie Dabbous restaurant and quirky interior design by Dorothée Meilichzon. The food, is delicious – clean, clever and uncomplicated – with highlights that might include the sheeps’ milk curds with pistachio, beef tartare with nasturtium and rye, and wonderful freshly baked warm madeleines with Chantilly cream. Don't miss a cocktail, which can be chosen à la carte or with a consultation from the barman. Read expert review From £220per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Ginger PigHove, Brighton, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 11-bedroom guesthouse above Hove’s highly-acclaimed Ginger Pig Bar and Restaurant is ideal if you want a quieter seaside base. Spacious and elegantly understated rooms include thoughtful beach bags with towels and well-stocked minibars. Always buzzy, this sprawling gastropub serves up highly delicious grub and excellent Sunday roasts. Look out for seasonal specials like asparagus with brown crab and chipotle mayo, or seabream with samphire. The adjoining Orangerie is where breakfast is served (there’s an outdoor area for sunny days), offering imaginative dishes such as baked eggs with hummus, chorizo and peppers, Irish rock oysters and rarebit with roasted tomatoes and mushrooms. Read expert review From £80per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Simpsons RestaurantBirmingham, England 8Telegraph expert rating The cooking is superlative at this gastronomic powerhouse, which also offers three individually styled – and great value – rooms. Throw in the added draw of the Simpsons Cookery School and you pretty much have Michelin-starred, Brummie food nirvana. The winning team of owner Andreas Antona and chef director Luke Tipping, one of Britain’s finest sauciers, has weathered fashions and trends. The three-course à la carte menu features plump marinière-style mussels on a delicate, buttery skate wing, while refined hipster influences are showcased with a barbecued beef cheek with a rich, silky bone marrow sauce. The pastry section’s take on a Belgian Speculoos cookie, with caramelised white chocolate and coffee granite, is fabulous. Read expert review From £110per night The White Star TavernSouthampton, Hampshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating A characterful tavern with rooms on Southampton’s vibrant Oxford Street. The restaurant is a destination in itself, with a varied menu that caters to all comers. If you fancy a plate of fish and chips washed down with real ale, then you’ll get the crispest batter and a unique brew from Itchen Valley. But the real tour de force is the à la carte menu, where chef Matt Noonan serves up his creativity and innovation in dishes that linger long in the memory: a melt-in-the-mouth braised ox cheek with black bean glaze and oriental vegetables to start, perhaps, or a seared bass with a sauté of wild mushrooms, egg yolk ketchup, smoked and cured egg yolk, leek and fresh Dorset truffle as a main. The Death by Chocolate dessert is served up like a piece of street art and really is to die for. Read expert review From £105per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels for a UK city break   WALES Llys MeddygPembrokeshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating A cosy hotel in the small town of Newport, on the Pembrokeshire coast, offering colourful interiors, reasonable rates and an exceptional restaurant, which has gained a reputation in Pembrokeshire and beyond as one of the best and most reasonable fine dining establishments. Chef Daniel Jones does wonders with local produce – such as Newport bay crab and lobster, Preseli lamb, Welsh beef and West Wales cheeses – in two separate dining areas: the romantic basement-level Cellar Bar, which has a slate floor and leather settees, and a wood burning stove in an inglenook fireplace; and, on the ground floor, the recently refurbished main dining room. Ed smokes salmon in a shed in his house just next door. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Ynyshir Restaurant and RoomsPowys, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Queen Victoria once owned this handsome white painted house as a hidden retreat. The undulating grounds are lovely and lead to the RSPB Ynys Hir Nature Reserve at the head of the Dovey estuary. Current owner and professional artist Rob Reen is responsible for the vibrant interiors, their colours taking a lead from his equally bold canvasses that dominate the walls. In the kitchen, Gareth Ward, who trained with Sat Bains, is a rising star, a recipient of one Michelin star and gunning for a second. He prefers to serve a series of small, integrated dishes, and is always coming up with new ideas and loves surprises. The tasting menu at dinner might include simple plates such as Welsh wagyu, pork belly with 'river bacon' or pollock with black bean. Read expert review From £215per night Tyddyn LlanDenbighshire, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A modest Georgian house just outside Llandrillo, with a complementary extension using local slate and stone. The house was once a shooting lodge belonging to the Dukes of Westminster, but now places food centre stage. The views are spectacular, with the Vale of Edeyrnion’s meadows and the slopes of the Berwyn Mountains beyond. The dining room is decorated in Wedgewood blue with tall windows on three sides. Bryan Webb is considered one of Wales’s foremost chefs, with a long-held Michelin star and a commitment to local produce, such as melting Welsh black beef, and quality seasonal ingredients. The menu changes daily. Read expert review From £195per night The Old Rectory on the LakeSnowdonia, Tal-y-llyn, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A sun-trap hideaway on the shores of a huge lake, and at the foot of the mountain, Cadair Idris. It’s elegant and relaxing with free-standing roll-top baths, an outdoor hot tub and locally sourced food perfectly cooked to order in the restaurant. The food, courtesy of the self-trained chef, Ricky, is outstanding. There may be freshly-caught trout, or local Bala lamb on the menu, along with perfectly-cooked vegetables and perhaps Dauphinois potatoes. The chocolate fondant is a signature pudding. The terrace is the perfect place to enjoy the sunset over the lake with a Welsh gin and tonic. Read expert review From £110per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Harbourmaster HotelAberaeron, Cardigan Bay, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating Beach chic comes into its own at this forget-me-not-blue boutique hotel on Aberaeron’s harbour wall. And you won’t likely forget it with these killer sea views, glam rooms and imaginatively thought-out menus. The restaurant has a serious foodie bent in the evening – try to snag the cwtch (cubby hole) for intimate dining. Go for Carlingford oysters, a plump, sweet burst of the sea, and the perfect prelude for well-cooked Welsh fillet of steak, followed by an oozy chocolate fondant with salted caramel ice cream. For a buzzier vibe, head to the bar-lounge to nurse a Brecon gin or nibble bar snacks like crispy cockles with chilli vinegar. Read expert review From £185per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith FairyhillReynoldston, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Snuggled away in 24 acres of woodland near the Gower coast, Fairyhill enchants with more than just its name. Think Downton Abbey meets Watership Down with a pinch of 21st-century cool. It has carved out its name as a foodie retreat with good reason. The chef pulls off a daring, imaginative menu, taking a pride in local sourcing and garden-grown ingredients in dishes that are both robust and refined. Clean flavours sing of the seasons in dishes simple as gazpacho, pear and Pembroke crab, and goat's cheese mousse with courgette flower with beetroot gel. Mains like meltingly tender Welsh lamb served three ways and Serrano-wrapped monkfish with clams, samphire and fresh linguine strike the perfect balance. Read expert review From £135per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com JabajakCarmarthenshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Jabajak is a former drover’s farm, now a fine vineyard and boutique bolthole, serving home-grown food and wines with a slice of history, rustic elegance and first-class service. The restaurant has scooped awards for its locally sourced, home-grown approach. A drink in the lounge bar piques the appetite for dishes prepared with garden herbs, fruit, veg and edible flowers, ramped up flavour-wise by foraged ingredients such as nettles and wild garlic when in season. Starters including basil-marinated bruschetta with gooseberry and elderflower chutney prelude mains such as butter-soft Celtic steak with local Moody Mabel cheese. There are many nods to local produce at breakfast, too, and the cooked Welsh option with a side order of cockles is bang on the money. Read expert review From £130per night Rates provided by Booking.com   SCOTLAND The Three Chimneys and The House Over-ByDunvegan, Isle of Skye, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This destination restaurant with rooms is back doing what it does best, with a new chef, updated look and reinvigorated sense of discipline and purpose. The essential ingredients are there: attentive service, attractive rooms with mesmerising views and a talented young chef. Choose from a three-course à la carte menu or the epic Skye Showcase Menu, served at the ‘Kitchen Table’, right in the heart of the action. Dishes on the latter menu might include the likes of Dungvegan crab, seaweed and miso-cured halibut, Orbost Farm beef and pot-roasted young grouse. A road (albeit single-track and quiet) runs between the House Over-By and the shore of Loch Dunvegan, slightly eroding what would otherwise be a feeling of privacy, but not unduly distracting from the peaceful views. Read expert review From £345per night The Peat InnSt Andrews, Fife, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating A long-standing gastro-destination lying between the 'town and gown' of St Andrews and Fife’s East Neuk fishing villages, this is well worth a detour. It’s a short stagger from restaurant to homely split-level suites: a calm, comfortable place to sleep off the fabulous Michelin-starred food. The rustic-chic restaurant, all tender taupes with amber and deep sea-blue accents, is a fittingly sophisticated setting for the triumphant cooking. You come here for the food and you won’t leave disappointed. From the home-made butter to the unusually good petit-fours, everything is a reflection of chef Geoffrey Smeddle’s joyous approach to food, with dishes like a starter of smoked beef tartare with wasabi puree raising your eyebrows and your expectations simultaneously. Read expert review From £195per night The Taynuilt Etive Restaurant with RoomsTaynuilt, Argyll & Bute, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating This historic rural hotel has been reinvented as a restaurant with rooms with a young Scottish chef leading a bright and creative team. It's at the heart of a small community that makes an ideal base for exploring Argyll and the isles. The Etive restaurant is the axis here, a genuine foodie oasis and arguably the finest place to eat in the region. John McNulty works wonders with the ultra-local produce, whether it be the Mull Pig’s Heed or the salmon he smokes using local larch from Loch Awe. Sound provenance ripples through the Etive even as far as breakfast, where local fish stars. Read expert review From £79per night 21212Edinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating The four bedrooms above this Michelin-starred restaurant are no afterthought; there is a confident hand at work in rooms that are as striking as the food, displaying a sometimes surprising but always sensual contemporary/baroque style and unexpectedly leafy views. Michelin-starred chef Paul Kitching is a maverick who likes to tease flavours, building fantastic creations that sound impossible, but work, like silky pink trout served with artichokes, pasta, almonds, chickpeas, kidney beans, oriental mushrooms, warm coleslaw and feta cheese. He’s utterly serious but there’s an edge of play - such as a pre-dessert of porridge, milk and cinnamon poured from a china cow. Read expert review From £112per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith The Bridge Inn, RathoEdinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This 18-century coaching inn – now an award-winning gastropub with rooms – is on a leafy canal in a tranquil village just 20 minutes away from Edinburgh's city centre. Four pretty bedrooms are each individually decorated. The cooking is exceptional, with talented head chef Ben doing wonderful things with good Scottish fish and game, properly hung beef, and pork from their own fat and sassy pigs. They grow their own vegetables, herbs and fruit too, in an old walled garden a short walk away down the canal path. Breakfast is a fine indulgence. You can have a hair of the dog as well: Champagne, Prosecco, Buck’s Fizz or a Bloody Mary. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best castle hotels in Scotland Contributions from Ros Belford, Suzy Bennett, Sophie Butler, Gill Charlton, Kerry Christiani, Fiona Duncan, Suzanne King, Gabriella Le Breton, Linda Macdonald, Richard McComb, Robin McKelvie, Harriet O'Brien, Ben Parker, Helen Pickles, Louise Roddon, Cathy Stebbings, Sarah Stirling, Anna Turns, Debbie Ward and Antonia Windsor.

Britain's loveliest restaurants with rooms for autumn

What could be more appealing than the epicurean informality of an inn or restaurant with rooms? These wonderfully relaxed establishments combine an emphasis on great ingredients from the area with local charm and stylish panache. There’s an insider feel that you don’t get at a more formal hotel, and there’s a foodie enthusiasm that wouldn’t be exuded quite as joyfully at a larger enterprise. Autumn/winter is a particularly good time to seek out their gently indulgent accommodation and fabulous seasonal flavours – the likes of wild rabbit with foraged mushrooms, grouse and damsons, elderberries and more. Harriet O'Brien Our experts round up their favourite establishments in Britain, from the Cotswolds to Cornwall, Suffolk to Skye, for feasting – and then flopping.  ENGLAND Cotswolds The Wild RabbitKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Wild Rabbit is a haven of eco-elegance a few fields away from sister enterprise Daylesford, the organic farm shop, deli, spa (and more) of Carole Bamford. She transformed this 18th-century inn and it has been meticulously devised in quiet colours, stone and wood. It’s a beautiful posh pub, with food to match. The kitchen is masterminded by Tim Allen, who won the Wild Rabbit a Michelin star in October 2016. His cuisine takes diners on a taste adventure, with dishes such as haddock on leek and apple slaw, topped with an amazingly cooked egg – poached and lightly deep fried. Read expert review From £148per night The Feathered Nest Country InnOxfordshire, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fabulous food and a superb setting above the Evenlode valley make this old country inn a hedonistic haven. The owners describe it as a pub with a twist. They’ve created an elegant restaurant that has won armloads of awards since it opened, with three stylish and supremely comfy bedrooms. The exquisite food is almost on a par with sleek gastro establishments such as Tom Kerridge’s The Hand and Flowers in Marlow - and even Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons where head chef Kuba Winkowski previously worked. There’s a stupendous wine list, too. Among the choice of 200 or so is a wonderful range of South African wines. There’s also a bar menu featuring classics such as burgers of brilliant quality. Read expert review From £140per night The Wheatsheaf InnNorthleach, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A creeper-clad coaching inn turned arty, boutique haven. The Wheatsheaf is in a particularly pretty and enterprising little Cotswold town. The restaurant draws a regular local crowd and the emphasis is on the very best quality, from the menu ingredients to the room amenities. The sophisticated menu offers great flavour combinations, the likes of roast parsnip and fennel salad with chestnuts, and mutton and apple pie with creamed potatoes. If there’s space in the bar beforehand try an aperitif of Sloe Negroni, with sloe gin and Campari, or opt for a pint of Cotswold Old Hooky. Read expert review From £102per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Kingham PloughKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Kingham Plough is a treat of a foodie destinatio, with relaxing furnishings, genial staff and brilliantly conceived menus. Emily Watkins has won numerous awards for her modern British cuisine with a twist ‒ dishes are often based on old Cotswold recipes. Her food is also much inspired by local produce; the likes of Windrush Valley goat cheese and pork from Paddock Farm a few miles away. There’s a pleasingly short and sophisticated à la carte menu: starters might include slow braised oxtail with horseradish, and mains could feature venison wellington, with meat supplied from nearby Cornbury Park. There’s also a well-priced bar menu featuring gastro comfort food such as rabbit parfait. Read expert review From £145per night The Ebrington ArmsEbrington, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating This hidden treasure set in a gloriously unspoilt village is a modern day version of a country tavern – it’s at once a genuine pub that brews its own very smooth ales; a lovely restaurant with real local flavour; and a charming hotel with rural-chic bedrooms. Chef Ben Dulley offers short, understated menus which reflect his commitment to freshness, with many vegetables straight from surrounding Drinkwater Farm. Dishes are beautifully presented and packed with local flavour – the likes of hot-smoked Bibury trout salad, and Cotswold lamb with stuffed tomatoes. Wines are from independent growers, including the Cotswolds’ own Little Oak Vineyard. Read expert review From £165per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best Cotswolds pubs with rooms   Oxfordshire Artist Residence OxfordshireSouth Leigh, Oxfordshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A unique country pub with a bohemian twist and arty vibe, offering gorgeous quirky rooms, scrumptious meals and contemporary art. The food is as heart-warming as the dining room. Local game and meat, foraged herbs and flowers join vegetables from the garden. The menu could include the likes of smoky pigeon breast electrified by a pickled walnut with caramelised chicory, port jelly and smoked spring onions and plaice in seaweed butter, smoked cockles, sea vegetables and bisque. The wine list is small, selective and good value. Join locals for a pint at the bar, read the paper or play cards around the fire. Read expert review From £130per night • The best luxury hotels in Oxfordshire   Lake District L’EnclumeCartmel, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Simon Rogan's two-Michelin-starred restaurant plus handful of rooms stay true both to the simple village location and rich surrounding land. Rooms are modest but smartly furnished, the setting picture-box pretty while the food is an exemplar of local sourcing and creativity. This isn’t Blumenthal-style magic but simply 20 (tiny) courses of exceptional skill, balance and creativity: an egg shell containing a yolk in mushroom broth; confit cauliflower in a pea and calamint sauce; a finger of turbot in nasturtium butter, the dinkiest caramel mousse sitting on compressed apple. All is presented exquisitely but without fanfare on rustic pottery, handmade glass, even a pebble. The Coravin wine system allows you to try top-rank or small-producer wines. Read expert review From £129per night The Punch Bowl InnLake District, Cumbria, England 8Telegraph expert rating A smart but relaxed country inn, in a quiet corner of the Lake District, with a deserved reputation for its classy food. The ground floor is a semi open-plan series of dining rooms, bar and relaxed eating areas, separated by little steps. The cooking is smart-city-restaurant standard producing assured, modern British dishes that are interesting without being tricksy or fussy. No fancy canapés or pre-starters, just clean flavours. Starters might include black pudding with bubble and squeak or tomato salad with local crab and lobster while mains could be pork with ham hock croquette or cod with Morteau sausage. There's a wide-ranging wine list, plus a couple of local real ales. Read expert review From £130per night • The Lake District's best pubs and inns   Peak District The Samuel Fox Country InnHope Valley, Peak District, England 8Telegraph expert rating This stone-built inn – which is more of a restaurant with rooms than a standard country pub – has an ever-growing reputation. Come for a great dinner, stay over in one of four comfortable rooms and spend the next day exploring the glorious Peak District. The foodie credentials are strong: chef-patron James Duckett has worked with Albert Roux, Michel Roux, Marcus Wareing and Philip Howard, and done extended stints in Australia and Spain. Now he turns out some of the best food in the area: everything from a piquant, pretty-as-a-picture starter of soused sardines to the kind of iced chocolate cherry parfait that makes you wish you hadn’t shared with your other half. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Peak District   Yorkshire Crab Manor HotelThirsk, Yorkshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fun and exotic, individually themed rooms combined with a well-regarded seafood restaurant and an overall madcap sense of decoration make this a hugely popular choice for special occasions. The restaurant specialises in fish and seafood serving both classics – lobster thermidor, grilled Queen scallops – as well as more modern dishes such as sea trout with samphire. It's open for lunch and dinner, and for afternoon 'lighter' options (including moules mariniere), but there's nothing delicate about portion sizes. Half the fun is the setting: jolly bar, romantic dining room or brighter conservatory, all with a bonkers decoration that includes a suite of orchestral instruments. Breakfast is also a delight. Read expert review From £165per night The Star InnHarome, Helmsley, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant-with-rooms with chocolate-box, thatched-pub looks and a bucolic farming-village location. Bedrooms, across the road, have a comfy, hunting-lodge style. Whitby-born chef-owner Andrew Pern was one of the first champions of local sourcing - and why wouldn’t you be with his ‘back garden’: moorland game and pasture-fed meat, coastal fish, Yorkshire Wolds’ fruit and vegetables. He now has a huge kitchen garden at the back of the pub. His menus are punchy, robust yet skilfully balanced and as much about texture as taste: crab stick with seashore vegetables and avocado ice, perhaps followed by roasted lamb chop with truffled faggot or honey-roasted duck with tea-poached quail’s egg. Read expert review From £150per night The Timble InnNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 8Telegraph expert rating A food-driven village pub in a quiet, yet surprisingly well-connected location with bold, contemporary styling and smart bedrooms. Glorious views and walks are on the doorstep. A pub that does two sittings for Sunday lunch is serious about food, and has been awarded two AA rosettes for it. It’s ambitious stuff – wood pigeon with quail’s egg and black pudding; venison loin with celeriac remoulade and chestnuts. The seafood platter and chateaubriand steak are favourites. It's not really a beer pub but offers a wide-ranging wine list – including fine ones by the glass – plus local gins. Read expert review From £150per night The Yorke ArmsNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant with rooms in an off-the-beaten-track location; perfect for walking off the spoiling food. The food is why people come here – some helicopter in from London for chef-proprietor Frances Atkins’s flavour-intense cooking. It’s not fussy or tricksy, just skilled, imaginative and full of the unexpected – quail with lychee and jasmine; brill with fennel in turmeric broth, peach and curd tart. Choose the eight-course tasting menu and everything is a surprise. Much is home-grown; the huge kitchen garden produces a summer surplus. These are meals to savour (even the lunchtime bar menu includes devilled kidneys, and gratin of seared scallops). Read expert review From £345per night • The best luxury hotels in Yorkshire   Norfolk Morston HallNorfolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating A flint- and brick-built Jacobean country-house hotel, with large conservatory extensions that provide extra dining space. Inside, you’ll find open fires, squashy sofas and cosy corners in a hushed, fairly formal atmosphere. The food is the main reason to come to Morston Hall, the only restaurant with a Michelin star on this stretch of coast. Galton Blackiston’s cooking is rated highly by both visitors and locals: he offers a set dinner based on fresh, local ingredients, served at 8pm daily. Four courses usually include two meat dishes (perhaps confit of duck or beef fillet) and a fish course. Recommended wines are suggested to accompany the dishes – or you can choose from an extensive list. Read expert review From £340per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Norfolk   Suffolk The Great HouseLavenham, Suffolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating The five-bedroom hotel looks onto the market square of Lavenham, a well-preserved medieval village of timbered houses. It would be wrong to stay here without sampling the food, as this is primarily a restaurant – and a very good one at that. From a regularly changing menu, you might find starters of mussels with chilli, coriander and cream, tuna sashimi or wild mushroom ravioli, and main courses of pheasant supreme, grilled fillet of lamb with thyme sauce or roasted duck breast with grilled beetroot. Desserts could be dark chocolate terrine, millefeuille or maple syrup rice pudding. Read expert review From £99per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best spa hotels in Suffolk   Somerset The White PostYeovil, Somerset, England 8Telegraph expert rating At this cosy Victorian ‘pub-and-lodgings’, the elegant gastronomy is as much a pull as the rooms. Brett’s passion for foraging and elegant presentation seeps through. The best way to experience the dishes? The 10-course tasting menu, which pays homage to the West Country (pork done eight ways, served with local chilli and ginger cider) as well as international influences (spiced lentil dhal with gurnard, mango and coconut). The wine list is sufficient but it’s the local ales and ciders that stand out, particularly if you pair a pint of Dorset Knob bitter with the Sunday roast. Painted walls are interrupted only by the wide windows, long cardinal-coloured drapes and filament bulb lamps that, along with on-table candles, add just enough light during evening dining. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The most romantic hotels in Somerset   Dorset La FosseCranborne, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating Snug in the wave-like green hills of east Dorset, La Fosse at Cranborne is a peaceful bed and breakfast as well as popular restaurant. Run by husband and wife, this simple West Country retreat, embracing both modern and traditional, feels as far from the madding crowds as possible. Owner-chef Mark is a true locavore, sourcing as much from in and around the village as possible. His passion for local, inventive cuisine has seen him named best chef in Dorset. The colourful duck dish, replete with homegrown vegetables, is a highlight, drizzled in a piquant jus. Mark’s award-winning cheeseboard is part of the experience, so save some room. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Anchor InnSeatown, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Anchor Inn, sat beyond snaking lanes and tucked between scarped cliffs on the edge of a little known Dorset village, is a destination gastropub serving elevated British classics. It is also a boutique hideaway that cocoons guests amid the sound of rolling waves. If the weather is decent, expect a fight to secure a lunchtime spot, either tucked inside or al fresco. Menus from head chef Jean-Paul De Ronne — who previously worked under Masterchef winner Mat Follas — reveal commitment to seasonal fare from land and sea, such as the fresh crab salad using crustacea caught only metres away. Ales are all from Palmers, brewed four miles away, while an extensive cocktail list from former Hix bartender David Smith features a number of Dorset’s own spirits. Read expert review From £120per night • The best hotels in Dorset   Buckinghamshire The Mash InnRadnage, Buckinghamshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating Described by its owner Nick Mash as a ‘new generation inn’, The Mash Inn's aim is to remove the barriers between chef and diner. The open kitchen takes centre stage: a solid wood workstation groaning with ingredients and stacked plates, beneath a ceiling rack dripping with pots and pans, in front of an open fire for rotisserie cooking. Chef Jon Parry cooks up a storm, producing a delicious, earthy and inventive no frills tasting menu and a short à la carte menu. Much of the produce is from the garden or very local. Diners sit at individual tables or at a large communal table, which may sound daunting but such is the communal, friendly atmosphere that it’s a pleasure to do so. Read expert review From £100per night The Hand & FlowersMarlow, Buckinghamshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn with a Michelin-starred restaurant, enticing locals to dine, and couples for weekends or nights away. It's on busy West Street, just along the road from the house where Mary Shelley created Frankenstein. The chef-proprietor is Tom Kerridge, who gained a Michelin star within 10 months from a kitchen which was then the size of a large cupboard. These days he has a new, celadon green kitchen and a brigade of chefs. As restaurants go, it rocks. Expect crayfish scotch egg, slow cooked duck breast with duck fat chips and other earthy, deeply satisfying dishes that are also full of imaginative twists, served in a cosy and convivial dining room. Read expert review From £140per night • The best hotels in Buckinghamshire   Kent RocksaltFolkestone, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Rocksalt is the littoral culinary kingdom of Mark Sargeant of Claridge's fame. A microcosm of London sophistication in gritty Folkestone, it's a genuine dining destination. The recent addition of four bedrooms above "Sargey's" adjacent Smokehouse enables visitors to abandon themselves to gluttony. His dedication to local ingredients introduces diners to new treasures, such as meaty huss dogfish and tart sea buckthorn (oozing out of a dense chocolate mousse fondant), yet dishes are refreshingly clean and unpretentious. Hunks of bread, served with beef dripping, rich butter and home-roasted salt, and nuggets of treacly fudge and slices of colourful rock bookend a perfectly executed meal. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Wife of BathWye, Kent, England 9Telegraph expert rating Another addition to chef Mark Sargeant and Josh De Haan's portfolio of Kentish restaurants with rooms. With a superb Spanish restaurant and tiny tapas bar, its signature quirky style and authentic cuisine works surprisingly well in the bucolic setting. The restaurant serves impeccable fare: juicy scallops with spicy chorizo and earthy morcillo (black pudding); honey sweet melon smothered in Brindisa's finest Serrano ham; succulent Galician steaks with creamy aioli and fiery paprika potatoes; and hake with radishes, Seville orange and a buttery sauce laced with Gin Mare. Save space for pudding: the bitter chocolate tart with salt and olive oil is revelatory, as is ice-cream made with raisins soaked in PX sherry. Read expert review From £70per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Read's Restaurant With RoomsFaversham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Read's, housed in a Georgian mansion on the north Kentish coast, is a smart restaurant with six rooms, owned and run by acclaimed chef David Pitchford and his wife Rona. Sticking firmly to their decades-long recipe for success, they deliver classic cuisine and unfussy hospitality. David won a Michelin star in 1992, which he retained for 20 consecutive years, becoming the second longest holder of the accolade in Britain. The food is hard to fault, if lacking the innovation and excitement that comes with Michelin recognition: comforting, classic French cuisine with British influence. Think ham and pea mousse; smoked haddock in cream sauce topped with cheese soufflé; Kentish lamb served with buttery asparagus and garden vegetables; and a Cassis-soaked summer pudding. Read expert review From £145per night The Dog at WinghamWingham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating A medieval pub in a rural village, run by an enterprising local family, that serves exceptionally good food and features eight attractive bedrooms. Virtually equidistant from Canterbury and Sandwich, it’s ideally located for exploring the Kentish city, countryside and coast. The kitchen is overseen by the young and talented Dan Johns, who has worked at Gary Rhodes’ Searcy’s at The Gherkin and Urban Coterie. The menu changes monthly to reflect seasonality and local produce. Imaginative starters such as fragrant Thai-style chicken salad and rich pork and pistachio terrine with pineapple jam are followed by melt-in-the-mouth Moroccan spiced lamb and crisp pork collar with chorizo dumplings. Read expert review From £86per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best pubs with rooms in Kent   Devon The Dartmoor InnOkehampton, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 16th-century coaching inn on the north-western edge of Dartmoor National Park is acclaimed for its fresh, seasonal cooking, but it’s worth bedding down for a stay in one of its three chic bedrooms. A blackboard heralds not only the breed of cattle, but also the name of the farmer it has come from. Dishes are pub classics, done to perfection: rib-eye steak and chips, confit of duck leg with toffee apple puree and roasted hazelnuts, and brisket of beef. Philip has a strong ethical policy, forging strong links with local artisan food producers, and ensures the beef has been grass fed and reared within a 20-mile radius. Breakfast is refreshingly original, with dainty portions of caramelised bananas or a daring cooked menu, including herb-crusted goat’s cheese, black pudding and bacon lardons. Read expert review From £65per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Lamb InnSandford, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating With open fires, beamed walls, deep sofas and award-winning food, this 16th-century inn in the village of Sandford is a pub of dreams for town-dwellers. Upstairs, seven bedrooms have big beds, soft linen and powerful showers, and there’s a pretty cobbled terrace at the rear. The Lamb Inn’s menu consistently attracts rave reviews. The produce is seasonal and locally sourced, mixing upmarket dishes with pub classics: shellfish bisque, mushroom ravioli, roasted pigeon with smoked bacon and savoy cabbage or steak and chips. The perfectly fluffy sticky toffee pudding is worth a visit alone. Landlord Mark is a fan of real ale and regularly rotates his cask brews to ensure they stay fresh. Read expert review From £69per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Masons ArmsBranscombe, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This dog-friendly 14th-century thatched inn, in Branscombe, on the Jurassic Coast, is one of Devon’s best. It prides itself on serving local, seasonal Devon fare on a traditional pub menu – it even has a 'food sourcing map' detailing exactly where the produce comes from. There’s steamed River Exe mussels and fries, steak and kidney shortcrust pie, rump steak and a seafood platter. Ales, hand-pumped from casks, are just as local. On a sunny day, the action moves outside to the pretty suntrap terrace. It's a 15-minute walk to Branscombe Beach, a lovely, long shingle cove from where you can pick up the South West Coastal Path. Read expert review From £75per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Salutation InnTopsham, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating Eat well and rest your head at this 18th-century coaching inn in chichi Topsham: a stylish option with a truly excellent restaurant, helmed by one of Gordon Ramsay's former protégés. Exquisite handmade petit-fours welcome guests on arrival – the first hint that your dining experience will be full of extra surprises. The wild mushroom appetiser comes accompanied by an umami-enhancing pinot noir, and the tomato gazpacho with local crab, served in a glass on ice, and followed by a rich rump of beef from Greendale Farm. Each modern dish is accompanied by diverse wines chosen by Stephen Edwardes – the unusual sake complements the beautiful strawberry dessert which is garnished with home-grown edible flowers. Read expert review From £145per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Devon   Cornwall The Gurnard's HeadSt Ives, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn offering outstanding food, fabulous sea and moorland views, situated close to St Ives and Land's End. Popular with walkers and couples of all ages seeking a low-key, restorative break in a wild coastal location. Locals come from miles around to dine here. The Scottish head chef, Bruce Rennie, cooks a short, inventive menu. Lunch may include beetroot risotto, octopus and white wine stew, or Merguez sausages with Puy lentils. The supper menu may include salmon and lobster tortellini, cod with pig’s trotter, and sole with Vermouth. The wine list focuses on Old World wines, notably from France, Italy and Portugal. Read expert review From £110per night Padstow TownhousePadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A handsome listed townhouse on Padstow's high street that has been superbly renovated and opened as a six-bedroom luxury guesthouse by chef Paul Ainsworth to complement his Michelin-starred restaurant, Paul Ainsworth at Number 6. Head there for amusingly-presented, delicately-flavoured meat and fish dishes and a fun and informal atmosphere, or to his even more informal restaurant, Rojanos, for superior pasta, pizza and hamburgers. Breakfast is served at the latter. The guesthouse owns an electric BMW in which guests can be transported if they don’t want to walk around. Read expert review From £280per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com St Petroc's HotelPadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A sociable, intimate townhouse with a labyrinth of gorgeously styled sitting and reading rooms – as well as a buzzy bistro. St Petroc’s Bistro opened along with the hotel in 1988. It’s a lovely room – with an engaging selection of original art on the walls – and a relaxing, happy place to eat at either lunch or dinner. Pride of place on the menu goes to the 30-day dry-aged steaks, but there are fish, chicken and vegetarian options as well – all of them classic Rick Stein recipes (try the grilled hake with Serrano ham, succotash and chives). Ruby’s Bar is the new Stein pub – a great place for a local beer or cocktail. Read expert review From £112per night Kota Restaurant with RoomsPorthleven, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating With a fantastic Asian-Cornish fusion restaurant downstairs, and Porthleven’s picturesque harbour on the doorstep, the Kota’s two simple, homey rooms are proof that sometimes substance can win over style. The vibe in the restaurant is casual, with a long room overlooking the harbour and a waterfront lawn on which you can dine in good weather. New Zealander Jude, who is part Maori, part Malay-Chinese, brings Asian spices and cooking styles to fresh, meticulously sourced Cornish produce – squid with green mango salad, scallops with miso dressing and seaweed salad, and Laksa with prawns, mussels and fish. There are also some very creative burgers – tempura fish with wasabi tartare, and satay chicken with Asian slaw. Read expert review From £75per night DriftwoodPortscatho, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating Sitting on a hill above the rugged coastline of the Roseland peninsula, Driftwood is nautically furnished in soft creams and blues. A Michelin-starred restaurant, private sea-facing terraces, and a private beach make this the perfect venue for pretty much everyone. There are wonderful coastal path walks for miles in each direction. This is Cornish cooking at its finest: unfussy and focused on bringing out the flavour of fresh fish and seafood and locally reared beef and lamb. Dinner in summer comprises a six-course tasting menu with complementary wines. For children there are early suppers with proper chef-made food. Read expert review From £250per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Coombeshead FarmLewannick, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating This is the joint venture from chef Tom Adams of London restaurant Pitt Cue and April Bloomfield, English born chef/proprietor of The Spotted Pig in New York. Both wanted to get back to the roots of food and hospitality and the result is this relaxed communal dining farmhouse b&b. Tom and his partner Lottie Mew live off the land and share their fresh, foraged, pickled and harvested produce with their guests. Tom cooks a three-course feast, kicking off with plates of delicious nibbles from 6.30pm onwards, which is shared at a communal table by all the guests. Tom’s own rare breed Mangalitza pigs feature large, plus perhaps a cep and walnut broth, lamb shoulder and mushroom porridge, with madeleine, whey and prune for pudding. Wines are unusual. Read expert review From £175per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Cornwall   Sussex The Barn at RoundhurstLurgashall, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating A rural South Downs retreat on a 250-acre organic farm with its own lakes. Home-reared food is a specialty. Converted outhouses with six rooms are set around a courtyard, just steps from a dramatic converted barn for dining and lounging. A four-course set menu with generous portions is available for guests and non-guests Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays; a light supper is provided for guests on other days. Meals highlight the farm’s own organic beef, lamb and pork and could include colourful heritage carrots and an exceptional triple chocolate mousse. Read expert review From £98per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com CrouchersChichester, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating An unassuming motel-like exterior belies a foodie haven a short drive from the Witterings. Relax on the patio of a garden-facing room, head to the beach, or explore the cultural and sporting highlights around Chichester but leave room for dinner in the impressive restaurant. Proximity to the coast ensures good seafood. The squid-ink pasta starter is light and delicate and a showy dessert of white chocolate and saffron mousse with edible flowers, caramel and orange ice-cream is a multi-sensory delight. A strong wine list includes an emphasis on the owners’ native South Africa. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Crab & LobsterWest Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating Herons can be seen on the doorstep of this modernised 350-year-old pub beside a bird sanctuary, where guests can stay in cosy bedrooms or an adjoining cottage. Tuck into locally caught seafood in the bar-restaurant and plan nature walks or trips to nearby beaches. The menu, as this gastropub’s name suggests, makes good use of locally caught seafood. Baked Selsey crab with a salad or crab cakes is a highlight. Meat, like rump of lamb (on an autumn menu with garlic Pommes Anna, butternut squash purée, confit tomatoes, baby leeks and Madeira jus) is also locally reared. There’s an extensive wine list and takeaway fish and chips. Read expert review From £160per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith Wingrove HouseAlfriston, South Downs, England 8Telegraph expert rating Yards from the South Downs Way and the half-timbered, candlelit pubs of Alfriston, this swish 19th-century boutique hotel with a modern country restaurant delivers roaring log fires, low-slung sofas and top-notch food, and draws city dwellers craving an easy country escape. Matthew Comben, formerly of the Hungry Monk in Jevington, heads up the kitchen and has brought with him the Monk's original banoffee pie recipe. Highlights from the seasonal menu include cauliflower fritters with Brighton blue cheese mayonnaise, and a soft beef fillet with tarragon. There's an impressive gin menu with 11 different options, including Brighton Gin, and a refreshingly reasonable wine list. Read expert review From £108per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best places and cities to visit in England – and where to stay   Cheshire The Roebuck InnMobberley, Cheshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This French-influenced bistro with rooms is perfect weekend break material, with lashings of character, great food and a beautifully designed garden. The bistro menu, tweaked with the seasons, is European in style, and everything comes in generous portions, whether it’s ‘small plates’ of cassoulet, caponata and crostini; mains such as saffron risotto, venison bourguignon and moules marinière; or puds of tarte au citron, profiteroles and crème caramel. On the drinks front, you’ll find an interesting selection of local ales, old-world wines and a vintage dresser filled with classic aperitifs and digestifs. Read expert review From £115per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • Britain's cosiest hotels for autumn   County Durham Lord Crewe ArmsBlanchland, Northumberland, England 9Telegraph expert rating A lord-of-the-manor building, in a pin-neat estate village, that oozes atmosphere at every stone-flagged turn. A reputation for honest, British cooking, plus its rural location, makes it popular with walkers and foodies as well as the country-sports fraternity. Expect punchy, robust, British cooking, rich with flavour and unusual combinations: devilled lamb’s kidneys on roasted cauliflower; grilled sea trout and mixed alliums; sea buckthorn posset. There’s an element of fun, too; eggy bread with fried bacon or Bloody Mary tomatoes on toast for breakfast. Some ingredients come from the kitchen garden. Eat on the terrace in the summer. The atmospheric, barrel-vaulted bar has local ales including a custom-made Lord Crewe Brew. Read expert review From £155per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Rose & CrownCounty Durham, England 9Telegraph expert rating A foodie destination country inn that has smartened up while still maintaining a sense of village pub: country-comfortable rooms; horse-brasses and dogs in the bar. Surrounded by the sheep-dotted fields and moors of the North Pennines, you come to eat, relax and then walk it off. The modern British menu shows confident cooking that lets the ingredients shine through; no fuss but definitely interesting: honey-glazed goat's cheese with beetroot, hazelnuts and gingerbread, perhaps, or pan-fried fillet of sea trout with roasted baby gem and crushed peas. There’s good local sourcing with Teesdale lamb rarely off the menu. Eat in the candle-lit dining room or buzzier bar; the latter offers three real ales and a good selection of single malts. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best country house hotels in Britain   Cities The Henrietta HotelCovent Garden, London, England 8Telegraph expert rating An 18-bedroom boutique address in one of Covent Garden’s most attractive streets, owned and run by the Paris-based Experimental Group, with a cocktail bar, Ollie Dabbous restaurant and quirky interior design by Dorothée Meilichzon. The food, is delicious – clean, clever and uncomplicated – with highlights that might include the sheeps’ milk curds with pistachio, beef tartare with nasturtium and rye, and wonderful freshly baked warm madeleines with Chantilly cream. Don't miss a cocktail, which can be chosen à la carte or with a consultation from the barman. Read expert review From £220per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Ginger PigHove, Brighton, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 11-bedroom guesthouse above Hove’s highly-acclaimed Ginger Pig Bar and Restaurant is ideal if you want a quieter seaside base. Spacious and elegantly understated rooms include thoughtful beach bags with towels and well-stocked minibars. Always buzzy, this sprawling gastropub serves up highly delicious grub and excellent Sunday roasts. Look out for seasonal specials like asparagus with brown crab and chipotle mayo, or seabream with samphire. The adjoining Orangerie is where breakfast is served (there’s an outdoor area for sunny days), offering imaginative dishes such as baked eggs with hummus, chorizo and peppers, Irish rock oysters and rarebit with roasted tomatoes and mushrooms. Read expert review From £80per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Simpsons RestaurantBirmingham, England 8Telegraph expert rating The cooking is superlative at this gastronomic powerhouse, which also offers three individually styled – and great value – rooms. Throw in the added draw of the Simpsons Cookery School and you pretty much have Michelin-starred, Brummie food nirvana. The winning team of owner Andreas Antona and chef director Luke Tipping, one of Britain’s finest sauciers, has weathered fashions and trends. The three-course à la carte menu features plump marinière-style mussels on a delicate, buttery skate wing, while refined hipster influences are showcased with a barbecued beef cheek with a rich, silky bone marrow sauce. The pastry section’s take on a Belgian Speculoos cookie, with caramelised white chocolate and coffee granite, is fabulous. Read expert review From £110per night The White Star TavernSouthampton, Hampshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating A characterful tavern with rooms on Southampton’s vibrant Oxford Street. The restaurant is a destination in itself, with a varied menu that caters to all comers. If you fancy a plate of fish and chips washed down with real ale, then you’ll get the crispest batter and a unique brew from Itchen Valley. But the real tour de force is the à la carte menu, where chef Matt Noonan serves up his creativity and innovation in dishes that linger long in the memory: a melt-in-the-mouth braised ox cheek with black bean glaze and oriental vegetables to start, perhaps, or a seared bass with a sauté of wild mushrooms, egg yolk ketchup, smoked and cured egg yolk, leek and fresh Dorset truffle as a main. The Death by Chocolate dessert is served up like a piece of street art and really is to die for. Read expert review From £105per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels for a UK city break   WALES Llys MeddygPembrokeshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating A cosy hotel in the small town of Newport, on the Pembrokeshire coast, offering colourful interiors, reasonable rates and an exceptional restaurant, which has gained a reputation in Pembrokeshire and beyond as one of the best and most reasonable fine dining establishments. Chef Daniel Jones does wonders with local produce – such as Newport bay crab and lobster, Preseli lamb, Welsh beef and West Wales cheeses – in two separate dining areas: the romantic basement-level Cellar Bar, which has a slate floor and leather settees, and a wood burning stove in an inglenook fireplace; and, on the ground floor, the recently refurbished main dining room. Ed smokes salmon in a shed in his house just next door. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Ynyshir Restaurant and RoomsPowys, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Queen Victoria once owned this handsome white painted house as a hidden retreat. The undulating grounds are lovely and lead to the RSPB Ynys Hir Nature Reserve at the head of the Dovey estuary. Current owner and professional artist Rob Reen is responsible for the vibrant interiors, their colours taking a lead from his equally bold canvasses that dominate the walls. In the kitchen, Gareth Ward, who trained with Sat Bains, is a rising star, a recipient of one Michelin star and gunning for a second. He prefers to serve a series of small, integrated dishes, and is always coming up with new ideas and loves surprises. The tasting menu at dinner might include simple plates such as Welsh wagyu, pork belly with 'river bacon' or pollock with black bean. Read expert review From £215per night Tyddyn LlanDenbighshire, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A modest Georgian house just outside Llandrillo, with a complementary extension using local slate and stone. The house was once a shooting lodge belonging to the Dukes of Westminster, but now places food centre stage. The views are spectacular, with the Vale of Edeyrnion’s meadows and the slopes of the Berwyn Mountains beyond. The dining room is decorated in Wedgewood blue with tall windows on three sides. Bryan Webb is considered one of Wales’s foremost chefs, with a long-held Michelin star and a commitment to local produce, such as melting Welsh black beef, and quality seasonal ingredients. The menu changes daily. Read expert review From £195per night The Old Rectory on the LakeSnowdonia, Tal-y-llyn, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A sun-trap hideaway on the shores of a huge lake, and at the foot of the mountain, Cadair Idris. It’s elegant and relaxing with free-standing roll-top baths, an outdoor hot tub and locally sourced food perfectly cooked to order in the restaurant. The food, courtesy of the self-trained chef, Ricky, is outstanding. There may be freshly-caught trout, or local Bala lamb on the menu, along with perfectly-cooked vegetables and perhaps Dauphinois potatoes. The chocolate fondant is a signature pudding. The terrace is the perfect place to enjoy the sunset over the lake with a Welsh gin and tonic. Read expert review From £110per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Harbourmaster HotelAberaeron, Cardigan Bay, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating Beach chic comes into its own at this forget-me-not-blue boutique hotel on Aberaeron’s harbour wall. And you won’t likely forget it with these killer sea views, glam rooms and imaginatively thought-out menus. The restaurant has a serious foodie bent in the evening – try to snag the cwtch (cubby hole) for intimate dining. Go for Carlingford oysters, a plump, sweet burst of the sea, and the perfect prelude for well-cooked Welsh fillet of steak, followed by an oozy chocolate fondant with salted caramel ice cream. For a buzzier vibe, head to the bar-lounge to nurse a Brecon gin or nibble bar snacks like crispy cockles with chilli vinegar. Read expert review From £185per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith FairyhillReynoldston, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Snuggled away in 24 acres of woodland near the Gower coast, Fairyhill enchants with more than just its name. Think Downton Abbey meets Watership Down with a pinch of 21st-century cool. It has carved out its name as a foodie retreat with good reason. The chef pulls off a daring, imaginative menu, taking a pride in local sourcing and garden-grown ingredients in dishes that are both robust and refined. Clean flavours sing of the seasons in dishes simple as gazpacho, pear and Pembroke crab, and goat's cheese mousse with courgette flower with beetroot gel. Mains like meltingly tender Welsh lamb served three ways and Serrano-wrapped monkfish with clams, samphire and fresh linguine strike the perfect balance. Read expert review From £135per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com JabajakCarmarthenshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Jabajak is a former drover’s farm, now a fine vineyard and boutique bolthole, serving home-grown food and wines with a slice of history, rustic elegance and first-class service. The restaurant has scooped awards for its locally sourced, home-grown approach. A drink in the lounge bar piques the appetite for dishes prepared with garden herbs, fruit, veg and edible flowers, ramped up flavour-wise by foraged ingredients such as nettles and wild garlic when in season. Starters including basil-marinated bruschetta with gooseberry and elderflower chutney prelude mains such as butter-soft Celtic steak with local Moody Mabel cheese. There are many nods to local produce at breakfast, too, and the cooked Welsh option with a side order of cockles is bang on the money. Read expert review From £130per night Rates provided by Booking.com   SCOTLAND The Three Chimneys and The House Over-ByDunvegan, Isle of Skye, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This destination restaurant with rooms is back doing what it does best, with a new chef, updated look and reinvigorated sense of discipline and purpose. The essential ingredients are there: attentive service, attractive rooms with mesmerising views and a talented young chef. Choose from a three-course à la carte menu or the epic Skye Showcase Menu, served at the ‘Kitchen Table’, right in the heart of the action. Dishes on the latter menu might include the likes of Dungvegan crab, seaweed and miso-cured halibut, Orbost Farm beef and pot-roasted young grouse. A road (albeit single-track and quiet) runs between the House Over-By and the shore of Loch Dunvegan, slightly eroding what would otherwise be a feeling of privacy, but not unduly distracting from the peaceful views. Read expert review From £345per night The Peat InnSt Andrews, Fife, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating A long-standing gastro-destination lying between the 'town and gown' of St Andrews and Fife’s East Neuk fishing villages, this is well worth a detour. It’s a short stagger from restaurant to homely split-level suites: a calm, comfortable place to sleep off the fabulous Michelin-starred food. The rustic-chic restaurant, all tender taupes with amber and deep sea-blue accents, is a fittingly sophisticated setting for the triumphant cooking. You come here for the food and you won’t leave disappointed. From the home-made butter to the unusually good petit-fours, everything is a reflection of chef Geoffrey Smeddle’s joyous approach to food, with dishes like a starter of smoked beef tartare with wasabi puree raising your eyebrows and your expectations simultaneously. Read expert review From £195per night The Taynuilt Etive Restaurant with RoomsTaynuilt, Argyll & Bute, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating This historic rural hotel has been reinvented as a restaurant with rooms with a young Scottish chef leading a bright and creative team. It's at the heart of a small community that makes an ideal base for exploring Argyll and the isles. The Etive restaurant is the axis here, a genuine foodie oasis and arguably the finest place to eat in the region. John McNulty works wonders with the ultra-local produce, whether it be the Mull Pig’s Heed or the salmon he smokes using local larch from Loch Awe. Sound provenance ripples through the Etive even as far as breakfast, where local fish stars. Read expert review From £79per night 21212Edinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating The four bedrooms above this Michelin-starred restaurant are no afterthought; there is a confident hand at work in rooms that are as striking as the food, displaying a sometimes surprising but always sensual contemporary/baroque style and unexpectedly leafy views. Michelin-starred chef Paul Kitching is a maverick who likes to tease flavours, building fantastic creations that sound impossible, but work, like silky pink trout served with artichokes, pasta, almonds, chickpeas, kidney beans, oriental mushrooms, warm coleslaw and feta cheese. He’s utterly serious but there’s an edge of play - such as a pre-dessert of porridge, milk and cinnamon poured from a china cow. Read expert review From £112per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith The Bridge Inn, RathoEdinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This 18-century coaching inn – now an award-winning gastropub with rooms – is on a leafy canal in a tranquil village just 20 minutes away from Edinburgh's city centre. Four pretty bedrooms are each individually decorated. The cooking is exceptional, with talented head chef Ben doing wonderful things with good Scottish fish and game, properly hung beef, and pork from their own fat and sassy pigs. They grow their own vegetables, herbs and fruit too, in an old walled garden a short walk away down the canal path. Breakfast is a fine indulgence. You can have a hair of the dog as well: Champagne, Prosecco, Buck’s Fizz or a Bloody Mary. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best castle hotels in Scotland Contributions from Ros Belford, Suzy Bennett, Sophie Butler, Gill Charlton, Kerry Christiani, Fiona Duncan, Suzanne King, Gabriella Le Breton, Linda Macdonald, Richard McComb, Robin McKelvie, Harriet O'Brien, Ben Parker, Helen Pickles, Louise Roddon, Cathy Stebbings, Sarah Stirling, Anna Turns, Debbie Ward and Antonia Windsor.

Britain's loveliest restaurants with rooms for autumn

What could be more appealing than the epicurean informality of an inn or restaurant with rooms? These wonderfully relaxed establishments combine an emphasis on great ingredients from the area with local charm and stylish panache. There’s an insider feel that you don’t get at a more formal hotel, and there’s a foodie enthusiasm that wouldn’t be exuded quite as joyfully at a larger enterprise. Autumn/winter is a particularly good time to seek out their gently indulgent accommodation and fabulous seasonal flavours – the likes of wild rabbit with foraged mushrooms, grouse and damsons, elderberries and more. Harriet O'Brien Our experts round up their favourite establishments in Britain, from the Cotswolds to Cornwall, Suffolk to Skye, for feasting – and then flopping.  ENGLAND Cotswolds The Wild RabbitKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Wild Rabbit is a haven of eco-elegance a few fields away from sister enterprise Daylesford, the organic farm shop, deli, spa (and more) of Carole Bamford. She transformed this 18th-century inn and it has been meticulously devised in quiet colours, stone and wood. It’s a beautiful posh pub, with food to match. The kitchen is masterminded by Tim Allen, who won the Wild Rabbit a Michelin star in October 2016. His cuisine takes diners on a taste adventure, with dishes such as haddock on leek and apple slaw, topped with an amazingly cooked egg – poached and lightly deep fried. Read expert review From £148per night The Feathered Nest Country InnOxfordshire, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fabulous food and a superb setting above the Evenlode valley make this old country inn a hedonistic haven. The owners describe it as a pub with a twist. They’ve created an elegant restaurant that has won armloads of awards since it opened, with three stylish and supremely comfy bedrooms. The exquisite food is almost on a par with sleek gastro establishments such as Tom Kerridge’s The Hand and Flowers in Marlow - and even Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons where head chef Kuba Winkowski previously worked. There’s a stupendous wine list, too. Among the choice of 200 or so is a wonderful range of South African wines. There’s also a bar menu featuring classics such as burgers of brilliant quality. Read expert review From £140per night The Wheatsheaf InnNorthleach, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A creeper-clad coaching inn turned arty, boutique haven. The Wheatsheaf is in a particularly pretty and enterprising little Cotswold town. The restaurant draws a regular local crowd and the emphasis is on the very best quality, from the menu ingredients to the room amenities. The sophisticated menu offers great flavour combinations, the likes of roast parsnip and fennel salad with chestnuts, and mutton and apple pie with creamed potatoes. If there’s space in the bar beforehand try an aperitif of Sloe Negroni, with sloe gin and Campari, or opt for a pint of Cotswold Old Hooky. Read expert review From £102per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Kingham PloughKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Kingham Plough is a treat of a foodie destinatio, with relaxing furnishings, genial staff and brilliantly conceived menus. Emily Watkins has won numerous awards for her modern British cuisine with a twist ‒ dishes are often based on old Cotswold recipes. Her food is also much inspired by local produce; the likes of Windrush Valley goat cheese and pork from Paddock Farm a few miles away. There’s a pleasingly short and sophisticated à la carte menu: starters might include slow braised oxtail with horseradish, and mains could feature venison wellington, with meat supplied from nearby Cornbury Park. There’s also a well-priced bar menu featuring gastro comfort food such as rabbit parfait. Read expert review From £145per night The Ebrington ArmsEbrington, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating This hidden treasure set in a gloriously unspoilt village is a modern day version of a country tavern – it’s at once a genuine pub that brews its own very smooth ales; a lovely restaurant with real local flavour; and a charming hotel with rural-chic bedrooms. Chef Ben Dulley offers short, understated menus which reflect his commitment to freshness, with many vegetables straight from surrounding Drinkwater Farm. Dishes are beautifully presented and packed with local flavour – the likes of hot-smoked Bibury trout salad, and Cotswold lamb with stuffed tomatoes. Wines are from independent growers, including the Cotswolds’ own Little Oak Vineyard. Read expert review From £165per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best Cotswolds pubs with rooms   Oxfordshire Artist Residence OxfordshireSouth Leigh, Oxfordshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A unique country pub with a bohemian twist and arty vibe, offering gorgeous quirky rooms, scrumptious meals and contemporary art. The food is as heart-warming as the dining room. Local game and meat, foraged herbs and flowers join vegetables from the garden. The menu could include the likes of smoky pigeon breast electrified by a pickled walnut with caramelised chicory, port jelly and smoked spring onions and plaice in seaweed butter, smoked cockles, sea vegetables and bisque. The wine list is small, selective and good value. Join locals for a pint at the bar, read the paper or play cards around the fire. Read expert review From £130per night • The best luxury hotels in Oxfordshire   Lake District L’EnclumeCartmel, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Simon Rogan's two-Michelin-starred restaurant plus handful of rooms stay true both to the simple village location and rich surrounding land. Rooms are modest but smartly furnished, the setting picture-box pretty while the food is an exemplar of local sourcing and creativity. This isn’t Blumenthal-style magic but simply 20 (tiny) courses of exceptional skill, balance and creativity: an egg shell containing a yolk in mushroom broth; confit cauliflower in a pea and calamint sauce; a finger of turbot in nasturtium butter, the dinkiest caramel mousse sitting on compressed apple. All is presented exquisitely but without fanfare on rustic pottery, handmade glass, even a pebble. The Coravin wine system allows you to try top-rank or small-producer wines. Read expert review From £129per night The Punch Bowl InnLake District, Cumbria, England 8Telegraph expert rating A smart but relaxed country inn, in a quiet corner of the Lake District, with a deserved reputation for its classy food. The ground floor is a semi open-plan series of dining rooms, bar and relaxed eating areas, separated by little steps. The cooking is smart-city-restaurant standard producing assured, modern British dishes that are interesting without being tricksy or fussy. No fancy canapés or pre-starters, just clean flavours. Starters might include black pudding with bubble and squeak or tomato salad with local crab and lobster while mains could be pork with ham hock croquette or cod with Morteau sausage. There's a wide-ranging wine list, plus a couple of local real ales. Read expert review From £130per night • The Lake District's best pubs and inns   Peak District The Samuel Fox Country InnHope Valley, Peak District, England 8Telegraph expert rating This stone-built inn – which is more of a restaurant with rooms than a standard country pub – has an ever-growing reputation. Come for a great dinner, stay over in one of four comfortable rooms and spend the next day exploring the glorious Peak District. The foodie credentials are strong: chef-patron James Duckett has worked with Albert Roux, Michel Roux, Marcus Wareing and Philip Howard, and done extended stints in Australia and Spain. Now he turns out some of the best food in the area: everything from a piquant, pretty-as-a-picture starter of soused sardines to the kind of iced chocolate cherry parfait that makes you wish you hadn’t shared with your other half. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Peak District   Yorkshire Crab Manor HotelThirsk, Yorkshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fun and exotic, individually themed rooms combined with a well-regarded seafood restaurant and an overall madcap sense of decoration make this a hugely popular choice for special occasions. The restaurant specialises in fish and seafood serving both classics – lobster thermidor, grilled Queen scallops – as well as more modern dishes such as sea trout with samphire. It's open for lunch and dinner, and for afternoon 'lighter' options (including moules mariniere), but there's nothing delicate about portion sizes. Half the fun is the setting: jolly bar, romantic dining room or brighter conservatory, all with a bonkers decoration that includes a suite of orchestral instruments. Breakfast is also a delight. Read expert review From £165per night The Star InnHarome, Helmsley, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant-with-rooms with chocolate-box, thatched-pub looks and a bucolic farming-village location. Bedrooms, across the road, have a comfy, hunting-lodge style. Whitby-born chef-owner Andrew Pern was one of the first champions of local sourcing - and why wouldn’t you be with his ‘back garden’: moorland game and pasture-fed meat, coastal fish, Yorkshire Wolds’ fruit and vegetables. He now has a huge kitchen garden at the back of the pub. His menus are punchy, robust yet skilfully balanced and as much about texture as taste: crab stick with seashore vegetables and avocado ice, perhaps followed by roasted lamb chop with truffled faggot or honey-roasted duck with tea-poached quail’s egg. Read expert review From £150per night The Timble InnNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 8Telegraph expert rating A food-driven village pub in a quiet, yet surprisingly well-connected location with bold, contemporary styling and smart bedrooms. Glorious views and walks are on the doorstep. A pub that does two sittings for Sunday lunch is serious about food, and has been awarded two AA rosettes for it. It’s ambitious stuff – wood pigeon with quail’s egg and black pudding; venison loin with celeriac remoulade and chestnuts. The seafood platter and chateaubriand steak are favourites. It's not really a beer pub but offers a wide-ranging wine list – including fine ones by the glass – plus local gins. Read expert review From £150per night The Yorke ArmsNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant with rooms in an off-the-beaten-track location; perfect for walking off the spoiling food. The food is why people come here – some helicopter in from London for chef-proprietor Frances Atkins’s flavour-intense cooking. It’s not fussy or tricksy, just skilled, imaginative and full of the unexpected – quail with lychee and jasmine; brill with fennel in turmeric broth, peach and curd tart. Choose the eight-course tasting menu and everything is a surprise. Much is home-grown; the huge kitchen garden produces a summer surplus. These are meals to savour (even the lunchtime bar menu includes devilled kidneys, and gratin of seared scallops). Read expert review From £345per night • The best luxury hotels in Yorkshire   Norfolk Morston HallNorfolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating A flint- and brick-built Jacobean country-house hotel, with large conservatory extensions that provide extra dining space. Inside, you’ll find open fires, squashy sofas and cosy corners in a hushed, fairly formal atmosphere. The food is the main reason to come to Morston Hall, the only restaurant with a Michelin star on this stretch of coast. Galton Blackiston’s cooking is rated highly by both visitors and locals: he offers a set dinner based on fresh, local ingredients, served at 8pm daily. Four courses usually include two meat dishes (perhaps confit of duck or beef fillet) and a fish course. Recommended wines are suggested to accompany the dishes – or you can choose from an extensive list. Read expert review From £340per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Norfolk   Suffolk The Great HouseLavenham, Suffolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating The five-bedroom hotel looks onto the market square of Lavenham, a well-preserved medieval village of timbered houses. It would be wrong to stay here without sampling the food, as this is primarily a restaurant – and a very good one at that. From a regularly changing menu, you might find starters of mussels with chilli, coriander and cream, tuna sashimi or wild mushroom ravioli, and main courses of pheasant supreme, grilled fillet of lamb with thyme sauce or roasted duck breast with grilled beetroot. Desserts could be dark chocolate terrine, millefeuille or maple syrup rice pudding. Read expert review From £99per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best spa hotels in Suffolk   Somerset The White PostYeovil, Somerset, England 8Telegraph expert rating At this cosy Victorian ‘pub-and-lodgings’, the elegant gastronomy is as much a pull as the rooms. Brett’s passion for foraging and elegant presentation seeps through. The best way to experience the dishes? The 10-course tasting menu, which pays homage to the West Country (pork done eight ways, served with local chilli and ginger cider) as well as international influences (spiced lentil dhal with gurnard, mango and coconut). The wine list is sufficient but it’s the local ales and ciders that stand out, particularly if you pair a pint of Dorset Knob bitter with the Sunday roast. Painted walls are interrupted only by the wide windows, long cardinal-coloured drapes and filament bulb lamps that, along with on-table candles, add just enough light during evening dining. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The most romantic hotels in Somerset   Dorset La FosseCranborne, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating Snug in the wave-like green hills of east Dorset, La Fosse at Cranborne is a peaceful bed and breakfast as well as popular restaurant. Run by husband and wife, this simple West Country retreat, embracing both modern and traditional, feels as far from the madding crowds as possible. Owner-chef Mark is a true locavore, sourcing as much from in and around the village as possible. His passion for local, inventive cuisine has seen him named best chef in Dorset. The colourful duck dish, replete with homegrown vegetables, is a highlight, drizzled in a piquant jus. Mark’s award-winning cheeseboard is part of the experience, so save some room. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Anchor InnSeatown, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Anchor Inn, sat beyond snaking lanes and tucked between scarped cliffs on the edge of a little known Dorset village, is a destination gastropub serving elevated British classics. It is also a boutique hideaway that cocoons guests amid the sound of rolling waves. If the weather is decent, expect a fight to secure a lunchtime spot, either tucked inside or al fresco. Menus from head chef Jean-Paul De Ronne — who previously worked under Masterchef winner Mat Follas — reveal commitment to seasonal fare from land and sea, such as the fresh crab salad using crustacea caught only metres away. Ales are all from Palmers, brewed four miles away, while an extensive cocktail list from former Hix bartender David Smith features a number of Dorset’s own spirits. Read expert review From £120per night • The best hotels in Dorset   Buckinghamshire The Mash InnRadnage, Buckinghamshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating Described by its owner Nick Mash as a ‘new generation inn’, The Mash Inn's aim is to remove the barriers between chef and diner. The open kitchen takes centre stage: a solid wood workstation groaning with ingredients and stacked plates, beneath a ceiling rack dripping with pots and pans, in front of an open fire for rotisserie cooking. Chef Jon Parry cooks up a storm, producing a delicious, earthy and inventive no frills tasting menu and a short à la carte menu. Much of the produce is from the garden or very local. Diners sit at individual tables or at a large communal table, which may sound daunting but such is the communal, friendly atmosphere that it’s a pleasure to do so. Read expert review From £100per night The Hand & FlowersMarlow, Buckinghamshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn with a Michelin-starred restaurant, enticing locals to dine, and couples for weekends or nights away. It's on busy West Street, just along the road from the house where Mary Shelley created Frankenstein. The chef-proprietor is Tom Kerridge, who gained a Michelin star within 10 months from a kitchen which was then the size of a large cupboard. These days he has a new, celadon green kitchen and a brigade of chefs. As restaurants go, it rocks. Expect crayfish scotch egg, slow cooked duck breast with duck fat chips and other earthy, deeply satisfying dishes that are also full of imaginative twists, served in a cosy and convivial dining room. Read expert review From £140per night • The best hotels in Buckinghamshire   Kent RocksaltFolkestone, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Rocksalt is the littoral culinary kingdom of Mark Sargeant of Claridge's fame. A microcosm of London sophistication in gritty Folkestone, it's a genuine dining destination. The recent addition of four bedrooms above "Sargey's" adjacent Smokehouse enables visitors to abandon themselves to gluttony. His dedication to local ingredients introduces diners to new treasures, such as meaty huss dogfish and tart sea buckthorn (oozing out of a dense chocolate mousse fondant), yet dishes are refreshingly clean and unpretentious. Hunks of bread, served with beef dripping, rich butter and home-roasted salt, and nuggets of treacly fudge and slices of colourful rock bookend a perfectly executed meal. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Wife of BathWye, Kent, England 9Telegraph expert rating Another addition to chef Mark Sargeant and Josh De Haan's portfolio of Kentish restaurants with rooms. With a superb Spanish restaurant and tiny tapas bar, its signature quirky style and authentic cuisine works surprisingly well in the bucolic setting. The restaurant serves impeccable fare: juicy scallops with spicy chorizo and earthy morcillo (black pudding); honey sweet melon smothered in Brindisa's finest Serrano ham; succulent Galician steaks with creamy aioli and fiery paprika potatoes; and hake with radishes, Seville orange and a buttery sauce laced with Gin Mare. Save space for pudding: the bitter chocolate tart with salt and olive oil is revelatory, as is ice-cream made with raisins soaked in PX sherry. Read expert review From £70per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Read's Restaurant With RoomsFaversham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Read's, housed in a Georgian mansion on the north Kentish coast, is a smart restaurant with six rooms, owned and run by acclaimed chef David Pitchford and his wife Rona. Sticking firmly to their decades-long recipe for success, they deliver classic cuisine and unfussy hospitality. David won a Michelin star in 1992, which he retained for 20 consecutive years, becoming the second longest holder of the accolade in Britain. The food is hard to fault, if lacking the innovation and excitement that comes with Michelin recognition: comforting, classic French cuisine with British influence. Think ham and pea mousse; smoked haddock in cream sauce topped with cheese soufflé; Kentish lamb served with buttery asparagus and garden vegetables; and a Cassis-soaked summer pudding. Read expert review From £145per night The Dog at WinghamWingham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating A medieval pub in a rural village, run by an enterprising local family, that serves exceptionally good food and features eight attractive bedrooms. Virtually equidistant from Canterbury and Sandwich, it’s ideally located for exploring the Kentish city, countryside and coast. The kitchen is overseen by the young and talented Dan Johns, who has worked at Gary Rhodes’ Searcy’s at The Gherkin and Urban Coterie. The menu changes monthly to reflect seasonality and local produce. Imaginative starters such as fragrant Thai-style chicken salad and rich pork and pistachio terrine with pineapple jam are followed by melt-in-the-mouth Moroccan spiced lamb and crisp pork collar with chorizo dumplings. Read expert review From £86per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best pubs with rooms in Kent   Devon The Dartmoor InnOkehampton, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 16th-century coaching inn on the north-western edge of Dartmoor National Park is acclaimed for its fresh, seasonal cooking, but it’s worth bedding down for a stay in one of its three chic bedrooms. A blackboard heralds not only the breed of cattle, but also the name of the farmer it has come from. Dishes are pub classics, done to perfection: rib-eye steak and chips, confit of duck leg with toffee apple puree and roasted hazelnuts, and brisket of beef. Philip has a strong ethical policy, forging strong links with local artisan food producers, and ensures the beef has been grass fed and reared within a 20-mile radius. Breakfast is refreshingly original, with dainty portions of caramelised bananas or a daring cooked menu, including herb-crusted goat’s cheese, black pudding and bacon lardons. Read expert review From £65per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Lamb InnSandford, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating With open fires, beamed walls, deep sofas and award-winning food, this 16th-century inn in the village of Sandford is a pub of dreams for town-dwellers. Upstairs, seven bedrooms have big beds, soft linen and powerful showers, and there’s a pretty cobbled terrace at the rear. The Lamb Inn’s menu consistently attracts rave reviews. The produce is seasonal and locally sourced, mixing upmarket dishes with pub classics: shellfish bisque, mushroom ravioli, roasted pigeon with smoked bacon and savoy cabbage or steak and chips. The perfectly fluffy sticky toffee pudding is worth a visit alone. Landlord Mark is a fan of real ale and regularly rotates his cask brews to ensure they stay fresh. Read expert review From £69per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Masons ArmsBranscombe, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This dog-friendly 14th-century thatched inn, in Branscombe, on the Jurassic Coast, is one of Devon’s best. It prides itself on serving local, seasonal Devon fare on a traditional pub menu – it even has a 'food sourcing map' detailing exactly where the produce comes from. There’s steamed River Exe mussels and fries, steak and kidney shortcrust pie, rump steak and a seafood platter. Ales, hand-pumped from casks, are just as local. On a sunny day, the action moves outside to the pretty suntrap terrace. It's a 15-minute walk to Branscombe Beach, a lovely, long shingle cove from where you can pick up the South West Coastal Path. Read expert review From £75per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Salutation InnTopsham, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating Eat well and rest your head at this 18th-century coaching inn in chichi Topsham: a stylish option with a truly excellent restaurant, helmed by one of Gordon Ramsay's former protégés. Exquisite handmade petit-fours welcome guests on arrival – the first hint that your dining experience will be full of extra surprises. The wild mushroom appetiser comes accompanied by an umami-enhancing pinot noir, and the tomato gazpacho with local crab, served in a glass on ice, and followed by a rich rump of beef from Greendale Farm. Each modern dish is accompanied by diverse wines chosen by Stephen Edwardes – the unusual sake complements the beautiful strawberry dessert which is garnished with home-grown edible flowers. Read expert review From £145per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Devon   Cornwall The Gurnard's HeadSt Ives, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn offering outstanding food, fabulous sea and moorland views, situated close to St Ives and Land's End. Popular with walkers and couples of all ages seeking a low-key, restorative break in a wild coastal location. Locals come from miles around to dine here. The Scottish head chef, Bruce Rennie, cooks a short, inventive menu. Lunch may include beetroot risotto, octopus and white wine stew, or Merguez sausages with Puy lentils. The supper menu may include salmon and lobster tortellini, cod with pig’s trotter, and sole with Vermouth. The wine list focuses on Old World wines, notably from France, Italy and Portugal. Read expert review From £110per night Padstow TownhousePadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A handsome listed townhouse on Padstow's high street that has been superbly renovated and opened as a six-bedroom luxury guesthouse by chef Paul Ainsworth to complement his Michelin-starred restaurant, Paul Ainsworth at Number 6. Head there for amusingly-presented, delicately-flavoured meat and fish dishes and a fun and informal atmosphere, or to his even more informal restaurant, Rojanos, for superior pasta, pizza and hamburgers. Breakfast is served at the latter. The guesthouse owns an electric BMW in which guests can be transported if they don’t want to walk around. Read expert review From £280per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com St Petroc's HotelPadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A sociable, intimate townhouse with a labyrinth of gorgeously styled sitting and reading rooms – as well as a buzzy bistro. St Petroc’s Bistro opened along with the hotel in 1988. It’s a lovely room – with an engaging selection of original art on the walls – and a relaxing, happy place to eat at either lunch or dinner. Pride of place on the menu goes to the 30-day dry-aged steaks, but there are fish, chicken and vegetarian options as well – all of them classic Rick Stein recipes (try the grilled hake with Serrano ham, succotash and chives). Ruby’s Bar is the new Stein pub – a great place for a local beer or cocktail. Read expert review From £112per night Kota Restaurant with RoomsPorthleven, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating With a fantastic Asian-Cornish fusion restaurant downstairs, and Porthleven’s picturesque harbour on the doorstep, the Kota’s two simple, homey rooms are proof that sometimes substance can win over style. The vibe in the restaurant is casual, with a long room overlooking the harbour and a waterfront lawn on which you can dine in good weather. New Zealander Jude, who is part Maori, part Malay-Chinese, brings Asian spices and cooking styles to fresh, meticulously sourced Cornish produce – squid with green mango salad, scallops with miso dressing and seaweed salad, and Laksa with prawns, mussels and fish. There are also some very creative burgers – tempura fish with wasabi tartare, and satay chicken with Asian slaw. Read expert review From £75per night DriftwoodPortscatho, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating Sitting on a hill above the rugged coastline of the Roseland peninsula, Driftwood is nautically furnished in soft creams and blues. A Michelin-starred restaurant, private sea-facing terraces, and a private beach make this the perfect venue for pretty much everyone. There are wonderful coastal path walks for miles in each direction. This is Cornish cooking at its finest: unfussy and focused on bringing out the flavour of fresh fish and seafood and locally reared beef and lamb. Dinner in summer comprises a six-course tasting menu with complementary wines. For children there are early suppers with proper chef-made food. Read expert review From £250per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Coombeshead FarmLewannick, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating This is the joint venture from chef Tom Adams of London restaurant Pitt Cue and April Bloomfield, English born chef/proprietor of The Spotted Pig in New York. Both wanted to get back to the roots of food and hospitality and the result is this relaxed communal dining farmhouse b&b. Tom and his partner Lottie Mew live off the land and share their fresh, foraged, pickled and harvested produce with their guests. Tom cooks a three-course feast, kicking off with plates of delicious nibbles from 6.30pm onwards, which is shared at a communal table by all the guests. Tom’s own rare breed Mangalitza pigs feature large, plus perhaps a cep and walnut broth, lamb shoulder and mushroom porridge, with madeleine, whey and prune for pudding. Wines are unusual. Read expert review From £175per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Cornwall   Sussex The Barn at RoundhurstLurgashall, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating A rural South Downs retreat on a 250-acre organic farm with its own lakes. Home-reared food is a specialty. Converted outhouses with six rooms are set around a courtyard, just steps from a dramatic converted barn for dining and lounging. A four-course set menu with generous portions is available for guests and non-guests Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays; a light supper is provided for guests on other days. Meals highlight the farm’s own organic beef, lamb and pork and could include colourful heritage carrots and an exceptional triple chocolate mousse. Read expert review From £98per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com CrouchersChichester, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating An unassuming motel-like exterior belies a foodie haven a short drive from the Witterings. Relax on the patio of a garden-facing room, head to the beach, or explore the cultural and sporting highlights around Chichester but leave room for dinner in the impressive restaurant. Proximity to the coast ensures good seafood. The squid-ink pasta starter is light and delicate and a showy dessert of white chocolate and saffron mousse with edible flowers, caramel and orange ice-cream is a multi-sensory delight. A strong wine list includes an emphasis on the owners’ native South Africa. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Crab & LobsterWest Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating Herons can be seen on the doorstep of this modernised 350-year-old pub beside a bird sanctuary, where guests can stay in cosy bedrooms or an adjoining cottage. Tuck into locally caught seafood in the bar-restaurant and plan nature walks or trips to nearby beaches. The menu, as this gastropub’s name suggests, makes good use of locally caught seafood. Baked Selsey crab with a salad or crab cakes is a highlight. Meat, like rump of lamb (on an autumn menu with garlic Pommes Anna, butternut squash purée, confit tomatoes, baby leeks and Madeira jus) is also locally reared. There’s an extensive wine list and takeaway fish and chips. Read expert review From £160per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith Wingrove HouseAlfriston, South Downs, England 8Telegraph expert rating Yards from the South Downs Way and the half-timbered, candlelit pubs of Alfriston, this swish 19th-century boutique hotel with a modern country restaurant delivers roaring log fires, low-slung sofas and top-notch food, and draws city dwellers craving an easy country escape. Matthew Comben, formerly of the Hungry Monk in Jevington, heads up the kitchen and has brought with him the Monk's original banoffee pie recipe. Highlights from the seasonal menu include cauliflower fritters with Brighton blue cheese mayonnaise, and a soft beef fillet with tarragon. There's an impressive gin menu with 11 different options, including Brighton Gin, and a refreshingly reasonable wine list. Read expert review From £108per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best places and cities to visit in England – and where to stay   Cheshire The Roebuck InnMobberley, Cheshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This French-influenced bistro with rooms is perfect weekend break material, with lashings of character, great food and a beautifully designed garden. The bistro menu, tweaked with the seasons, is European in style, and everything comes in generous portions, whether it’s ‘small plates’ of cassoulet, caponata and crostini; mains such as saffron risotto, venison bourguignon and moules marinière; or puds of tarte au citron, profiteroles and crème caramel. On the drinks front, you’ll find an interesting selection of local ales, old-world wines and a vintage dresser filled with classic aperitifs and digestifs. Read expert review From £115per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • Britain's cosiest hotels for autumn   County Durham Lord Crewe ArmsBlanchland, Northumberland, England 9Telegraph expert rating A lord-of-the-manor building, in a pin-neat estate village, that oozes atmosphere at every stone-flagged turn. A reputation for honest, British cooking, plus its rural location, makes it popular with walkers and foodies as well as the country-sports fraternity. Expect punchy, robust, British cooking, rich with flavour and unusual combinations: devilled lamb’s kidneys on roasted cauliflower; grilled sea trout and mixed alliums; sea buckthorn posset. There’s an element of fun, too; eggy bread with fried bacon or Bloody Mary tomatoes on toast for breakfast. Some ingredients come from the kitchen garden. Eat on the terrace in the summer. The atmospheric, barrel-vaulted bar has local ales including a custom-made Lord Crewe Brew. Read expert review From £155per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Rose & CrownCounty Durham, England 9Telegraph expert rating A foodie destination country inn that has smartened up while still maintaining a sense of village pub: country-comfortable rooms; horse-brasses and dogs in the bar. Surrounded by the sheep-dotted fields and moors of the North Pennines, you come to eat, relax and then walk it off. The modern British menu shows confident cooking that lets the ingredients shine through; no fuss but definitely interesting: honey-glazed goat's cheese with beetroot, hazelnuts and gingerbread, perhaps, or pan-fried fillet of sea trout with roasted baby gem and crushed peas. There’s good local sourcing with Teesdale lamb rarely off the menu. Eat in the candle-lit dining room or buzzier bar; the latter offers three real ales and a good selection of single malts. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best country house hotels in Britain   Cities The Henrietta HotelCovent Garden, London, England 8Telegraph expert rating An 18-bedroom boutique address in one of Covent Garden’s most attractive streets, owned and run by the Paris-based Experimental Group, with a cocktail bar, Ollie Dabbous restaurant and quirky interior design by Dorothée Meilichzon. The food, is delicious – clean, clever and uncomplicated – with highlights that might include the sheeps’ milk curds with pistachio, beef tartare with nasturtium and rye, and wonderful freshly baked warm madeleines with Chantilly cream. Don't miss a cocktail, which can be chosen à la carte or with a consultation from the barman. Read expert review From £220per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Ginger PigHove, Brighton, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 11-bedroom guesthouse above Hove’s highly-acclaimed Ginger Pig Bar and Restaurant is ideal if you want a quieter seaside base. Spacious and elegantly understated rooms include thoughtful beach bags with towels and well-stocked minibars. Always buzzy, this sprawling gastropub serves up highly delicious grub and excellent Sunday roasts. Look out for seasonal specials like asparagus with brown crab and chipotle mayo, or seabream with samphire. The adjoining Orangerie is where breakfast is served (there’s an outdoor area for sunny days), offering imaginative dishes such as baked eggs with hummus, chorizo and peppers, Irish rock oysters and rarebit with roasted tomatoes and mushrooms. Read expert review From £80per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Simpsons RestaurantBirmingham, England 8Telegraph expert rating The cooking is superlative at this gastronomic powerhouse, which also offers three individually styled – and great value – rooms. Throw in the added draw of the Simpsons Cookery School and you pretty much have Michelin-starred, Brummie food nirvana. The winning team of owner Andreas Antona and chef director Luke Tipping, one of Britain’s finest sauciers, has weathered fashions and trends. The three-course à la carte menu features plump marinière-style mussels on a delicate, buttery skate wing, while refined hipster influences are showcased with a barbecued beef cheek with a rich, silky bone marrow sauce. The pastry section’s take on a Belgian Speculoos cookie, with caramelised white chocolate and coffee granite, is fabulous. Read expert review From £110per night The White Star TavernSouthampton, Hampshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating A characterful tavern with rooms on Southampton’s vibrant Oxford Street. The restaurant is a destination in itself, with a varied menu that caters to all comers. If you fancy a plate of fish and chips washed down with real ale, then you’ll get the crispest batter and a unique brew from Itchen Valley. But the real tour de force is the à la carte menu, where chef Matt Noonan serves up his creativity and innovation in dishes that linger long in the memory: a melt-in-the-mouth braised ox cheek with black bean glaze and oriental vegetables to start, perhaps, or a seared bass with a sauté of wild mushrooms, egg yolk ketchup, smoked and cured egg yolk, leek and fresh Dorset truffle as a main. The Death by Chocolate dessert is served up like a piece of street art and really is to die for. Read expert review From £105per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels for a UK city break   WALES Llys MeddygPembrokeshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating A cosy hotel in the small town of Newport, on the Pembrokeshire coast, offering colourful interiors, reasonable rates and an exceptional restaurant, which has gained a reputation in Pembrokeshire and beyond as one of the best and most reasonable fine dining establishments. Chef Daniel Jones does wonders with local produce – such as Newport bay crab and lobster, Preseli lamb, Welsh beef and West Wales cheeses – in two separate dining areas: the romantic basement-level Cellar Bar, which has a slate floor and leather settees, and a wood burning stove in an inglenook fireplace; and, on the ground floor, the recently refurbished main dining room. Ed smokes salmon in a shed in his house just next door. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Ynyshir Restaurant and RoomsPowys, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Queen Victoria once owned this handsome white painted house as a hidden retreat. The undulating grounds are lovely and lead to the RSPB Ynys Hir Nature Reserve at the head of the Dovey estuary. Current owner and professional artist Rob Reen is responsible for the vibrant interiors, their colours taking a lead from his equally bold canvasses that dominate the walls. In the kitchen, Gareth Ward, who trained with Sat Bains, is a rising star, a recipient of one Michelin star and gunning for a second. He prefers to serve a series of small, integrated dishes, and is always coming up with new ideas and loves surprises. The tasting menu at dinner might include simple plates such as Welsh wagyu, pork belly with 'river bacon' or pollock with black bean. Read expert review From £215per night Tyddyn LlanDenbighshire, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A modest Georgian house just outside Llandrillo, with a complementary extension using local slate and stone. The house was once a shooting lodge belonging to the Dukes of Westminster, but now places food centre stage. The views are spectacular, with the Vale of Edeyrnion’s meadows and the slopes of the Berwyn Mountains beyond. The dining room is decorated in Wedgewood blue with tall windows on three sides. Bryan Webb is considered one of Wales’s foremost chefs, with a long-held Michelin star and a commitment to local produce, such as melting Welsh black beef, and quality seasonal ingredients. The menu changes daily. Read expert review From £195per night The Old Rectory on the LakeSnowdonia, Tal-y-llyn, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating A sun-trap hideaway on the shores of a huge lake, and at the foot of the mountain, Cadair Idris. It’s elegant and relaxing with free-standing roll-top baths, an outdoor hot tub and locally sourced food perfectly cooked to order in the restaurant. The food, courtesy of the self-trained chef, Ricky, is outstanding. There may be freshly-caught trout, or local Bala lamb on the menu, along with perfectly-cooked vegetables and perhaps Dauphinois potatoes. The chocolate fondant is a signature pudding. The terrace is the perfect place to enjoy the sunset over the lake with a Welsh gin and tonic. Read expert review From £110per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Harbourmaster HotelAberaeron, Cardigan Bay, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating Beach chic comes into its own at this forget-me-not-blue boutique hotel on Aberaeron’s harbour wall. And you won’t likely forget it with these killer sea views, glam rooms and imaginatively thought-out menus. The restaurant has a serious foodie bent in the evening – try to snag the cwtch (cubby hole) for intimate dining. Go for Carlingford oysters, a plump, sweet burst of the sea, and the perfect prelude for well-cooked Welsh fillet of steak, followed by an oozy chocolate fondant with salted caramel ice cream. For a buzzier vibe, head to the bar-lounge to nurse a Brecon gin or nibble bar snacks like crispy cockles with chilli vinegar. Read expert review From £185per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith FairyhillReynoldston, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Snuggled away in 24 acres of woodland near the Gower coast, Fairyhill enchants with more than just its name. Think Downton Abbey meets Watership Down with a pinch of 21st-century cool. It has carved out its name as a foodie retreat with good reason. The chef pulls off a daring, imaginative menu, taking a pride in local sourcing and garden-grown ingredients in dishes that are both robust and refined. Clean flavours sing of the seasons in dishes simple as gazpacho, pear and Pembroke crab, and goat's cheese mousse with courgette flower with beetroot gel. Mains like meltingly tender Welsh lamb served three ways and Serrano-wrapped monkfish with clams, samphire and fresh linguine strike the perfect balance. Read expert review From £135per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com JabajakCarmarthenshire, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Jabajak is a former drover’s farm, now a fine vineyard and boutique bolthole, serving home-grown food and wines with a slice of history, rustic elegance and first-class service. The restaurant has scooped awards for its locally sourced, home-grown approach. A drink in the lounge bar piques the appetite for dishes prepared with garden herbs, fruit, veg and edible flowers, ramped up flavour-wise by foraged ingredients such as nettles and wild garlic when in season. Starters including basil-marinated bruschetta with gooseberry and elderflower chutney prelude mains such as butter-soft Celtic steak with local Moody Mabel cheese. There are many nods to local produce at breakfast, too, and the cooked Welsh option with a side order of cockles is bang on the money. Read expert review From £130per night Rates provided by Booking.com   SCOTLAND The Three Chimneys and The House Over-ByDunvegan, Isle of Skye, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This destination restaurant with rooms is back doing what it does best, with a new chef, updated look and reinvigorated sense of discipline and purpose. The essential ingredients are there: attentive service, attractive rooms with mesmerising views and a talented young chef. Choose from a three-course à la carte menu or the epic Skye Showcase Menu, served at the ‘Kitchen Table’, right in the heart of the action. Dishes on the latter menu might include the likes of Dungvegan crab, seaweed and miso-cured halibut, Orbost Farm beef and pot-roasted young grouse. A road (albeit single-track and quiet) runs between the House Over-By and the shore of Loch Dunvegan, slightly eroding what would otherwise be a feeling of privacy, but not unduly distracting from the peaceful views. Read expert review From £345per night The Peat InnSt Andrews, Fife, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating A long-standing gastro-destination lying between the 'town and gown' of St Andrews and Fife’s East Neuk fishing villages, this is well worth a detour. It’s a short stagger from restaurant to homely split-level suites: a calm, comfortable place to sleep off the fabulous Michelin-starred food. The rustic-chic restaurant, all tender taupes with amber and deep sea-blue accents, is a fittingly sophisticated setting for the triumphant cooking. You come here for the food and you won’t leave disappointed. From the home-made butter to the unusually good petit-fours, everything is a reflection of chef Geoffrey Smeddle’s joyous approach to food, with dishes like a starter of smoked beef tartare with wasabi puree raising your eyebrows and your expectations simultaneously. Read expert review From £195per night The Taynuilt Etive Restaurant with RoomsTaynuilt, Argyll & Bute, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating This historic rural hotel has been reinvented as a restaurant with rooms with a young Scottish chef leading a bright and creative team. It's at the heart of a small community that makes an ideal base for exploring Argyll and the isles. The Etive restaurant is the axis here, a genuine foodie oasis and arguably the finest place to eat in the region. John McNulty works wonders with the ultra-local produce, whether it be the Mull Pig’s Heed or the salmon he smokes using local larch from Loch Awe. Sound provenance ripples through the Etive even as far as breakfast, where local fish stars. Read expert review From £79per night 21212Edinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating The four bedrooms above this Michelin-starred restaurant are no afterthought; there is a confident hand at work in rooms that are as striking as the food, displaying a sometimes surprising but always sensual contemporary/baroque style and unexpectedly leafy views. Michelin-starred chef Paul Kitching is a maverick who likes to tease flavours, building fantastic creations that sound impossible, but work, like silky pink trout served with artichokes, pasta, almonds, chickpeas, kidney beans, oriental mushrooms, warm coleslaw and feta cheese. He’s utterly serious but there’s an edge of play - such as a pre-dessert of porridge, milk and cinnamon poured from a china cow. Read expert review From £112per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith The Bridge Inn, RathoEdinburgh, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating This 18-century coaching inn – now an award-winning gastropub with rooms – is on a leafy canal in a tranquil village just 20 minutes away from Edinburgh's city centre. Four pretty bedrooms are each individually decorated. The cooking is exceptional, with talented head chef Ben doing wonderful things with good Scottish fish and game, properly hung beef, and pork from their own fat and sassy pigs. They grow their own vegetables, herbs and fruit too, in an old walled garden a short walk away down the canal path. Breakfast is a fine indulgence. You can have a hair of the dog as well: Champagne, Prosecco, Buck’s Fizz or a Bloody Mary. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best castle hotels in Scotland Contributions from Ros Belford, Suzy Bennett, Sophie Butler, Gill Charlton, Kerry Christiani, Fiona Duncan, Suzanne King, Gabriella Le Breton, Linda Macdonald, Richard McComb, Robin McKelvie, Harriet O'Brien, Ben Parker, Helen Pickles, Louise Roddon, Cathy Stebbings, Sarah Stirling, Anna Turns, Debbie Ward and Antonia Windsor.

Britain's loveliest restaurants with rooms for autumn

What could be more appealing than the epicurean informality of an inn or restaurant with rooms? These wonderfully relaxed establishments combine an emphasis on great ingredients from the area with local charm and stylish panache. There’s an insider feel that you don’t get at a more formal hotel, and there’s a foodie enthusiasm that wouldn’t be exuded quite as joyfully at a larger enterprise. Autumn/winter is a particularly good time to seek out their gently indulgent accommodation and fabulous seasonal flavours – the likes of wild rabbit with foraged mushrooms, grouse and damsons, elderberries and more. Harriet O'Brien Our experts round up their favourite establishments in Britain, from the Cotswolds to Cornwall, Suffolk to Skye, for feasting – and then flopping.  ENGLAND Cotswolds The Wild RabbitKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Wild Rabbit is a haven of eco-elegance a few fields away from sister enterprise Daylesford, the organic farm shop, deli, spa (and more) of Carole Bamford. She transformed this 18th-century inn and it has been meticulously devised in quiet colours, stone and wood. It’s a beautiful posh pub, with food to match. The kitchen is masterminded by Tim Allen, who won the Wild Rabbit a Michelin star in October 2016. His cuisine takes diners on a taste adventure, with dishes such as haddock on leek and apple slaw, topped with an amazingly cooked egg – poached and lightly deep fried. Read expert review From £148per night The Feathered Nest Country InnOxfordshire, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fabulous food and a superb setting above the Evenlode valley make this old country inn a hedonistic haven. The owners describe it as a pub with a twist. They’ve created an elegant restaurant that has won armloads of awards since it opened, with three stylish and supremely comfy bedrooms. The exquisite food is almost on a par with sleek gastro establishments such as Tom Kerridge’s The Hand and Flowers in Marlow - and even Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons where head chef Kuba Winkowski previously worked. There’s a stupendous wine list, too. Among the choice of 200 or so is a wonderful range of South African wines. There’s also a bar menu featuring classics such as burgers of brilliant quality. Read expert review From £140per night The Wheatsheaf InnNorthleach, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A creeper-clad coaching inn turned arty, boutique haven. The Wheatsheaf is in a particularly pretty and enterprising little Cotswold town. The restaurant draws a regular local crowd and the emphasis is on the very best quality, from the menu ingredients to the room amenities. The sophisticated menu offers great flavour combinations, the likes of roast parsnip and fennel salad with chestnuts, and mutton and apple pie with creamed potatoes. If there’s space in the bar beforehand try an aperitif of Sloe Negroni, with sloe gin and Campari, or opt for a pint of Cotswold Old Hooky. Read expert review From £102per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Kingham PloughKingham, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Kingham Plough is a treat of a foodie destinatio, with relaxing furnishings, genial staff and brilliantly conceived menus. Emily Watkins has won numerous awards for her modern British cuisine with a twist ‒ dishes are often based on old Cotswold recipes. Her food is also much inspired by local produce; the likes of Windrush Valley goat cheese and pork from Paddock Farm a few miles away. There’s a pleasingly short and sophisticated à la carte menu: starters might include slow braised oxtail with horseradish, and mains could feature venison wellington, with meat supplied from nearby Cornbury Park. There’s also a well-priced bar menu featuring gastro comfort food such as rabbit parfait. Read expert review From £145per night The Ebrington ArmsEbrington, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating This hidden treasure set in a gloriously unspoilt village is a modern day version of a country tavern – it’s at once a genuine pub that brews its own very smooth ales; a lovely restaurant with real local flavour; and a charming hotel with rural-chic bedrooms. Chef Ben Dulley offers short, understated menus which reflect his commitment to freshness, with many vegetables straight from surrounding Drinkwater Farm. Dishes are beautifully presented and packed with local flavour – the likes of hot-smoked Bibury trout salad, and Cotswold lamb with stuffed tomatoes. Wines are from independent growers, including the Cotswolds’ own Little Oak Vineyard. Read expert review From £165per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best Cotswolds pubs with rooms   Oxfordshire Artist Residence OxfordshireSouth Leigh, Oxfordshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A unique country pub with a bohemian twist and arty vibe, offering gorgeous quirky rooms, scrumptious meals and contemporary art. The food is as heart-warming as the dining room. Local game and meat, foraged herbs and flowers join vegetables from the garden. The menu could include the likes of smoky pigeon breast electrified by a pickled walnut with caramelised chicory, port jelly and smoked spring onions and plaice in seaweed butter, smoked cockles, sea vegetables and bisque. The wine list is small, selective and good value. Join locals for a pint at the bar, read the paper or play cards around the fire. Read expert review From £130per night • The best luxury hotels in Oxfordshire   Lake District L’EnclumeCartmel, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Simon Rogan's two-Michelin-starred restaurant plus handful of rooms stay true both to the simple village location and rich surrounding land. Rooms are modest but smartly furnished, the setting picture-box pretty while the food is an exemplar of local sourcing and creativity. This isn’t Blumenthal-style magic but simply 20 (tiny) courses of exceptional skill, balance and creativity: an egg shell containing a yolk in mushroom broth; confit cauliflower in a pea and calamint sauce; a finger of turbot in nasturtium butter, the dinkiest caramel mousse sitting on compressed apple. All is presented exquisitely but without fanfare on rustic pottery, handmade glass, even a pebble. The Coravin wine system allows you to try top-rank or small-producer wines. Read expert review From £129per night The Punch Bowl InnLake District, Cumbria, England 8Telegraph expert rating A smart but relaxed country inn, in a quiet corner of the Lake District, with a deserved reputation for its classy food. The ground floor is a semi open-plan series of dining rooms, bar and relaxed eating areas, separated by little steps. The cooking is smart-city-restaurant standard producing assured, modern British dishes that are interesting without being tricksy or fussy. No fancy canapés or pre-starters, just clean flavours. Starters might include black pudding with bubble and squeak or tomato salad with local crab and lobster while mains could be pork with ham hock croquette or cod with Morteau sausage. There's a wide-ranging wine list, plus a couple of local real ales. Read expert review From £130per night • The Lake District's best pubs and inns   Peak District The Samuel Fox Country InnHope Valley, Peak District, England 8Telegraph expert rating This stone-built inn – which is more of a restaurant with rooms than a standard country pub – has an ever-growing reputation. Come for a great dinner, stay over in one of four comfortable rooms and spend the next day exploring the glorious Peak District. The foodie credentials are strong: chef-patron James Duckett has worked with Albert Roux, Michel Roux, Marcus Wareing and Philip Howard, and done extended stints in Australia and Spain. Now he turns out some of the best food in the area: everything from a piquant, pretty-as-a-picture starter of soused sardines to the kind of iced chocolate cherry parfait that makes you wish you hadn’t shared with your other half. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Peak District   Yorkshire Crab Manor HotelThirsk, Yorkshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Fun and exotic, individually themed rooms combined with a well-regarded seafood restaurant and an overall madcap sense of decoration make this a hugely popular choice for special occasions. The restaurant specialises in fish and seafood serving both classics – lobster thermidor, grilled Queen scallops – as well as more modern dishes such as sea trout with samphire. It's open for lunch and dinner, and for afternoon 'lighter' options (including moules mariniere), but there's nothing delicate about portion sizes. Half the fun is the setting: jolly bar, romantic dining room or brighter conservatory, all with a bonkers decoration that includes a suite of orchestral instruments. Breakfast is also a delight. Read expert review From £165per night The Star InnHarome, Helmsley, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant-with-rooms with chocolate-box, thatched-pub looks and a bucolic farming-village location. Bedrooms, across the road, have a comfy, hunting-lodge style. Whitby-born chef-owner Andrew Pern was one of the first champions of local sourcing - and why wouldn’t you be with his ‘back garden’: moorland game and pasture-fed meat, coastal fish, Yorkshire Wolds’ fruit and vegetables. He now has a huge kitchen garden at the back of the pub. His menus are punchy, robust yet skilfully balanced and as much about texture as taste: crab stick with seashore vegetables and avocado ice, perhaps followed by roasted lamb chop with truffled faggot or honey-roasted duck with tea-poached quail’s egg. Read expert review From £150per night The Timble InnNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 8Telegraph expert rating A food-driven village pub in a quiet, yet surprisingly well-connected location with bold, contemporary styling and smart bedrooms. Glorious views and walks are on the doorstep. A pub that does two sittings for Sunday lunch is serious about food, and has been awarded two AA rosettes for it. It’s ambitious stuff – wood pigeon with quail’s egg and black pudding; venison loin with celeriac remoulade and chestnuts. The seafood platter and chateaubriand steak are favourites. It's not really a beer pub but offers a wide-ranging wine list – including fine ones by the glass – plus local gins. Read expert review From £150per night The Yorke ArmsNidderdale, Yorkshire Dales, England 9Telegraph expert rating A Michelin-starred restaurant with rooms in an off-the-beaten-track location; perfect for walking off the spoiling food. The food is why people come here – some helicopter in from London for chef-proprietor Frances Atkins’s flavour-intense cooking. It’s not fussy or tricksy, just skilled, imaginative and full of the unexpected – quail with lychee and jasmine; brill with fennel in turmeric broth, peach and curd tart. Choose the eight-course tasting menu and everything is a surprise. Much is home-grown; the huge kitchen garden produces a summer surplus. These are meals to savour (even the lunchtime bar menu includes devilled kidneys, and gratin of seared scallops). Read expert review From £345per night • The best luxury hotels in Yorkshire   Norfolk Morston HallNorfolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating A flint- and brick-built Jacobean country-house hotel, with large conservatory extensions that provide extra dining space. Inside, you’ll find open fires, squashy sofas and cosy corners in a hushed, fairly formal atmosphere. The food is the main reason to come to Morston Hall, the only restaurant with a Michelin star on this stretch of coast. Galton Blackiston’s cooking is rated highly by both visitors and locals: he offers a set dinner based on fresh, local ingredients, served at 8pm daily. Four courses usually include two meat dishes (perhaps confit of duck or beef fillet) and a fish course. Recommended wines are suggested to accompany the dishes – or you can choose from an extensive list. Read expert review From £340per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Norfolk   Suffolk The Great HouseLavenham, Suffolk, England 8Telegraph expert rating The five-bedroom hotel looks onto the market square of Lavenham, a well-preserved medieval village of timbered houses. It would be wrong to stay here without sampling the food, as this is primarily a restaurant – and a very good one at that. From a regularly changing menu, you might find starters of mussels with chilli, coriander and cream, tuna sashimi or wild mushroom ravioli, and main courses of pheasant supreme, grilled fillet of lamb with thyme sauce or roasted duck breast with grilled beetroot. Desserts could be dark chocolate terrine, millefeuille or maple syrup rice pudding. Read expert review From £99per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best spa hotels in Suffolk   Somerset The White PostYeovil, Somerset, England 8Telegraph expert rating At this cosy Victorian ‘pub-and-lodgings’, the elegant gastronomy is as much a pull as the rooms. Brett’s passion for foraging and elegant presentation seeps through. The best way to experience the dishes? The 10-course tasting menu, which pays homage to the West Country (pork done eight ways, served with local chilli and ginger cider) as well as international influences (spiced lentil dhal with gurnard, mango and coconut). The wine list is sufficient but it’s the local ales and ciders that stand out, particularly if you pair a pint of Dorset Knob bitter with the Sunday roast. Painted walls are interrupted only by the wide windows, long cardinal-coloured drapes and filament bulb lamps that, along with on-table candles, add just enough light during evening dining. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The most romantic hotels in Somerset   Dorset La FosseCranborne, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating Snug in the wave-like green hills of east Dorset, La Fosse at Cranborne is a peaceful bed and breakfast as well as popular restaurant. Run by husband and wife, this simple West Country retreat, embracing both modern and traditional, feels as far from the madding crowds as possible. Owner-chef Mark is a true locavore, sourcing as much from in and around the village as possible. His passion for local, inventive cuisine has seen him named best chef in Dorset. The colourful duck dish, replete with homegrown vegetables, is a highlight, drizzled in a piquant jus. Mark’s award-winning cheeseboard is part of the experience, so save some room. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Anchor InnSeatown, Dorset, England 8Telegraph expert rating The Anchor Inn, sat beyond snaking lanes and tucked between scarped cliffs on the edge of a little known Dorset village, is a destination gastropub serving elevated British classics. It is also a boutique hideaway that cocoons guests amid the sound of rolling waves. If the weather is decent, expect a fight to secure a lunchtime spot, either tucked inside or al fresco. Menus from head chef Jean-Paul De Ronne — who previously worked under Masterchef winner Mat Follas — reveal commitment to seasonal fare from land and sea, such as the fresh crab salad using crustacea caught only metres away. Ales are all from Palmers, brewed four miles away, while an extensive cocktail list from former Hix bartender David Smith features a number of Dorset’s own spirits. Read expert review From £120per night • The best hotels in Dorset   Buckinghamshire The Mash InnRadnage, Buckinghamshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating Described by its owner Nick Mash as a ‘new generation inn’, The Mash Inn's aim is to remove the barriers between chef and diner. The open kitchen takes centre stage: a solid wood workstation groaning with ingredients and stacked plates, beneath a ceiling rack dripping with pots and pans, in front of an open fire for rotisserie cooking. Chef Jon Parry cooks up a storm, producing a delicious, earthy and inventive no frills tasting menu and a short à la carte menu. Much of the produce is from the garden or very local. Diners sit at individual tables or at a large communal table, which may sound daunting but such is the communal, friendly atmosphere that it’s a pleasure to do so. Read expert review From £100per night The Hand & FlowersMarlow, Buckinghamshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn with a Michelin-starred restaurant, enticing locals to dine, and couples for weekends or nights away. It's on busy West Street, just along the road from the house where Mary Shelley created Frankenstein. The chef-proprietor is Tom Kerridge, who gained a Michelin star within 10 months from a kitchen which was then the size of a large cupboard. These days he has a new, celadon green kitchen and a brigade of chefs. As restaurants go, it rocks. Expect crayfish scotch egg, slow cooked duck breast with duck fat chips and other earthy, deeply satisfying dishes that are also full of imaginative twists, served in a cosy and convivial dining room. Read expert review From £140per night • The best hotels in Buckinghamshire   Kent RocksaltFolkestone, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Rocksalt is the littoral culinary kingdom of Mark Sargeant of Claridge's fame. A microcosm of London sophistication in gritty Folkestone, it's a genuine dining destination. The recent addition of four bedrooms above "Sargey's" adjacent Smokehouse enables visitors to abandon themselves to gluttony. His dedication to local ingredients introduces diners to new treasures, such as meaty huss dogfish and tart sea buckthorn (oozing out of a dense chocolate mousse fondant), yet dishes are refreshingly clean and unpretentious. Hunks of bread, served with beef dripping, rich butter and home-roasted salt, and nuggets of treacly fudge and slices of colourful rock bookend a perfectly executed meal. Read expert review From £85per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Wife of BathWye, Kent, England 9Telegraph expert rating Another addition to chef Mark Sargeant and Josh De Haan's portfolio of Kentish restaurants with rooms. With a superb Spanish restaurant and tiny tapas bar, its signature quirky style and authentic cuisine works surprisingly well in the bucolic setting. The restaurant serves impeccable fare: juicy scallops with spicy chorizo and earthy morcillo (black pudding); honey sweet melon smothered in Brindisa's finest Serrano ham; succulent Galician steaks with creamy aioli and fiery paprika potatoes; and hake with radishes, Seville orange and a buttery sauce laced with Gin Mare. Save space for pudding: the bitter chocolate tart with salt and olive oil is revelatory, as is ice-cream made with raisins soaked in PX sherry. Read expert review From £70per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Read's Restaurant With RoomsFaversham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating Read's, housed in a Georgian mansion on the north Kentish coast, is a smart restaurant with six rooms, owned and run by acclaimed chef David Pitchford and his wife Rona. Sticking firmly to their decades-long recipe for success, they deliver classic cuisine and unfussy hospitality. David won a Michelin star in 1992, which he retained for 20 consecutive years, becoming the second longest holder of the accolade in Britain. The food is hard to fault, if lacking the innovation and excitement that comes with Michelin recognition: comforting, classic French cuisine with British influence. Think ham and pea mousse; smoked haddock in cream sauce topped with cheese soufflé; Kentish lamb served with buttery asparagus and garden vegetables; and a Cassis-soaked summer pudding. Read expert review From £145per night The Dog at WinghamWingham, Kent, England 8Telegraph expert rating A medieval pub in a rural village, run by an enterprising local family, that serves exceptionally good food and features eight attractive bedrooms. Virtually equidistant from Canterbury and Sandwich, it’s ideally located for exploring the Kentish city, countryside and coast. The kitchen is overseen by the young and talented Dan Johns, who has worked at Gary Rhodes’ Searcy’s at The Gherkin and Urban Coterie. The menu changes monthly to reflect seasonality and local produce. Imaginative starters such as fragrant Thai-style chicken salad and rich pork and pistachio terrine with pineapple jam are followed by melt-in-the-mouth Moroccan spiced lamb and crisp pork collar with chorizo dumplings. Read expert review From £86per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best pubs with rooms in Kent   Devon The Dartmoor InnOkehampton, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 16th-century coaching inn on the north-western edge of Dartmoor National Park is acclaimed for its fresh, seasonal cooking, but it’s worth bedding down for a stay in one of its three chic bedrooms. A blackboard heralds not only the breed of cattle, but also the name of the farmer it has come from. Dishes are pub classics, done to perfection: rib-eye steak and chips, confit of duck leg with toffee apple puree and roasted hazelnuts, and brisket of beef. Philip has a strong ethical policy, forging strong links with local artisan food producers, and ensures the beef has been grass fed and reared within a 20-mile radius. Breakfast is refreshingly original, with dainty portions of caramelised bananas or a daring cooked menu, including herb-crusted goat’s cheese, black pudding and bacon lardons. Read expert review From £65per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Lamb InnSandford, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating With open fires, beamed walls, deep sofas and award-winning food, this 16th-century inn in the village of Sandford is a pub of dreams for town-dwellers. Upstairs, seven bedrooms have big beds, soft linen and powerful showers, and there’s a pretty cobbled terrace at the rear. The Lamb Inn’s menu consistently attracts rave reviews. The produce is seasonal and locally sourced, mixing upmarket dishes with pub classics: shellfish bisque, mushroom ravioli, roasted pigeon with smoked bacon and savoy cabbage or steak and chips. The perfectly fluffy sticky toffee pudding is worth a visit alone. Landlord Mark is a fan of real ale and regularly rotates his cask brews to ensure they stay fresh. Read expert review From £69per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Masons ArmsBranscombe, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating This dog-friendly 14th-century thatched inn, in Branscombe, on the Jurassic Coast, is one of Devon’s best. It prides itself on serving local, seasonal Devon fare on a traditional pub menu – it even has a 'food sourcing map' detailing exactly where the produce comes from. There’s steamed River Exe mussels and fries, steak and kidney shortcrust pie, rump steak and a seafood platter. Ales, hand-pumped from casks, are just as local. On a sunny day, the action moves outside to the pretty suntrap terrace. It's a 15-minute walk to Branscombe Beach, a lovely, long shingle cove from where you can pick up the South West Coastal Path. Read expert review From £75per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Salutation InnTopsham, Devon, England 8Telegraph expert rating Eat well and rest your head at this 18th-century coaching inn in chichi Topsham: a stylish option with a truly excellent restaurant, helmed by one of Gordon Ramsay's former protégés. Exquisite handmade petit-fours welcome guests on arrival – the first hint that your dining experience will be full of extra surprises. The wild mushroom appetiser comes accompanied by an umami-enhancing pinot noir, and the tomato gazpacho with local crab, served in a glass on ice, and followed by a rich rump of beef from Greendale Farm. Each modern dish is accompanied by diverse wines chosen by Stephen Edwardes – the unusual sake complements the beautiful strawberry dessert which is garnished with home-grown edible flowers. Read expert review From £145per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Devon   Cornwall The Gurnard's HeadSt Ives, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating A country inn offering outstanding food, fabulous sea and moorland views, situated close to St Ives and Land's End. Popular with walkers and couples of all ages seeking a low-key, restorative break in a wild coastal location. Locals come from miles around to dine here. The Scottish head chef, Bruce Rennie, cooks a short, inventive menu. Lunch may include beetroot risotto, octopus and white wine stew, or Merguez sausages with Puy lentils. The supper menu may include salmon and lobster tortellini, cod with pig’s trotter, and sole with Vermouth. The wine list focuses on Old World wines, notably from France, Italy and Portugal. Read expert review From £110per night Padstow TownhousePadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A handsome listed townhouse on Padstow's high street that has been superbly renovated and opened as a six-bedroom luxury guesthouse by chef Paul Ainsworth to complement his Michelin-starred restaurant, Paul Ainsworth at Number 6. Head there for amusingly-presented, delicately-flavoured meat and fish dishes and a fun and informal atmosphere, or to his even more informal restaurant, Rojanos, for superior pasta, pizza and hamburgers. Breakfast is served at the latter. The guesthouse owns an electric BMW in which guests can be transported if they don’t want to walk around. Read expert review From £280per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com St Petroc's HotelPadstow, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating A sociable, intimate townhouse with a labyrinth of gorgeously styled sitting and reading rooms – as well as a buzzy bistro. St Petroc’s Bistro opened along with the hotel in 1988. It’s a lovely room – with an engaging selection of original art on the walls – and a relaxing, happy place to eat at either lunch or dinner. Pride of place on the menu goes to the 30-day dry-aged steaks, but there are fish, chicken and vegetarian options as well – all of them classic Rick Stein recipes (try the grilled hake with Serrano ham, succotash and chives). Ruby’s Bar is the new Stein pub – a great place for a local beer or cocktail. Read expert review From £112per night Kota Restaurant with RoomsPorthleven, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating With a fantastic Asian-Cornish fusion restaurant downstairs, and Porthleven’s picturesque harbour on the doorstep, the Kota’s two simple, homey rooms are proof that sometimes substance can win over style. The vibe in the restaurant is casual, with a long room overlooking the harbour and a waterfront lawn on which you can dine in good weather. New Zealander Jude, who is part Maori, part Malay-Chinese, brings Asian spices and cooking styles to fresh, meticulously sourced Cornish produce – squid with green mango salad, scallops with miso dressing and seaweed salad, and Laksa with prawns, mussels and fish. There are also some very creative burgers – tempura fish with wasabi tartare, and satay chicken with Asian slaw. Read expert review From £75per night DriftwoodPortscatho, Cornwall, England 8Telegraph expert rating Sitting on a hill above the rugged coastline of the Roseland peninsula, Driftwood is nautically furnished in soft creams and blues. A Michelin-starred restaurant, private sea-facing terraces, and a private beach make this the perfect venue for pretty much everyone. There are wonderful coastal path walks for miles in each direction. This is Cornish cooking at its finest: unfussy and focused on bringing out the flavour of fresh fish and seafood and locally reared beef and lamb. Dinner in summer comprises a six-course tasting menu with complementary wines. For children there are early suppers with proper chef-made food. Read expert review From £250per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Coombeshead FarmLewannick, Cornwall, England 9Telegraph expert rating This is the joint venture from chef Tom Adams of London restaurant Pitt Cue and April Bloomfield, English born chef/proprietor of The Spotted Pig in New York. Both wanted to get back to the roots of food and hospitality and the result is this relaxed communal dining farmhouse b&b. Tom and his partner Lottie Mew live off the land and share their fresh, foraged, pickled and harvested produce with their guests. Tom cooks a three-course feast, kicking off with plates of delicious nibbles from 6.30pm onwards, which is shared at a communal table by all the guests. Tom’s own rare breed Mangalitza pigs feature large, plus perhaps a cep and walnut broth, lamb shoulder and mushroom porridge, with madeleine, whey and prune for pudding. Wines are unusual. Read expert review From £175per night • The best dog-friendly hotels in Cornwall   Sussex The Barn at RoundhurstLurgashall, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating A rural South Downs retreat on a 250-acre organic farm with its own lakes. Home-reared food is a specialty. Converted outhouses with six rooms are set around a courtyard, just steps from a dramatic converted barn for dining and lounging. A four-course set menu with generous portions is available for guests and non-guests Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays; a light supper is provided for guests on other days. Meals highlight the farm’s own organic beef, lamb and pork and could include colourful heritage carrots and an exceptional triple chocolate mousse. Read expert review From £98per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com CrouchersChichester, West Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating An unassuming motel-like exterior belies a foodie haven a short drive from the Witterings. Relax on the patio of a garden-facing room, head to the beach, or explore the cultural and sporting highlights around Chichester but leave room for dinner in the impressive restaurant. Proximity to the coast ensures good seafood. The squid-ink pasta starter is light and delicate and a showy dessert of white chocolate and saffron mousse with edible flowers, caramel and orange ice-cream is a multi-sensory delight. A strong wine list includes an emphasis on the owners’ native South Africa. Read expert review From £90per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Crab & LobsterWest Sussex, England 8Telegraph expert rating Herons can be seen on the doorstep of this modernised 350-year-old pub beside a bird sanctuary, where guests can stay in cosy bedrooms or an adjoining cottage. Tuck into locally caught seafood in the bar-restaurant and plan nature walks or trips to nearby beaches. The menu, as this gastropub’s name suggests, makes good use of locally caught seafood. Baked Selsey crab with a salad or crab cakes is a highlight. Meat, like rump of lamb (on an autumn menu with garlic Pommes Anna, butternut squash purée, confit tomatoes, baby leeks and Madeira jus) is also locally reared. There’s an extensive wine list and takeaway fish and chips. Read expert review From £160per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith Wingrove HouseAlfriston, South Downs, England 8Telegraph expert rating Yards from the South Downs Way and the half-timbered, candlelit pubs of Alfriston, this swish 19th-century boutique hotel with a modern country restaurant delivers roaring log fires, low-slung sofas and top-notch food, and draws city dwellers craving an easy country escape. Matthew Comben, formerly of the Hungry Monk in Jevington, heads up the kitchen and has brought with him the Monk's original banoffee pie recipe. Highlights from the seasonal menu include cauliflower fritters with Brighton blue cheese mayonnaise, and a soft beef fillet with tarragon. There's an impressive gin menu with 11 different options, including Brighton Gin, and a refreshingly reasonable wine list. Read expert review From £108per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best places and cities to visit in England – and where to stay   Cheshire The Roebuck InnMobberley, Cheshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This French-influenced bistro with rooms is perfect weekend break material, with lashings of character, great food and a beautifully designed garden. The bistro menu, tweaked with the seasons, is European in style, and everything comes in generous portions, whether it’s ‘small plates’ of cassoulet, caponata and crostini; mains such as saffron risotto, venison bourguignon and moules marinière; or puds of tarte au citron, profiteroles and crème caramel. On the drinks front, you’ll find an interesting selection of local ales, old-world wines and a vintage dresser filled with classic aperitifs and digestifs. Read expert review From £115per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • Britain's cosiest hotels for autumn   County Durham Lord Crewe ArmsBlanchland, Northumberland, England 9Telegraph expert rating A lord-of-the-manor building, in a pin-neat estate village, that oozes atmosphere at every stone-flagged turn. A reputation for honest, British cooking, plus its rural location, makes it popular with walkers and foodies as well as the country-sports fraternity. Expect punchy, robust, British cooking, rich with flavour and unusual combinations: devilled lamb’s kidneys on roasted cauliflower; grilled sea trout and mixed alliums; sea buckthorn posset. There’s an element of fun, too; eggy bread with fried bacon or Bloody Mary tomatoes on toast for breakfast. Some ingredients come from the kitchen garden. Eat on the terrace in the summer. The atmospheric, barrel-vaulted bar has local ales including a custom-made Lord Crewe Brew. Read expert review From £155per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Rose & CrownCounty Durham, England 9Telegraph expert rating A foodie destination country inn that has smartened up while still maintaining a sense of village pub: country-comfortable rooms; horse-brasses and dogs in the bar. Surrounded by the sheep-dotted fields and moors of the North Pennines, you come to eat, relax and then walk it off. The modern British menu shows confident cooking that lets the ingredients shine through; no fuss but definitely interesting: honey-glazed goat's cheese with beetroot, hazelnuts and gingerbread, perhaps, or pan-fried fillet of sea trout with roasted baby gem and crushed peas. There’s good local sourcing with Teesdale lamb rarely off the menu. Eat in the candle-lit dining room or buzzier bar; the latter offers three real ales and a good selection of single malts. Read expert review From £95per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best country house hotels in Britain   Cities The Henrietta HotelCovent Garden, London, England 8Telegraph expert rating An 18-bedroom boutique address in one of Covent Garden’s most attractive streets, owned and run by the Paris-based Experimental Group, with a cocktail bar, Ollie Dabbous restaurant and quirky interior design by Dorothée Meilichzon. The food, is delicious – clean, clever and uncomplicated – with highlights that might include the sheeps’ milk curds with pistachio, beef tartare with nasturtium and rye, and wonderful freshly baked warm madeleines with Chantilly cream. Don't miss a cocktail, which can be chosen à la carte or with a consultation from the barman. Read expert review From £220per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The Ginger PigHove, Brighton, England 8Telegraph expert rating This 11-bedroom guesthouse above Hove’s highly-acclaimed Ginger Pig Bar and Restaurant is ideal if you want a quieter seaside base. Spacious and elegantly understated rooms include thoughtful beach bags with towels and well-stocked minibars. Always buzzy, this sprawling gastropub serves up highly delicious grub and excellent Sunday roasts. Look out for seasonal specials like asparagus with brown crab and chipotle mayo, or seabream with samphire. The adjoining Orangerie is where breakfast is served (there’s an outdoor area for sunny days), offering imaginative dishes such as baked eggs with hummus, chorizo and peppers, Irish rock oysters and rarebit with roasted tomatoes and mushrooms. Read expert review From £80per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com Simps