Copa America

Copa America Slideshow

Peru's Guerrero and Paraguay's Da Silva chase after the ball during their Copa America 2015 third-place soccer match at Estadio Municipal Alcaldesa Ester Roa Rebolledo in Concepcion

Peru's Paolo Guerrero and Paraguay's Paulo Da Silva (L) chase after the ball during their Copa America 2015 third-place soccer match at Estadio Municipal Alcaldesa Ester Roa Rebolledo in Concepcion, Chile, July 3, 2015. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo

Argentina Savior Messi Enforces His Brilliance When His Nation Needs Him Most

Twenty years ago, Lionel Messi, then a 10-year-old playing for a youth team at Newell’s Old Boys, headed into rural Santa Fe for a game against Pujato. These were always difficult, physical matches, and Messi took a kicking. Pujato scored twice early on and, as Newell’s defender Gerardo Grighini recalls, Newell’s was still 2-0 down when, with “eight or nine minutes to go” Messi “got the face on,” It was as though Messi had said to himself, “F*** it, I’ll sort it!” and he scored three goals in those closing minutes to win the game.
Messi has been getting the face on a lot recently. With Neymar gone, Ousmane Dembele injured and general chaos at the Camp Nou, it feels as though Barcelona’s perfect start to the season has been the result of him, fired by the “bronca” that used to motivate Diego Maradona, dragging Barcelona forward almost single-handed. And then, in Quito on Tuesday night, with Argentina 1-0 down after some 40 seconds and facing the possibility of missing a World Cup for the first time since 1970, he scored a hat trick.
“F*** it, I’ll sort it!”
Bronca” is a favorite world of Maradona. It’s a term from lunfardo, the street slang of Buenos Aires that inverts the syllables of words. In this case, “cabron”–bastard–becomes a noun meaning the energy derived from anger or when provoked. Listen to Maradona and it comes to seem that every act of greatness he ever performed on a pitch was motivated by bronca–but then Maradona, a far more volatile, less consistent genius than Messi, was forever making points with his brilliance, as though no transcendent act could ever be wasted on something as straightforward as just winning a game or professionalism.
Messi’s excellence is relentless, so much so that there is a danger we have become inured to it and take it for granted. Then comes something like Tuesday, when he not merely wins a game, not merely scored three high-caliber goals, but needled by the inadequacy of those around him–players, coaches, directors or administrators–he grabs the mood of a game and forces it to go the way he wants it to.
Argentina had only ever won once in Quito. It had scored only twice in its previous five qualifiers: a penalty and an own-goal. In this most chaotic of qualifying campaigns, it had gone through 43 players, three managers and three federation presidents, including a FIFA normalization committee. Messi had retired, been injured and banned. There was a genuine possibility that Tuesday night might have been his last game for the national side, certainly his last World Cup-related game as the player he is now before age saps at his acceleration.

There was moaning and grumbling; without a World Cup title, it was said, he could never match Maradona’s legacy. Perhaps he can’t. In his turbulent personal life, in his look and manner, in his emergence from a villa miseria on the banks of the Riachuelo, Maradona was always something more than a footballer; he was the incarnation of the pibe ideal, almost as though his coming had been foretold.
Messi is just a brilliant footballer. His father was a factory manager and the fact that he grew up under the protection of Barcelona in a sense makes his story less dramatic, less operatic. In terms of trophies won, in terms of the number of staggering performances, he already far outstrips Maradona, whose career was always fragmented by injuries and indiscipline. It’s true his success has always been at a superclub, but that is the nature modern football and what, anyway, is he supposed to do? Should he leave Barcelona to join a smaller side just to make a point? Maradona also had his opportunity at Barcelona; the difference is he failed–admittedly when the club was run far worse than it is even today. Messi has already played in more international finals than Maradona, who rarely bothered with the Copa America; that he has won none of them says more about the finishing under pressure of Gonzalo Higuain than his own abilities.
That’s not to say that Messi is better than Maradona; it’s to point out that the arguments used in support of Maradona tend to be flawed. Comparisons across generations are nearly impossible. The game has changed and memories blur events. International football, with a limited number of fixtures, often hinges on the slightest events. Argentina’s qualification for the 1986 World Cup, Maradona and all, was secured only by an 81st-minute goal in their final qualifier from Ricardo Gareca, the present Peru manager. Had that not gone in, Argentina would have been forced into a four-team playoff for a single additional slot.
Plenty of champions have qualified poorly. The truest test of a champion, perhaps, is to do it when it really matters, to have that force of will to harness circumstance. A great player can, as Paulo Dybala acknowledged last week, be a problem, inhibiting others from playing their natural game–look at how Brazil has improved since it stopped being all about Neymar; look how Sweden has improved since Zlatan Ibrahimovic retired–but they also offer possibilities way beyond what can normally be conceived.
Narratives can make heroes and heroes can make narratives. For the true great, events often seem to fall into place. Argentina can now believe that Russia will be the fulfillment of Messi’s destiny, and that everything that has gone before was mere buildup. Without adversity, there can be no savior, and if Messi does go on to win the World Cup next summer, how much sweeter will it be if it is his last attempt? If he did, before Tuesday’s hat trick, teeter on the brink of failure before getting the face on and sorting it?

Soccer: 2016 Copa America Centenario-Argentina at Venezuela

Jun 18, 2016; Foxborough, MA, USA; Argentina midfielder Lionel Messi (10) congratulates forward Gonzalo Higuain (9) after he scored his second goal of the game against the Venezuela during the first half of quarter-final play in the 2016 Copa America Centenario soccer tournament at Gillette Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Winslow Townson-USA TODAY Sports / Reuters.

Soccer: 2016 Copa America Centenario-Argentina at USA

Jun 21, 2016; Houston, TX, USA; Argentina forward Gonzalo Higuain (left) celebrates with midfielder Lionel Messi (10) after scoring a goal during the second half against the United States in the semifinals of the 2016 Copa America Centenario soccer tournament at NRG Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Kevin Jairaj-USA TODAY Sports

Soccer: 2016 Copa America Centenario-Ecuador at Brazil

Jun 4, 2016; Pasadena, CA, USA; Brazil manager Dunga looks on before a game against Ecuador during the group play stage of the 2016 Copa America Centenario at Rose Bowl Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Kelvin Kuo-USA TODAY Sports

Colombia's national soccer team coach Hernan Dario "El, Bolillo" Gomez attends a training session in Jujuy

Colombia's national soccer team coach Hernan Dario "El, Bolillo" Gomez attends a training session in Jujuy July 3, 2011. Colombia will play Argentina in their Copa America Group A soccer match on Wednesday. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

FILE PHOTO: Uruguay's Maximiliano Pereira talks to head coach Oscar Tabarez at a training session at Sport Center Los Llanos in La Serena

FILE PHOTO: Uruguay's Maximiliano Pereira (L) talks to head coach Oscar Tabarez at a training session at Sport Center Los Llanos in La Serena, June 19, 2015. Uruguay will play against Paraguay on June 20 during their Group B soccer match at the Copa America soccer tournament in Chile. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo/File Photo

Brazil Legend Roberto Carlos Reveals Lucky Element That Aided His Iconic Free-Kick Against France

​Former Real Madrid star Roberto Carlos has broken many people's hearts by admitting that his world-renowned free-kick against France in 1997 was wind-assisted and branded the goal a 'miracle'.  The Brazilian enjoyed a fantastic career at both club and international level. During his time at Real Madrid he won four La Liga titles and three Champions League trophies. He was also extremely successful with Brazil as they won two Copa America titles and the World Cup in 2002. But what will perhaps...

Brazil Legend Roberto Carlos Reveals Lucky Element That Aided His Iconic Free-Kick Against France

​Former Real Madrid star Roberto Carlos has broken many people's hearts by admitting that his world-renowned free-kick against France in 1997 was wind-assisted and branded the goal a 'miracle'.  The Brazilian enjoyed a fantastic career at both club and international level. During his time at Real Madrid he won four La Liga titles and three Champions League trophies. He was also extremely successful with Brazil as they won two Copa America titles and the World Cup in 2002. But what will perhaps...

Brazil Legend Roberto Carlos Reveals Lucky Element That Aided His Iconic Free-Kick Against France

​Former Real Madrid star Roberto Carlos has broken many people's hearts by admitting that his world-renowned free-kick against France in 1997 was wind-assisted and branded the goal a 'miracle'.  The Brazilian enjoyed a fantastic career at both club and international level. During his time at Real Madrid he won four La Liga titles and three Champions League trophies. He was also extremely successful with Brazil as they won two Copa America titles and the World Cup in 2002. But what will perhaps...

Brazil Legend Roberto Carlos Reveals Lucky Element That Aided His Iconic Free-Kick Against France

​Former Real Madrid star Roberto Carlos has broken many people's hearts by admitting that his world-renowned free-kick against France in 1997 was wind-assisted and branded the goal a 'miracle'.  The Brazilian enjoyed a fantastic career at both club and international level. During his time at Real Madrid he won four La Liga titles and three Champions League trophies. He was also extremely successful with Brazil as they won two Copa America titles and the World Cup in 2002. But what will perhaps...

FIFA Trial Witness Says Officials Used Car Names to Disguise Secret Payments

NEW YORK (AP) – Payments to the head of Peruvian soccer were masked under the name ''Fiat.'' Money for Paraguay's boss was listed as ''Honda.''

Excel spreadsheets detailed the cloak-and-dagger recording system of money given to ''Benz,'' ''VW,'' ''Toyota,'' ''Kia,'' and ''Peugeot,'' among others, including a pair of payments labeled ''Q2022'' that appeared to be related to the FIFA executive committee's 2010 vote giving Qatar rights to host the 2022 World Cup.

''We basically decided to make up fantasy names for each of the people involved,'' sports marketing executive Santiago Pena testified Monday as the trial of three high-ranking soccer executives entered its second week at federal court in Brooklyn.

Pena worked for Full Play Group, a company based in Argentina that won marketing rights to South American World Cup qualifiers and the Copa America and Copa Libertatores tournaments.

Hugo and Mariano Jinkis, a father and son who are Full Play's controlling principals, were indicted along with many top soccer executives in 2015 by U.S. prosecutors. The father and son have not been extradited thus far.

Pena testified that he took the ledger from Full Play's office on a thumb drive along with a stack of documents shortly after the first indictments were unsealed in May 2015 and kept the evidence at his home for two years before turning it over the American prosecutors.

Juan Angel Napout, the ex-president of Paraguay's soccer federation; Jose Maria Marin, the former president of Brazil's soccer federation; and Manuel Burga, the ex-head of Peru's soccer federation; are on trial for racketeering conspiracy, wire fraud conspiracy and money laundering conspiracy.

Rafael Esquivel, the former president of Venezuelan soccer, was nicknamed ''Benz'' and his ledger listed a $750,000 payment owed for ''Q2022.'' He pleaded guilty in November 2016 to racketeering conspiracy, three counts of wire fraud conspiracy and three counts of money laundering conspiracy.

Luis Chiriboga, the former president of Ecuadorean soccer, was nicknamed ''Toyota'' and his ledger listed a $500,000 payment owed for ''Q2022.'' He was convicted in his own country in November 2016 of money laundering.

Neither Esquivel nor Chiriboga was on the FIFA executive committee that made Qatar the 2022 World Cup host. M. Kristen Mace, the assistant U.S. attorney questioning Pena, did not ask whether the payments were to be redirected to others.

Other nicknames included ''VW'' for Carlos Chavez of Bolivia, ''Honda'' for Napout, ''Fiat'' for Burga, ''Flemic,'' for Luis Bedoya of Colombia, ''Kia'' for Sergio Jadue of Chile and ''Peugeot'' for Jose Meiszner, the former general secretary of the South American governing body CONMEBOL.

Pena said that as part of the contracts for the Copa America covering 2015, 2019 and 2023, plus the 2016 Centennial Copa America, payments were made to soccer federation presidents and the CONMEBOL general secretary, listing amount for various events plus for signing contracts. He said the money was not recorded on Full Play's regular accounts.

''They were secret payments,'' he said.

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Among the payments were some for the Copa Libertadores, even though Full Play did not hold rights. Pena said his bosses described them as loyalty payments.

Pena also testified about corporate sponsorship deals for the 2015 Copa: $9 million each for MasterCard and Banco Santander; $8 million for Kia Motors; $3.2 million for Coca-Cola and DHL; $3 million for Kellogg; and $1.5 million for LATAM Airlines.

He said that payments were made from Full Play directly to Venezuela's players and coaches at the request of the nation's federation to get around currency restrictions in that nation.

Pena also detailed $2 million in payments Full Play made to Soccer United Marketing, a marketing company of the U.S. Soccer Federation and Major League Soccer, for a pair of exhibition games involving Mexico in March 2015, against Ecuador and Paraguay. He said Full Play sold U.S. rights to World Cup qualifiers to BeIN Sports through a London-based company.

Before testimony, U.S. District Judge Pamela K. Chen said she denied the government's request to remand Burga into custody but tightened restrictions on his cellphone use. Prosecutors said he made a slashing motion with a finger across his throat in a threatening gesture during the testimony of Alejandro Burzaco, another marketing executive. Burga's lawyer said he was scratching because of a skin condition.

The Best Players Who Missed the World Cup: A Full 23-Man Squad

Much has been made about the nations who didn't qualify for the 2018 World Cup, and for good reason. The list is loaded with international powers and World Cup regulars, and four reigning regional champions–Chile, USA, New Zealand and Cameroon–won't be making the trip to Russia.

The field in Russia boasts plenty of intrigue and star power, and those competing on the grand stage will command the spotlight for the next eight months on the journey to the top prize in the international game. Before that, though, there's still reason to look back at the series of stars who won't be competing at the World Cup due to their nations' inability to get there. There are so many, in fact, that carving out a legitimate, World Cup-like, 23-man roster isn't all that difficult of a task.

Sticking with players who won't be at the World Cup because of a failure to qualify and not because of a current standing with their national team that did qualify and a traditional roster construction, here's a team of star players that you won't be seeing next summer under the bright lights in Russia.

GOALKEEPERS

Gianluigi Buffon (Italy), Jan Oblak (Slovenia), Jasper Cillessen (Netherlands)

It's an absolute shame that Buffon won't be able to exit on his own terms in the World Cup. The 2006 winner is universally adored and revered and was one of the last active holdovers from that Italian title team. It feels like the soccer universe has been cheated some with the last international image of Buffon being him crying tears of sorrow, but storybook endings don't happen for everyone. Presuming this is Buffon's last season as a player, he'll still hope to go out with more silverware at Juventus.

A pair of La Liga netminders round out the group, with Atletico Madrid's Oblak, who supplanted Inter's talented Samir Handanovic as Slovenia's No. 1, and Barcelona backup Cillessen, who, at 28, will be fighting for his place in qualifying for Qatar 2022.

DEFENDERS

David Alaba (Austria); Andrea Barzagli, Leonardo Bonucci, Giorgio Chiellini (Italy); Faouzi Ghoulam (Algeria); Antonio Valencia (Ecuador); Virgil Van Dijk (Netherlands)

Just like Buffon, the entire B-B-C back line of Italy that has been so resolute for so long won't be making the journey to Russia, and a true changing of the guard is in store for the Azzurri defense. It's a true end of an era.

With this group, you've got a blend of that experience and players hitting their prime in Alaba and Ghoulam, plus clout in the center and fullbacks who can bomb forward.

MIDFIELDERS

Marek Hamsik (Slovakia), Naby Keita (Guinea), Henrikh Mkhitaryan (Armenia), Miralem Pjanic (Bosnia & Herzegovina), Christian Pulisic (USA), Thomas Partey (Ghana), Arturo Vidal (Chile), Wilfried Zaha (Ivory Coast)

Pulisic won't get to experience a breakout on the biggest stage possible thanks to the USA's failure, but the 19-year-old is hardly to blame given he carried the Americans at times and provided hope in the fateful finale vs. Trinidad & Tobago. Pulisic will have to wait until 2022 for his first potential taste of a senior World Cup.

This group is a balanced one, blessed with wing play in Pulisic and Zaha, central creators like Hamsik and Mkhitaryan and central muscle in Vidal and Partey. For Keita, at least he did not need the World Cup as a springboard to bigger things, as he's already headed to Liverpool next summer from RB Leipzig.

FORWARDS

Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang (Gabon), Gareth Bale (Wales), Arjen Robben (Netherlands), Edin Dzeko (Bosnia & Herzegovina), Alexis Sanchez (Chile)

Robben went out with a golazo in his final appearance with the Dutch, and his unstoppable cut-in-from-the-right, shoot-with-the-left move will be missed on the grand stage.

After Wales' run to the Euro 2016 semifinals, a World Cup bid was surely expected to follow, but the Dragons had to cope without Bale in their final qualifiers, and they couldn't quite make it to the playoff stage, falling to Ireland at the last hurdle. That's a killer for the 28-year-old Bale, who could well go his entire international career without playing in a World Cup depending on how the next five years play out.

Elsewhere, Aubameyang and Gabon attributed their failure to some dodgy orange juice, while Bosnia & Herzegovina underachieved considering its wealth of talent, which includes the prolific Dzeko. As for Alexis Sanchez, who has given his all for his country and helped guide it to the last two Copa America titles, not even reaching the World Cup stage is a shocking blow.

On the provisional 40-man roster but not quite making the cut: Gianluigi Donnarumma (Italy), Stefan de Vrij (Netherlands), Daley Blind (Netherlands), Eric Bailly (Ivory Coast), Sokratis Papastathopoulos (Greece), Serge Aurier (Ivory Coast), Marco Verratti (Italy), Gary Medel (Chile), Charles Aranguiz (Chile), Hakan Calhanoglu (Turkey), Aaron Ramsey (Wales), Riyad Mahrez (Algeria), Cenk Tosun (Turkey), Vincent Aboubakar (Cameroon), Andriy Yarmolenko (Ukraine), Stevan Jovetic (Montenegro), Andrea Belotti (Italy).

World Cup Power Rankings: How the 2018 Field of 32 Nations Stacks Up

With the field of the 32 nations who will compete at the World Cup in Russia next summer completed by Peru's success in Lima Wednesday night, there's little time to waste in ranking the sides headed to the showcase event by making an initial assessment of their form.

Sure, there is plenty left to be decided. Which nations have managerial issues to resolve? Who knows what their starting lineup is likely to be? Who is praying for their key center forward to stay fit? Everything, of course, could change with the answers to those questions and the fallout from the group draw on Dec. 1, but, with all else being equal, who are the likely winners and who's just glad to going to Russia? Here's how we see the World Cup field stacking up:

1. BRAZIL

Six games into qualifying, Brazil had won only twice and looked in serious danger of failing to qualify. Going out of the Copa America Centenario in the group stage confirmed the moribund state of the Brazilian game. But then Tite replaced Dunga as manager, and the whole set-up changed. This Brazil plays modern, aggressive football, is far less reliant on Neymar and won 10 and drew two of its final 12 games to qualify, a full 10 points clear at the top of the CONMEBOL table.

Best Finish: Champions (1958, 1962, 1970, 1994, 2002)

2. SPAIN

Eliminated in the group stage in the last World Cup and then beaten by Italy in the last 16 of Euro 2016, the curtain seemed to have come down on the golden age of Spanish football. But after replacing Vicente Del Bosque, Julen Lopetegui has rejuvenated the side. Its 3-0 win over Italy in qualifying offered a clear warning that Spain is back.

Best Finish: Champions (2010)

3. GERMANY

Germany disappointed at Euro 2016, never really hitting top form and being well-beaten by France in the semifinal. Since then, though, it has qualified for the World Cup with a perfect 10-0-0 record and won the Confederations Cup with what was, in effect, a reserve side. Manager Jogi Low has used 36 players over the past two years, which for another manager might be a sign of chaos; for him it’s an indicator of strength.

Best Finish: Champions (1954, 1974, 1990, 2014)

4. FRANCE

This is a ridiculously gifted generation of French players who really should have won the Euros on home soil last summer. The sense, though, is that Didier Deschamps is not necessarily the man to get the best out if them, and the 4-4-2 he has adopted of late seems a weirdly blockish solution that leads to predictability.

Best Finish: Champions (1998)

5. BELGIUM

Now that it has been relieved of the handicap of Marc Wilmots, can Belgium’s golden generation make good on its promise? Under Roberto Martinez, Belgium qualified with ease, dropping only two points. Kevin De Bruyne has thrived in a slightly deeper role, but the question, as ever with Martinez, is whether the side will be able to cope defensively against better opposition. De Bruyne has already questioned Martinez's tactics.

Best Finish: Fourth Place (1986)

6. ARGENTINA

Qualification was traumatic, but with the dust settled, Argentina remains in a strong position. For all the doubts about players coming through, this remains a strong squad, overloaded with gifted forwards and, by appointing Jorge Sampaoli, it did, at the third attempt, get the right manager. Lionel Messi’s (probable) final chance at a World Cup may be the one he takes.

Best Finish: Champions (1978, 1986)

7. PORTUGAL

Portugal is the European champion and breezed through qualification by winning nine games in a row after losing the opener in Switzerland. Cristiano Ronaldo gives the goal-scoring edge, but its real strength is in the solidity of the midfield.

Best Finish: Third Place (1966)

8. URUGUAY

The stereotype of Uruguay is of defensive resolve, stifling tactics and a pragmatism that can tip into cynicism. This side, though, had the second-best scoring record in South American World Cup qualifying and looks to take full advantage of the abilities of Luis Suarez and Edinson Cavani.

Best Finish: Champions (1930, 1950)

9. ENGLAND

A mood of persistent frustration hangs over England, so much so that the general reaction to its unbeaten qualification was a collective yawn about the way the Three Lions had trudged through a less-than-testing group. Harry Kane and a highly gifted emerging generation, though, offer some hope.

Best Finish: Champions (1966)

10. CROATIA

If football were just about players, Croatia would never have needed a playoff to qualify. It may lack a defensive midfielder but has a great wealth of creators. But with hardcore fans at war with the federation, which belatedly replaced their manager Ante Cacic, Croatia was underachieving desperately until Zlatko Dalic took over. He secured the win Croatia needed against Ukraine in the final qualifier, and the side then cruised through its playoff against Greece, winning 4-1.

Best Finish: Third Place (1998)

11. COLOMBIA

James Rodriguez was the breakout star of the last World Cup, and there is a sense that he has perhaps stagnated thanks to the glut of talent at Real Madrid. If he can rediscover his form at Bayern Munich, though, and with Radamel Falcao enjoying a late-career renaissance, Jose Pekerman’s side could be a threat.

Best Finish: Quarterfinals (2014)

12. SWITZERLAND

The Swiss qualified thanks to a very dodgy penalty in the playoff against Northern Ireland, and struggled to impose themselves in that series, but Vladimir Petkovic’s well-balanced side won all of its first nine qualifiers and has, in Ricardo Rodriguez and Stephan Lichtsteiner, a pair of excellent attacking fullbacks.

Best Finish: Quarterfinals (1934, 1938, 1954)

13. POLAND

Poland is ranked sixth in the world, which is evidence of just how much impact the trick of not playing friendlies can be. This, after all, is a side that in September lost 4-0 to Denmark. But it is generally solid and has, in Robert Lewandowski, one of the best strikers in the world.

Best Finish: Third Place (1974, 1982)

14. RUSSIA

Only one host nation has ever failed to make it through the group stage of a World Cup, but Russia could be the second. The gifted generation that reached the semifinal of Euro 2008 grew old together and Stanislav Cherchesov? has struggled to rejuvenate a squad that is heavily reliant on Alan Dzagoev for creativity.

Best Finish: Fourth Place (1966)

15. MEXICO

Juan Carlos Osorio is a controversial figure, with many feeling he rotates too often and question his hard-pressing. His players, though, seem generally enthused, and Mexico finished top of CONCACAF qualifying as well as getting out of their group at the Confederations Cup. After eliminations at the round of 16 in the last six World Cups, Osorio's first target must be set on reaching the quarterfinals.

Best Finish: Quarterfinals (1970, 1986)

16. ICELAND

After eliminating England to reach the quarterfinal of the Euros last summer, Iceland kicked on to become, by some distance, the smallest nation ever to qualify for a World Cup, finishing top of an awkward group that also included Croatia, Ukraine and Turkey. Gylfi Sigurdsson is the highest-profile player, but no side will have such a ferocious team spirit.

Best Finish: N/A

17. DENMARK

Denmark may have required a playoff to qualify, but that was because of results early in qualifying. More recently, the Danes put four past Poland and Montenegro and five past Ireland. Their Norwegian coach, Age Hareide, favors a direct approach and has made them defensively solid, but they also have the technical quality to unpick sides.

Best Finish: Quarterfinals (1998)

18. IRAN

Carlos Queiroz has been in charge of Iran for six years now. His side qualified unbeaten, letting in just two goals in 10 games in the final group, and can be relied upon to play in the characteristic Quieroz way, full of neat, technical, risk-averse football.

Best Finish: Group Stage (1978, 1998, 2006, 2014)

19. NIGERIA

Inconsistency and underachievement have characterized Nigerian football over the past decade. The Super Eagles have failed to qualify for three of the last four Africa Cup of Nations tournaments but won the one they did get to. Under Gernot Rohr, though, there is a sense of renewal, and they ended up topping a brutally tough qualifying group with relative comfort. A 4-2 friendly victory over a (Messi-less) Argentina this week was hugely impressive.

Best Finish: Round of 16 (1994, 1998, 2014)

20. SWEDEN

The Swedes dug deep and held firm to beat Italy over two legs and seem to have improved as a team since the retirement of Zlatan Ibrahimovic. Memories of their dismal Euro 2016 lurk in the background, and there is a lack of obvious creativity, but this is a side that also beat France in qualifying.

Best Finish: Runner-up (1958)

21. MOROCCO

Herve Renard’s record as an international coach is remarkable. He’s the only man to win the Cup of Nations with two different sides (Zambia, Ivory Coast) and he’s now taken Morocco to its first World Cup since 1998, coming out on top of a group that included Ivory Coast–without conceding a goal.

Best Finish: Round of 16 (1986)

22. JAPAN

There is an awkward sense about Japanese football that it has plateaued. The Samurai Blue finished top of their qualifying group and have an experienced coach in Vahid Halilhodzic, but, having been knocked out of the 2015 Asian Cup in the quarterfinals, there’s no reason to believe they’ll improve on their habit of alternating between group stage and last 16 exits.

Best Finish: Round of 16 (2002, 2010)

23. SERBIA

No side that finished top of its group in European qualifying collected fewer points than Serbia. This is a talented group, particularly in midfield, but the specter of past disintegrations at tournaments haunts them, and the chances of another potential collapse were only increased when Slavoljub Muslin was removed as coach after qualifying essentially because his football had been insufficiently exciting.

Best Finish: Group Stage (2010)

24. EGYPT

This is Egypt’s first World Cup since 1990, but it won a hat trick of Cups of Nations between 2006 and 2010. Having failed to make the following three Cups of Nations, the Pharaohs returned to the tournament this year and showed all the familiar defensive qualities, augmented by the pace of Mohamed Salah on the break, to reach the final.

Best Finish: Group Stage (1934, 1990)

25. SENEGAL

Senegal qualified unbeaten at the top of an awkward group that included Burkina Faso, Cape Verde and South Africa. The Lions of Teranga have pace and attacking flair on the flanks with Sadio Mane and Keita Balde and solidity in midfield with Idrissa Gueye. They disappointed at the Cup of Nations, though, eliminated in the quarterfinal by Cameroon.

Best Finish: Quarterfinals (2002)

26. SOUTH KOREA

South Korea struggled to second in its qualifying group, behind Iran, losing three of its 10 games. The squad should be better than that, though, as it features the likes of Son Heung-min (Tottenham), Lee Chung-yong (Crystal Palace) and Ji Dong-won (Augsburg).

Best Finish: Fourth Place (2002)

27. PERU

Peru is ranked 10th in the world, which is another lesson about the benefit of not playing friendlies. Ricardo Gareca’s side is well-organized and has impressed in recent tournaments, reaching the semifinal of the Copa America in 2015 and losing on penalties in the quarterfinal of the Copa America Centenario a year later. If Paolo Guerrero’s doping ban is confirmed and extended through the summer, though, it will be desperately short of firepower.

Best Finish: Quarterfinals (1970)

28. COSTA RICA

Reaching the last eight four years ago looks like being the summit for a generation. Costa Rica has regressed since then, as a number of key players have aged. The Ticos finished second behind Mexico but managed just two wins away from home in the hexagonal.

Best Finish: Quarterfinals (2014)

29. TUNISIA

A 2-1 win over DR Congo in September effectively sealed Tunisia’s place in Russia, but it will go there with limited ambition after a hugely disappointing Cup of Nations in which it was eliminated by Burkina Faso in the quarterfinal. That led–eventually–to the departure of manager Henryk Kasperczak and his replacement, Nabil Maaloul.

Best Finish: Group Stage (1978, 1998, 2002, 2006)

30. AUSTRALIA

Ange Postecoglu’s side eventually qualified via a playoff, beating Honduras 3-1 over two legs, but the big concern must be that the Socceroos haven’t won any of their last nine games outside of Australia.

Best Finish: Round of 16 (2006)

31. SAUDI ARABIA

Saudi Arabia scraped to an automatic World Cup berth on goal difference ahead of Australia, but lost three of their five away games, beating only Thailand and Iraq on the road. The manager who guided the side through qualifying, Bert van Marwijk, failed to agree to a new contract and was replaced by former Argentina manager Edgardo Bauza.

Best Finish: Round of 16 (1994)

32. PANAMA

Hernan Dario Gomez’s side qualified in third place in CONCACAF, but averaged less than a goal a game and won only one game away from home in the hexagonal. It's a just reward for a veteran core, but there'll be a hill to climb in Russia.

Best Finish: N/A

Bail tightened for official in FIFA soccer bribery case

FILE - In this May 14, 2015, file photo, CONMEBOL delegate Roger Bello, of Bolivia, left, talks with Boca Juniors goalkeeper Agustin Orion, center, and Alejandro Burzaco, president of Torneos y Competencias, during a Copa Libertadores soccer match between Boca Juniors and River Plate, in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Burzaco, the former CEO of a marketing firm based in Argentina, testified Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017, at the U.S. trial of three former South American soccer officials accused of taking bribes in a sprawling corruption investigation of FIFA, that Fox was among several media companies paying bribes through sham contracts for the Copa America and other events. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano, File)

Bail tightened for official in FIFA soccer bribery case

FILE - This Nov. 11, 2010, file photo shows Julio Grondona, President of the Argentine Football Association, standing behind the Copa America trophy during the draw of the groups ceremony in La Plata, Argentina. Violence threatens almost every match in Argentina, whether the perpetrators are individual fans, police or hooligan gangs. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko, File)

Bail tightened for official in FIFA soccer bribery case

FILE - In this May 14, 2015, file photo, CONMEBOL delegate Roger Bello, of Bolivia, left, talks with Boca Juniors goalkeeper Agustin Orion, center, and Alejandro Burzaco, president of Torneos y Competencias, during a Copa Libertadores soccer match between Boca Juniors and River Plate, in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Burzaco, the former CEO of a marketing firm based in Argentina, testified Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017, at the U.S. trial of three former South American soccer officials accused of taking bribes in a sprawling corruption investigation of FIFA, that Fox was among several media companies paying bribes through sham contracts for the Copa America and other events. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano, File)

Bail tightened for official in FIFA soccer bribery case

FILE - In this May 14, 2015, file photo, CONMEBOL delegate Roger Bello, of Bolivia, left, talks with Boca Juniors goalkeeper Agustin Orion, center, and Alejandro Burzaco, president of Torneos y Competencias, during a Copa Libertadores soccer match between Boca Juniors and River Plate, in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Burzaco, the former CEO of a marketing firm based in Argentina, testified Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017, at the U.S. trial of three former South American soccer officials accused of taking bribes in a sprawling corruption investigation of FIFA, that Fox was among several media companies paying bribes through sham contracts for the Copa America and other events. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano, File)

Sepp Blatter's Fifa vice-president took $1m bribe to vote for Qatar to win 2022 World Cup, court hears

Sepp Blatter’s most senior vice-president at Fifa took at least $1 million in bribes to vote for Qatar to host the 2022 World Cup, a court has heard. Julio Grondona, who was effectively Blatter’s number two until his death in 2014, allegedly told an Argentinian sports marketing executive he had been “owed” the money in exchange for helping the tiny Gulf state secure the tournament. Alejandro Burzaco, the former chief executive of Torneos y Competencias SA, told the first major trial in the Fifa scandal he did not know the source of a bribe that has long been suspected but said Grondona angrily confronted Qatari officials following reports he had been bought off, demanding $80m or a statement from them denying paying him. Organisers of the Qatar World Cup have repeatedly denied paying bribes, distancing themselves from Mohamed bin Hammam, the country’s disgraced Fifa former executive committee member previously accused of orchestrating such a scheme. Burzaco, who pleaded guilty this summer to bribing senior South American football officials in exchange for broadcast rights, told a court in Brooklyn, New York, that while he was arranging a $1m bung to Grondona and another to fellow Fifa executive Ricardo Teixeira over the rights to the Copa America, the former confessed to taking one for his World Cup vote. Alejandro Burzaco (right) pleaded guilty this summer to bribing senior South American football officials in exchange for broadcast rights Credit: AP Burzaco said Grondona told him a month after the December 2010 ballot to pay him Teixeria’s $1m Copa America bribe, which the Brazilian “owed him” as “Grondona voted for Qatar to host the 2022 World Cup”. The witness also told the court he had accompanied the duo and another ExCo member, Conmebol president Nicolás Leoz, to Zurich for the vote and knew they planned to back Qatar. Burzaco testified that Grondona told him Leoz then voted for Japan and then South Korea but switched his allegiance to Qatar when the long-standing head of the Argentine Football Association said to him: “What the hell are you doing? Are you the one not voting for Qatar?” Describing an altercation between Grondona and Qatari officials at a Fifa event 11 months later amid reports he had sold his vote, Burzaco said: “Basically, Grondona told them, ‘You will pay me $80m or write a letter saying you never paid me’.” The trial of three former Fifa officials, José Maria Marin, Juan Ángel Napout and Manuel Burga continues. The trio all deny taking bribes in exchange for football broadcast rights in what prosecutors have branded the “World Cup of fraud”.

Sepp Blatter's Fifa vice-president took $1m bribe to vote for Qatar to win 2022 World Cup, court hears

Sepp Blatter’s most senior vice-president at Fifa took at least $1 million in bribes to vote for Qatar to host the 2022 World Cup, a court has heard. Julio Grondona, who was effectively Blatter’s number two until his death in 2014, allegedly told an Argentinian sports marketing executive he had been “owed” the money in exchange for helping the tiny Gulf state secure the tournament. Alejandro Burzaco, the former chief executive of Torneos y Competencias SA, told the first major trial in the Fifa scandal he did not know the source of a bribe that has long been suspected but said Grondona angrily confronted Qatari officials following reports he had been bought off, demanding $80m or a statement from them denying paying him. Organisers of the Qatar World Cup have repeatedly denied paying bribes, distancing themselves from Mohamed bin Hammam, the country’s disgraced Fifa former executive committee member previously accused of orchestrating such a scheme. Burzaco, who pleaded guilty this summer to bribing senior South American football officials in exchange for broadcast rights, told a court in Brooklyn, New York, that while he was arranging a $1m bung to Grondona and another to fellow Fifa executive Ricardo Teixeira over the rights to the Copa America, the former confessed to taking one for his World Cup vote. Alejandro Burzaco (right) pleaded guilty this summer to bribing senior South American football officials in exchange for broadcast rights Credit: AP Burzaco said Grondona told him a month after the December 2010 ballot to pay him Teixeria’s $1m Copa America bribe, which the Brazilian “owed him” as “Grondona voted for Qatar to host the 2022 World Cup”. The witness also told the court he had accompanied the duo and another ExCo member, Conmebol president Nicolás Leoz, to Zurich for the vote and knew they planned to back Qatar. Burzaco testified that Grondona told him Leoz then voted for Japan and then South Korea but switched his allegiance to Qatar when the long-standing head of the Argentine Football Association said to him: “What the hell are you doing? Are you the one not voting for Qatar?” Describing an altercation between Grondona and Qatari officials at a Fifa event 11 months later amid reports he had sold his vote, Burzaco said: “Basically, Grondona told them, ‘You will pay me $80m or write a letter saying you never paid me’.” The trial of three former Fifa officials, José Maria Marin, Juan Ángel Napout and Manuel Burga continues. The trio all deny taking bribes in exchange for football broadcast rights in what prosecutors have branded the “World Cup of fraud”.

FILE - In this May 14, 2015, file photo, CONMEBOL delegate Roger Bello, of Bolivia, left, talks with Boca Juniors goalkeeper Agustin Orion, center, and Alejandro Burzaco, president of Torneos y Competencias, during a Copa Libertadores soccer match between Boca Juniors and River Plate, in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Burzaco, the former CEO of a marketing firm based in Argentina, testified Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017, at the U.S. trial of three former South American soccer officials accused of taking bribes in a sprawling corruption investigation of FIFA, that Fox was among several media companies paying bribes through sham contracts for the Copa America and other events. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano, File)

FILE - In this May 14, 2015, file photo, CONMEBOL delegate Roger Bello, of Bolivia, left, talks with Boca Juniors goalkeeper Agustin Orion, center, and Alejandro Burzaco, president of Torneos y Competencias, during a Copa Libertadores soccer match between Boca Juniors and River Plate, in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Burzaco, the former CEO of a marketing firm based in Argentina, testified Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017, at the U.S. trial of three former South American soccer officials accused of taking bribes in a sprawling corruption investigation of FIFA, that Fox was among several media companies paying bribes through sham contracts for the Copa America and other events. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano, File)

Tite - revivalist, revolutionary or reactionary? How Brazil recovered from national humiliation 

Brazil in 1970, wrote the great Uruguayan essayist and epigrammist Eduardo Galeano, “played a soccer worthy of her people’s yearning for celebration and craving for beauty”. It has become commonplace to argue ever since their grisly campaign to defend the World Cup in 1974 that the subsequent five decades have been spent in a kind of aesthetic wilderness, betraying the credo and paradigm of ‘the beautiful game’ in grim pursuit of defensive robustness to counterbalance the seemingly ad-lib attacking ingenuity. A fear of being overrun by unyielding, ruthless opponents should Brazil return to first principles as they did under Tele Santana in 1982, the hypothesis goes, has reduced them to sacrificing the poetic for the prosaic.   System, structure, discipline and world-class strikers earned a fourth and fifth World Cup. We would all feel blessed to be thus compromised. But by 2014, this muddle took them on a foul-strewn run to the semi-final where, without the injured Neymar, they suffered their utmost humiliation in the 7-1 thrashing by Germany. The way the nation treated Neymar’s absence in the build-up, gnashing their teeth as if he had been martyred instead of injured, emphasised the extent of the problem. Those laments were a siren and the autopsy dwelt on the philosophical and psychological inadequacies that disgraced the team’s heritage. Guillem Balague once asked Roberto Carlos, a World Cup runner-up in 1998 and a winner in 2002, about the burden of expectation on Brazil’s players and he exhaled through a thin smile. “Football made me old before my time,” he said. “My country is one of suffering where the people look to victory in football to take them away from the poverty. Football is the only thing that can make the people happy.  “And that brings enormous pressure - we have to bear and play under its weight. It’s down to us to make the whole country happy. [Only we] can make the people forget about the assassinations and kidnappings, the economic crisis. We are God’s chosen ones to step up to the plate.” After the 2014 World Cup, fears that the bond between the public and its team (that had sustained football’s most important and optimistic culture) had been sundered provoked an understandable but unfortunate reaction from the incontinently scandal-plagued confederation. Ignoring that it had been the pragmatic taskmaster Luiz Felipe Scolari who had presided over the great indignity, Dunga, coach from 2006 to 2010, was reappointed once again to instil discipline, tactical rigidity and penitence. Dejected Brazil fans after the 7-1 semi-final humiliation Credit: AP Photo/Andre Penner The CBF has lived high on the hog since 1958 when Joao Havelange’s ascendancy began as president of the Brazilian sports confederation, but it never sees the harm in prescribing a spell of sackcloth and ashes for the players to deflect from broader deficiencies.  The board had two options in July 2014: Tite, who had won four regional titles at four clubs and, with Corinthians, the championship of Brazil, the Copa Libertadores and the Fifa Club World Cup or Dunga, a World Cup-winning captain who had won the Copa America in his first year as national team coach but packed his team with so many workhorses and cloggers by 2010 that it resembled a rat’s nest and left South Africa unmourned at the quarter-final stage. The CBF went for the familiar and disappointed Tite, who had taken a season’s sabbatical in anticipation of succeeding Scolari, his former PE teacher and team-mate, and tried to prepare himself by visiting Arsenal and Real Madrid to observe and consult with Arsène Wenger and Carlo Ancelotti. While the national team was flagellating itself in a show of atonement under Dunga, mired in his usual incoherence, Tite returned to Corinthians and won a second national title. When Brazil were eliminated from the Copa America Centenario at the group stage following a draw with Ecuador and defeat by Peru, the confederation at last redressed its error, sacked Dunga and summoned Tite.  Brazil treated Neymar as if he'd been martyred rather than injured Credit: ODD ANDERSEN/AFP He was appointed in June 2016 and rejuvenated the qualification campaign for Russia so thoroughly that they won nine successive group matches and were the first team to join the hosts in the pot last March. Yet the hopes that Brazil’s resurgence is because the coach is the heir to Jorge Saldanha, the man who fashioned the 1970 side but was manoeuvred out of his job before the tournament because of his opposition to the military dictatorship, and also Santana are not supported by the evidence.  Tite is as much a pragmatist as his predecessors but he has introduced one crucial change he refined at Corinthians that has re-established midfield as the power train of the team. Scolari deployed flying full-backs as the creative motor of his side, stationing two holding midfielders in front of the centre-backs, a forceful, hard-running centre-forward ahead of wide men and a 10. Hulk and Oscar were no one’s idea of wingers but they started on the flanks and cut in to leave space for the bombing Dani Alves and Marcelo. Dunga tried variations of 4-1-4-1 and 4-2-3-1 but could never get the balance right.  Sam Wallace's Power Rankings 42:04 By contrast Tite has stuck with largely the same personnel yet has turned them into a coherent whole. Renato Augusto, a 2016 Olympic gold medallist, was already in Dunga’s side but has been transformed into a deep-lying playmaker in the Andrea Pirlo mode by Tite who used him there for Corinthians. During four seasons at Bayer Leverkusen, he played in the hole but in this withdrawn role he dictates the tempo and runs the game. Behind him sits Casemiro or Fernandinho and to his right the recalled Paulinho. These three positions are the heart of the new Brazil - a holder, a playmaker and a box-to-box raider - just as Ralf, Jadson and Elias drove Corinthians on from the same berths. With Neymar to the left, Philippe Coutinho or Willian on the right and Gabriel Jesus or Roberto Firmino through the middle, they have the flexibility to spring from 4-1-4-1 to 4-3-3 and, with Paulinho’s lung-bursting runs, something approaching the 4-2-4 that makes the heart sing.  We’re not looking at midfielders of Gerson’s quality or Socrates’ or Falcao’s, more a functioning system in which the players understand their assignments and have the confidence to trust the coach’s judgment. Last March Paulinho scored a hat-trick in a 1-4 victory over Uruguay in Montevideo arriving each time with the judicious timing of a player who reads the game fluently. As we saw at the typically bombastic Barcelona unveiling in August, Paulinho may not be able to execute pointless tricks with precision but stick him in a match and he plays with poise and intelligence.   Paulinho was restored to the side by his former Corinthians manager and scored a hat-trick in Montevideo last March Credit: Natacha Pisarenko/AP In addition Tite has addressed the reliance on Neymar by sometimes, paraphrasing Barry Davies’ immortal line, “using him by not using him”. “The collective empowers the individual,” the coach says. “If the ball arrives to Neymar, they mark [him], but the other side is more exposed. Coutinho creates chances. Enter Fagner, enter Paulinho. We take Neymar to one side, let him be isolated and make room for another.” You can tell by the tears when Tite praised him last week and pledged his support, that Neymar, caricatured as a prima donna, is anything but in a canary shirt.  Note that the collective ‘empowers the individual’ but only to serve the collective and Neymar buys into this. The coach's habit of rotating the captaincy apparently indiscriminately would make the armband fetishists among the England correspondents apoplectic but he does it simply to stress the team counts more than any of its components, much like Billy Bremner’s old mantra: “Side before self, every time.”   Brazil will walk out at Wembley on Tuesday night second behind Germany in the betting for next year’s World Cup. Under Tite they have lost only one game, a friendly last June at the Melbourne Cricket Ground against Argentina, and won 10 of 12 competitive matches. Perennial favourites for tournaments often for sentimental reasons, this time their claims are genuine. Because now they are not being led by a revivalist, a revolutionary or a reactionary but an astute, dauntless and enlightened coach who has found a fourth way.  

Tite - revivalist, revolutionary or reactionary? How Brazil recovered from national humiliation 

Brazil in 1970, wrote the great Uruguayan essayist and epigrammist Eduardo Galeano, “played a soccer worthy of her people’s yearning for celebration and craving for beauty”. It has become commonplace to argue ever since their grisly campaign to defend the World Cup in 1974 that the subsequent five decades have been spent in a kind of aesthetic wilderness, betraying the credo and paradigm of ‘the beautiful game’ in grim pursuit of defensive robustness to counterbalance the seemingly ad-lib attacking ingenuity. A fear of being overrun by unyielding, ruthless opponents should Brazil return to first principles as they did under Tele Santana in 1982, the hypothesis goes, has reduced them to sacrificing the poetic for the prosaic.   System, structure, discipline and world-class strikers earned a fourth and fifth World Cup. We would all feel blessed to be thus compromised. But by 2014, this muddle took them on a foul-strewn run to the semi-final where, without the injured Neymar, they suffered their utmost humiliation in the 7-1 thrashing by Germany. The way the nation treated Neymar’s absence in the build-up, gnashing their teeth as if he had been martyred instead of injured, emphasised the extent of the problem. Those laments were a siren and the autopsy dwelt on the philosophical and psychological inadequacies that disgraced the team’s heritage. Guillem Balague once asked Roberto Carlos, a World Cup runner-up in 1998 and a winner in 2002, about the burden of expectation on Brazil’s players and he exhaled through a thin smile. “Football made me old before my time,” he said. “My country is one of suffering where the people look to victory in football to take them away from the poverty. Football is the only thing that can make the people happy.  “And that brings enormous pressure - we have to bear and play under its weight. It’s down to us to make the whole country happy. [Only we] can make the people forget about the assassinations and kidnappings, the economic crisis. We are God’s chosen ones to step up to the plate.” After the 2014 World Cup, fears that the bond between the public and its team (that had sustained football’s most important and optimistic culture) had been sundered provoked an understandable but unfortunate reaction from the incontinently scandal-plagued confederation. Ignoring that it had been the pragmatic taskmaster Luiz Felipe Scolari who had presided over the great indignity, Dunga, coach from 2006 to 2010, was reappointed once again to instil discipline, tactical rigidity and penitence. Dejected Brazil fans after the 7-1 semi-final humiliation Credit: AP Photo/Andre Penner The CBF has lived high on the hog since 1958 when Joao Havelange’s ascendancy began as president of the Brazilian sports confederation, but it never sees the harm in prescribing a spell of sackcloth and ashes for the players to deflect from broader deficiencies.  The board had two options in July 2014: Tite, who had won four regional titles at four clubs and, with Corinthians, the championship of Brazil, the Copa Libertadores and the Fifa Club World Cup or Dunga, a World Cup-winning captain who had won the Copa America in his first year as national team coach but packed his team with so many workhorses and cloggers by 2010 that it resembled a rat’s nest and left South Africa unmourned at the quarter-final stage. The CBF went for the familiar and disappointed Tite, who had taken a season’s sabbatical in anticipation of succeeding Scolari, his former PE teacher and team-mate, and tried to prepare himself by visiting Arsenal and Real Madrid to observe and consult with Arsène Wenger and Carlo Ancelotti. While the national team was flagellating itself in a show of atonement under Dunga, mired in his usual incoherence, Tite returned to Corinthians and won a second national title. When Brazil were eliminated from the Copa America Centenario at the group stage following a draw with Ecuador and defeat by Peru, the confederation at last redressed its error, sacked Dunga and summoned Tite.  Brazil treated Neymar as if he'd been martyred rather than injured Credit: ODD ANDERSEN/AFP He was appointed in June 2016 and rejuvenated the qualification campaign for Russia so thoroughly that they won nine successive group matches and were the first team to join the hosts in the pot last March. Yet the hopes that Brazil’s resurgence is because the coach is the heir to Jorge Saldanha, the man who fashioned the 1970 side but was manoeuvred out of his job before the tournament because of his opposition to the military dictatorship, and also Santana are not supported by the evidence.  Tite is as much a pragmatist as his predecessors but he has introduced one crucial change he refined at Corinthians that has re-established midfield as the power train of the team. Scolari deployed flying full-backs as the creative motor of his side, stationing two holding midfielders in front of the centre-backs, a forceful, hard-running centre-forward ahead of wide men and a 10. Hulk and Oscar were no one’s idea of wingers but they started on the flanks and cut in to leave space for the bombing Dani Alves and Marcelo. Dunga tried variations of 4-1-4-1 and 4-2-3-1 but could never get the balance right.  Sam Wallace's Power Rankings 42:04 By contrast Tite has stuck with largely the same personnel yet has turned them into a coherent whole. Renato Augusto, a 2016 Olympic gold medallist, was already in Dunga’s side but has been transformed into a deep-lying playmaker in the Andrea Pirlo mode by Tite who used him there for Corinthians. During four seasons at Bayer Leverkusen, he played in the hole but in this withdrawn role he dictates the tempo and runs the game. Behind him sits Casemiro or Fernandinho and to his right the recalled Paulinho. These three positions are the heart of the new Brazil - a holder, a playmaker and a box-to-box raider - just as Ralf, Jadson and Elias drove Corinthians on from the same berths. With Neymar to the left, Philippe Coutinho or Willian on the right and Gabriel Jesus or Roberto Firmino through the middle, they have the flexibility to spring from 4-1-4-1 to 4-3-3 and, with Paulinho’s lung-bursting runs, something approaching the 4-2-4 that makes the heart sing.  We’re not looking at midfielders of Gerson’s quality or Socrates’ or Falcao’s, more a functioning system in which the players understand their assignments and have the confidence to trust the coach’s judgment. Last March Paulinho scored a hat-trick in a 1-4 victory over Uruguay in Montevideo arriving each time with the judicious timing of a player who reads the game fluently. As we saw at the typically bombastic Barcelona unveiling in August, Paulinho may not be able to execute pointless tricks with precision but stick him in a match and he plays with poise and intelligence.   Paulinho was restored to the side by his former Corinthians manager and scored a hat-trick in Montevideo last March Credit: Natacha Pisarenko/AP In addition Tite has addressed the reliance on Neymar by sometimes, paraphrasing Barry Davies’ immortal line, “using him by not using him”. “The collective empowers the individual,” the coach says. “If the ball arrives to Neymar, they mark [him], but the other side is more exposed. Coutinho creates chances. Enter Fagner, enter Paulinho. We take Neymar to one side, let him be isolated and make room for another.” You can tell by the tears when Tite praised him last week and pledged his support, that Neymar, caricatured as a prima donna, is anything but in a canary shirt.  Note that the collective ‘empowers the individual’ but only to serve the collective and Neymar buys into this. The coach's habit of rotating the captaincy apparently indiscriminately would make the armband fetishists among the England correspondents apoplectic but he does it simply to stress the team counts more than any of its components, much like Billy Bremner’s old mantra: “Side before self, every time.”   Brazil will walk out at Wembley on Tuesday night second behind Germany in the betting for next year’s World Cup. Under Tite they have lost only one game, a friendly last June at the Melbourne Cricket Ground against Argentina, and won 10 of 12 competitive matches. Perennial favourites for tournaments often for sentimental reasons, this time their claims are genuine. Because now they are not being led by a revivalist, a revolutionary or a reactionary but an astute, dauntless and enlightened coach who has found a fourth way.  

Tite - revivalist, revolutionary or reactionary? How Brazil recovered from national humiliation 

Brazil in 1970, wrote the great Uruguayan essayist and epigrammist Eduardo Galeano, “played a soccer worthy of her people’s yearning for celebration and craving for beauty”. It has become commonplace to argue ever since their grisly campaign to defend the World Cup in 1974 that the subsequent five decades have been spent in a kind of aesthetic wilderness, betraying the credo and paradigm of ‘the beautiful game’ in grim pursuit of defensive robustness to counterbalance the seemingly ad-lib attacking ingenuity. A fear of being overrun by unyielding, ruthless opponents should Brazil return to first principles as they did under Tele Santana in 1982, the hypothesis goes, has reduced them to sacrificing the poetic for the prosaic.   System, structure, discipline and world-class strikers earned a fourth and fifth World Cup. We would all feel blessed to be thus compromised. But by 2014, this muddle took them on a foul-strewn run to the semi-final where, without the injured Neymar, they suffered their utmost humiliation in the 7-1 thrashing by Germany. The way the nation treated Neymar’s absence in the build-up, gnashing their teeth as if he had been martyred instead of injured, emphasised the extent of the problem. Those laments were a siren and the autopsy dwelt on the philosophical and psychological inadequacies that disgraced the team’s heritage. Guillem Balague once asked Roberto Carlos, a World Cup runner-up in 1998 and a winner in 2002, about the burden of expectation on Brazil’s players and he exhaled through a thin smile. “Football made me old before my time,” he said. “My country is one of suffering where the people look to victory in football to take them away from the poverty. Football is the only thing that can make the people happy.  “And that brings enormous pressure - we have to bear and play under its weight. It’s down to us to make the whole country happy. [Only we] can make the people forget about the assassinations and kidnappings, the economic crisis. We are God’s chosen ones to step up to the plate.” After the 2014 World Cup, fears that the bond between the public and its team (that had sustained football’s most important and optimistic culture) had been sundered provoked an understandable but unfortunate reaction from the incontinently scandal-plagued confederation. Ignoring that it had been the pragmatic taskmaster Luiz Felipe Scolari who had presided over the great indignity, Dunga, coach from 2006 to 2010, was reappointed once again to instil discipline, tactical rigidity and penitence. Dejected Brazil fans after the 7-1 semi-final humiliation Credit: AP Photo/Andre Penner The CBF has lived high on the hog since 1958 when Joao Havelange’s ascendancy began as president of the Brazilian sports confederation, but it never sees the harm in prescribing a spell of sackcloth and ashes for the players to deflect from broader deficiencies.  The board had two options in July 2014: Tite, who had won four regional titles at four clubs and, with Corinthians, the championship of Brazil, the Copa Libertadores and the Fifa Club World Cup or Dunga, a World Cup-winning captain who had won the Copa America in his first year as national team coach but packed his team with so many workhorses and cloggers by 2010 that it resembled a rat’s nest and left South Africa unmourned at the quarter-final stage. The CBF went for the familiar and disappointed Tite, who had taken a season’s sabbatical in anticipation of succeeding Scolari, his former PE teacher and team-mate, and tried to prepare himself by visiting Arsenal and Real Madrid to observe and consult with Arsène Wenger and Carlo Ancelotti. While the national team was flagellating itself in a show of atonement under Dunga, mired in his usual incoherence, Tite returned to Corinthians and won a second national title. When Brazil were eliminated from the Copa America Centenario at the group stage following a draw with Ecuador and defeat by Peru, the confederation at last redressed its error, sacked Dunga and summoned Tite.  Brazil treated Neymar as if he'd been martyred rather than injured Credit: ODD ANDERSEN/AFP He was appointed in June 2016 and rejuvenated the qualification campaign for Russia so thoroughly that they won nine successive group matches and were the first team to join the hosts in the pot last March. Yet the hopes that Brazil’s resurgence is because the coach is the heir to Jorge Saldanha, the man who fashioned the 1970 side but was manoeuvred out of his job before the tournament because of his opposition to the military dictatorship, and also Santana are not supported by the evidence.  Tite is as much a pragmatist as his predecessors but he has introduced one crucial change he refined at Corinthians that has re-established midfield as the power train of the team. Scolari deployed flying full-backs as the creative motor of his side, stationing two holding midfielders in front of the centre-backs, a forceful, hard-running centre-forward ahead of wide men and a 10. Hulk and Oscar were no one’s idea of wingers but they started on the flanks and cut in to leave space for the bombing Dani Alves and Marcelo. Dunga tried variations of 4-1-4-1 and 4-2-3-1 but could never get the balance right.  Sam Wallace's Power Rankings 42:04 By contrast Tite has stuck with largely the same personnel yet has turned them into a coherent whole. Renato Augusto, a 2016 Olympic gold medallist, was already in Dunga’s side but has been transformed into a deep-lying playmaker in the Andrea Pirlo mode by Tite who used him there for Corinthians. During four seasons at Bayer Leverkusen, he played in the hole but in this withdrawn role he dictates the tempo and runs the game. Behind him sits Casemiro or Fernandinho and to his right the recalled Paulinho. These three positions are the heart of the new Brazil - a holder, a playmaker and a box-to-box raider - just as Ralf, Jadson and Elias drove Corinthians on from the same berths. With Neymar to the left, Philippe Coutinho or Willian on the right and Gabriel Jesus or Roberto Firmino through the middle, they have the flexibility to spring from 4-1-4-1 to 4-3-3 and, with Paulinho’s lung-bursting runs, something approaching the 4-2-4 that makes the heart sing.  We’re not looking at midfielders of Gerson’s quality or Socrates’ or Falcao’s, more a functioning system in which the players understand their assignments and have the confidence to trust the coach’s judgment. Last March Paulinho scored a hat-trick in a 1-4 victory over Uruguay in Montevideo arriving each time with the judicious timing of a player who reads the game fluently. As we saw at the typically bombastic Barcelona unveiling in August, Paulinho may not be able to execute pointless tricks with precision but stick him in a match and he plays with poise and intelligence.   Paulinho was restored to the side by his former Corinthians manager and scored a hat-trick in Montevideo last March Credit: Natacha Pisarenko/AP In addition Tite has addressed the reliance on Neymar by sometimes, paraphrasing Barry Davies’ immortal line, “using him by not using him”. “The collective empowers the individual,” the coach says. “If the ball arrives to Neymar, they mark [him], but the other side is more exposed. Coutinho creates chances. Enter Fagner, enter Paulinho. We take Neymar to one side, let him be isolated and make room for another.” You can tell by the tears when Tite praised him last week and pledged his support, that Neymar, caricatured as a prima donna, is anything but in a canary shirt.  Note that the collective ‘empowers the individual’ but only to serve the collective and Neymar buys into this. The coach's habit of rotating the captaincy apparently indiscriminately would make the armband fetishists among the England correspondents apoplectic but he does it simply to stress the team counts more than any of its components, much like Billy Bremner’s old mantra: “Side before self, every time.”   Brazil will walk out at Wembley on Tuesday night second behind Germany in the betting for next year’s World Cup. Under Tite they have lost only one game, a friendly last June at the Melbourne Cricket Ground against Argentina, and won 10 of 12 competitive matches. Perennial favourites for tournaments often for sentimental reasons, this time their claims are genuine. Because now they are not being led by a revivalist, a revolutionary or a reactionary but an astute, dauntless and enlightened coach who has found a fourth way.  

Tite - revivalist, revolutionary or reactionary? How Brazil recovered from national humiliation 

Brazil in 1970, wrote the great Uruguayan essayist and epigrammist Eduardo Galeano, “played a soccer worthy of her people’s yearning for celebration and craving for beauty”. It has become commonplace to argue ever since their grisly campaign to defend the World Cup in 1974 that the subsequent five decades have been spent in a kind of aesthetic wilderness, betraying the credo and paradigm of ‘the beautiful game’ in grim pursuit of defensive robustness to counterbalance the seemingly ad-lib attacking ingenuity. A fear of being overrun by unyielding, ruthless opponents should Brazil return to first principles as they did under Tele Santana in 1982, the hypothesis goes, has reduced them to sacrificing the poetic for the prosaic.   System, structure, discipline and world-class strikers earned a fourth and fifth World Cup. We would all feel blessed to be thus compromised. But by 2014, this muddle took them on a foul-strewn run to the semi-final where, without the injured Neymar, they suffered their utmost humiliation in the 7-1 thrashing by Germany. The way the nation treated Neymar’s absence in the build-up, gnashing their teeth as if he had been martyred instead of injured, emphasised the extent of the problem. Those laments were a siren and the autopsy dwelt on the philosophical and psychological inadequacies that disgraced the team’s heritage. Guillem Balague once asked Roberto Carlos, a World Cup runner-up in 1998 and a winner in 2002, about the burden of expectation on Brazil’s players and he exhaled through a thin smile. “Football made me old before my time,” he said. “My country is one of suffering where the people look to victory in football to take them away from the poverty. Football is the only thing that can make the people happy.  “And that brings enormous pressure - we have to bear and play under its weight. It’s down to us to make the whole country happy. [Only we] can make the people forget about the assassinations and kidnappings, the economic crisis. We are God’s chosen ones to step up to the plate.” After the 2014 World Cup, fears that the bond between the public and its team (that had sustained football’s most important and optimistic culture) had been sundered provoked an understandable but unfortunate reaction from the incontinently scandal-plagued confederation. Ignoring that it had been the pragmatic taskmaster Luiz Felipe Scolari who had presided over the great indignity, Dunga, coach from 2006 to 2010, was reappointed once again to instil discipline, tactical rigidity and penitence. Dejected Brazil fans after the 7-1 semi-final humiliation Credit: AP Photo/Andre Penner The CBF has lived high on the hog since 1958 when Joao Havelange’s ascendancy began as president of the Brazilian sports confederation, but it never sees the harm in prescribing a spell of sackcloth and ashes for the players to deflect from broader deficiencies.  The board had two options in July 2014: Tite, who had won four regional titles at four clubs and, with Corinthians, the championship of Brazil, the Copa Libertadores and the Fifa Club World Cup or Dunga, a World Cup-winning captain who had won the Copa America in his first year as national team coach but packed his team with so many workhorses and cloggers by 2010 that it resembled a rat’s nest and left South Africa unmourned at the quarter-final stage. The CBF went for the familiar and disappointed Tite, who had taken a season’s sabbatical in anticipation of succeeding Scolari, his former PE teacher and team-mate, and tried to prepare himself by visiting Arsenal and Real Madrid to observe and consult with Arsène Wenger and Carlo Ancelotti. While the national team was flagellating itself in a show of atonement under Dunga, mired in his usual incoherence, Tite returned to Corinthians and won a second national title. When Brazil were eliminated from the Copa America Centenario at the group stage following a draw with Ecuador and defeat by Peru, the confederation at last redressed its error, sacked Dunga and summoned Tite.  Brazil treated Neymar as if he'd been martyred rather than injured Credit: ODD ANDERSEN/AFP He was appointed in June 2016 and rejuvenated the qualification campaign for Russia so thoroughly that they won nine successive group matches and were the first team to join the hosts in the pot last March. Yet the hopes that Brazil’s resurgence is because the coach is the heir to Jorge Saldanha, the man who fashioned the 1970 side but was manoeuvred out of his job before the tournament because of his opposition to the military dictatorship, and also Santana are not supported by the evidence.  Tite is as much a pragmatist as his predecessors but he has introduced one crucial change he refined at Corinthians that has re-established midfield as the power train of the team. Scolari deployed flying full-backs as the creative motor of his side, stationing two holding midfielders in front of the centre-backs, a forceful, hard-running centre-forward ahead of wide men and a 10. Hulk and Oscar were no one’s idea of wingers but they started on the flanks and cut in to leave space for the bombing Dani Alves and Marcelo. Dunga tried variations of 4-1-4-1 and 4-2-3-1 but could never get the balance right.  Sam Wallace's Power Rankings 42:04 By contrast Tite has stuck with largely the same personnel yet has turned them into a coherent whole. Renato Augusto, a 2016 Olympic gold medallist, was already in Dunga’s side but has been transformed into a deep-lying playmaker in the Andrea Pirlo mode by Tite who used him there for Corinthians. During four seasons at Bayer Leverkusen, he played in the hole but in this withdrawn role he dictates the tempo and runs the game. Behind him sits Casemiro or Fernandinho and to his right the recalled Paulinho. These three positions are the heart of the new Brazil - a holder, a playmaker and a box-to-box raider - just as Ralf, Jadson and Elias drove Corinthians on from the same berths. With Neymar to the left, Philippe Coutinho or Willian on the right and Gabriel Jesus or Roberto Firmino through the middle, they have the flexibility to spring from 4-1-4-1 to 4-3-3 and, with Paulinho’s lung-bursting runs, something approaching the 4-2-4 that makes the heart sing.  We’re not looking at midfielders of Gerson’s quality or Socrates’ or Falcao’s, more a functioning system in which the players understand their assignments and have the confidence to trust the coach’s judgment. Last March Paulinho scored a hat-trick in a 1-4 victory over Uruguay in Montevideo arriving each time with the judicious timing of a player who reads the game fluently. As we saw at the typically bombastic Barcelona unveiling in August, Paulinho may not be able to execute pointless tricks with precision but stick him in a match and he plays with poise and intelligence.   Paulinho was restored to the side by his former Corinthians manager and scored a hat-trick in Montevideo last March Credit: Natacha Pisarenko/AP In addition Tite has addressed the reliance on Neymar by sometimes, paraphrasing Barry Davies’ immortal line, “using him by not using him”. “The collective empowers the individual,” the coach says. “If the ball arrives to Neymar, they mark [him], but the other side is more exposed. Coutinho creates chances. Enter Fagner, enter Paulinho. We take Neymar to one side, let him be isolated and make room for another.” You can tell by the tears when Tite praised him last week and pledged his support, that Neymar, caricatured as a prima donna, is anything but in a canary shirt.  Note that the collective ‘empowers the individual’ but only to serve the collective and Neymar buys into this. The coach's habit of rotating the captaincy apparently indiscriminately would make the armband fetishists among the England correspondents apoplectic but he does it simply to stress the team counts more than any of its components, much like Billy Bremner’s old mantra: “Side before self, every time.”   Brazil will walk out at Wembley on Tuesday night second behind Germany in the betting for next year’s World Cup. Under Tite they have lost only one game, a friendly last June at the Melbourne Cricket Ground against Argentina, and won 10 of 12 competitive matches. Perennial favourites for tournaments often for sentimental reasons, this time their claims are genuine. Because now they are not being led by a revivalist, a revolutionary or a reactionary but an astute, dauntless and enlightened coach who has found a fourth way.  

PHOTOS: World Cup jerseys have throwback vibes

EURO 2016 and Copa America Centenario saw a lot of teams wearing very similar kits.

PHOTOS: World Cup jerseys have throwback vibes

EURO 2016 and Copa America Centenario saw a lot of teams wearing very similar kits.

PHOTOS: World Cup jerseys have throwback vibes

EURO 2016 and Copa America Centenario saw a lot of teams wearing very similar kits.

U.S. Soccer Holds Surplus of Between $130-$140 Million

Much has been made of the current financial surplus of U.S. Soccer, which has been reported to be around $100 million following the success of the 2016 Copa America Centenario. But a source with direct knowledge of the situation says the actual number on the surplus is significantly higher: Between $130 million and $140 million.

While a significant portion of that surplus needs to be kept in reserve, U.S. Soccer has yet to decide on what to spend the rest of that money. Board discussions have centered on capital investments in infrastructure, youth development and new uses of technology to identify talent. But everyone has their own idea on what they think the surplus should go toward.

In May, SI.com reported that part of the surplus was being earmarked for a project called the "Innovate to Grow Fund," which would stimulate growth among membership at all levels, from the grassroots and up. U.S. Soccer was also engaged in talks over building a national training center with the surplus funds.

Argentina's Lionel Messi and Gonzalo Higuain celebrate after scoring against Venezuela during their 2016 Copa America Centenario quarter-final match, in Foxborough, Massachusetts

Argentina's Lionel Messi and Gonzalo Higuain celebrate after scoring against Venezuela during their 2016 Copa America Centenario quarter-final match, in Foxborough, Massachusetts

Argentina's Lionel Messi and Gonzalo Higuain celebrate after scoring against Venezuela during their 2016 Copa America Centenario quarter-final match, in Foxborough, Massachusetts (AFP Photo/ALFREDO ESTRELLA)

The 30 Most Influential Hispanics in Sports

Hispanics are reshaping sports in America. With Hispanic Heritage Month upon us, SI is honoring the 30 most influential Latinos in sports who aren’t athletes: the coaches, journalists, CEOs and other innovators who shape American sports culture and industry.This list, which is unranked, defines influence by how each person affects the fan experience. These household names don't just offer a diverse perspective—they enrich the American sports landscape.

Linda G. Alvarado

Occupation: Co-owner, Colorado Rockies
Hometown: Albuquerque
Age: 66

Alvarado is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Alvarado Construction and President of Palo Alto, Inc. Restaurant Company. After making her fortune in the business world, she turned to the sports world. Alvarado became the first Hispanic female co-owner of a major league team, and the first woman ever involved in a formal bid for ownership of a major league baseball team, when she became co-owner of the Rockies. Alvarado was inducted in the National Women’s Hall of Fame in 2003. She has long been a stout advocate for diversity in the work place, especially involving Hispanics. "We advocate for Hispanics and other ethnicities, genders and diverse groups because there is an underutilized talent pool seeking opportunity to create value to the growth and success of the company," she told Hispanic Executive in 2015.

Al Avila

Occupation: Executive Vice President of Baseball Operations/General Manager, Detroit Tigers
Hometown: Havana
Age: 59

Avila began his coaching career as an assistant at St. Thomas University, his alma mater. He was promoted to head coach and served as the school’s athletic director until 1992, when he joined the Florida Marlins and became the director of Latin American operations. Under Avila’s guidance, the Marlins signed 1997 World Series MVP Liván Hernández, who led Florida to their first title in franchise history. In 1998, Avila was promoted to director of scouting and signed 16-year-old Miguel Cabrera, who would become one of baseball’s best hitters, a year later. He was hired as the assistant general manager and vice president of the Detroit Tigers in 2002 and remained in the role until 2015, when he was promoted to general manager and executive vice president of baseball operations. With the promotion, Avila became the first Cuban-born general manager in baseball history. His son, Alex, currently plays catcher for the Chicago Cubs and was an All-Star for Detroit in 2011.

Hugo Balta

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Occupation: Senior Director of Hispanic Initiatives, ESPN
Hometown: Paterson, NJ
Age: 47

Balta began his reporting career as a producer for NY1 in 1994. Since then, he has worked for Telemundo, NBC, MSNBC, WCBS and most recently, ESPN. Baltais responsible for expanding ESPN Deportes’ coverage and was the creator of the bilingual Max y Marly audio podcast and Nación ESPN. He also served as President for the National Association of Hispanic Journalists from 2012-2014 and is the co-founder of the Latino Multimedia Communicators social media group, which shares, discusses and supports professionals and their products of interest to the Latino community. Balta is a passionate advocate for diversity, and his work constantly highlights the beauty of multiculturalism and Hispanic representation.

Luis Gerardo Bucci

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Occupation: Sportscaster, CNN Deportes
Hometown: Caracas, Venezuela
Age: 37

After specializing in sports journalism at the Universidad Simón Bolívar, Bucci began his professional career in radios in his native Venezuela. He first broke through in television at RCTV, where he was a producer and commentator of the 2004 Olympics. Bucci moved to Miami in 2008 where he worked as a reporter and presenter on the GOL TV network. In 2011, he was hired by CNN as a producer and presenter of CNN Sports, and in 2012 became the main driver of the program and sports segments of Our World, Direct USA and World Panorama. Bucci's work can be seen and heard across different CNN platforms including podcasts, radio, video and social media.

Wilmer Cabrera

Occupation: Head Coach, Houston Dynamo
Hometown: Cartagena, Colombia
Age: 50

Throughout an 18-year playing career, Cabrera played for clubs in Colombia, Argentina, Costa Rica and the United States. After retiring, he worked in Major League Soccer’s front office as a community development manager working on Hispanic grassroots and youth programs. He earned his coaching license in 2005 and in 2007, was named head coach of the United States men's national under-17 soccer team, becoming the first Latin American head coach in the U.S. national team system. Cabrera would then become the head coach for MLS clubs Chivas USA and Rio Grande Valley FC Toros before being named the head coach of the Houston Dynamo in 2016.

Andres Cantor

Occupation: Sports Commentator, NBC Deportes/Telemundo
Hometown: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Age: 54

Cantor moved from his hometown Buenos Aires to Southern California as a teenager before graduating from the University of Southern California. After college, he became a soccer play-by-play commentator for Univision and Telemundo, where he introduced his signature bellowing of “Gooooool!” after a score. He quickly became so popular in the U.S. that he appeared on the Late Show with David Letterman and even appeared in a Volkswagen commercial during the 1998 World Cup. Cantor currently works for Telemundo Deportes, where he introduced the first-ever U.S. Spanish-language broadcast of the Olympics. He has also won four Emmys, including the sports Emmy for Outstanding On-Air Personality in Spanish, twice in 2014 and 2017.

Cantor will lead as the Spanish-language voice of the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia on Telemundo.

Cantor also co-founded Fútbol de Primera Radio with his business partner Alejandro Gutman, the largest nationally-syndicated soccer radio network in the United States.Apart from the World Cup, FDP has broadcasted Copa América tournaments, Gold and Confederations Cups. FDP also has a daily sports talk show from Monday through Friday hosted by Cantor.

Oscar De La Hoya

Occupation: Founder,Golden Boy Promotions
Hometown: Montebello, CA
Age: 44

De La Hoya, who is of Mexican descent, competed in boxing from 1992 to 2008, winning ten world titles in six different world classes and finishing with a 39-6 record. De La Hoya has generated over $700 million in pay-per-view income and was the top-rated fighter in the world in 1997 and 1998. Nicknamed “The Golden Boy,” he won a gold medal in the 1992 Barcelona Olympics and is the first American of Mexican descent to own a national boxing promotional firm. His firm, Golden Boy Enterprises is one of boxing’s most active and respected promoters and holds a 25% interest in the Houston Dynamo MLS team. Throughout his career, De La Hoya has been active in the community. In 2005, Golden Boy Enterprises announced the formation of Golden Boy Partners, a company focused on urban development in Latino communities. In 2008, De La Hoya donated $3.5 million to the De La Hoya Animo Charter High School to help underprivileged youth to education. After losing to Manny Pacquiao in 2008, he decided to retire from boxing.

Fernando Fiore

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Occupation: Sportscaster
Hometown: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Age: 57

Fiore is best known as the host of Republica Deportiva, a weekly sports show for Univision, and for anchoring Univision’s FIFA World Cup coverage from 1999 until 2014. He is a two-time Emmy Award winner and is the author of The World Cup: The Ultimate Guide to the Greatest Sports Spectacle in the World. A legend among Spanish-speaking sports fans, Fiore is renowned for bringing his contagious energy and passion to the broadcast booth, resulting in a comedic analysis of the game. You will see more of Fiore when the World Cup comes around, as he is a vital member of Fox's coverage in Russia.

Esther Garcia

Occupation: Vice President, Heineken’s Tecate and TecateLight
Hometown: Madrid, Spain
Age: 40

Originally from Madrid, Garcia worked at Heineken Spain before taking a break to work for other consumer brands. In 2015, Garcia rejoined Heineken as the Vice President for Tecate beer, named after a city in Baja California, Mexico. The Tecate exec is best known for partnering Heineken with the Champions League, a soccer league that counts more than 4.2 billion fans globally. Garcia was named to Ad Week’s “Most Powerful Women in Sports” in June. She currently lives with her family in Dobbs Ferry, New York.

Mònica González

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Occupation: Announcer, Founder of Gonzo Soccer
Hometown: Corpus Christi, TX
Age: 38

Gonzalez was a founding member in 1998 of the Mexican Women’s National team and helped lead the team in the 1999 FIFA Women’s World Cup. She played for the Mexican National Team for 13 years and was captain from 2003-07. During her career, González played in 83 international games and scored 10 goals. In 2011, she was hired by ESPN as a studio analyst for the 2011 Women’s World Cup and has since become a sideline reporter for Major League Soccer. She has also announced games for NBC Universo and Fox Deportes and, in 2016, was the only woman calling games in the UEFA Champions League.

Gonzalez's most valuable job title, however, is her role as co-founder and director of Gonzo Soccer, a non-profit organization that teaches soccer, life and leaderships to girls in Hispanic communities. What started as a soccer clinic in the lower west side of Chicago in 2009, the program now helps more than 900 girls worldwide, with academies in the U.S, Mexico and Colombia.

Earlier this year, Gonzalez joined other ex-professionals and The Equal Playing Field (EPF) Initiative and climbed Mount Kilamanjaro to play the highest 90-minute match ever recorded to raise awareness for gender inequality.

Tony Gonzalez

Occupation: NFL studio analyst, FOX NFL Kickoff
Hometown: Torrance, CA
Age: 41

Gonzalez, who is of a mixed background, played 17 seasons in the NFL for the Kansas City Chiefs and the Atlanta Falcons. "One of the most common questions I get in my lifetime, and Tony gets it too: What are you?" said Gonzalez's older brother, Chris. "I just say we're mixed - black, white, Jamaican, Hispanic, Portuguese." Gonzalez has been selected to 14 Pro Bowls in his career and currently holds the NFL record for total receiving yards by a tight end with 15,127. He also has the second-most receptions by any player all-time with 1325 and was well known for his durability, missing just two games in his career. While playing for the Chiefs, he co-founded All-Pro Science, a sports nutrition company, and starred in xXx: Return of Xander Cage, playing Paul Donovan in his first feature film role. Immediately after retirement, Gonzalez became an analyst on CBS's NFL pregame show NFL Today. He worked for CBS until the end of the 2016 season before being added to FOX's pregame show in May.

In 2009, Gonzalez co-authored The All-Pro Diet with Mitzi Dulan, the former nutritionist for the Chiefs, detailing his diet and workout routine. The aim was to provide information and help for others (athletes and non-athletes) to follow the same path.

In his rookie year, Gonzalez joined the Shadow Buddies Foundation, an organization that provides support and knowledge to children with severe illnesses and disabilities. When he moved to Atlanta he continued this program with children's hospitals in the city.

Dan Le Batard

Occupation: Sportswriter/Television Host, Miami Herald, ESPN
Hometown: Miami
Age: 48

Le Batard, whose parents were exiled from Cuba, is an American sportswriter, radio host and television reporter. He is most known for his radio show The Dan Le Batard show and for hosting Highly Questionable, which airs daily on ESPN. "It's rare to have a show that embraces heritage," Erik Rydholm, executive producer at ESPN said of the show, which features Le Batard and his father and targets a Hispanic audience. "It has to have family and that connection with viewers." Le Batard also frequently serves as a host for Pardon the Interruption and writes for his hometown paper, the Miami Herald. He is lauded for his self-deprecating humor and often writes about controversial topics such as race. His candor has made him one of the most respected journalists in the industry and has led to a devoted fan base.

Valeria Marín

Occupation: Host/Reporter, Fox Deportes/NFLeros
Hometown: Mexico City

Marín joined Fox Deportes in 2013 as part of Central Fox, the network’s leading sports news program. In 2015, she began covering the NFL and MLB for Fox Deportes En Vivo. Marín began her career covering Mexican Tennis at the newspaper “Impacto” before becoming a host and reporter of La Aficion at Milenio TV. She was also a commentator for Telivisa Deportes Network and Televis Deportes W Radio. On her show NFLeros, Marín often highlights Hispanic athletes and uses social media to interact with the community.

Gerardo “Tata” Martino

Occupation: Head Coach, Atlanta United FC
Hometown: Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina
Age: 54

Martino is an icon in his native Rosario because of his success with local club Newell’s Old Boys. He holds the record of appearances with the team, playing a total of 505 matches in 14 years with the club. He was also selected in a fan’s poll as the best player throughout the club’s history. After retiring from soccer, Martino continued his success as a manager. In 2013, he was chosen as manager of FC Barcelona, but resigned just a year later after a runner-up La Liga finish. In 2015, he led Argentina to the Copa América Final, but resigned in 2016 after losing to Chile in two consecutive finals. Martino currently manages MLS expansion club Atlanta FC, who reached the playoffs in its first season. His presence in the U.S not only elevates the league's reputation, but due to his passion for youth, local development, Atlanta has a manager who has a vision that can help the city's multicultural talent.

Jessica Mendoza

Occupation: MLB Analyst, ESPN
Hometown: Camarillo, CA
Age: 36

Mendoza was a four-time First Team All-American softball player for the Stanford Cardinals between 1999-2002 and a former member of the US women’s national team between 2004-2010.She won gold at the 2004 Olympics in Athens, and a silver medal at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing.On August 24, 2015 she became the first female analyst in the history of Major League Baseball. She is currently a broadcaster for ESPN’s Sunday Night Baseball and analyzed her first MLB post-season series on ESPN radio on Saturday. On her Hispanic heritage, Mendoza told ESPN she felt Latinas needed to "Embrace the fact that you are different." She often points her source of inspiration to her father, who was a first-generation Mexican-American that taught her to love her Hispanic roots.

Mendoza is a past president of Women Sports Foundation, an organization founded by Billie Jean King in 1974 aimed to advance the lives of women and girls through sports and physical activity. During the 2008 Olympics, she was also an athletic ambassador for Team Darfur, which was devoted to raising awareness of humanitarian crises related to War in Darfur.

Arte Moreno

Occupation: Owner, Los Angeles Angels
Hometown: Tuscon, AZ
Age: 71

Moreno earned his fortune through advertising and was hired by billboard company Outdoor Systems in 1984. After taking Outdoor Systems public in 1996, Moreno sold the company to Infinity Broadcasting for $8 billion. In 2003, he became the first Mexican-American to own a major sports team in the United States when he purchased the Anaheim Angels from the Walt Disney Company. Moreno led the Angels to division titles from 2004-2009 and 2014. In the community, he established the Moreno Family Foundation, which supports non-profit organizations focusing on youth and education as well as athletic programs at the University of Arizona.

Marisabel Muñoz

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Occupation: Major League Soccer, Vice President of Communications
Hometown: Miami
Age: 37

Muñoz developed a passion for soccer while growing up in Miami, leading to her career in sports journalism with The Miami Herald and ESPN The Magazine. She became involved with the MLS in 2002 and has played an important role in establishing relationships with League broadcast partners, including Univision, ESPN and FOX.Muñozis also responsible for the league’s U.S. Hispanic initiatives, including the Sueño MLS reality show and the league’s Spanish-language digital platform, FutbolMLS.com. The strong relationship between Hispanic soccer fans and Major League Soccer is a testament to her work as both an executive and a passionate fútbol fan.

Sandy Nunez

Occupation: Coordinating Producer, ESPN
Hometown: Los Angeles
Age: 53

Sandy Nunez is a Coordinating Producing overseeing all SportsCenter production for ESPN in Los Angeles. SportsCenter production in LA includes SC Coast to Coast with anchors Cari Champion and David Lloyd as well as the late night SportsCenter Los Angeles with Neil Everett and Stan Verrett. Nunez is currently a member of the Los Angeles chapter of Women in Sports and Events (WISE). She also serves on the Board of Managers of Ketchum-Downtown YMCA.Earlier this month, Nunez was named one of “Los Angeles Most Influential Latina Journalists” by the California Chicano News Media Association (CCNMA.)

She is the only Latina who holds her position of coordinating producer at ESPN.

Fernando Palomo

Occupation: International Football Analyst, ESPN
Hometown: San Salvador, El Salvador
Age: 44

Palomo started his broadcasting career in 1999 with Channel 4 TV in San Salvador covering events including the Olympics and the Pan American Games. He joined ESPN in 2000 as a SportsCenter anchor for ESPN in Latin America and served as an anchor for Sportscenter for ESPN Deportes from 2004-06.Palomocurrently covers European soccer as a Spanish commentator and is the host of Fuera de Juego, ESPN Deportes’ highest-rated international program. In July 2012, he was chosen to be the voices for the FIFA video game franchise and has appeared in their Spanish versions since FIFA 13. This role has helped Palomo influence millions of young people who are introduced to the beautiful game.Palomowas also a member of the National Track and Field team of El Salvador and is the country’s record-holder in the javelin throw.

Rick Renteria

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Occupation: Manager, Chicago White Sox
Hometown: Harbor City, CA
Age: 55

After playing in South Gate, California, Renteria was drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates with the 20th overall pick in the 1980 Major League Baseball draft. Renteria played five seasons in the Majors and two seasons with the Mexican League's Jalisco Charros before coaching and managing in the Marlins organization until 2001, and in the San Diego Padres organization until 2013, the same year he managed the Mexico national team in the World Baseball Classic. He was hired to be the manager of the Chicago Cubs for the 2014 season, but was terminated just a year later. Renteria would stay in Chicago, though, serving as a bench coach for the Chicago White Sox before becoming manager in 2017. On his Mexican pride, Renteria told ESPN "I can't deny who I am. I am Mexican. My parents were both from Mexico. They came here. They gave us an opportunity." As the only Hispanic manager in Major League Baseball, Renteria's influence for Latino youth ball players are not taken for granted.

Marly Rivera

Occupation: MLB Writer/TV Host,ESPN
Hometown: San Juan, Puerto Rico
Age: 42

Rivera, who was born and raised in San Juan before moving to the United States as a teenager, is a bilingual sportswriter and reporter for ESPN and ESPN Deportes. She started her career as an editorial producer and writer at Major League Baseball and an editor at Univision communications before becoming an ESPN beat writer for the New York Yankees as one of the few Hispanic females in the BBWAA (Baseball Writers’ Association of America). More recently, Rivera has been a guest contributor on Béisbol Esta Noche, Sunday Night Baseball, Outside the Lines and SportsCenter. On her Hispanic culture, Rivera told ESPN "I have an accent. My first language is Spanish. I try, I am trying to help your culture, but I still have my culture. You have to respect it. I am not going to give up everything that makes me me just because you don't like it."

Rivera has done tremendous work for her native Puerto Rico, as the island deals with the devastation of Hurricane Maria. Her campaign has accumulated more than $30,000 and is getting closer to the $50,000 goal. Her invaluable voice throughout the disaster has inspired other names in the sports world to contribute.

Ron Rivera

Occupation: Head Coach, Carolina Panthers
Hometown: Fort Ord, CA
Age: 55

Rivera, a former linebacker for the Chicago Bears, is the current head coach of the Carolina Panthers. Rivera was selected in the second round of the 1984 NFL draft, becoming the first person of Puerto Rican and Mexican descent to play in the NFL. After retiring in 1992, he worked in Chicago as a TV analyst covering the Bears before becoming the team's defensive coordinator from 2004-2006. In 2008, Rivera was named defensive coordinator of the San Diego Chargers and received his first NFL head coaching gig with the Panthers in 2011. He was named the NFL Coach of the Year in 2013 and 2015 and has led the Panthers to three straight division titles and an appearance in Super Bowl 50. Rivera, who is of Puerto Rican and Mexican descent, was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2003. Rivera is "the ideal image of a [Hispanic] father figure: stern, but fair," said José Hernández-París, executive director of Charlotte's Latin American Coalition, adding that Rivera and the Panthers do significant work of reaching out to local Hispanics.

Alex Rodriguez

Occupation: MLB Analyst, Fox
Hometown: Miami
Age:42

Rodriguez, nicknamed “A-Rod,” played 22 seasons in the MLB for the Seattle Mariners, Texas Rangers and New York Yankees and won three AL Most Valuable Player awards, 10 Silver Slugger awards and two Gold Glove awards. He has also hit the most home runs by a player of Hispanic descent with 696, fourth-most in MLB history. However, A-Rod has led a controversial career after incurring criticism from the media for his behavior and use of banned performance-enhancing drugs. After announcing his retirement in 2016, Rodriguez has become a media personality, serving as a broadcaster for Fox Sports 1, a cast member of Shark Tank and a member of the ABC News network.

In 2003, he gave $3.9 million to the University of Miami to renovate its baseball stadium and as a result it was re-named "Alex Rodriguez Park at Mark Light Field."

When he came back from suspension in 2015, A-Rod donated $1 million to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Miami-Dade, a donation that arrived in good timing with the Yankees's expansion initiative to serve more children. Rodriguez said of the act, "if it wasn't for the Boys & Girls Club, I wouldn't be in the big leagues today."

Angel Rodriguez

Occupation: Sports Editor, Los Angeles Times
Hometown: Houston
Age: 46

Rodriguez began his journalism career shortly after graduating from the University of Texas at Austin. He has covered U.S. Sports forEFE, helped launch ESPNDeportes, was an online sports producer at the Arizona Republic and was a sports editor at the Cincinnati Enquirer. Rodriguez joined the LA Times as a sports editor in 2015 after spending a year as deputy editor for mobile innovation at the Washington Post. Throughout his career, Rodriguez has consistently aimed to diversify sports by reporting through multiple languages and using digital tools.

Juan Carlos Rodriguez

Occupation: President, UnivisionDeportes
Hometown: Mexico City

Rodriguez began his business career when he co-founded and became CEO ofGrupoEstadio, which, under his leadership, became the leading partner for DIRECTV to product and distribute the 2002 FIFA World Cup. Since 2012, he has served as the president of UnivisionDeportes, the sports division of Univision Communications Inc. He has grown Univision Deportes Network to be the leading sports destination for Hispanic America and was named one of the “31 Most Powerful People in U.S. Soccer” by FourFourTwo. Rodriguez also received the Cynopsis Sports’ 2015 Navigator Award and has led Univision Deportes to four Sports Emmy Awards for excellence in sports coverage.

Tony Romo

Occupation: NFL Analyst, CBS
Hometown: Burlington, WI
Age: 37

Romo, whose grandfather emigrated to the U.S. from Mexico as a teenager, played quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys from 2004-16. In that time, he made four Pro Bowls, threw for over 34,000 yards and established himself as one of the NFL’s most popular athletes. His 97.1 passer rating is the fourth highest of all time.Romowas active in the Dallas community, hosting a youth football camp and participating in activities with United Way, the Make-A-Wish Foundation and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. During his playing days, he would often draw large Hispanic crowds to the Cowboys, telling ESPN he "really appreciates the support [The Hispanic Community] gives us." He announced his retirement in April and was quickly hired by CBS to serve as lead analyst for NFL games. In a short time, he’s established himself as one of the sport’s best broadcasters.

In the Dallas area, Romo has done much work in the community, as he has collaborated with United Way, the Make-A-Wish Foundation, and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. In 2012, as a speaker for "Miracle of the Million" Romo pledged $1 million to its “adopt-a-school” program where local churches help troubled schools.

Armando Salguero

Occupation: Sportswriter, Miami Herald
Hometown: Miami
Age: 54

Salguero, who was born in Havana, Cuba but raised in Miami, has covered South Florida sports since 1982 and the Dolphins and the NFL since 1990. He previously worked as a national reporter for ESPN and is well respected across the NFL and the sports media industry.Salgueroalso serves as a Pro Football Hall of Fame selector and is a voter for the Associated Press All-Pro team and its annual awards. He currently reports and writes for the Miami Herald, where his general sports columns garner frequent attention.

Shea Serrano

Occupation: Writer, The Ringer; Author of ?The Rap Year Book: The Most Important Rap Song From Every Year Since 1979, Discussed, Debated, and Deconstructed
Hometown: San Antonio
Age: 36

Serrano, who is of Mexican descent, began his career as a middle-school science teacher in Houston. After writing for the Near Northwest Banner, Serrano freelanced for the Houston Press in 2007, where he drew national attention for his work on hip-hop and pop culture. He was quickly offered a place at the LA Weekly before writing for ESPN’s Grantland and Bill Simmons’ website, The Ringer, where he currently works. Serrano is best known for his humor and activity on social media, which he frequently uses for charitable causes. In August, Serrano invited Twitter followers to join him in a “F--- Hurricane Harvey” round of donations to support Houston relief work; by the end of the night, they had raised more than $130,000. Serrano’s newest book Basketball (and Other Things) will be published in October 2017.

Mariano Trujillo

Occupation: Analyst, FoxDeportes
Hometown: Mexico City
Age: 40

Trujillo made his professional soccer debut with UNAM Pumas in 1996. After playing for three teams in Mexico from 1996-2007, he signed with Skoda Xanthi of Greece. In 2009, Trujillo signed for Chivas USA and became captain of the team in just his second season. He retired in 2013 and immediately thrived in a new role as host of the news magazine show Fox Deportes En Vivo alongside John Laguna.

Trujillo is an analyst for both English and Spanish markets, lending his talents to both Fox Deportes and Fox Sports as a voice of Mexican fútbol. This is extremely valuable to many US-born Latino soccer fans, who passionately follow the sport in both languages.

Luis Omar Tapia

Occupation: Reporter, Univision Deportes/Fox Sports
Hometown: Santiago, Chile
Age: 54

Tapia currently reports on MX League matches for Univision Deportes and Champions League matches for Fox Sports. He has also worked at ESPN, commentating on world football.Tapiais of Chilean descent and has strived to give back to his community. He founded the “The 90 Minutes Foundation” in the city of Miami to help low-income families and youth in education and sport. Tapia is best known for his catch phrases and nicknames for players and coaches as well as his classic comment before every football match, "Begin 90 minutes of the most beautiful sport in the world."

The 30 Most Influential Hispanics in Sports

Hispanics are reshaping sports in America. With Hispanic Heritage Month upon us, SI is honoring the 30 most influential Latinos in sports who aren’t athletes: the coaches, journalists, CEOs and other innovators who shape American sports culture and industry.This list, which is unranked, defines influence by how each person affects the fan experience. These household names don't just offer a diverse perspective—they enrich the American sports landscape.

Linda G. Alvarado

Occupation: Co-owner, Colorado Rockies
Hometown: Albuquerque
Age: 66

Alvarado is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Alvarado Construction and President of Palo Alto, Inc. Restaurant Company. After making her fortune in the business world, she turned to the sports world. Alvarado became the first Hispanic female co-owner of a major league team, and the first woman ever involved in a formal bid for ownership of a major league baseball team, when she became co-owner of the Rockies. Alvarado was inducted in the National Women’s Hall of Fame in 2003. She has long been a stout advocate for diversity in the work place, especially involving Hispanics. "We advocate for Hispanics and other ethnicities, genders and diverse groups because there is an underutilized talent pool seeking opportunity to create value to the growth and success of the company," she told Hispanic Executive in 2015.

Al Avila

Occupation: Executive Vice President of Baseball Operations/General Manager, Detroit Tigers
Hometown: Havana
Age: 59

Avila began his coaching career as an assistant at St. Thomas University, his alma mater. He was promoted to head coach and served as the school’s athletic director until 1992, when he joined the Florida Marlins and became the director of Latin American operations. Under Avila’s guidance, the Marlins signed 1997 World Series MVP Liván Hernández, who led Florida to their first title in franchise history. In 1998, Avila was promoted to director of scouting and signed 16-year-old Miguel Cabrera, who would become one of baseball’s best hitters, a year later. He was hired as the assistant general manager and vice president of the Detroit Tigers in 2002 and remained in the role until 2015, when he was promoted to general manager and executive vice president of baseball operations. With the promotion, Avila became the first Cuban-born general manager in baseball history. His son, Alex, currently plays catcher for the Chicago Cubs and was an All-Star for Detroit in 2011.

Hugo Balta

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Occupation: Senior Director of Hispanic Initiatives, ESPN
Hometown: Paterson, NJ
Age: 47

Balta began his reporting career as a producer for NY1 in 1994. Since then, he has worked for Telemundo, NBC, MSNBC, WCBS and most recently, ESPN. Baltais responsible for expanding ESPN Deportes’ coverage and was the creator of the bilingual Max y Marly audio podcast and Nación ESPN. He also served as President for the National Association of Hispanic Journalists from 2012-2014 and is the co-founder of the Latino Multimedia Communicators social media group, which shares, discusses and supports professionals and their products of interest to the Latino community. Balta is a passionate advocate for diversity, and his work constantly highlights the beauty of multiculturalism and Hispanic representation.

Luis Gerardo Bucci

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Occupation: Sportscaster, CNN Deportes
Hometown: Caracas, Venezuela
Age: 37

After specializing in sports journalism at the Universidad Simón Bolívar, Bucci began his professional career in radios in his native Venezuela. He first broke through in television at RCTV, where he was a producer and commentator of the 2004 Olympics. Bucci moved to Miami in 2008 where he worked as a reporter and presenter on the GOL TV network. In 2011, he was hired by CNN as a producer and presenter of CNN Sports, and in 2012 became the main driver of the program and sports segments of Our World, Direct USA and World Panorama. Bucci's work can be seen and heard across different CNN platforms including podcasts, radio, video and social media.

Wilmer Cabrera

Occupation: Head Coach, Houston Dynamo
Hometown: Cartagena, Colombia
Age: 50

Throughout an 18-year playing career, Cabrera played for clubs in Colombia, Argentina, Costa Rica and the United States. After retiring, he worked in Major League Soccer’s front office as a community development manager working on Hispanic grassroots and youth programs. He earned his coaching license in 2005 and in 2007, was named head coach of the United States men's national under-17 soccer team, becoming the first Latin American head coach in the U.S. national team system. Cabrera would then become the head coach for MLS clubs Chivas USA and Rio Grande Valley FC Toros before being named the head coach of the Houston Dynamo in 2016.

Andres Cantor

Occupation: Sports Commentator, NBC Deportes/Telemundo
Hometown: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Age: 54

Cantor moved from his hometown Buenos Aires to Southern California as a teenager before graduating from the University of Southern California. After college, he became a soccer play-by-play commentator for Univision and Telemundo, where he introduced his signature bellowing of “Gooooool!” after a score. He quickly became so popular in the U.S. that he appeared on the Late Show with David Letterman and even appeared in a Volkswagen commercial during the 1998 World Cup. Cantor currently works for Telemundo Deportes, where he introduced the first-ever U.S. Spanish-language broadcast of the Olympics. He has also won four Emmys, including the sports Emmy for Outstanding On-Air Personality in Spanish, twice in 2014 and 2017.

Cantor will lead as the Spanish-language voice of the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia on Telemundo.

Cantor also co-founded Fútbol de Primera Radio with his business partner Alejandro Gutman, the largest nationally-syndicated soccer radio network in the United States.Apart from the World Cup, FDP has broadcasted Copa América tournaments, Gold and Confederations Cups. FDP also has a daily sports talk show from Monday through Friday hosted by Cantor.

Oscar De La Hoya

Occupation: Founder,Golden Boy Promotions
Hometown: Montebello, CA
Age: 44

De La Hoya, who is of Mexican descent, competed in boxing from 1992 to 2008, winning ten world titles in six different world classes and finishing with a 39-6 record. De La Hoya has generated over $700 million in pay-per-view income and was the top-rated fighter in the world in 1997 and 1998. Nicknamed “The Golden Boy,” he won a gold medal in the 1992 Barcelona Olympics and is the first American of Mexican descent to own a national boxing promotional firm. His firm, Golden Boy Enterprises is one of boxing’s most active and respected promoters and holds a 25% interest in the Houston Dynamo MLS team. Throughout his career, De La Hoya has been active in the community. In 2005, Golden Boy Enterprises announced the formation of Golden Boy Partners, a company focused on urban development in Latino communities. In 2008, De La Hoya donated $3.5 million to the De La Hoya Animo Charter High School to help underprivileged youth to education. After losing to Manny Pacquiao in 2008, he decided to retire from boxing.

Fernando Fiore

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Occupation: Sportscaster
Hometown: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Age: 57

Fiore is best known as the host of Republica Deportiva, a weekly sports show for Univision, and for anchoring Univision’s FIFA World Cup coverage from 1999 until 2014. He is a two-time Emmy Award winner and is the author of The World Cup: The Ultimate Guide to the Greatest Sports Spectacle in the World. A legend among Spanish-speaking sports fans, Fiore is renowned for bringing his contagious energy and passion to the broadcast booth, resulting in a comedic analysis of the game. You will see more of Fiore when the World Cup comes around, as he is a vital member of Fox's coverage in Russia.

Esther Garcia

Occupation: Vice President, Heineken’s Tecate and TecateLight
Hometown: Madrid, Spain
Age: 40

Originally from Madrid, Garcia worked at Heineken Spain before taking a break to work for other consumer brands. In 2015, Garcia rejoined Heineken as the Vice President for Tecate beer, named after a city in Baja California, Mexico. The Tecate exec is best known for partnering Heineken with the Champions League, a soccer league that counts more than 4.2 billion fans globally. Garcia was named to Ad Week’s “Most Powerful Women in Sports” in June. She currently lives with her family in Dobbs Ferry, New York.

Mònica González

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Occupation: Announcer, Founder of Gonzo Soccer
Hometown: Corpus Christi, TX
Age: 38

Gonzalez was a founding member in 1998 of the Mexican Women’s National team and helped lead the team in the 1999 FIFA Women’s World Cup. She played for the Mexican National Team for 13 years and was captain from 2003-07. During her career, González played in 83 international games and scored 10 goals. In 2011, she was hired by ESPN as a studio analyst for the 2011 Women’s World Cup and has since become a sideline reporter for Major League Soccer. She has also announced games for NBC Universo and Fox Deportes and, in 2016, was the only woman calling games in the UEFA Champions League.

Gonzalez's most valuable job title, however, is her role as co-founder and director of Gonzo Soccer, a non-profit organization that teaches soccer, life and leaderships to girls in Hispanic communities. What started as a soccer clinic in the lower west side of Chicago in 2009, the program now helps more than 900 girls worldwide, with academies in the U.S, Mexico and Colombia.

Earlier this year, Gonzalez joined other ex-professionals and The Equal Playing Field (EPF) Initiative and climbed Mount Kilamanjaro to play the highest 90-minute match ever recorded to raise awareness for gender inequality.

Tony Gonzalez

Occupation: NFL studio analyst, FOX NFL Kickoff
Hometown: Torrance, CA
Age: 41

Gonzalez, who is of a mixed background, played 17 seasons in the NFL for the Kansas City Chiefs and the Atlanta Falcons. "One of the most common questions I get in my lifetime, and Tony gets it too: What are you?" said Gonzalez's older brother, Chris. "I just say we're mixed - black, white, Jamaican, Hispanic, Portuguese." Gonzalez has been selected to 14 Pro Bowls in his career and currently holds the NFL record for total receiving yards by a tight end with 15,127. He also has the second-most receptions by any player all-time with 1325 and was well known for his durability, missing just two games in his career. While playing for the Chiefs, he co-founded All-Pro Science, a sports nutrition company, and starred in xXx: Return of Xander Cage, playing Paul Donovan in his first feature film role. Immediately after retirement, Gonzalez became an analyst on CBS's NFL pregame show NFL Today. He worked for CBS until the end of the 2016 season before being added to FOX's pregame show in May.

In 2009, Gonzalez co-authored The All-Pro Diet with Mitzi Dulan, the former nutritionist for the Chiefs, detailing his diet and workout routine. The aim was to provide information and help for others (athletes and non-athletes) to follow the same path.

In his rookie year, Gonzalez joined the Shadow Buddies Foundation, an organization that provides support and knowledge to children with severe illnesses and disabilities. When he moved to Atlanta he continued this program with children's hospitals in the city.

Dan Le Batard

Occupation: Sportswriter/Television Host, Miami Herald, ESPN
Hometown: Miami
Age: 48

Le Batard, whose parents were exiled from Cuba, is an American sportswriter, radio host and television reporter. He is most known for his radio show The Dan Le Batard show and for hosting Highly Questionable, which airs daily on ESPN. "It's rare to have a show that embraces heritage," Erik Rydholm, executive producer at ESPN said of the show, which features Le Batard and his father and targets a Hispanic audience. "It has to have family and that connection with viewers." Le Batard also frequently serves as a host for Pardon the Interruption and writes for his hometown paper, the Miami Herald. He is lauded for his self-deprecating humor and often writes about controversial topics such as race. His candor has made him one of the most respected journalists in the industry and has led to a devoted fan base.

Valeria Marín

Occupation: Host/Reporter, Fox Deportes/NFLeros
Hometown: Mexico City

Marín joined Fox Deportes in 2013 as part of Central Fox, the network’s leading sports news program. In 2015, she began covering the NFL and MLB for Fox Deportes En Vivo. Marín began her career covering Mexican Tennis at the newspaper “Impacto” before becoming a host and reporter of La Aficion at Milenio TV. She was also a commentator for Telivisa Deportes Network and Televis Deportes W Radio. On her show NFLeros, Marín often highlights Hispanic athletes and uses social media to interact with the community.

Gerardo “Tata” Martino

Occupation: Head Coach, Atlanta United FC
Hometown: Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina
Age: 54

Martino is an icon in his native Rosario because of his success with local club Newell’s Old Boys. He holds the record of appearances with the team, playing a total of 505 matches in 14 years with the club. He was also selected in a fan’s poll as the best player throughout the club’s history. After retiring from soccer, Martino continued his success as a manager. In 2013, he was chosen as manager of FC Barcelona, but resigned just a year later after a runner-up La Liga finish. In 2015, he led Argentina to the Copa América Final, but resigned in 2016 after losing to Chile in two consecutive finals. Martino currently manages MLS expansion club Atlanta FC, who reached the playoffs in its first season. His presence in the U.S not only elevates the league's reputation, but due to his passion for youth, local development, Atlanta has a manager who has a vision that can help the city's multicultural talent.

Jessica Mendoza

Occupation: MLB Analyst, ESPN
Hometown: Camarillo, CA
Age: 36

Mendoza was a four-time First Team All-American softball player for the Stanford Cardinals between 1999-2002 and a former member of the US women’s national team between 2004-2010.She won gold at the 2004 Olympics in Athens, and a silver medal at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing.On August 24, 2015 she became the first female analyst in the history of Major League Baseball. She is currently a broadcaster for ESPN’s Sunday Night Baseball and analyzed her first MLB post-season series on ESPN radio on Saturday. On her Hispanic heritage, Mendoza told ESPN she felt Latinas needed to "Embrace the fact that you are different." She often points her source of inspiration to her father, who was a first-generation Mexican-American that taught her to love her Hispanic roots.

Mendoza is a past president of Women Sports Foundation, an organization founded by Billie Jean King in 1974 aimed to advance the lives of women and girls through sports and physical activity. During the 2008 Olympics, she was also an athletic ambassador for Team Darfur, which was devoted to raising awareness of humanitarian crises related to War in Darfur.

Arte Moreno

Occupation: Owner, Los Angeles Angels
Hometown: Tuscon, AZ
Age: 71

Moreno earned his fortune through advertising and was hired by billboard company Outdoor Systems in 1984. After taking Outdoor Systems public in 1996, Moreno sold the company to Infinity Broadcasting for $8 billion. In 2003, he became the first Mexican-American to own a major sports team in the United States when he purchased the Anaheim Angels from the Walt Disney Company. Moreno led the Angels to division titles from 2004-2009 and 2014. In the community, he established the Moreno Family Foundation, which supports non-profit organizations focusing on youth and education as well as athletic programs at the University of Arizona.

Marisabel Muñoz

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Occupation: Major League Soccer, Vice President of Communications
Hometown: Miami
Age: 37

Muñoz developed a passion for soccer while growing up in Miami, leading to her career in sports journalism with The Miami Herald and ESPN The Magazine. She became involved with the MLS in 2002 and has played an important role in establishing relationships with League broadcast partners, including Univision, ESPN and FOX.Muñozis also responsible for the league’s U.S. Hispanic initiatives, including the Sueño MLS reality show and the league’s Spanish-language digital platform, FutbolMLS.com. The strong relationship between Hispanic soccer fans and Major League Soccer is a testament to her work as both an executive and a passionate fútbol fan.

Sandy Nunez

Occupation: Coordinating Producer, ESPN
Hometown: Los Angeles
Age: 53

Sandy Nunez is a Coordinating Producing overseeing all SportsCenter production for ESPN in Los Angeles. SportsCenter production in LA includes SC Coast to Coast with anchors Cari Champion and David Lloyd as well as the late night SportsCenter Los Angeles with Neil Everett and Stan Verrett. Nunez is currently a member of the Los Angeles chapter of Women in Sports and Events (WISE). She also serves on the Board of Managers of Ketchum-Downtown YMCA.Earlier this month, Nunez was named one of “Los Angeles Most Influential Latina Journalists” by the California Chicano News Media Association (CCNMA.)

She is the only Latina who holds her position of coordinating producer at ESPN.

Fernando Palomo

Occupation: International Football Analyst, ESPN
Hometown: San Salvador, El Salvador
Age: 44

Palomo started his broadcasting career in 1999 with Channel 4 TV in San Salvador covering events including the Olympics and the Pan American Games. He joined ESPN in 2000 as a SportsCenter anchor for ESPN in Latin America and served as an anchor for Sportscenter for ESPN Deportes from 2004-06.Palomocurrently covers European soccer as a Spanish commentator and is the host of Fuera de Juego, ESPN Deportes’ highest-rated international program. In July 2012, he was chosen to be the voices for the FIFA video game franchise and has appeared in their Spanish versions since FIFA 13. This role has helped Palomo influence millions of young people who are introduced to the beautiful game.Palomowas also a member of the National Track and Field team of El Salvador and is the country’s record-holder in the javelin throw.

Rick Renteria

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Occupation: Manager, Chicago White Sox
Hometown: Harbor City, CA
Age: 55

After playing in South Gate, California, Renteria was drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates with the 20th overall pick in the 1980 Major League Baseball draft. Renteria played five seasons in the Majors and two seasons with the Mexican League's Jalisco Charros before coaching and managing in the Marlins organization until 2001, and in the San Diego Padres organization until 2013, the same year he managed the Mexico national team in the World Baseball Classic. He was hired to be the manager of the Chicago Cubs for the 2014 season, but was terminated just a year later. Renteria would stay in Chicago, though, serving as a bench coach for the Chicago White Sox before becoming manager in 2017. On his Mexican pride, Renteria told ESPN "I can't deny who I am. I am Mexican. My parents were both from Mexico. They came here. They gave us an opportunity." As the only Hispanic manager in Major League Baseball, Renteria's influence for Latino youth ball players are not taken for granted.

Marly Rivera

Occupation: MLB Writer/TV Host,ESPN
Hometown: San Juan, Puerto Rico
Age: 42

Rivera, who was born and raised in San Juan before moving to the United States as a teenager, is a bilingual sportswriter and reporter for ESPN and ESPN Deportes. She started her career as an editorial producer and writer at Major League Baseball and an editor at Univision communications before becoming an ESPN beat writer for the New York Yankees as one of the few Hispanic females in the BBWAA (Baseball Writers’ Association of America). More recently, Rivera has been a guest contributor on Béisbol Esta Noche, Sunday Night Baseball, Outside the Lines and SportsCenter. On her Hispanic culture, Rivera told ESPN "I have an accent. My first language is Spanish. I try, I am trying to help your culture, but I still have my culture. You have to respect it. I am not going to give up everything that makes me me just because you don't like it."

Rivera has done tremendous work for her native Puerto Rico, as the island deals with the devastation of Hurricane Maria. Her campaign has accumulated more than $30,000 and is getting closer to the $50,000 goal. Her invaluable voice throughout the disaster has inspired other names in the sports world to contribute.

Ron Rivera

Occupation: Head Coach, Carolina Panthers
Hometown: Fort Ord, CA
Age: 55

Rivera, a former linebacker for the Chicago Bears, is the current head coach of the Carolina Panthers. Rivera was selected in the second round of the 1984 NFL draft, becoming the first person of Puerto Rican and Mexican descent to play in the NFL. After retiring in 1992, he worked in Chicago as a TV analyst covering the Bears before becoming the team's defensive coordinator from 2004-2006. In 2008, Rivera was named defensive coordinator of the San Diego Chargers and received his first NFL head coaching gig with the Panthers in 2011. He was named the NFL Coach of the Year in 2013 and 2015 and has led the Panthers to three straight division titles and an appearance in Super Bowl 50. Rivera, who is of Puerto Rican and Mexican descent, was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2003. Rivera is "the ideal image of a [Hispanic] father figure: stern, but fair," said José Hernández-París, executive director of Charlotte's Latin American Coalition, adding that Rivera and the Panthers do significant work of reaching out to local Hispanics.

Alex Rodriguez

Occupation: MLB Analyst, Fox
Hometown: Miami
Age:42

Rodriguez, nicknamed “A-Rod,” played 22 seasons in the MLB for the Seattle Mariners, Texas Rangers and New York Yankees and won three AL Most Valuable Player awards, 10 Silver Slugger awards and two Gold Glove awards. He has also hit the most home runs by a player of Hispanic descent with 696, fourth-most in MLB history. However, A-Rod has led a controversial career after incurring criticism from the media for his behavior and use of banned performance-enhancing drugs. After announcing his retirement in 2016, Rodriguez has become a media personality, serving as a broadcaster for Fox Sports 1, a cast member of Shark Tank and a member of the ABC News network.

In 2003, he gave $3.9 million to the University of Miami to renovate its baseball stadium and as a result it was re-named "Alex Rodriguez Park at Mark Light Field."

When he came back from suspension in 2015, A-Rod donated $1 million to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Miami-Dade, a donation that arrived in good timing with the Yankees's expansion initiative to serve more children. Rodriguez said of the act, "if it wasn't for the Boys & Girls Club, I wouldn't be in the big leagues today."

Angel Rodriguez

Occupation: Sports Editor, Los Angeles Times
Hometown: Houston
Age: 46

Rodriguez began his journalism career shortly after graduating from the University of Texas at Austin. He has covered U.S. Sports forEFE, helped launch ESPNDeportes, was an online sports producer at the Arizona Republic and was a sports editor at the Cincinnati Enquirer. Rodriguez joined the LA Times as a sports editor in 2015 after spending a year as deputy editor for mobile innovation at the Washington Post. Throughout his career, Rodriguez has consistently aimed to diversify sports by reporting through multiple languages and using digital tools.

Juan Carlos Rodriguez

Occupation: President, UnivisionDeportes
Hometown: Mexico City

Rodriguez began his business career when he co-founded and became CEO ofGrupoEstadio, which, under his leadership, became the leading partner for DIRECTV to product and distribute the 2002 FIFA World Cup. Since 2012, he has served as the president of UnivisionDeportes, the sports division of Univision Communications Inc. He has grown Univision Deportes Network to be the leading sports destination for Hispanic America and was named one of the “31 Most Powerful People in U.S. Soccer” by FourFourTwo. Rodriguez also received the Cynopsis Sports’ 2015 Navigator Award and has led Univision Deportes to four Sports Emmy Awards for excellence in sports coverage.

Tony Romo

Occupation: NFL Analyst, CBS
Hometown: Burlington, WI
Age: 37

Romo, whose grandfather emigrated to the U.S. from Mexico as a teenager, played quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys from 2004-16. In that time, he made four Pro Bowls, threw for over 34,000 yards and established himself as one of the NFL’s most popular athletes. His 97.1 passer rating is the fourth highest of all time.Romowas active in the Dallas community, hosting a youth football camp and participating in activities with United Way, the Make-A-Wish Foundation and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. During his playing days, he would often draw large Hispanic crowds to the Cowboys, telling ESPN he "really appreciates the support [The Hispanic Community] gives us." He announced his retirement in April and was quickly hired by CBS to serve as lead analyst for NFL games. In a short time, he’s established himself as one of the sport’s best broadcasters.

In the Dallas area, Romo has done much work in the community, as he has collaborated with United Way, the Make-A-Wish Foundation, and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. In 2012, as a speaker for "Miracle of the Million" Romo pledged $1 million to its “adopt-a-school” program where local churches help troubled schools.

Armando Salguero

Occupation: Sportswriter, Miami Herald
Hometown: Miami
Age: 54

Salguero, who was born in Havana, Cuba but raised in Miami, has covered South Florida sports since 1982 and the Dolphins and the NFL since 1990. He previously worked as a national reporter for ESPN and is well respected across the NFL and the sports media industry.Salgueroalso serves as a Pro Football Hall of Fame selector and is a voter for the Associated Press All-Pro team and its annual awards. He currently reports and writes for the Miami Herald, where his general sports columns garner frequent attention.

Shea Serrano

Occupation: Writer, The Ringer; Author of ?The Rap Year Book: The Most Important Rap Song From Every Year Since 1979, Discussed, Debated, and Deconstructed
Hometown: San Antonio
Age: 36

Serrano, who is of Mexican descent, began his career as a middle-school science teacher in Houston. After writing for the Near Northwest Banner, Serrano freelanced for the Houston Press in 2007, where he drew national attention for his work on hip-hop and pop culture. He was quickly offered a place at the LA Weekly before writing for ESPN’s Grantland and Bill Simmons’ website, The Ringer, where he currently works. Serrano is best known for his humor and activity on social media, which he frequently uses for charitable causes. In August, Serrano invited Twitter followers to join him in a “F--- Hurricane Harvey” round of donations to support Houston relief work; by the end of the night, they had raised more than $130,000. Serrano’s newest book Basketball (and Other Things) will be published in October 2017.

Mariano Trujillo

Occupation: Analyst, FoxDeportes
Hometown: Mexico City
Age: 40

Trujillo made his professional soccer debut with UNAM Pumas in 1996. After playing for three teams in Mexico from 1996-2007, he signed with Skoda Xanthi of Greece. In 2009, Trujillo signed for Chivas USA and became captain of the team in just his second season. He retired in 2013 and immediately thrived in a new role as host of the news magazine show Fox Deportes En Vivo alongside John Laguna.

Trujillo is an analyst for both English and Spanish markets, lending his talents to both Fox Deportes and Fox Sports as a voice of Mexican fútbol. This is extremely valuable to many US-born Latino soccer fans, who passionately follow the sport in both languages.

Luis Omar Tapia

Occupation: Reporter, Univision Deportes/Fox Sports
Hometown: Santiago, Chile
Age: 54

Tapia currently reports on MX League matches for Univision Deportes and Champions League matches for Fox Sports. He has also worked at ESPN, commentating on world football.Tapiais of Chilean descent and has strived to give back to his community. He founded the “The 90 Minutes Foundation” in the city of Miami to help low-income families and youth in education and sport. Tapia is best known for his catch phrases and nicknames for players and coaches as well as his classic comment before every football match, "Begin 90 minutes of the most beautiful sport in the world."

The 30 Most Influential Hispanics in Sports

Hispanics are reshaping sports in America. With Hispanic Heritage Month upon us, SI is honoring the 30 most influential Latinos in sports who aren’t athletes: the coaches, journalists, CEOs and other innovators who shape American sports culture and industry.This list, which is unranked, defines influence by how each person affects the fan experience. These household names don't just offer a diverse perspective—they enrich the American sports landscape.

Linda G. Alvarado

Occupation: Co-owner, Colorado Rockies
Hometown: Albuquerque
Age: 66

Alvarado is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Alvarado Construction and President of Palo Alto, Inc. Restaurant Company. After making her fortune in the business world, she turned to the sports world. Alvarado became the first Hispanic female co-owner of a major league team, and the first woman ever involved in a formal bid for ownership of a major league baseball team, when she became co-owner of the Rockies. Alvarado was inducted in the National Women’s Hall of Fame in 2003. She has long been a stout advocate for diversity in the work place, especially involving Hispanics. "We advocate for Hispanics and other ethnicities, genders and diverse groups because there is an underutilized talent pool seeking opportunity to create value to the growth and success of the company," she told Hispanic Executive in 2015.

Al Avila

Occupation: Executive Vice President of Baseball Operations/General Manager, Detroit Tigers
Hometown: Havana
Age: 59

Avila began his coaching career as an assistant at St. Thomas University, his alma mater. He was promoted to head coach and served as the school’s athletic director until 1992, when he joined the Florida Marlins and became the director of Latin American operations. Under Avila’s guidance, the Marlins signed 1997 World Series MVP Liván Hernández, who led Florida to their first title in franchise history. In 1998, Avila was promoted to director of scouting and signed 16-year-old Miguel Cabrera, who would become one of baseball’s best hitters, a year later. He was hired as the assistant general manager and vice president of the Detroit Tigers in 2002 and remained in the role until 2015, when he was promoted to general manager and executive vice president of baseball operations. With the promotion, Avila became the first Cuban-born general manager in baseball history. His son, Alex, currently plays catcher for the Chicago Cubs and was an All-Star for Detroit in 2011.

Hugo Balta

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Occupation: Senior Director of Hispanic Initiatives, ESPN
Hometown: Paterson, NJ
Age: 47

Balta began his reporting career as a producer for NY1 in 1994. Since then, he has worked for Telemundo, NBC, MSNBC, WCBS and most recently, ESPN. Baltais responsible for expanding ESPN Deportes’ coverage and was the creator of the bilingual Max y Marly audio podcast and Nación ESPN. He also served as President for the National Association of Hispanic Journalists from 2012-2014 and is the co-founder of the Latino Multimedia Communicators social media group, which shares, discusses and supports professionals and their products of interest to the Latino community. Balta is a passionate advocate for diversity, and his work constantly highlights the beauty of multiculturalism and Hispanic representation.

Luis Gerardo Bucci

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Occupation: Sportscaster, CNN Deportes
Hometown: Caracas, Venezuela
Age: 37

After specializing in sports journalism at the Universidad Simón Bolívar, Bucci began his professional career in radios in his native Venezuela. He first broke through in television at RCTV, where he was a producer and commentator of the 2004 Olympics. Bucci moved to Miami in 2008 where he worked as a reporter and presenter on the GOL TV network. In 2011, he was hired by CNN as a producer and presenter of CNN Sports, and in 2012 became the main driver of the program and sports segments of Our World, Direct USA and World Panorama. Bucci's work can be seen and heard across different CNN platforms including podcasts, radio, video and social media.

Wilmer Cabrera

Occupation: Head Coach, Houston Dynamo
Hometown: Cartagena, Colombia
Age: 50

Throughout an 18-year playing career, Cabrera played for clubs in Colombia, Argentina, Costa Rica and the United States. After retiring, he worked in Major League Soccer’s front office as a community development manager working on Hispanic grassroots and youth programs. He earned his coaching license in 2005 and in 2007, was named head coach of the United States men's national under-17 soccer team, becoming the first Latin American head coach in the U.S. national team system. Cabrera would then become the head coach for MLS clubs Chivas USA and Rio Grande Valley FC Toros before being named the head coach of the Houston Dynamo in 2016.

Andres Cantor

Occupation: Sports Commentator, NBC Deportes/Telemundo
Hometown: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Age: 54

Cantor moved from his hometown Buenos Aires to Southern California as a teenager before graduating from the University of Southern California. After college, he became a soccer play-by-play commentator for Univision and Telemundo, where he introduced his signature bellowing of “Gooooool!” after a score. He quickly became so popular in the U.S. that he appeared on the Late Show with David Letterman and even appeared in a Volkswagen commercial during the 1998 World Cup. Cantor currently works for Telemundo Deportes, where he introduced the first-ever U.S. Spanish-language broadcast of the Olympics. He has also won four Emmys, including the sports Emmy for Outstanding On-Air Personality in Spanish, twice in 2014 and 2017.

Cantor will lead as the Spanish-language voice of the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia on Telemundo.

Cantor also co-founded Fútbol de Primera Radio with his business partner Alejandro Gutman, the largest nationally-syndicated soccer radio network in the United States.Apart from the World Cup, FDP has broadcasted Copa América tournaments, Gold and Confederations Cups. FDP also has a daily sports talk show from Monday through Friday hosted by Cantor.

Oscar De La Hoya

Occupation: Founder,Golden Boy Promotions
Hometown: Montebello, CA
Age: 44

De La Hoya, who is of Mexican descent, competed in boxing from 1992 to 2008, winning ten world titles in six different world classes and finishing with a 39-6 record. De La Hoya has generated over $700 million in pay-per-view income and was the top-rated fighter in the world in 1997 and 1998. Nicknamed “The Golden Boy,” he won a gold medal in the 1992 Barcelona Olympics and is the first American of Mexican descent to own a national boxing promotional firm. His firm, Golden Boy Enterprises is one of boxing’s most active and respected promoters and holds a 25% interest in the Houston Dynamo MLS team. Throughout his career, De La Hoya has been active in the community. In 2005, Golden Boy Enterprises announced the formation of Golden Boy Partners, a company focused on urban development in Latino communities. In 2008, De La Hoya donated $3.5 million to the De La Hoya Animo Charter High School to help underprivileged youth to education. After losing to Manny Pacquiao in 2008, he decided to retire from boxing.

Fernando Fiore

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Occupation: Sportscaster
Hometown: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Age: 57

Fiore is best known as the host of Republica Deportiva, a weekly sports show for Univision, and for anchoring Univision’s FIFA World Cup coverage from 1999 until 2014. He is a two-time Emmy Award winner and is the author of The World Cup: The Ultimate Guide to the Greatest Sports Spectacle in the World. A legend among Spanish-speaking sports fans, Fiore is renowned for bringing his contagious energy and passion to the broadcast booth, resulting in a comedic analysis of the game. You will see more of Fiore when the World Cup comes around, as he is a vital member of Fox's coverage in Russia.

Esther Garcia

Occupation: Vice President, Heineken’s Tecate and TecateLight
Hometown: Madrid, Spain
Age: 40

Originally from Madrid, Garcia worked at Heineken Spain before taking a break to work for other consumer brands. In 2015, Garcia rejoined Heineken as the Vice President for Tecate beer, named after a city in Baja California, Mexico. The Tecate exec is best known for partnering Heineken with the Champions League, a soccer league that counts more than 4.2 billion fans globally. Garcia was named to Ad Week’s “Most Powerful Women in Sports” in June. She currently lives with her family in Dobbs Ferry, New York.

Mònica González

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Occupation: Announcer, Founder of Gonzo Soccer
Hometown: Corpus Christi, TX
Age: 38

Gonzalez was a founding member in 1998 of the Mexican Women’s National team and helped lead the team in the 1999 FIFA Women’s World Cup. She played for the Mexican National Team for 13 years and was captain from 2003-07. During her career, González played in 83 international games and scored 10 goals. In 2011, she was hired by ESPN as a studio analyst for the 2011 Women’s World Cup and has since become a sideline reporter for Major League Soccer. She has also announced games for NBC Universo and Fox Deportes and, in 2016, was the only woman calling games in the UEFA Champions League.

Gonzalez's most valuable job title, however, is her role as co-founder and director of Gonzo Soccer, a non-profit organization that teaches soccer, life and leaderships to girls in Hispanic communities. What started as a soccer clinic in the lower west side of Chicago in 2009, the program now helps more than 900 girls worldwide, with academies in the U.S, Mexico and Colombia.

Earlier this year, Gonzalez joined other ex-professionals and The Equal Playing Field (EPF) Initiative and climbed Mount Kilamanjaro to play the highest 90-minute match ever recorded to raise awareness for gender inequality.

Tony Gonzalez

Occupation: NFL studio analyst, FOX NFL Kickoff
Hometown: Torrance, CA
Age: 41

Gonzalez, who is of a mixed background, played 17 seasons in the NFL for the Kansas City Chiefs and the Atlanta Falcons. "One of the most common questions I get in my lifetime, and Tony gets it too: What are you?" said Gonzalez's older brother, Chris. "I just say we're mixed - black, white, Jamaican, Hispanic, Portuguese." Gonzalez has been selected to 14 Pro Bowls in his career and currently holds the NFL record for total receiving yards by a tight end with 15,127. He also has the second-most receptions by any player all-time with 1325 and was well known for his durability, missing just two games in his career. While playing for the Chiefs, he co-founded All-Pro Science, a sports nutrition company, and starred in xXx: Return of Xander Cage, playing Paul Donovan in his first feature film role. Immediately after retirement, Gonzalez became an analyst on CBS's NFL pregame show NFL Today. He worked for CBS until the end of the 2016 season before being added to FOX's pregame show in May.

In 2009, Gonzalez co-authored The All-Pro Diet with Mitzi Dulan, the former nutritionist for the Chiefs, detailing his diet and workout routine. The aim was to provide information and help for others (athletes and non-athletes) to follow the same path.

In his rookie year, Gonzalez joined the Shadow Buddies Foundation, an organization that provides support and knowledge to children with severe illnesses and disabilities. When he moved to Atlanta he continued this program with children's hospitals in the city.

Dan Le Batard

Occupation: Sportswriter/Television Host, Miami Herald, ESPN
Hometown: Miami
Age: 48

Le Batard, whose parents were exiled from Cuba, is an American sportswriter, radio host and television reporter. He is most known for his radio show The Dan Le Batard show and for hosting Highly Questionable, which airs daily on ESPN. "It's rare to have a show that embraces heritage," Erik Rydholm, executive producer at ESPN said of the show, which features Le Batard and his father and targets a Hispanic audience. "It has to have family and that connection with viewers." Le Batard also frequently serves as a host for Pardon the Interruption and writes for his hometown paper, the Miami Herald. He is lauded for his self-deprecating humor and often writes about controversial topics such as race. His candor has made him one of the most respected journalists in the industry and has led to a devoted fan base.

Valeria Marín

Occupation: Host/Reporter, Fox Deportes/NFLeros
Hometown: Mexico City

Marín joined Fox Deportes in 2013 as part of Central Fox, the network’s leading sports news program. In 2015, she began covering the NFL and MLB for Fox Deportes En Vivo. Marín began her career covering Mexican Tennis at the newspaper “Impacto” before becoming a host and reporter of La Aficion at Milenio TV. She was also a commentator for Telivisa Deportes Network and Televis Deportes W Radio. On her show NFLeros, Marín often highlights Hispanic athletes and uses social media to interact with the community.

Gerardo “Tata” Martino

Occupation: Head Coach, Atlanta United FC
Hometown: Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina
Age: 54

Martino is an icon in his native Rosario because of his success with local club Newell’s Old Boys. He holds the record of appearances with the team, playing a total of 505 matches in 14 years with the club. He was also selected in a fan’s poll as the best player throughout the club’s history. After retiring from soccer, Martino continued his success as a manager. In 2013, he was chosen as manager of FC Barcelona, but resigned just a year later after a runner-up La Liga finish. In 2015, he led Argentina to the Copa América Final, but resigned in 2016 after losing to Chile in two consecutive finals. Martino currently manages MLS expansion club Atlanta FC, who reached the playoffs in its first season. His presence in the U.S not only elevates the league's reputation, but due to his passion for youth, local development, Atlanta has a manager who has a vision that can help the city's multicultural talent.

Jessica Mendoza

Occupation: MLB Analyst, ESPN
Hometown: Camarillo, CA
Age: 36

Mendoza was a four-time First Team All-American softball player for the Stanford Cardinals between 1999-2002 and a former member of the US women’s national team between 2004-2010.She won gold at the 2004 Olympics in Athens, and a silver medal at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing.On August 24, 2015 she became the first female analyst in the history of Major League Baseball. She is currently a broadcaster for ESPN’s Sunday Night Baseball and analyzed her first MLB post-season series on ESPN radio on Saturday. On her Hispanic heritage, Mendoza told ESPN she felt Latinas needed to "Embrace the fact that you are different." She often points her source of inspiration to her father, who was a first-generation Mexican-American that taught her to love her Hispanic roots.

Mendoza is a past president of Women Sports Foundation, an organization founded by Billie Jean King in 1974 aimed to advance the lives of women and girls through sports and physical activity. During the 2008 Olympics, she was also an athletic ambassador for Team Darfur, which was devoted to raising awareness of humanitarian crises related to War in Darfur.

Arte Moreno

Occupation: Owner, Los Angeles Angels
Hometown: Tuscon, AZ
Age: 71

Moreno earned his fortune through advertising and was hired by billboard company Outdoor Systems in 1984. After taking Outdoor Systems public in 1996, Moreno sold the company to Infinity Broadcasting for $8 billion. In 2003, he became the first Mexican-American to own a major sports team in the United States when he purchased the Anaheim Angels from the Walt Disney Company. Moreno led the Angels to division titles from 2004-2009 and 2014. In the community, he established the Moreno Family Foundation, which supports non-profit organizations focusing on youth and education as well as athletic programs at the University of Arizona.

Marisabel Muñoz

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Occupation: Major League Soccer, Vice President of Communications
Hometown: Miami
Age: 37

Muñoz developed a passion for soccer while growing up in Miami, leading to her career in sports journalism with The Miami Herald and ESPN The Magazine. She became involved with the MLS in 2002 and has played an important role in establishing relationships with League broadcast partners, including Univision, ESPN and FOX.Muñozis also responsible for the league’s U.S. Hispanic initiatives, including the Sueño MLS reality show and the league’s Spanish-language digital platform, FutbolMLS.com. The strong relationship between Hispanic soccer fans and Major League Soccer is a testament to her work as both an executive and a passionate fútbol fan.

Sandy Nunez

Occupation: Coordinating Producer, ESPN
Hometown: Los Angeles
Age: 53

Sandy Nunez is a Coordinating Producing overseeing all SportsCenter production for ESPN in Los Angeles. SportsCenter production in LA includes SC Coast to Coast with anchors Cari Champion and David Lloyd as well as the late night SportsCenter Los Angeles with Neil Everett and Stan Verrett. Nunez is currently a member of the Los Angeles chapter of Women in Sports and Events (WISE). She also serves on the Board of Managers of Ketchum-Downtown YMCA.Earlier this month, Nunez was named one of “Los Angeles Most Influential Latina Journalists” by the California Chicano News Media Association (CCNMA.)

She is the only Latina who holds her position of coordinating producer at ESPN.

Fernando Palomo

Occupation: International Football Analyst, ESPN
Hometown: San Salvador, El Salvador
Age: 44

Palomo started his broadcasting career in 1999 with Channel 4 TV in San Salvador covering events including the Olympics and the Pan American Games. He joined ESPN in 2000 as a SportsCenter anchor for ESPN in Latin America and served as an anchor for Sportscenter for ESPN Deportes from 2004-06.Palomocurrently covers European soccer as a Spanish commentator and is the host of Fuera de Juego, ESPN Deportes’ highest-rated international program. In July 2012, he was chosen to be the voices for the FIFA video game franchise and has appeared in their Spanish versions since FIFA 13. This role has helped Palomo influence millions of young people who are introduced to the beautiful game.Palomowas also a member of the National Track and Field team of El Salvador and is the country’s record-holder in the javelin throw.

Rick Renteria

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Occupation: Manager, Chicago White Sox
Hometown: Harbor City, CA
Age: 55

After playing in South Gate, California, Renteria was drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates with the 20th overall pick in the 1980 Major League Baseball draft. Renteria played five seasons in the Majors and two seasons with the Mexican League's Jalisco Charros before coaching and managing in the Marlins organization until 2001, and in the San Diego Padres organization until 2013, the same year he managed the Mexico national team in the World Baseball Classic. He was hired to be the manager of the Chicago Cubs for the 2014 season, but was terminated just a year later. Renteria would stay in Chicago, though, serving as a bench coach for the Chicago White Sox before becoming manager in 2017. On his Mexican pride, Renteria told ESPN "I can't deny who I am. I am Mexican. My parents were both from Mexico. They came here. They gave us an opportunity." As the only Hispanic manager in Major League Baseball, Renteria's influence for Latino youth ball players are not taken for granted.

Marly Rivera

Occupation: MLB Writer/TV Host,ESPN
Hometown: San Juan, Puerto Rico
Age: 42

Rivera, who was born and raised in San Juan before moving to the United States as a teenager, is a bilingual sportswriter and reporter for ESPN and ESPN Deportes. She started her career as an editorial producer and writer at Major League Baseball and an editor at Univision communications before becoming an ESPN beat writer for the New York Yankees as one of the few Hispanic females in the BBWAA (Baseball Writers’ Association of America). More recently, Rivera has been a guest contributor on Béisbol Esta Noche, Sunday Night Baseball, Outside the Lines and SportsCenter. On her Hispanic culture, Rivera told ESPN "I have an accent. My first language is Spanish. I try, I am trying to help your culture, but I still have my culture. You have to respect it. I am not going to give up everything that makes me me just because you don't like it."

Rivera has done tremendous work for her native Puerto Rico, as the island deals with the devastation of Hurricane Maria. Her campaign has accumulated more than $30,000 and is getting closer to the $50,000 goal. Her invaluable voice throughout the disaster has inspired other names in the sports world to contribute.

Ron Rivera

Occupation: Head Coach, Carolina Panthers
Hometown: Fort Ord, CA
Age: 55

Rivera, a former linebacker for the Chicago Bears, is the current head coach of the Carolina Panthers. Rivera was selected in the second round of the 1984 NFL draft, becoming the first person of Puerto Rican and Mexican descent to play in the NFL. After retiring in 1992, he worked in Chicago as a TV analyst covering the Bears before becoming the team's defensive coordinator from 2004-2006. In 2008, Rivera was named defensive coordinator of the San Diego Chargers and received his first NFL head coaching gig with the Panthers in 2011. He was named the NFL Coach of the Year in 2013 and 2015 and has led the Panthers to three straight division titles and an appearance in Super Bowl 50. Rivera, who is of Puerto Rican and Mexican descent, was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2003. Rivera is "the ideal image of a [Hispanic] father figure: stern, but fair," said José Hernández-París, executive director of Charlotte's Latin American Coalition, adding that Rivera and the Panthers do significant work of reaching out to local Hispanics.

Alex Rodriguez

Occupation: MLB Analyst, Fox
Hometown: Miami
Age:42

Rodriguez, nicknamed “A-Rod,” played 22 seasons in the MLB for the Seattle Mariners, Texas Rangers and New York Yankees and won three AL Most Valuable Player awards, 10 Silver Slugger awards and two Gold Glove awards. He has also hit the most home runs by a player of Hispanic descent with 696, fourth-most in MLB history. However, A-Rod has led a controversial career after incurring criticism from the media for his behavior and use of banned performance-enhancing drugs. After announcing his retirement in 2016, Rodriguez has become a media personality, serving as a broadcaster for Fox Sports 1, a cast member of Shark Tank and a member of the ABC News network.

In 2003, he gave $3.9 million to the University of Miami to renovate its baseball stadium and as a result it was re-named "Alex Rodriguez Park at Mark Light Field."

When he came back from suspension in 2015, A-Rod donated $1 million to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Miami-Dade, a donation that arrived in good timing with the Yankees's expansion initiative to serve more children. Rodriguez said of the act, "if it wasn't for the Boys & Girls Club, I wouldn't be in the big leagues today."

Angel Rodriguez

Occupation: Sports Editor, Los Angeles Times
Hometown: Houston
Age: 46

Rodriguez began his journalism career shortly after graduating from the University of Texas at Austin. He has covered U.S. Sports forEFE, helped launch ESPNDeportes, was an online sports producer at the Arizona Republic and was a sports editor at the Cincinnati Enquirer. Rodriguez joined the LA Times as a sports editor in 2015 after spending a year as deputy editor for mobile innovation at the Washington Post. Throughout his career, Rodriguez has consistently aimed to diversify sports by reporting through multiple languages and using digital tools.

Juan Carlos Rodriguez

Occupation: President, UnivisionDeportes
Hometown: Mexico City

Rodriguez began his business career when he co-founded and became CEO ofGrupoEstadio, which, under his leadership, became the leading partner for DIRECTV to product and distribute the 2002 FIFA World Cup. Since 2012, he has served as the president of UnivisionDeportes, the sports division of Univision Communications Inc. He has grown Univision Deportes Network to be the leading sports destination for Hispanic America and was named one of the “31 Most Powerful People in U.S. Soccer” by FourFourTwo. Rodriguez also received the Cynopsis Sports’ 2015 Navigator Award and has led Univision Deportes to four Sports Emmy Awards for excellence in sports coverage.

Tony Romo

Occupation: NFL Analyst, CBS
Hometown: Burlington, WI
Age: 37

Romo, whose grandfather emigrated to the U.S. from Mexico as a teenager, played quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys from 2004-16. In that time, he made four Pro Bowls, threw for over 34,000 yards and established himself as one of the NFL’s most popular athletes. His 97.1 passer rating is the fourth highest of all time.Romowas active in the Dallas community, hosting a youth football camp and participating in activities with United Way, the Make-A-Wish Foundation and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. During his playing days, he would often draw large Hispanic crowds to the Cowboys, telling ESPN he "really appreciates the support [The Hispanic Community] gives us." He announced his retirement in April and was quickly hired by CBS to serve as lead analyst for NFL games. In a short time, he’s established himself as one of the sport’s best broadcasters.

In the Dallas area, Romo has done much work in the community, as he has collaborated with United Way, the Make-A-Wish Foundation, and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. In 2012, as a speaker for "Miracle of the Million" Romo pledged $1 million to its “adopt-a-school” program where local churches help troubled schools.

Armando Salguero

Occupation: Sportswriter, Miami Herald
Hometown: Miami
Age: 54

Salguero, who was born in Havana, Cuba but raised in Miami, has covered South Florida sports since 1982 and the Dolphins and the NFL since 1990. He previously worked as a national reporter for ESPN and is well respected across the NFL and the sports media industry.Salgueroalso serves as a Pro Football Hall of Fame selector and is a voter for the Associated Press All-Pro team and its annual awards. He currently reports and writes for the Miami Herald, where his general sports columns garner frequent attention.

Shea Serrano

Occupation: Writer, The Ringer; Author of ?The Rap Year Book: The Most Important Rap Song From Every Year Since 1979, Discussed, Debated, and Deconstructed
Hometown: San Antonio
Age: 36

Serrano, who is of Mexican descent, began his career as a middle-school science teacher in Houston. After writing for the Near Northwest Banner, Serrano freelanced for the Houston Press in 2007, where he drew national attention for his work on hip-hop and pop culture. He was quickly offered a place at the LA Weekly before writing for ESPN’s Grantland and Bill Simmons’ website, The Ringer, where he currently works. Serrano is best known for his humor and activity on social media, which he frequently uses for charitable causes. In August, Serrano invited Twitter followers to join him in a “F--- Hurricane Harvey” round of donations to support Houston relief work; by the end of the night, they had raised more than $130,000. Serrano’s newest book Basketball (and Other Things) will be published in October 2017.

Mariano Trujillo

Occupation: Analyst, FoxDeportes
Hometown: Mexico City
Age: 40

Trujillo made his professional soccer debut with UNAM Pumas in 1996. After playing for three teams in Mexico from 1996-2007, he signed with Skoda Xanthi of Greece. In 2009, Trujillo signed for Chivas USA and became captain of the team in just his second season. He retired in 2013 and immediately thrived in a new role as host of the news magazine show Fox Deportes En Vivo alongside John Laguna.

Trujillo is an analyst for both English and Spanish markets, lending his talents to both Fox Deportes and Fox Sports as a voice of Mexican fútbol. This is extremely valuable to many US-born Latino soccer fans, who passionately follow the sport in both languages.

Luis Omar Tapia

Occupation: Reporter, Univision Deportes/Fox Sports
Hometown: Santiago, Chile
Age: 54

Tapia currently reports on MX League matches for Univision Deportes and Champions League matches for Fox Sports. He has also worked at ESPN, commentating on world football.Tapiais of Chilean descent and has strived to give back to his community. He founded the “The 90 Minutes Foundation” in the city of Miami to help low-income families and youth in education and sport. Tapia is best known for his catch phrases and nicknames for players and coaches as well as his classic comment before every football match, "Begin 90 minutes of the most beautiful sport in the world."

The 30 Most Influential Hispanics in Sports

Hispanics are reshaping sports in America. With Hispanic Heritage Month upon us, SI is honoring the 30 most influential Latinos in sports who aren’t athletes: the coaches, journalists, CEOs and other innovators who shape American sports culture and industry.This list, which is unranked, defines influence by how each person affects the fan experience. These household names don't just offer a diverse perspective—they enrich the American sports landscape.

Linda G. Alvarado

Occupation: Co-owner, Colorado Rockies
Hometown: Albuquerque
Age: 66

Alvarado is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Alvarado Construction and President of Palo Alto, Inc. Restaurant Company. After making her fortune in the business world, she turned to the sports world. Alvarado became the first Hispanic female co-owner of a major league team, and the first woman ever involved in a formal bid for ownership of a major league baseball team, when she became co-owner of the Rockies. Alvarado was inducted in the National Women’s Hall of Fame in 2003. She has long been a stout advocate for diversity in the work place, especially involving Hispanics. "We advocate for Hispanics and other ethnicities, genders and diverse groups because there is an underutilized talent pool seeking opportunity to create value to the growth and success of the company," she told Hispanic Executive in 2015.

Al Avila

Occupation: Executive Vice President of Baseball Operations/General Manager, Detroit Tigers
Hometown: Havana
Age: 59

Avila began his coaching career as an assistant at St. Thomas University, his alma mater. He was promoted to head coach and served as the school’s athletic director until 1992, when he joined the Florida Marlins and became the director of Latin American operations. Under Avila’s guidance, the Marlins signed 1997 World Series MVP Liván Hernández, who led Florida to their first title in franchise history. In 1998, Avila was promoted to director of scouting and signed 16-year-old Miguel Cabrera, who would become one of baseball’s best hitters, a year later. He was hired as the assistant general manager and vice president of the Detroit Tigers in 2002 and remained in the role until 2015, when he was promoted to general manager and executive vice president of baseball operations. With the promotion, Avila became the first Cuban-born general manager in baseball history. His son, Alex, currently plays catcher for the Chicago Cubs and was an All-Star for Detroit in 2011.

Hugo Balta

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Occupation: Senior Director of Hispanic Initiatives, ESPN
Hometown: Paterson, NJ
Age: 47

Balta began his reporting career as a producer for NY1 in 1994. Since then, he has worked for Telemundo, NBC, MSNBC, WCBS and most recently, ESPN. Baltais responsible for expanding ESPN Deportes’ coverage and was the creator of the bilingual Max y Marly audio podcast and Nación ESPN. He also served as President for the National Association of Hispanic Journalists from 2012-2014 and is the co-founder of the Latino Multimedia Communicators social media group, which shares, discusses and supports professionals and their products of interest to the Latino community. Balta is a passionate advocate for diversity, and his work constantly highlights the beauty of multiculturalism and Hispanic representation.

Luis Gerardo Bucci

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Occupation: Sportscaster, CNN Deportes
Hometown: Caracas, Venezuela
Age: 37

After specializing in sports journalism at the Universidad Simón Bolívar, Bucci began his professional career in radios in his native Venezuela. He first broke through in television at RCTV, where he was a producer and commentator of the 2004 Olympics. Bucci moved to Miami in 2008 where he worked as a reporter and presenter on the GOL TV network. In 2011, he was hired by CNN as a producer and presenter of CNN Sports, and in 2012 became the main driver of the program and sports segments of Our World, Direct USA and World Panorama. Bucci's work can be seen and heard across different CNN platforms including podcasts, radio, video and social media.

Wilmer Cabrera

Occupation: Head Coach, Houston Dynamo
Hometown: Cartagena, Colombia
Age: 50

Throughout an 18-year playing career, Cabrera played for clubs in Colombia, Argentina, Costa Rica and the United States. After retiring, he worked in Major League Soccer’s front office as a community development manager working on Hispanic grassroots and youth programs. He earned his coaching license in 2005 and in 2007, was named head coach of the United States men's national under-17 soccer team, becoming the first Latin American head coach in the U.S. national team system. Cabrera would then become the head coach for MLS clubs Chivas USA and Rio Grande Valley FC Toros before being named the head coach of the Houston Dynamo in 2016.

Andres Cantor

Occupation: Sports Commentator, NBC Deportes/Telemundo
Hometown: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Age: 54

Cantor moved from his hometown Buenos Aires to Southern California as a teenager before graduating from the University of Southern California. After college, he became a soccer play-by-play commentator for Univision and Telemundo, where he introduced his signature bellowing of “Gooooool!” after a score. He quickly became so popular in the U.S. that he appeared on the Late Show with David Letterman and even appeared in a Volkswagen commercial during the 1998 World Cup. Cantor currently works for Telemundo Deportes, where he introduced the first-ever U.S. Spanish-language broadcast of the Olympics. He has also won four Emmys, including the sports Emmy for Outstanding On-Air Personality in Spanish, twice in 2014 and 2017.

Cantor will lead as the Spanish-language voice of the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia on Telemundo.

Cantor also co-founded Fútbol de Primera Radio with his business partner Alejandro Gutman, the largest nationally-syndicated soccer radio network in the United States.Apart from the World Cup, FDP has broadcasted Copa América tournaments, Gold and Confederations Cups. FDP also has a daily sports talk show from Monday through Friday hosted by Cantor.

Oscar De La Hoya

Occupation: Founder,Golden Boy Promotions
Hometown: Montebello, CA
Age: 44

De La Hoya, who is of Mexican descent, competed in boxing from 1992 to 2008, winning ten world titles in six different world classes and finishing with a 39-6 record. De La Hoya has generated over $700 million in pay-per-view income and was the top-rated fighter in the world in 1997 and 1998. Nicknamed “The Golden Boy,” he won a gold medal in the 1992 Barcelona Olympics and is the first American of Mexican descent to own a national boxing promotional firm. His firm, Golden Boy Enterprises is one of boxing’s most active and respected promoters and holds a 25% interest in the Houston Dynamo MLS team. Throughout his career, De La Hoya has been active in the community. In 2005, Golden Boy Enterprises announced the formation of Golden Boy Partners, a company focused on urban development in Latino communities. In 2008, De La Hoya donated $3.5 million to the De La Hoya Animo Charter High School to help underprivileged youth to education. After losing to Manny Pacquiao in 2008, he decided to retire from boxing.

Fernando Fiore

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Occupation: Sportscaster
Hometown: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Age: 57

Fiore is best known as the host of Republica Deportiva, a weekly sports show for Univision, and for anchoring Univision’s FIFA World Cup coverage from 1999 until 2014. He is a two-time Emmy Award winner and is the author of The World Cup: The Ultimate Guide to the Greatest Sports Spectacle in the World. A legend among Spanish-speaking sports fans, Fiore is renowned for bringing his contagious energy and passion to the broadcast booth, resulting in a comedic analysis of the game. You will see more of Fiore when the World Cup comes around, as he is a vital member of Fox's coverage in Russia.

Esther Garcia

Occupation: Vice President, Heineken’s Tecate and TecateLight
Hometown: Madrid, Spain
Age: 40

Originally from Madrid, Garcia worked at Heineken Spain before taking a break to work for other consumer brands. In 2015, Garcia rejoined Heineken as the Vice President for Tecate beer, named after a city in Baja California, Mexico. The Tecate exec is best known for partnering Heineken with the Champions League, a soccer league that counts more than 4.2 billion fans globally. Garcia was named to Ad Week’s “Most Powerful Women in Sports” in June. She currently lives with her family in Dobbs Ferry, New York.

Mònica González

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Occupation: Announcer, Founder of Gonzo Soccer
Hometown: Corpus Christi, TX
Age: 38

Gonzalez was a founding member in 1998 of the Mexican Women’s National team and helped lead the team in the 1999 FIFA Women’s World Cup. She played for the Mexican National Team for 13 years and was captain from 2003-07. During her career, González played in 83 international games and scored 10 goals. In 2011, she was hired by ESPN as a studio analyst for the 2011 Women’s World Cup and has since become a sideline reporter for Major League Soccer. She has also announced games for NBC Universo and Fox Deportes and, in 2016, was the only woman calling games in the UEFA Champions League.

Gonzalez's most valuable job title, however, is her role as co-founder and director of Gonzo Soccer, a non-profit organization that teaches soccer, life and leaderships to girls in Hispanic communities. What started as a soccer clinic in the lower west side of Chicago in 2009, the program now helps more than 900 girls worldwide, with academies in the U.S, Mexico and Colombia.

Earlier this year, Gonzalez joined other ex-professionals and The Equal Playing Field (EPF) Initiative and climbed Mount Kilamanjaro to play the highest 90-minute match ever recorded to raise awareness for gender inequality.

Tony Gonzalez

Occupation: NFL studio analyst, FOX NFL Kickoff
Hometown: Torrance, CA
Age: 41

Gonzalez, who is of a mixed background, played 17 seasons in the NFL for the Kansas City Chiefs and the Atlanta Falcons. "One of the most common questions I get in my lifetime, and Tony gets it too: What are you?" said Gonzalez's older brother, Chris. "I just say we're mixed - black, white, Jamaican, Hispanic, Portuguese." Gonzalez has been selected to 14 Pro Bowls in his career and currently holds the NFL record for total receiving yards by a tight end with 15,127. He also has the second-most receptions by any player all-time with 1325 and was well known for his durability, missing just two games in his career. While playing for the Chiefs, he co-founded All-Pro Science, a sports nutrition company, and starred in xXx: Return of Xander Cage, playing Paul Donovan in his first feature film role. Immediately after retirement, Gonzalez became an analyst on CBS's NFL pregame show NFL Today. He worked for CBS until the end of the 2016 season before being added to FOX's pregame show in May.

In 2009, Gonzalez co-authored The All-Pro Diet with Mitzi Dulan, the former nutritionist for the Chiefs, detailing his diet and workout routine. The aim was to provide information and help for others (athletes and non-athletes) to follow the same path.

In his rookie year, Gonzalez joined the Shadow Buddies Foundation, an organization that provides support and knowledge to children with severe illnesses and disabilities. When he moved to Atlanta he continued this program with children's hospitals in the city.

Dan Le Batard

Occupation: Sportswriter/Television Host, Miami Herald, ESPN
Hometown: Miami
Age: 48

Le Batard, whose parents were exiled from Cuba, is an American sportswriter, radio host and television reporter. He is most known for his radio show The Dan Le Batard show and for hosting Highly Questionable, which airs daily on ESPN. "It's rare to have a show that embraces heritage," Erik Rydholm, executive producer at ESPN said of the show, which features Le Batard and his father and targets a Hispanic audience. "It has to have family and that connection with viewers." Le Batard also frequently serves as a host for Pardon the Interruption and writes for his hometown paper, the Miami Herald. He is lauded for his self-deprecating humor and often writes about controversial topics such as race. His candor has made him one of the most respected journalists in the industry and has led to a devoted fan base.

Valeria Marín

Occupation: Host/Reporter, Fox Deportes/NFLeros
Hometown: Mexico City

Marín joined Fox Deportes in 2013 as part of Central Fox, the network’s leading sports news program. In 2015, she began covering the NFL and MLB for Fox Deportes En Vivo. Marín began her career covering Mexican Tennis at the newspaper “Impacto” before becoming a host and reporter of La Aficion at Milenio TV. She was also a commentator for Telivisa Deportes Network and Televis Deportes W Radio. On her show NFLeros, Marín often highlights Hispanic athletes and uses social media to interact with the community.

Gerardo “Tata” Martino

Occupation: Head Coach, Atlanta United FC
Hometown: Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina
Age: 54

Martino is an icon in his native Rosario because of his success with local club Newell’s Old Boys. He holds the record of appearances with the team, playing a total of 505 matches in 14 years with the club. He was also selected in a fan’s poll as the best player throughout the club’s history. After retiring from soccer, Martino continued his success as a manager. In 2013, he was chosen as manager of FC Barcelona, but resigned just a year later after a runner-up La Liga finish. In 2015, he led Argentina to the Copa América Final, but resigned in 2016 after losing to Chile in two consecutive finals. Martino currently manages MLS expansion club Atlanta FC, who reached the playoffs in its first season. His presence in the U.S not only elevates the league's reputation, but due to his passion for youth, local development, Atlanta has a manager who has a vision that can help the city's multicultural talent.

Jessica Mendoza

Occupation: MLB Analyst, ESPN
Hometown: Camarillo, CA
Age: 36

Mendoza was a four-time First Team All-American softball player for the Stanford Cardinals between 1999-2002 and a former member of the US women’s national team between 2004-2010.She won gold at the 2004 Olympics in Athens, and a silver medal at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing.On August 24, 2015 she became the first female analyst in the history of Major League Baseball. She is currently a broadcaster for ESPN’s Sunday Night Baseball and analyzed her first MLB post-season series on ESPN radio on Saturday. On her Hispanic heritage, Mendoza told ESPN she felt Latinas needed to "Embrace the fact that you are different." She often points her source of inspiration to her father, who was a first-generation Mexican-American that taught her to love her Hispanic roots.

Mendoza is a past president of Women Sports Foundation, an organization founded by Billie Jean King in 1974 aimed to advance the lives of women and girls through sports and physical activity. During the 2008 Olympics, she was also an athletic ambassador for Team Darfur, which was devoted to raising awareness of humanitarian crises related to War in Darfur.

Arte Moreno

Occupation: Owner, Los Angeles Angels
Hometown: Tuscon, AZ
Age: 71

Moreno earned his fortune through advertising and was hired by billboard company Outdoor Systems in 1984. After taking Outdoor Systems public in 1996, Moreno sold the company to Infinity Broadcasting for $8 billion. In 2003, he became the first Mexican-American to own a major sports team in the United States when he purchased the Anaheim Angels from the Walt Disney Company. Moreno led the Angels to division titles from 2004-2009 and 2014. In the community, he established the Moreno Family Foundation, which supports non-profit organizations focusing on youth and education as well as athletic programs at the University of Arizona.

Marisabel Muñoz

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Occupation: Major League Soccer, Vice President of Communications
Hometown: Miami
Age: 37

Muñoz developed a passion for soccer while growing up in Miami, leading to her career in sports journalism with The Miami Herald and ESPN The Magazine. She became involved with the MLS in 2002 and has played an important role in establishing relationships with League broadcast partners, including Univision, ESPN and FOX.Muñozis also responsible for the league’s U.S. Hispanic initiatives, including the Sueño MLS reality show and the league’s Spanish-language digital platform, FutbolMLS.com. The strong relationship between Hispanic soccer fans and Major League Soccer is a testament to her work as both an executive and a passionate fútbol fan.

Sandy Nunez

Occupation: Coordinating Producer, ESPN
Hometown: Los Angeles
Age: 53

Sandy Nunez is a Coordinating Producing overseeing all SportsCenter production for ESPN in Los Angeles. SportsCenter production in LA includes SC Coast to Coast with anchors Cari Champion and David Lloyd as well as the late night SportsCenter Los Angeles with Neil Everett and Stan Verrett. Nunez is currently a member of the Los Angeles chapter of Women in Sports and Events (WISE). She also serves on the Board of Managers of Ketchum-Downtown YMCA.Earlier this month, Nunez was named one of “Los Angeles Most Influential Latina Journalists” by the California Chicano News Media Association (CCNMA.)

She is the only Latina who holds her position of coordinating producer at ESPN.

Fernando Palomo

Occupation: International Football Analyst, ESPN
Hometown: San Salvador, El Salvador
Age: 44

Palomo started his broadcasting career in 1999 with Channel 4 TV in San Salvador covering events including the Olympics and the Pan American Games. He joined ESPN in 2000 as a SportsCenter anchor for ESPN in Latin America and served as an anchor for Sportscenter for ESPN Deportes from 2004-06.Palomocurrently covers European soccer as a Spanish commentator and is the host of Fuera de Juego, ESPN Deportes’ highest-rated international program. In July 2012, he was chosen to be the voices for the FIFA video game franchise and has appeared in their Spanish versions since FIFA 13. This role has helped Palomo influence millions of young people who are introduced to the beautiful game.Palomowas also a member of the National Track and Field team of El Salvador and is the country’s record-holder in the javelin throw.

Rick Renteria

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Occupation: Manager, Chicago White Sox
Hometown: Harbor City, CA
Age: 55

After playing in South Gate, California, Renteria was drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates with the 20th overall pick in the 1980 Major League Baseball draft. Renteria played five seasons in the Majors and two seasons with the Mexican League's Jalisco Charros before coaching and managing in the Marlins organization until 2001, and in the San Diego Padres organization until 2013, the same year he managed the Mexico national team in the World Baseball Classic. He was hired to be the manager of the Chicago Cubs for the 2014 season, but was terminated just a year later. Renteria would stay in Chicago, though, serving as a bench coach for the Chicago White Sox before becoming manager in 2017. On his Mexican pride, Renteria told ESPN "I can't deny who I am. I am Mexican. My parents were both from Mexico. They came here. They gave us an opportunity." As the only Hispanic manager in Major League Baseball, Renteria's influence for Latino youth ball players are not taken for granted.

Marly Rivera

Occupation: MLB Writer/TV Host,ESPN
Hometown: San Juan, Puerto Rico
Age: 42

Rivera, who was born and raised in San Juan before moving to the United States as a teenager, is a bilingual sportswriter and reporter for ESPN and ESPN Deportes. She started her career as an editorial producer and writer at Major League Baseball and an editor at Univision communications before becoming an ESPN beat writer for the New York Yankees as one of the few Hispanic females in the BBWAA (Baseball Writers’ Association of America). More recently, Rivera has been a guest contributor on Béisbol Esta Noche, Sunday Night Baseball, Outside the Lines and SportsCenter. On her Hispanic culture, Rivera told ESPN "I have an accent. My first language is Spanish. I try, I am trying to help your culture, but I still have my culture. You have to respect it. I am not going to give up everything that makes me me just because you don't like it."

Rivera has done tremendous work for her native Puerto Rico, as the island deals with the devastation of Hurricane Maria. Her campaign has accumulated more than $30,000 and is getting closer to the $50,000 goal. Her invaluable voice throughout the disaster has inspired other names in the sports world to contribute.

Ron Rivera

Occupation: Head Coach, Carolina Panthers
Hometown: Fort Ord, CA
Age: 55

Rivera, a former linebacker for the Chicago Bears, is the current head coach of the Carolina Panthers. Rivera was selected in the second round of the 1984 NFL draft, becoming the first person of Puerto Rican and Mexican descent to play in the NFL. After retiring in 1992, he worked in Chicago as a TV analyst covering the Bears before becoming the team's defensive coordinator from 2004-2006. In 2008, Rivera was named defensive coordinator of the San Diego Chargers and received his first NFL head coaching gig with the Panthers in 2011. He was named the NFL Coach of the Year in 2013 and 2015 and has led the Panthers to three straight division titles and an appearance in Super Bowl 50. Rivera, who is of Puerto Rican and Mexican descent, was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2003. Rivera is "the ideal image of a [Hispanic] father figure: stern, but fair," said José Hernández-París, executive director of Charlotte's Latin American Coalition, adding that Rivera and the Panthers do significant work of reaching out to local Hispanics.

Alex Rodriguez

Occupation: MLB Analyst, Fox
Hometown: Miami
Age:42

Rodriguez, nicknamed “A-Rod,” played 22 seasons in the MLB for the Seattle Mariners, Texas Rangers and New York Yankees and won three AL Most Valuable Player awards, 10 Silver Slugger awards and two Gold Glove awards. He has also hit the most home runs by a player of Hispanic descent with 696, fourth-most in MLB history. However, A-Rod has led a controversial career after incurring criticism from the media for his behavior and use of banned performance-enhancing drugs. After announcing his retirement in 2016, Rodriguez has become a media personality, serving as a broadcaster for Fox Sports 1, a cast member of Shark Tank and a member of the ABC News network.

In 2003, he gave $3.9 million to the University of Miami to renovate its baseball stadium and as a result it was re-named "Alex Rodriguez Park at Mark Light Field."

When he came back from suspension in 2015, A-Rod donated $1 million to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Miami-Dade, a donation that arrived in good timing with the Yankees's expansion initiative to serve more children. Rodriguez said of the act, "if it wasn't for the Boys & Girls Club, I wouldn't be in the big leagues today."

Angel Rodriguez

Occupation: Sports Editor, Los Angeles Times
Hometown: Houston
Age: 46

Rodriguez began his journalism career shortly after graduating from the University of Texas at Austin. He has covered U.S. Sports forEFE, helped launch ESPNDeportes, was an online sports producer at the Arizona Republic and was a sports editor at the Cincinnati Enquirer. Rodriguez joined the LA Times as a sports editor in 2015 after spending a year as deputy editor for mobile innovation at the Washington Post. Throughout his career, Rodriguez has consistently aimed to diversify sports by reporting through multiple languages and using digital tools.

Juan Carlos Rodriguez

Occupation: President, UnivisionDeportes
Hometown: Mexico City

Rodriguez began his business career when he co-founded and became CEO ofGrupoEstadio, which, under his leadership, became the leading partner for DIRECTV to product and distribute the 2002 FIFA World Cup. Since 2012, he has served as the president of UnivisionDeportes, the sports division of Univision Communications Inc. He has grown Univision Deportes Network to be the leading sports destination for Hispanic America and was named one of the “31 Most Powerful People in U.S. Soccer” by FourFourTwo. Rodriguez also received the Cynopsis Sports’ 2015 Navigator Award and has led Univision Deportes to four Sports Emmy Awards for excellence in sports coverage.

Tony Romo

Occupation: NFL Analyst, CBS
Hometown: Burlington, WI
Age: 37

Romo, whose grandfather emigrated to the U.S. from Mexico as a teenager, played quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys from 2004-16. In that time, he made four Pro Bowls, threw for over 34,000 yards and established himself as one of the NFL’s most popular athletes. His 97.1 passer rating is the fourth highest of all time.Romowas active in the Dallas community, hosting a youth football camp and participating in activities with United Way, the Make-A-Wish Foundation and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. During his playing days, he would often draw large Hispanic crowds to the Cowboys, telling ESPN he "really appreciates the support [The Hispanic Community] gives us." He announced his retirement in April and was quickly hired by CBS to serve as lead analyst for NFL games. In a short time, he’s established himself as one of the sport’s best broadcasters.

In the Dallas area, Romo has done much work in the community, as he has collaborated with United Way, the Make-A-Wish Foundation, and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. In 2012, as a speaker for "Miracle of the Million" Romo pledged $1 million to its “adopt-a-school” program where local churches help troubled schools.

Armando Salguero

Occupation: Sportswriter, Miami Herald
Hometown: Miami
Age: 54

Salguero, who was born in Havana, Cuba but raised in Miami, has covered South Florida sports since 1982 and the Dolphins and the NFL since 1990. He previously worked as a national reporter for ESPN and is well respected across the NFL and the sports media industry.Salgueroalso serves as a Pro Football Hall of Fame selector and is a voter for the Associated Press All-Pro team and its annual awards. He currently reports and writes for the Miami Herald, where his general sports columns garner frequent attention.

Shea Serrano

Occupation: Writer, The Ringer; Author of ?The Rap Year Book: The Most Important Rap Song From Every Year Since 1979, Discussed, Debated, and Deconstructed
Hometown: San Antonio
Age: 36

Serrano, who is of Mexican descent, began his career as a middle-school science teacher in Houston. After writing for the Near Northwest Banner, Serrano freelanced for the Houston Press in 2007, where he drew national attention for his work on hip-hop and pop culture. He was quickly offered a place at the LA Weekly before writing for ESPN’s Grantland and Bill Simmons’ website, The Ringer, where he currently works. Serrano is best known for his humor and activity on social media, which he frequently uses for charitable causes. In August, Serrano invited Twitter followers to join him in a “F--- Hurricane Harvey” round of donations to support Houston relief work; by the end of the night, they had raised more than $130,000. Serrano’s newest book Basketball (and Other Things) will be published in October 2017.

Mariano Trujillo

Occupation: Analyst, FoxDeportes
Hometown: Mexico City
Age: 40

Trujillo made his professional soccer debut with UNAM Pumas in 1996. After playing for three teams in Mexico from 1996-2007, he signed with Skoda Xanthi of Greece. In 2009, Trujillo signed for Chivas USA and became captain of the team in just his second season. He retired in 2013 and immediately thrived in a new role as host of the news magazine show Fox Deportes En Vivo alongside John Laguna.

Trujillo is an analyst for both English and Spanish markets, lending his talents to both Fox Deportes and Fox Sports as a voice of Mexican fútbol. This is extremely valuable to many US-born Latino soccer fans, who passionately follow the sport in both languages.

Luis Omar Tapia

Occupation: Reporter, Univision Deportes/Fox Sports
Hometown: Santiago, Chile
Age: 54

Tapia currently reports on MX League matches for Univision Deportes and Champions League matches for Fox Sports. He has also worked at ESPN, commentating on world football.Tapiais of Chilean descent and has strived to give back to his community. He founded the “The 90 Minutes Foundation” in the city of Miami to help low-income families and youth in education and sport. Tapia is best known for his catch phrases and nicknames for players and coaches as well as his classic comment before every football match, "Begin 90 minutes of the most beautiful sport in the world."

The 30 Most Influential Hispanics in Sports

Hispanics are reshaping sports in America. With Hispanic Heritage Month upon us, SI is honoring the 30 most influential Latinos in sports who aren’t athletes: the coaches, journalists, CEOs and other innovators who shape American sports culture and industry.This list, which is unranked, defines influence by how each person affects the fan experience. These household names don't just offer a diverse perspective—they enrich the American sports landscape.

Linda G. Alvarado

Occupation: Co-owner, Colorado Rockies
Hometown: Albuquerque
Age: 66

Alvarado is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Alvarado Construction and President of Palo Alto, Inc. Restaurant Company. After making her fortune in the business world, she turned to the sports world. Alvarado became the first Hispanic female co-owner of a major league team, and the first woman ever involved in a formal bid for ownership of a major league baseball team, when she became co-owner of the Rockies. Alvarado was inducted in the National Women’s Hall of Fame in 2003. She has long been a stout advocate for diversity in the work place, especially involving Hispanics. "We advocate for Hispanics and other ethnicities, genders and diverse groups because there is an underutilized talent pool seeking opportunity to create value to the growth and success of the company," she told Hispanic Executive in 2015.

Al Avila

Occupation: Executive Vice President of Baseball Operations/General Manager, Detroit Tigers
Hometown: Havana
Age: 59

Avila began his coaching career as an assistant at St. Thomas University, his alma mater. He was promoted to head coach and served as the school’s athletic director until 1992, when he joined the Florida Marlins and became the director of Latin American operations. Under Avila’s guidance, the Marlins signed 1997 World Series MVP Liván Hernández, who led Florida to their first title in franchise history. In 1998, Avila was promoted to director of scouting and signed 16-year-old Miguel Cabrera, who would become one of baseball’s best hitters, a year later. He was hired as the assistant general manager and vice president of the Detroit Tigers in 2002 and remained in the role until 2015, when he was promoted to general manager and executive vice president of baseball operations. With the promotion, Avila became the first Cuban-born general manager in baseball history. His son, Alex, currently plays catcher for the Chicago Cubs and was an All-Star for Detroit in 2011.

Hugo Balta

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Occupation: Senior Director of Hispanic Initiatives, ESPN
Hometown: Paterson, NJ
Age: 47

Balta began his reporting career as a producer for NY1 in 1994. Since then, he has worked for Telemundo, NBC, MSNBC, WCBS and most recently, ESPN. Baltais responsible for expanding ESPN Deportes’ coverage and was the creator of the bilingual Max y Marly audio podcast and Nación ESPN. He also served as President for the National Association of Hispanic Journalists from 2012-2014 and is the co-founder of the Latino Multimedia Communicators social media group, which shares, discusses and supports professionals and their products of interest to the Latino community. Balta is a passionate advocate for diversity, and his work constantly highlights the beauty of multiculturalism and Hispanic representation.

Luis Gerardo Bucci

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Occupation: Sportscaster, CNN Deportes
Hometown: Caracas, Venezuela
Age: 37

After specializing in sports journalism at the Universidad Simón Bolívar, Bucci began his professional career in radios in his native Venezuela. He first broke through in television at RCTV, where he was a producer and commentator of the 2004 Olympics. Bucci moved to Miami in 2008 where he worked as a reporter and presenter on the GOL TV network. In 2011, he was hired by CNN as a producer and presenter of CNN Sports, and in 2012 became the main driver of the program and sports segments of Our World, Direct USA and World Panorama. Bucci's work can be seen and heard across different CNN platforms including podcasts, radio, video and social media.

Wilmer Cabrera

Occupation: Head Coach, Houston Dynamo
Hometown: Cartagena, Colombia
Age: 50

Throughout an 18-year playing career, Cabrera played for clubs in Colombia, Argentina, Costa Rica and the United States. After retiring, he worked in Major League Soccer’s front office as a community development manager working on Hispanic grassroots and youth programs. He earned his coaching license in 2005 and in 2007, was named head coach of the United States men's national under-17 soccer team, becoming the first Latin American head coach in the U.S. national team system. Cabrera would then become the head coach for MLS clubs Chivas USA and Rio Grande Valley FC Toros before being named the head coach of the Houston Dynamo in 2016.

Andres Cantor

Occupation: Sports Commentator, NBC Deportes/Telemundo
Hometown: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Age: 54

Cantor moved from his hometown Buenos Aires to Southern California as a teenager before graduating from the University of Southern California. After college, he became a soccer play-by-play commentator for Univision and Telemundo, where he introduced his signature bellowing of “Gooooool!” after a score. He quickly became so popular in the U.S. that he appeared on the Late Show with David Letterman and even appeared in a Volkswagen commercial during the 1998 World Cup. Cantor currently works for Telemundo Deportes, where he introduced the first-ever U.S. Spanish-language broadcast of the Olympics. He has also won four Emmys, including the sports Emmy for Outstanding On-Air Personality in Spanish, twice in 2014 and 2017.

Cantor will lead as the Spanish-language voice of the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia on Telemundo.

Cantor also co-founded Fútbol de Primera Radio with his business partner Alejandro Gutman, the largest nationally-syndicated soccer radio network in the United States.Apart from the World Cup, FDP has broadcasted Copa América tournaments, Gold and Confederations Cups. FDP also has a daily sports talk show from Monday through Friday hosted by Cantor.

Oscar De La Hoya

Occupation: Founder,Golden Boy Promotions
Hometown: Montebello, CA
Age: 44

De La Hoya, who is of Mexican descent, competed in boxing from 1992 to 2008, winning ten world titles in six different world classes and finishing with a 39-6 record. De La Hoya has generated over $700 million in pay-per-view income and was the top-rated fighter in the world in 1997 and 1998. Nicknamed “The Golden Boy,” he won a gold medal in the 1992 Barcelona Olympics and is the first American of Mexican descent to own a national boxing promotional firm. His firm, Golden Boy Enterprises is one of boxing’s most active and respected promoters and holds a 25% interest in the Houston Dynamo MLS team. Throughout his career, De La Hoya has been active in the community. In 2005, Golden Boy Enterprises announced the formation of Golden Boy Partners, a company focused on urban development in Latino communities. In 2008, De La Hoya donated $3.5 million to the De La Hoya Animo Charter High School to help underprivileged youth to education. After losing to Manny Pacquiao in 2008, he decided to retire from boxing.

Fernando Fiore

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Occupation: Sportscaster
Hometown: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Age: 57

Fiore is best known as the host of Republica Deportiva, a weekly sports show for Univision, and for anchoring Univision’s FIFA World Cup coverage from 1999 until 2014. He is a two-time Emmy Award winner and is the author of The World Cup: The Ultimate Guide to the Greatest Sports Spectacle in the World. A legend among Spanish-speaking sports fans, Fiore is renowned for bringing his contagious energy and passion to the broadcast booth, resulting in a comedic analysis of the game. You will see more of Fiore when the World Cup comes around, as he is a vital member of Fox's coverage in Russia.

Esther Garcia

Occupation: Vice President, Heineken’s Tecate and TecateLight
Hometown: Madrid, Spain
Age: 40

Originally from Madrid, Garcia worked at Heineken Spain before taking a break to work for other consumer brands. In 2015, Garcia rejoined Heineken as the Vice President for Tecate beer, named after a city in Baja California, Mexico. The Tecate exec is best known for partnering Heineken with the Champions League, a soccer league that counts more than 4.2 billion fans globally. Garcia was named to Ad Week’s “Most Powerful Women in Sports” in June. She currently lives with her family in Dobbs Ferry, New York.

Mònica González

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Occupation: Announcer, Founder of Gonzo Soccer
Hometown: Corpus Christi, TX
Age: 38

Gonzalez was a founding member in 1998 of the Mexican Women’s National team and helped lead the team in the 1999 FIFA Women’s World Cup. She played for the Mexican National Team for 13 years and was captain from 2003-07. During her career, González played in 83 international games and scored 10 goals. In 2011, she was hired by ESPN as a studio analyst for the 2011 Women’s World Cup and has since become a sideline reporter for Major League Soccer. She has also announced games for NBC Universo and Fox Deportes and, in 2016, was the only woman calling games in the UEFA Champions League.

Gonzalez's most valuable job title, however, is her role as co-founder and director of Gonzo Soccer, a non-profit organization that teaches soccer, life and leaderships to girls in Hispanic communities. What started as a soccer clinic in the lower west side of Chicago in 2009, the program now helps more than 900 girls worldwide, with academies in the U.S, Mexico and Colombia.

Earlier this year, Gonzalez joined other ex-professionals and The Equal Playing Field (EPF) Initiative and climbed Mount Kilamanjaro to play the highest 90-minute match ever recorded to raise awareness for gender inequality.

Tony Gonzalez

Occupation: NFL studio analyst, FOX NFL Kickoff
Hometown: Torrance, CA
Age: 41

Gonzalez, who is of a mixed background, played 17 seasons in the NFL for the Kansas City Chiefs and the Atlanta Falcons. "One of the most common questions I get in my lifetime, and Tony gets it too: What are you?" said Gonzalez's older brother, Chris. "I just say we're mixed - black, white, Jamaican, Hispanic, Portuguese." Gonzalez has been selected to 14 Pro Bowls in his career and currently holds the NFL record for total receiving yards by a tight end with 15,127. He also has the second-most receptions by any player all-time with 1325 and was well known for his durability, missing just two games in his career. While playing for the Chiefs, he co-founded All-Pro Science, a sports nutrition company, and starred in xXx: Return of Xander Cage, playing Paul Donovan in his first feature film role. Immediately after retirement, Gonzalez became an analyst on CBS's NFL pregame show NFL Today. He worked for CBS until the end of the 2016 season before being added to FOX's pregame show in May.

In 2009, Gonzalez co-authored The All-Pro Diet with Mitzi Dulan, the former nutritionist for the Chiefs, detailing his diet and workout routine. The aim was to provide information and help for others (athletes and non-athletes) to follow the same path.

In his rookie year, Gonzalez joined the Shadow Buddies Foundation, an organization that provides support and knowledge to children with severe illnesses and disabilities. When he moved to Atlanta he continued this program with children's hospitals in the city.

Dan Le Batard

Occupation: Sportswriter/Television Host, Miami Herald, ESPN
Hometown: Miami
Age: 48

Le Batard, whose parents were exiled from Cuba, is an American sportswriter, radio host and television reporter. He is most known for his radio show The Dan Le Batard show and for hosting Highly Questionable, which airs daily on ESPN. "It's rare to have a show that embraces heritage," Erik Rydholm, executive producer at ESPN said of the show, which features Le Batard and his father and targets a Hispanic audience. "It has to have family and that connection with viewers." Le Batard also frequently serves as a host for Pardon the Interruption and writes for his hometown paper, the Miami Herald. He is lauded for his self-deprecating humor and often writes about controversial topics such as race. His candor has made him one of the most respected journalists in the industry and has led to a devoted fan base.

Valeria Marín

Occupation: Host/Reporter, Fox Deportes/NFLeros
Hometown: Mexico City

Marín joined Fox Deportes in 2013 as part of Central Fox, the network’s leading sports news program. In 2015, she began covering the NFL and MLB for Fox Deportes En Vivo. Marín began her career covering Mexican Tennis at the newspaper “Impacto” before becoming a host and reporter of La Aficion at Milenio TV. She was also a commentator for Telivisa Deportes Network and Televis Deportes W Radio. On her show NFLeros, Marín often highlights Hispanic athletes and uses social media to interact with the community.

Gerardo “Tata” Martino

Occupation: Head Coach, Atlanta United FC
Hometown: Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina
Age: 54

Martino is an icon in his native Rosario because of his success with local club Newell’s Old Boys. He holds the record of appearances with the team, playing a total of 505 matches in 14 years with the club. He was also selected in a fan’s poll as the best player throughout the club’s history. After retiring from soccer, Martino continued his success as a manager. In 2013, he was chosen as manager of FC Barcelona, but resigned just a year later after a runner-up La Liga finish. In 2015, he led Argentina to the Copa América Final, but resigned in 2016 after losing to Chile in two consecutive finals. Martino currently manages MLS expansion club Atlanta FC, who reached the playoffs in its first season. His presence in the U.S not only elevates the league's reputation, but due to his passion for youth, local development, Atlanta has a manager who has a vision that can help the city's multicultural talent.

Jessica Mendoza

Occupation: MLB Analyst, ESPN
Hometown: Camarillo, CA
Age: 36

Mendoza was a four-time First Team All-American softball player for the Stanford Cardinals between 1999-2002 and a former member of the US women’s national team between 2004-2010.She won gold at the 2004 Olympics in Athens, and a silver medal at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing.On August 24, 2015 she became the first female analyst in the history of Major League Baseball. She is currently a broadcaster for ESPN’s Sunday Night Baseball and analyzed her first MLB post-season series on ESPN radio on Saturday. On her Hispanic heritage, Mendoza told ESPN she felt Latinas needed to "Embrace the fact that you are different." She often points her source of inspiration to her father, who was a first-generation Mexican-American that taught her to love her Hispanic roots.

Mendoza is a past president of Women Sports Foundation, an organization founded by Billie Jean King in 1974 aimed to advance the lives of women and girls through sports and physical activity. During the 2008 Olympics, she was also an athletic ambassador for Team Darfur, which was devoted to raising awareness of humanitarian crises related to War in Darfur.

Arte Moreno

Occupation: Owner, Los Angeles Angels
Hometown: Tuscon, AZ
Age: 71

Moreno earned his fortune through advertising and was hired by billboard company Outdoor Systems in 1984. After taking Outdoor Systems public in 1996, Moreno sold the company to Infinity Broadcasting for $8 billion. In 2003, he became the first Mexican-American to own a major sports team in the United States when he purchased the Anaheim Angels from the Walt Disney Company. Moreno led the Angels to division titles from 2004-2009 and 2014. In the community, he established the Moreno Family Foundation, which supports non-profit organizations focusing on youth and education as well as athletic programs at the University of Arizona.

Marisabel Muñoz

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Occupation: Major League Soccer, Vice President of Communications
Hometown: Miami
Age: 37

Muñoz developed a passion for soccer while growing up in Miami, leading to her career in sports journalism with The Miami Herald and ESPN The Magazine. She became involved with the MLS in 2002 and has played an important role in establishing relationships with League broadcast partners, including Univision, ESPN and FOX.Muñozis also responsible for the league’s U.S. Hispanic initiatives, including the Sueño MLS reality show and the league’s Spanish-language digital platform, FutbolMLS.com. The strong relationship between Hispanic soccer fans and Major League Soccer is a testament to her work as both an executive and a passionate fútbol fan.

Sandy Nunez

Occupation: Coordinating Producer, ESPN
Hometown: Los Angeles
Age: 53

Sandy Nunez is a Coordinating Producing overseeing all SportsCenter production for ESPN in Los Angeles. SportsCenter production in LA includes SC Coast to Coast with anchors Cari Champion and David Lloyd as well as the late night SportsCenter Los Angeles with Neil Everett and Stan Verrett. Nunez is currently a member of the Los Angeles chapter of Women in Sports and Events (WISE). She also serves on the Board of Managers of Ketchum-Downtown YMCA.Earlier this month, Nunez was named one of “Los Angeles Most Influential Latina Journalists” by the California Chicano News Media Association (CCNMA.)

She is the only Latina who holds her position of coordinating producer at ESPN.

Fernando Palomo

Occupation: International Football Analyst, ESPN
Hometown: San Salvador, El Salvador
Age: 44

Palomo started his broadcasting career in 1999 with Channel 4 TV in San Salvador covering events including the Olympics and the Pan American Games. He joined ESPN in 2000 as a SportsCenter anchor for ESPN in Latin America and served as an anchor for Sportscenter for ESPN Deportes from 2004-06.Palomocurrently covers European soccer as a Spanish commentator and is the host of Fuera de Juego, ESPN Deportes’ highest-rated international program. In July 2012, he was chosen to be the voices for the FIFA video game franchise and has appeared in their Spanish versions since FIFA 13. This role has helped Palomo influence millions of young people who are introduced to the beautiful game.Palomowas also a member of the National Track and Field team of El Salvador and is the country’s record-holder in the javelin throw.

Rick Renteria

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Occupation: Manager, Chicago White Sox
Hometown: Harbor City, CA
Age: 55

After playing in South Gate, California, Renteria was drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates with the 20th overall pick in the 1980 Major League Baseball draft. Renteria played five seasons in the Majors and two seasons with the Mexican League's Jalisco Charros before coaching and managing in the Marlins organization until 2001, and in the San Diego Padres organization until 2013, the same year he managed the Mexico national team in the World Baseball Classic. He was hired to be the manager of the Chicago Cubs for the 2014 season, but was terminated just a year later. Renteria would stay in Chicago, though, serving as a bench coach for the Chicago White Sox before becoming manager in 2017. On his Mexican pride, Renteria told ESPN "I can't deny who I am. I am Mexican. My parents were both from Mexico. They came here. They gave us an opportunity." As the only Hispanic manager in Major League Baseball, Renteria's influence for Latino youth ball players are not taken for granted.

Marly Rivera

Occupation: MLB Writer/TV Host,ESPN
Hometown: San Juan, Puerto Rico
Age: 42

Rivera, who was born and raised in San Juan before moving to the United States as a teenager, is a bilingual sportswriter and reporter for ESPN and ESPN Deportes. She started her career as an editorial producer and writer at Major League Baseball and an editor at Univision communications before becoming an ESPN beat writer for the New York Yankees as one of the few Hispanic females in the BBWAA (Baseball Writers’ Association of America). More recently, Rivera has been a guest contributor on Béisbol Esta Noche, Sunday Night Baseball, Outside the Lines and SportsCenter. On her Hispanic culture, Rivera told ESPN "I have an accent. My first language is Spanish. I try, I am trying to help your culture, but I still have my culture. You have to respect it. I am not going to give up everything that makes me me just because you don't like it."

Rivera has done tremendous work for her native Puerto Rico, as the island deals with the devastation of Hurricane Maria. Her campaign has accumulated more than $30,000 and is getting closer to the $50,000 goal. Her invaluable voice throughout the disaster has inspired other names in the sports world to contribute.

Ron Rivera

Occupation: Head Coach, Carolina Panthers
Hometown: Fort Ord, CA
Age: 55

Rivera, a former linebacker for the Chicago Bears, is the current head coach of the Carolina Panthers. Rivera was selected in the second round of the 1984 NFL draft, becoming the first person of Puerto Rican and Mexican descent to play in the NFL. After retiring in 1992, he worked in Chicago as a TV analyst covering the Bears before becoming the team's defensive coordinator from 2004-2006. In 2008, Rivera was named defensive coordinator of the San Diego Chargers and received his first NFL head coaching gig with the Panthers in 2011. He was named the NFL Coach of the Year in 2013 and 2015 and has led the Panthers to three straight division titles and an appearance in Super Bowl 50. Rivera, who is of Puerto Rican and Mexican descent, was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2003. Rivera is "the ideal image of a [Hispanic] father figure: stern, but fair," said José Hernández-París, executive director of Charlotte's Latin American Coalition, adding that Rivera and the Panthers do significant work of reaching out to local Hispanics.

Alex Rodriguez

Occupation: MLB Analyst, Fox
Hometown: Miami
Age:42

Rodriguez, nicknamed “A-Rod,” played 22 seasons in the MLB for the Seattle Mariners, Texas Rangers and New York Yankees and won three AL Most Valuable Player awards, 10 Silver Slugger awards and two Gold Glove awards. He has also hit the most home runs by a player of Hispanic descent with 696, fourth-most in MLB history. However, A-Rod has led a controversial career after incurring criticism from the media for his behavior and use of banned performance-enhancing drugs. After announcing his retirement in 2016, Rodriguez has become a media personality, serving as a broadcaster for Fox Sports 1, a cast member of Shark Tank and a member of the ABC News network.

In 2003, he gave $3.9 million to the University of Miami to renovate its baseball stadium and as a result it was re-named "Alex Rodriguez Park at Mark Light Field."

When he came back from suspension in 2015, A-Rod donated $1 million to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Miami-Dade, a donation that arrived in good timing with the Yankees's expansion initiative to serve more children. Rodriguez said of the act, "if it wasn't for the Boys & Girls Club, I wouldn't be in the big leagues today."

Angel Rodriguez

Occupation: Sports Editor, Los Angeles Times
Hometown: Houston
Age: 46

Rodriguez began his journalism career shortly after graduating from the University of Texas at Austin. He has covered U.S. Sports forEFE, helped launch ESPNDeportes, was an online sports producer at the Arizona Republic and was a sports editor at the Cincinnati Enquirer. Rodriguez joined the LA Times as a sports editor in 2015 after spending a year as deputy editor for mobile innovation at the Washington Post. Throughout his career, Rodriguez has consistently aimed to diversify sports by reporting through multiple languages and using digital tools.

Juan Carlos Rodriguez

Occupation: President, UnivisionDeportes
Hometown: Mexico City

Rodriguez began his business career when he co-founded and became CEO ofGrupoEstadio, which, under his leadership, became the leading partner for DIRECTV to product and distribute the 2002 FIFA World Cup. Since 2012, he has served as the president of UnivisionDeportes, the sports division of Univision Communications Inc. He has grown Univision Deportes Network to be the leading sports destination for Hispanic America and was named one of the “31 Most Powerful People in U.S. Soccer” by FourFourTwo. Rodriguez also received the Cynopsis Sports’ 2015 Navigator Award and has led Univision Deportes to four Sports Emmy Awards for excellence in sports coverage.

Tony Romo

Occupation: NFL Analyst, CBS
Hometown: Burlington, WI
Age: 37

Romo, whose grandfather emigrated to the U.S. from Mexico as a teenager, played quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys from 2004-16. In that time, he made four Pro Bowls, threw for over 34,000 yards and established himself as one of the NFL’s most popular athletes. His 97.1 passer rating is the fourth highest of all time.Romowas active in the Dallas community, hosting a youth football camp and participating in activities with United Way, the Make-A-Wish Foundation and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. During his playing days, he would often draw large Hispanic crowds to the Cowboys, telling ESPN he "really appreciates the support [The Hispanic Community] gives us." He announced his retirement in April and was quickly hired by CBS to serve as lead analyst for NFL games. In a short time, he’s established himself as one of the sport’s best broadcasters.

In the Dallas area, Romo has done much work in the community, as he has collaborated with United Way, the Make-A-Wish Foundation, and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. In 2012, as a speaker for "Miracle of the Million" Romo pledged $1 million to its “adopt-a-school” program where local churches help troubled schools.

Armando Salguero

Occupation: Sportswriter, Miami Herald
Hometown: Miami
Age: 54

Salguero, who was born in Havana, Cuba but raised in Miami, has covered South Florida sports since 1982 and the Dolphins and the NFL since 1990. He previously worked as a national reporter for ESPN and is well respected across the NFL and the sports media industry.Salgueroalso serves as a Pro Football Hall of Fame selector and is a voter for the Associated Press All-Pro team and its annual awards. He currently reports and writes for the Miami Herald, where his general sports columns garner frequent attention.

Shea Serrano

Occupation: Writer, The Ringer; Author of ?The Rap Year Book: The Most Important Rap Song From Every Year Since 1979, Discussed, Debated, and Deconstructed
Hometown: San Antonio
Age: 36

Serrano, who is of Mexican descent, began his career as a middle-school science teacher in Houston. After writing for the Near Northwest Banner, Serrano freelanced for the Houston Press in 2007, where he drew national attention for his work on hip-hop and pop culture. He was quickly offered a place at the LA Weekly before writing for ESPN’s Grantland and Bill Simmons’ website, The Ringer, where he currently works. Serrano is best known for his humor and activity on social media, which he frequently uses for charitable causes. In August, Serrano invited Twitter followers to join him in a “F--- Hurricane Harvey” round of donations to support Houston relief work; by the end of the night, they had raised more than $130,000. Serrano’s newest book Basketball (and Other Things) will be published in October 2017.

Mariano Trujillo

Occupation: Analyst, FoxDeportes
Hometown: Mexico City
Age: 40

Trujillo made his professional soccer debut with UNAM Pumas in 1996. After playing for three teams in Mexico from 1996-2007, he signed with Skoda Xanthi of Greece. In 2009, Trujillo signed for Chivas USA and became captain of the team in just his second season. He retired in 2013 and immediately thrived in a new role as host of the news magazine show Fox Deportes En Vivo alongside John Laguna.

Trujillo is an analyst for both English and Spanish markets, lending his talents to both Fox Deportes and Fox Sports as a voice of Mexican fútbol. This is extremely valuable to many US-born Latino soccer fans, who passionately follow the sport in both languages.

Luis Omar Tapia

Occupation: Reporter, Univision Deportes/Fox Sports
Hometown: Santiago, Chile
Age: 54

Tapia currently reports on MX League matches for Univision Deportes and Champions League matches for Fox Sports. He has also worked at ESPN, commentating on world football.Tapiais of Chilean descent and has strived to give back to his community. He founded the “The 90 Minutes Foundation” in the city of Miami to help low-income families and youth in education and sport. Tapia is best known for his catch phrases and nicknames for players and coaches as well as his classic comment before every football match, "Begin 90 minutes of the most beautiful sport in the world."

The 30 Most Influential Hispanics in Sports

Hispanics are reshaping sports in America. With Hispanic Heritage Month upon us, SI is honoring the 30 most influential Latinos in sports who aren’t athletes: the coaches, journalists, CEOs and other innovators who shape American sports culture and industry.This list, which is unranked, defines influence by how each person affects the fan experience. These household names don't just offer a diverse perspective—they enrich the American sports landscape.

Linda G. Alvarado

Occupation: Co-owner, Colorado Rockies
Hometown: Albuquerque
Age: 66

Alvarado is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Alvarado Construction and President of Palo Alto, Inc. Restaurant Company. After making her fortune in the business world, she turned to the sports world. Alvarado became the first Hispanic female co-owner of a major league team, and the first woman ever involved in a formal bid for ownership of a major league baseball team, when she became co-owner of the Rockies. Alvarado was inducted in the National Women’s Hall of Fame in 2003. She has long been a stout advocate for diversity in the work place, especially involving Hispanics. "We advocate for Hispanics and other ethnicities, genders and diverse groups because there is an underutilized talent pool seeking opportunity to create value to the growth and success of the company," she told Hispanic Executive in 2015.

Al Avila

Occupation: Executive Vice President of Baseball Operations/General Manager, Detroit Tigers
Hometown: Havana
Age: 59

Avila began his coaching career as an assistant at St. Thomas University, his alma mater. He was promoted to head coach and served as the school’s athletic director until 1992, when he joined the Florida Marlins and became the director of Latin American operations. Under Avila’s guidance, the Marlins signed 1997 World Series MVP Liván Hernández, who led Florida to their first title in franchise history. In 1998, Avila was promoted to director of scouting and signed 16-year-old Miguel Cabrera, who would become one of baseball’s best hitters, a year later. He was hired as the assistant general manager and vice president of the Detroit Tigers in 2002 and remained in the role until 2015, when he was promoted to general manager and executive vice president of baseball operations. With the promotion, Avila became the first Cuban-born general manager in baseball history. His son, Alex, currently plays catcher for the Chicago Cubs and was an All-Star for Detroit in 2011.

Hugo Balta

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Occupation: Senior Director of Hispanic Initiatives, ESPN
Hometown: Paterson, NJ
Age: 47

Balta began his reporting career as a producer for NY1 in 1994. Since then, he has worked for Telemundo, NBC, MSNBC, WCBS and most recently, ESPN. Baltais responsible for expanding ESPN Deportes’ coverage and was the creator of the bilingual Max y Marly audio podcast and Nación ESPN. He also served as President for the National Association of Hispanic Journalists from 2012-2014 and is the co-founder of the Latino Multimedia Communicators social media group, which shares, discusses and supports professionals and their products of interest to the Latino community. Balta is a passionate advocate for diversity, and his work constantly highlights the beauty of multiculturalism and Hispanic representation.

Luis Gerardo Bucci

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Occupation: Sportscaster, CNN Deportes
Hometown: Caracas, Venezuela
Age: 37

After specializing in sports journalism at the Universidad Simón Bolívar, Bucci began his professional career in radios in his native Venezuela. He first broke through in television at RCTV, where he was a producer and commentator of the 2004 Olympics. Bucci moved to Miami in 2008 where he worked as a reporter and presenter on the GOL TV network. In 2011, he was hired by CNN as a producer and presenter of CNN Sports, and in 2012 became the main driver of the program and sports segments of Our World, Direct USA and World Panorama. Bucci's work can be seen and heard across different CNN platforms including podcasts, radio, video and social media.

Wilmer Cabrera

Occupation: Head Coach, Houston Dynamo
Hometown: Cartagena, Colombia
Age: 50

Throughout an 18-year playing career, Cabrera played for clubs in Colombia, Argentina, Costa Rica and the United States. After retiring, he worked in Major League Soccer’s front office as a community development manager working on Hispanic grassroots and youth programs. He earned his coaching license in 2005 and in 2007, was named head coach of the United States men's national under-17 soccer team, becoming the first Latin American head coach in the U.S. national team system. Cabrera would then become the head coach for MLS clubs Chivas USA and Rio Grande Valley FC Toros before being named the head coach of the Houston Dynamo in 2016.

Andres Cantor

Occupation: Sports Commentator, NBC Deportes/Telemundo
Hometown: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Age: 54

Cantor moved from his hometown Buenos Aires to Southern California as a teenager before graduating from the University of Southern California. After college, he became a soccer play-by-play commentator for Univision and Telemundo, where he introduced his signature bellowing of “Gooooool!” after a score. He quickly became so popular in the U.S. that he appeared on the Late Show with David Letterman and even appeared in a Volkswagen commercial during the 1998 World Cup. Cantor currently works for Telemundo Deportes, where he introduced the first-ever U.S. Spanish-language broadcast of the Olympics. He has also won four Emmys, including the sports Emmy for Outstanding On-Air Personality in Spanish, twice in 2014 and 2017.

Cantor will lead as the Spanish-language voice of the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia on Telemundo.

Cantor also co-founded Fútbol de Primera Radio with his business partner Alejandro Gutman, the largest nationally-syndicated soccer radio network in the United States.Apart from the World Cup, FDP has broadcasted Copa América tournaments, Gold and Confederations Cups. FDP also has a daily sports talk show from Monday through Friday hosted by Cantor.

Oscar De La Hoya

Occupation: Founder,Golden Boy Promotions
Hometown: Montebello, CA
Age: 44

De La Hoya, who is of Mexican descent, competed in boxing from 1992 to 2008, winning ten world titles in six different world classes and finishing with a 39-6 record. De La Hoya has generated over $700 million in pay-per-view income and was the top-rated fighter in the world in 1997 and 1998. Nicknamed “The Golden Boy,” he won a gold medal in the 1992 Barcelona Olympics and is the first American of Mexican descent to own a national boxing promotional firm. His firm, Golden Boy Enterprises is one of boxing’s most active and respected promoters and holds a 25% interest in the Houston Dynamo MLS team. Throughout his career, De La Hoya has been active in the community. In 2005, Golden Boy Enterprises announced the formation of Golden Boy Partners, a company focused on urban development in Latino communities. In 2008, De La Hoya donated $3.5 million to the De La Hoya Animo Charter High School to help underprivileged youth to education. After losing to Manny Pacquiao in 2008, he decided to retire from boxing.

Fernando Fiore

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Occupation: Sportscaster
Hometown: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Age: 57

Fiore is best known as the host of Republica Deportiva, a weekly sports show for Univision, and for anchoring Univision’s FIFA World Cup coverage from 1999 until 2014. He is a two-time Emmy Award winner and is the author of The World Cup: The Ultimate Guide to the Greatest Sports Spectacle in the World. A legend among Spanish-speaking sports fans, Fiore is renowned for bringing his contagious energy and passion to the broadcast booth, resulting in a comedic analysis of the game. You will see more of Fiore when the World Cup comes around, as he is a vital member of Fox's coverage in Russia.

Esther Garcia

Occupation: Vice President, Heineken’s Tecate and TecateLight
Hometown: Madrid, Spain
Age: 40

Originally from Madrid, Garcia worked at Heineken Spain before taking a break to work for other consumer brands. In 2015, Garcia rejoined Heineken as the Vice President for Tecate beer, named after a city in Baja California, Mexico. The Tecate exec is best known for partnering Heineken with the Champions League, a soccer league that counts more than 4.2 billion fans globally. Garcia was named to Ad Week’s “Most Powerful Women in Sports” in June. She currently lives with her family in Dobbs Ferry, New York.

Mònica González

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Occupation: Announcer, Founder of Gonzo Soccer
Hometown: Corpus Christi, TX
Age: 38

Gonzalez was a founding member in 1998 of the Mexican Women’s National team and helped lead the team in the 1999 FIFA Women’s World Cup. She played for the Mexican National Team for 13 years and was captain from 2003-07. During her career, González played in 83 international games and scored 10 goals. In 2011, she was hired by ESPN as a studio analyst for the 2011 Women’s World Cup and has since become a sideline reporter for Major League Soccer. She has also announced games for NBC Universo and Fox Deportes and, in 2016, was the only woman calling games in the UEFA Champions League.

Gonzalez's most valuable job title, however, is her role as co-founder and director of Gonzo Soccer, a non-profit organization that teaches soccer, life and leaderships to girls in Hispanic communities. What started as a soccer clinic in the lower west side of Chicago in 2009, the program now helps more than 900 girls worldwide, with academies in the U.S, Mexico and Colombia.

Earlier this year, Gonzalez joined other ex-professionals and The Equal Playing Field (EPF) Initiative and climbed Mount Kilamanjaro to play the highest 90-minute match ever recorded to raise awareness for gender inequality.

Tony Gonzalez

Occupation: NFL studio analyst, FOX NFL Kickoff
Hometown: Torrance, CA
Age: 41

Gonzalez, who is of a mixed background, played 17 seasons in the NFL for the Kansas City Chiefs and the Atlanta Falcons. "One of the most common questions I get in my lifetime, and Tony gets it too: What are you?" said Gonzalez's older brother, Chris. "I just say we're mixed - black, white, Jamaican, Hispanic, Portuguese." Gonzalez has been selected to 14 Pro Bowls in his career and currently holds the NFL record for total receiving yards by a tight end with 15,127. He also has the second-most receptions by any player all-time with 1325 and was well known for his durability, missing just two games in his career. While playing for the Chiefs, he co-founded All-Pro Science, a sports nutrition company, and starred in xXx: Return of Xander Cage, playing Paul Donovan in his first feature film role. Immediately after retirement, Gonzalez became an analyst on CBS's NFL pregame show NFL Today. He worked for CBS until the end of the 2016 season before being added to FOX's pregame show in May.

In 2009, Gonzalez co-authored The All-Pro Diet with Mitzi Dulan, the former nutritionist for the Chiefs, detailing his diet and workout routine. The aim was to provide information and help for others (athletes and non-athletes) to follow the same path.

In his rookie year, Gonzalez joined the Shadow Buddies Foundation, an organization that provides support and knowledge to children with severe illnesses and disabilities. When he moved to Atlanta he continued this program with children's hospitals in the city.

Dan Le Batard

Occupation: Sportswriter/Television Host, Miami Herald, ESPN
Hometown: Miami
Age: 48

Le Batard, whose parents were exiled from Cuba, is an American sportswriter, radio host and television reporter. He is most known for his radio show The Dan Le Batard show and for hosting Highly Questionable, which airs daily on ESPN. "It's rare to have a show that embraces heritage," Erik Rydholm, executive producer at ESPN said of the show, which features Le Batard and his father and targets a Hispanic audience. "It has to have family and that connection with viewers." Le Batard also frequently serves as a host for Pardon the Interruption and writes for his hometown paper, the Miami Herald. He is lauded for his self-deprecating humor and often writes about controversial topics such as race. His candor has made him one of the most respected journalists in the industry and has led to a devoted fan base.

Valeria Marín

Occupation: Host/Reporter, Fox Deportes/NFLeros
Hometown: Mexico City

Marín joined Fox Deportes in 2013 as part of Central Fox, the network’s leading sports news program. In 2015, she began covering the NFL and MLB for Fox Deportes En Vivo. Marín began her career covering Mexican Tennis at the newspaper “Impacto” before becoming a host and reporter of La Aficion at Milenio TV. She was also a commentator for Telivisa Deportes Network and Televis Deportes W Radio. On her show NFLeros, Marín often highlights Hispanic athletes and uses social media to interact with the community.

Gerardo “Tata” Martino

Occupation: Head Coach, Atlanta United FC
Hometown: Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina
Age: 54

Martino is an icon in his native Rosario because of his success with local club Newell’s Old Boys. He holds the record of appearances with the team, playing a total of 505 matches in 14 years with the club. He was also selected in a fan’s poll as the best player throughout the club’s history. After retiring from soccer, Martino continued his success as a manager. In 2013, he was chosen as manager of FC Barcelona, but resigned just a year later after a runner-up La Liga finish. In 2015, he led Argentina to the Copa América Final, but resigned in 2016 after losing to Chile in two consecutive finals. Martino currently manages MLS expansion club Atlanta FC, who reached the playoffs in its first season. His presence in the U.S not only elevates the league's reputation, but due to his passion for youth, local development, Atlanta has a manager who has a vision that can help the city's multicultural talent.

Jessica Mendoza

Occupation: MLB Analyst, ESPN
Hometown: Camarillo, CA
Age: 36

Mendoza was a four-time First Team All-American softball player for the Stanford Cardinals between 1999-2002 and a former member of the US women’s national team between 2004-2010.She won gold at the 2004 Olympics in Athens, and a silver medal at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing.On August 24, 2015 she became the first female analyst in the history of Major League Baseball. She is currently a broadcaster for ESPN’s Sunday Night Baseball and analyzed her first MLB post-season series on ESPN radio on Saturday. On her Hispanic heritage, Mendoza told ESPN she felt Latinas needed to "Embrace the fact that you are different." She often points her source of inspiration to her father, who was a first-generation Mexican-American that taught her to love her Hispanic roots.

Mendoza is a past president of Women Sports Foundation, an organization founded by Billie Jean King in 1974 aimed to advance the lives of women and girls through sports and physical activity. During the 2008 Olympics, she was also an athletic ambassador for Team Darfur, which was devoted to raising awareness of humanitarian crises related to War in Darfur.

Arte Moreno

Occupation: Owner, Los Angeles Angels
Hometown: Tuscon, AZ
Age: 71

Moreno earned his fortune through advertising and was hired by billboard company Outdoor Systems in 1984. After taking Outdoor Systems public in 1996, Moreno sold the company to Infinity Broadcasting for $8 billion. In 2003, he became the first Mexican-American to own a major sports team in the United States when he purchased the Anaheim Angels from the Walt Disney Company. Moreno led the Angels to division titles from 2004-2009 and 2014. In the community, he established the Moreno Family Foundation, which supports non-profit organizations focusing on youth and education as well as athletic programs at the University of Arizona.

Marisabel Muñoz

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Occupation: Major League Soccer, Vice President of Communications
Hometown: Miami
Age: 37

Muñoz developed a passion for soccer while growing up in Miami, leading to her career in sports journalism with The Miami Herald and ESPN The Magazine. She became involved with the MLS in 2002 and has played an important role in establishing relationships with League broadcast partners, including Univision, ESPN and FOX.Muñozis also responsible for the league’s U.S. Hispanic initiatives, including the Sueño MLS reality show and the league’s Spanish-language digital platform, FutbolMLS.com. The strong relationship between Hispanic soccer fans and Major League Soccer is a testament to her work as both an executive and a passionate fútbol fan.

Sandy Nunez

Occupation: Coordinating Producer, ESPN
Hometown: Los Angeles
Age: 53

Sandy Nunez is a Coordinating Producing overseeing all SportsCenter production for ESPN in Los Angeles. SportsCenter production in LA includes SC Coast to Coast with anchors Cari Champion and David Lloyd as well as the late night SportsCenter Los Angeles with Neil Everett and Stan Verrett. Nunez is currently a member of the Los Angeles chapter of Women in Sports and Events (WISE). She also serves on the Board of Managers of Ketchum-Downtown YMCA.Earlier this month, Nunez was named one of “Los Angeles Most Influential Latina Journalists” by the California Chicano News Media Association (CCNMA.)

She is the only Latina who holds her position of coordinating producer at ESPN.

Fernando Palomo

Occupation: International Football Analyst, ESPN
Hometown: San Salvador, El Salvador
Age: 44

Palomo started his broadcasting career in 1999 with Channel 4 TV in San Salvador covering events including the Olympics and the Pan American Games. He joined ESPN in 2000 as a SportsCenter anchor for ESPN in Latin America and served as an anchor for Sportscenter for ESPN Deportes from 2004-06.Palomocurrently covers European soccer as a Spanish commentator and is the host of Fuera de Juego, ESPN Deportes’ highest-rated international program. In July 2012, he was chosen to be the voices for the FIFA video game franchise and has appeared in their Spanish versions since FIFA 13. This role has helped Palomo influence millions of young people who are introduced to the beautiful game.Palomowas also a member of the National Track and Field team of El Salvador and is the country’s record-holder in the javelin throw.

Rick Renteria

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Occupation: Manager, Chicago White Sox
Hometown: Harbor City, CA
Age: 55

After playing in South Gate, California, Renteria was drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates with the 20th overall pick in the 1980 Major League Baseball draft. Renteria played five seasons in the Majors and two seasons with the Mexican League's Jalisco Charros before coaching and managing in the Marlins organization until 2001, and in the San Diego Padres organization until 2013, the same year he managed the Mexico national team in the World Baseball Classic. He was hired to be the manager of the Chicago Cubs for the 2014 season, but was terminated just a year later. Renteria would stay in Chicago, though, serving as a bench coach for the Chicago White Sox before becoming manager in 2017. On his Mexican pride, Renteria told ESPN "I can't deny who I am. I am Mexican. My parents were both from Mexico. They came here. They gave us an opportunity." As the only Hispanic manager in Major League Baseball, Renteria's influence for Latino youth ball players are not taken for granted.

Marly Rivera

Occupation: MLB Writer/TV Host,ESPN
Hometown: San Juan, Puerto Rico
Age: 42

Rivera, who was born and raised in San Juan before moving to the United States as a teenager, is a bilingual sportswriter and reporter for ESPN and ESPN Deportes. She started her career as an editorial producer and writer at Major League Baseball and an editor at Univision communications before becoming an ESPN beat writer for the New York Yankees as one of the few Hispanic females in the BBWAA (Baseball Writers’ Association of America). More recently, Rivera has been a guest contributor on Béisbol Esta Noche, Sunday Night Baseball, Outside the Lines and SportsCenter. On her Hispanic culture, Rivera told ESPN "I have an accent. My first language is Spanish. I try, I am trying to help your culture, but I still have my culture. You have to respect it. I am not going to give up everything that makes me me just because you don't like it."

Rivera has done tremendous work for her native Puerto Rico, as the island deals with the devastation of Hurricane Maria. Her campaign has accumulated more than $30,000 and is getting closer to the $50,000 goal. Her invaluable voice throughout the disaster has inspired other names in the sports world to contribute.

Ron Rivera

Occupation: Head Coach, Carolina Panthers
Hometown: Fort Ord, CA
Age: 55

Rivera, a former linebacker for the Chicago Bears, is the current head coach of the Carolina Panthers. Rivera was selected in the second round of the 1984 NFL draft, becoming the first person of Puerto Rican and Mexican descent to play in the NFL. After retiring in 1992, he worked in Chicago as a TV analyst covering the Bears before becoming the team's defensive coordinator from 2004-2006. In 2008, Rivera was named defensive coordinator of the San Diego Chargers and received his first NFL head coaching gig with the Panthers in 2011. He was named the NFL Coach of the Year in 2013 and 2015 and has led the Panthers to three straight division titles and an appearance in Super Bowl 50. Rivera, who is of Puerto Rican and Mexican descent, was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2003. Rivera is "the ideal image of a [Hispanic] father figure: stern, but fair," said José Hernández-París, executive director of Charlotte's Latin American Coalition, adding that Rivera and the Panthers do significant work of reaching out to local Hispanics.

Alex Rodriguez

Occupation: MLB Analyst, Fox
Hometown: Miami
Age:42

Rodriguez, nicknamed “A-Rod,” played 22 seasons in the MLB for the Seattle Mariners, Texas Rangers and New York Yankees and won three AL Most Valuable Player awards, 10 Silver Slugger awards and two Gold Glove awards. He has also hit the most home runs by a player of Hispanic descent with 696, fourth-most in MLB history. However, A-Rod has led a controversial career after incurring criticism from the media for his behavior and use of banned performance-enhancing drugs. After announcing his retirement in 2016, Rodriguez has become a media personality, serving as a broadcaster for Fox Sports 1, a cast member of Shark Tank and a member of the ABC News network.

In 2003, he gave $3.9 million to the University of Miami to renovate its baseball stadium and as a result it was re-named "Alex Rodriguez Park at Mark Light Field."

When he came back from suspension in 2015, A-Rod donated $1 million to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Miami-Dade, a donation that arrived in good timing with the Yankees's expansion initiative to serve more children. Rodriguez said of the act, "if it wasn't for the Boys & Girls Club, I wouldn't be in the big leagues today."

Angel Rodriguez

Occupation: Sports Editor, Los Angeles Times
Hometown: Houston
Age: 46

Rodriguez began his journalism career shortly after graduating from the University of Texas at Austin. He has covered U.S. Sports forEFE, helped launch ESPNDeportes, was an online sports producer at the Arizona Republic and was a sports editor at the Cincinnati Enquirer. Rodriguez joined the LA Times as a sports editor in 2015 after spending a year as deputy editor for mobile innovation at the Washington Post. Throughout his career, Rodriguez has consistently aimed to diversify sports by reporting through multiple languages and using digital tools.

Juan Carlos Rodriguez

Occupation: President, UnivisionDeportes
Hometown: Mexico City

Rodriguez began his business career when he co-founded and became CEO ofGrupoEstadio, which, under his leadership, became the leading partner for DIRECTV to product and distribute the 2002 FIFA World Cup. Since 2012, he has served as the president of UnivisionDeportes, the sports division of Univision Communications Inc. He has grown Univision Deportes Network to be the leading sports destination for Hispanic America and was named one of the “31 Most Powerful People in U.S. Soccer” by FourFourTwo. Rodriguez also received the Cynopsis Sports’ 2015 Navigator Award and has led Univision Deportes to four Sports Emmy Awards for excellence in sports coverage.

Tony Romo

Occupation: NFL Analyst, CBS
Hometown: Burlington, WI
Age: 37

Romo, whose grandfather emigrated to the U.S. from Mexico as a teenager, played quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys from 2004-16. In that time, he made four Pro Bowls, threw for over 34,000 yards and established himself as one of the NFL’s most popular athletes. His 97.1 passer rating is the fourth highest of all time.Romowas active in the Dallas community, hosting a youth football camp and participating in activities with United Way, the Make-A-Wish Foundation and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. During his playing days, he would often draw large Hispanic crowds to the Cowboys, telling ESPN he "really appreciates the support [The Hispanic Community] gives us." He announced his retirement in April and was quickly hired by CBS to serve as lead analyst for NFL games. In a short time, he’s established himself as one of the sport’s best broadcasters.

In the Dallas area, Romo has done much work in the community, as he has collaborated with United Way, the Make-A-Wish Foundation, and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. In 2012, as a speaker for "Miracle of the Million" Romo pledged $1 million to its “adopt-a-school” program where local churches help troubled schools.

Armando Salguero

Occupation: Sportswriter, Miami Herald
Hometown: Miami
Age: 54

Salguero, who was born in Havana, Cuba but raised in Miami, has covered South Florida sports since 1982 and the Dolphins and the NFL since 1990. He previously worked as a national reporter for ESPN and is well respected across the NFL and the sports media industry.Salgueroalso serves as a Pro Football Hall of Fame selector and is a voter for the Associated Press All-Pro team and its annual awards. He currently reports and writes for the Miami Herald, where his general sports columns garner frequent attention.

Shea Serrano

Occupation: Writer, The Ringer; Author of ?The Rap Year Book: The Most Important Rap Song From Every Year Since 1979, Discussed, Debated, and Deconstructed
Hometown: San Antonio
Age: 36

Serrano, who is of Mexican descent, began his career as a middle-school science teacher in Houston. After writing for the Near Northwest Banner, Serrano freelanced for the Houston Press in 2007, where he drew national attention for his work on hip-hop and pop culture. He was quickly offered a place at the LA Weekly before writing for ESPN’s Grantland and Bill Simmons’ website, The Ringer, where he currently works. Serrano is best known for his humor and activity on social media, which he frequently uses for charitable causes. In August, Serrano invited Twitter followers to join him in a “F--- Hurricane Harvey” round of donations to support Houston relief work; by the end of the night, they had raised more than $130,000. Serrano’s newest book Basketball (and Other Things) will be published in October 2017.

Mariano Trujillo

Occupation: Analyst, FoxDeportes
Hometown: Mexico City
Age: 40

Trujillo made his professional soccer debut with UNAM Pumas in 1996. After playing for three teams in Mexico from 1996-2007, he signed with Skoda Xanthi of Greece. In 2009, Trujillo signed for Chivas USA and became captain of the team in just his second season. He retired in 2013 and immediately thrived in a new role as host of the news magazine show Fox Deportes En Vivo alongside John Laguna.

Trujillo is an analyst for both English and Spanish markets, lending his talents to both Fox Deportes and Fox Sports as a voice of Mexican fútbol. This is extremely valuable to many US-born Latino soccer fans, who passionately follow the sport in both languages.

Luis Omar Tapia

Occupation: Reporter, Univision Deportes/Fox Sports
Hometown: Santiago, Chile
Age: 54

Tapia currently reports on MX League matches for Univision Deportes and Champions League matches for Fox Sports. He has also worked at ESPN, commentating on world football.Tapiais of Chilean descent and has strived to give back to his community. He founded the “The 90 Minutes Foundation” in the city of Miami to help low-income families and youth in education and sport. Tapia is best known for his catch phrases and nicknames for players and coaches as well as his classic comment before every football match, "Begin 90 minutes of the most beautiful sport in the world."

The 30 Most Influential Hispanics in Sports

Hispanics are reshaping sports in America. With Hispanic Heritage Month upon us, SI is honoring the 30 most influential Latinos in sports who aren’t athletes: the coaches, journalists, CEOs and other innovators who shape American sports culture and industry.This list, which is unranked, defines influence by how each person affects the fan experience. These household names don't just offer a diverse perspective—they enrich the American sports landscape.

Linda G. Alvarado

Occupation: Co-owner, Colorado Rockies
Hometown: Albuquerque
Age: 66

Alvarado is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Alvarado Construction and President of Palo Alto, Inc. Restaurant Company. After making her fortune in the business world, she turned to the sports world. Alvarado became the first Hispanic female co-owner of a major league team, and the first woman ever involved in a formal bid for ownership of a major league baseball team, when she became co-owner of the Rockies. Alvarado was inducted in the National Women’s Hall of Fame in 2003. She has long been a stout advocate for diversity in the work place, especially involving Hispanics. "We advocate for Hispanics and other ethnicities, genders and diverse groups because there is an underutilized talent pool seeking opportunity to create value to the growth and success of the company," she told Hispanic Executive in 2015.

Al Avila

Occupation: Executive Vice President of Baseball Operations/General Manager, Detroit Tigers
Hometown: Havana
Age: 59

Avila began his coaching career as an assistant at St. Thomas University, his alma mater. He was promoted to head coach and served as the school’s athletic director until 1992, when he joined the Florida Marlins and became the director of Latin American operations. Under Avila’s guidance, the Marlins signed 1997 World Series MVP Liván Hernández, who led Florida to their first title in franchise history. In 1998, Avila was promoted to director of scouting and signed 16-year-old Miguel Cabrera, who would become one of baseball’s best hitters, a year later. He was hired as the assistant general manager and vice president of the Detroit Tigers in 2002 and remained in the role until 2015, when he was promoted to general manager and executive vice president of baseball operations. With the promotion, Avila became the first Cuban-born general manager in baseball history. His son, Alex, currently plays catcher for the Chicago Cubs and was an All-Star for Detroit in 2011.

Hugo Balta

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Occupation: Senior Director of Hispanic Initiatives, ESPN
Hometown: Paterson, NJ
Age: 47

Balta began his reporting career as a producer for NY1 in 1994. Since then, he has worked for Telemundo, NBC, MSNBC, WCBS and most recently, ESPN. Baltais responsible for expanding ESPN Deportes’ coverage and was the creator of the bilingual Max y Marly audio podcast and Nación ESPN. He also served as President for the National Association of Hispanic Journalists from 2012-2014 and is the co-founder of the Latino Multimedia Communicators social media group, which shares, discusses and supports professionals and their products of interest to the Latino community. Balta is a passionate advocate for diversity, and his work constantly highlights the beauty of multiculturalism and Hispanic representation.

Luis Gerardo Bucci

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Occupation: Sportscaster, CNN Deportes
Hometown: Caracas, Venezuela
Age: 37

After specializing in sports journalism at the Universidad Simón Bolívar, Bucci began his professional career in radios in his native Venezuela. He first broke through in television at RCTV, where he was a producer and commentator of the 2004 Olympics. Bucci moved to Miami in 2008 where he worked as a reporter and presenter on the GOL TV network. In 2011, he was hired by CNN as a producer and presenter of CNN Sports, and in 2012 became the main driver of the program and sports segments of Our World, Direct USA and World Panorama. Bucci's work can be seen and heard across different CNN platforms including podcasts, radio, video and social media.

Wilmer Cabrera

Occupation: Head Coach, Houston Dynamo
Hometown: Cartagena, Colombia
Age: 50

Throughout an 18-year playing career, Cabrera played for clubs in Colombia, Argentina, Costa Rica and the United States. After retiring, he worked in Major League Soccer’s front office as a community development manager working on Hispanic grassroots and youth programs. He earned his coaching license in 2005 and in 2007, was named head coach of the United States men's national under-17 soccer team, becoming the first Latin American head coach in the U.S. national team system. Cabrera would then become the head coach for MLS clubs Chivas USA and Rio Grande Valley FC Toros before being named the head coach of the Houston Dynamo in 2016.

Andres Cantor

Occupation: Sports Commentator, NBC Deportes/Telemundo
Hometown: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Age: 54

Cantor moved from his hometown Buenos Aires to Southern California as a teenager before graduating from the University of Southern California. After college, he became a soccer play-by-play commentator for Univision and Telemundo, where he introduced his signature bellowing of “Gooooool!” after a score. He quickly became so popular in the U.S. that he appeared on the Late Show with David Letterman and even appeared in a Volkswagen commercial during the 1998 World Cup. Cantor currently works for Telemundo Deportes, where he introduced the first-ever U.S. Spanish-language broadcast of the Olympics. He has also won four Emmys, including the sports Emmy for Outstanding On-Air Personality in Spanish, twice in 2014 and 2017.

Cantor will lead as the Spanish-language voice of the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia on Telemundo.

Cantor also co-founded Fútbol de Primera Radio with his business partner Alejandro Gutman, the largest nationally-syndicated soccer radio network in the United States.Apart from the World Cup, FDP has broadcasted Copa América tournaments, Gold and Confederations Cups. FDP also has a daily sports talk show from Monday through Friday hosted by Cantor.

Oscar De La Hoya

Occupation: Founder,Golden Boy Promotions
Hometown: Montebello, CA
Age: 44

De La Hoya, who is of Mexican descent, competed in boxing from 1992 to 2008, winning ten world titles in six different world classes and finishing with a 39-6 record. De La Hoya has generated over $700 million in pay-per-view income and was the top-rated fighter in the world in 1997 and 1998. Nicknamed “The Golden Boy,” he won a gold medal in the 1992 Barcelona Olympics and is the first American of Mexican descent to own a national boxing promotional firm. His firm, Golden Boy Enterprises is one of boxing’s most active and respected promoters and holds a 25% interest in the Houston Dynamo MLS team. Throughout his career, De La Hoya has been active in the community. In 2005, Golden Boy Enterprises announced the formation of Golden Boy Partners, a company focused on urban development in Latino communities. In 2008, De La Hoya donated $3.5 million to the De La Hoya Animo Charter High School to help underprivileged youth to education. After losing to Manny Pacquiao in 2008, he decided to retire from boxing.

Fernando Fiore

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Occupation: Sportscaster
Hometown: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Age: 57

Fiore is best known as the host of Republica Deportiva, a weekly sports show for Univision, and for anchoring Univision’s FIFA World Cup coverage from 1999 until 2014. He is a two-time Emmy Award winner and is the author of The World Cup: The Ultimate Guide to the Greatest Sports Spectacle in the World. A legend among Spanish-speaking sports fans, Fiore is renowned for bringing his contagious energy and passion to the broadcast booth, resulting in a comedic analysis of the game. You will see more of Fiore when the World Cup comes around, as he is a vital member of Fox's coverage in Russia.

Esther Garcia

Occupation: Vice President, Heineken’s Tecate and TecateLight
Hometown: Madrid, Spain
Age: 40

Originally from Madrid, Garcia worked at Heineken Spain before taking a break to work for other consumer brands. In 2015, Garcia rejoined Heineken as the Vice President for Tecate beer, named after a city in Baja California, Mexico. The Tecate exec is best known for partnering Heineken with the Champions League, a soccer league that counts more than 4.2 billion fans globally. Garcia was named to Ad Week’s “Most Powerful Women in Sports” in June. She currently lives with her family in Dobbs Ferry, New York.

Mònica González

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Occupation: Announcer, Founder of Gonzo Soccer
Hometown: Corpus Christi, TX
Age: 38

Gonzalez was a founding member in 1998 of the Mexican Women’s National team and helped lead the team in the 1999 FIFA Women’s World Cup. She played for the Mexican National Team for 13 years and was captain from 2003-07. During her career, González played in 83 international games and scored 10 goals. In 2011, she was hired by ESPN as a studio analyst for the 2011 Women’s World Cup and has since become a sideline reporter for Major League Soccer. She has also announced games for NBC Universo and Fox Deportes and, in 2016, was the only woman calling games in the UEFA Champions League.

Gonzalez's most valuable job title, however, is her role as co-founder and director of Gonzo Soccer, a non-profit organization that teaches soccer, life and leaderships to girls in Hispanic communities. What started as a soccer clinic in the lower west side of Chicago in 2009, the program now helps more than 900 girls worldwide, with academies in the U.S, Mexico and Colombia.

Earlier this year, Gonzalez joined other ex-professionals and The Equal Playing Field (EPF) Initiative and climbed Mount Kilamanjaro to play the highest 90-minute match ever recorded to raise awareness for gender inequality.

Tony Gonzalez

Occupation: NFL studio analyst, FOX NFL Kickoff
Hometown: Torrance, CA
Age: 41

Gonzalez, who is of a mixed background, played 17 seasons in the NFL for the Kansas City Chiefs and the Atlanta Falcons. "One of the most common questions I get in my lifetime, and Tony gets it too: What are you?" said Gonzalez's older brother, Chris. "I just say we're mixed - black, white, Jamaican, Hispanic, Portuguese." Gonzalez has been selected to 14 Pro Bowls in his career and currently holds the NFL record for total receiving yards by a tight end with 15,127. He also has the second-most receptions by any player all-time with 1325 and was well known for his durability, missing just two games in his career. While playing for the Chiefs, he co-founded All-Pro Science, a sports nutrition company, and starred in xXx: Return of Xander Cage, playing Paul Donovan in his first feature film role. Immediately after retirement, Gonzalez became an analyst on CBS's NFL pregame show NFL Today. He worked for CBS until the end of the 2016 season before being added to FOX's pregame show in May.

In 2009, Gonzalez co-authored The All-Pro Diet with Mitzi Dulan, the former nutritionist for the Chiefs, detailing his diet and workout routine. The aim was to provide information and help for others (athletes and non-athletes) to follow the same path.

In his rookie year, Gonzalez joined the Shadow Buddies Foundation, an organization that provides support and knowledge to children with severe illnesses and disabilities. When he moved to Atlanta he continued this program with children's hospitals in the city.

Dan Le Batard

Occupation: Sportswriter/Television Host, Miami Herald, ESPN
Hometown: Miami
Age: 48

Le Batard, whose parents were exiled from Cuba, is an American sportswriter, radio host and television reporter. He is most known for his radio show The Dan Le Batard show and for hosting Highly Questionable, which airs daily on ESPN. "It's rare to have a show that embraces heritage," Erik Rydholm, executive producer at ESPN said of the show, which features Le Batard and his father and targets a Hispanic audience. "It has to have family and that connection with viewers." Le Batard also frequently serves as a host for Pardon the Interruption and writes for his hometown paper, the Miami Herald. He is lauded for his self-deprecating humor and often writes about controversial topics such as race. His candor has made him one of the most respected journalists in the industry and has led to a devoted fan base.

Valeria Marín

Occupation: Host/Reporter, Fox Deportes/NFLeros
Hometown: Mexico City

Marín joined Fox Deportes in 2013 as part of Central Fox, the network’s leading sports news program. In 2015, she began covering the NFL and MLB for Fox Deportes En Vivo. Marín began her career covering Mexican Tennis at the newspaper “Impacto” before becoming a host and reporter of La Aficion at Milenio TV. She was also a commentator for Telivisa Deportes Network and Televis Deportes W Radio. On her show NFLeros, Marín often highlights Hispanic athletes and uses social media to interact with the community.

Gerardo “Tata” Martino

Occupation: Head Coach, Atlanta United FC
Hometown: Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina
Age: 54

Martino is an icon in his native Rosario because of his success with local club Newell’s Old Boys. He holds the record of appearances with the team, playing a total of 505 matches in 14 years with the club. He was also selected in a fan’s poll as the best player throughout the club’s history. After retiring from soccer, Martino continued his success as a manager. In 2013, he was chosen as manager of FC Barcelona, but resigned just a year later after a runner-up La Liga finish. In 2015, he led Argentina to the Copa América Final, but resigned in 2016 after losing to Chile in two consecutive finals. Martino currently manages MLS expansion club Atlanta FC, who reached the playoffs in its first season. His presence in the U.S not only elevates the league's reputation, but due to his passion for youth, local development, Atlanta has a manager who has a vision that can help the city's multicultural talent.

Jessica Mendoza

Occupation: MLB Analyst, ESPN
Hometown: Camarillo, CA
Age: 36

Mendoza was a four-time First Team All-American softball player for the Stanford Cardinals between 1999-2002 and a former member of the US women’s national team between 2004-2010.She won gold at the 2004 Olympics in Athens, and a silver medal at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing.On August 24, 2015 she became the first female analyst in the history of Major League Baseball. She is currently a broadcaster for ESPN’s Sunday Night Baseball and analyzed her first MLB post-season series on ESPN radio on Saturday. On her Hispanic heritage, Mendoza told ESPN she felt Latinas needed to "Embrace the fact that you are different." She often points her source of inspiration to her father, who was a first-generation Mexican-American that taught her to love her Hispanic roots.

Mendoza is a past president of Women Sports Foundation, an organization founded by Billie Jean King in 1974 aimed to advance the lives of women and girls through sports and physical activity. During the 2008 Olympics, she was also an athletic ambassador for Team Darfur, which was devoted to raising awareness of humanitarian crises related to War in Darfur.

Arte Moreno

Occupation: Owner, Los Angeles Angels
Hometown: Tuscon, AZ
Age: 71

Moreno earned his fortune through advertising and was hired by billboard company Outdoor Systems in 1984. After taking Outdoor Systems public in 1996, Moreno sold the company to Infinity Broadcasting for $8 billion. In 2003, he became the first Mexican-American to own a major sports team in the United States when he purchased the Anaheim Angels from the Walt Disney Company. Moreno led the Angels to division titles from 2004-2009 and 2014. In the community, he established the Moreno Family Foundation, which supports non-profit organizations focusing on youth and education as well as athletic programs at the University of Arizona.

Marisabel Muñoz

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Occupation: Major League Soccer, Vice President of Communications
Hometown: Miami
Age: 37

Muñoz developed a passion for soccer while growing up in Miami, leading to her career in sports journalism with The Miami Herald and ESPN The Magazine. She became involved with the MLS in 2002 and has played an important role in establishing relationships with League broadcast partners, including Univision, ESPN and FOX.Muñozis also responsible for the league’s U.S. Hispanic initiatives, including the Sueño MLS reality show and the league’s Spanish-language digital platform, FutbolMLS.com. The strong relationship between Hispanic soccer fans and Major League Soccer is a testament to her work as both an executive and a passionate fútbol fan.

Sandy Nunez

Occupation: Coordinating Producer, ESPN
Hometown: Los Angeles
Age: 53

Sandy Nunez is a Coordinating Producing overseeing all SportsCenter production for ESPN in Los Angeles. SportsCenter production in LA includes SC Coast to Coast with anchors Cari Champion and David Lloyd as well as the late night SportsCenter Los Angeles with Neil Everett and Stan Verrett. Nunez is currently a member of the Los Angeles chapter of Women in Sports and Events (WISE). She also serves on the Board of Managers of Ketchum-Downtown YMCA.Earlier this month, Nunez was named one of “Los Angeles Most Influential Latina Journalists” by the California Chicano News Media Association (CCNMA.)

She is the only Latina who holds her position of coordinating producer at ESPN.

Fernando Palomo

Occupation: International Football Analyst, ESPN
Hometown: San Salvador, El Salvador
Age: 44

Palomo started his broadcasting career in 1999 with Channel 4 TV in San Salvador covering events including the Olympics and the Pan American Games. He joined ESPN in 2000 as a SportsCenter anchor for ESPN in Latin America and served as an anchor for Sportscenter for ESPN Deportes from 2004-06.Palomocurrently covers European soccer as a Spanish commentator and is the host of Fuera de Juego, ESPN Deportes’ highest-rated international program. In July 2012, he was chosen to be the voices for the FIFA video game franchise and has appeared in their Spanish versions since FIFA 13. This role has helped Palomo influence millions of young people who are introduced to the beautiful game.Palomowas also a member of the National Track and Field team of El Salvador and is the country’s record-holder in the javelin throw.

Rick Renteria

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Occupation: Manager, Chicago White Sox
Hometown: Harbor City, CA
Age: 55

After playing in South Gate, California, Renteria was drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates with the 20th overall pick in the 1980 Major League Baseball draft. Renteria played five seasons in the Majors and two seasons with the Mexican League's Jalisco Charros before coaching and managing in the Marlins organization until 2001, and in the San Diego Padres organization until 2013, the same year he managed the Mexico national team in the World Baseball Classic. He was hired to be the manager of the Chicago Cubs for the 2014 season, but was terminated just a year later. Renteria would stay in Chicago, though, serving as a bench coach for the Chicago White Sox before becoming manager in 2017. On his Mexican pride, Renteria told ESPN "I can't deny who I am. I am Mexican. My parents were both from Mexico. They came here. They gave us an opportunity." As the only Hispanic manager in Major League Baseball, Renteria's influence for Latino youth ball players are not taken for granted.

Marly Rivera

Occupation: MLB Writer/TV Host,ESPN
Hometown: San Juan, Puerto Rico
Age: 42

Rivera, who was born and raised in San Juan before moving to the United States as a teenager, is a bilingual sportswriter and reporter for ESPN and ESPN Deportes. She started her career as an editorial producer and writer at Major League Baseball and an editor at Univision communications before becoming an ESPN beat writer for the New York Yankees as one of the few Hispanic females in the BBWAA (Baseball Writers’ Association of America). More recently, Rivera has been a guest contributor on Béisbol Esta Noche, Sunday Night Baseball, Outside the Lines and SportsCenter. On her Hispanic culture, Rivera told ESPN "I have an accent. My first language is Spanish. I try, I am trying to help your culture, but I still have my culture. You have to respect it. I am not going to give up everything that makes me me just because you don't like it."

Rivera has done tremendous work for her native Puerto Rico, as the island deals with the devastation of Hurricane Maria. Her campaign has accumulated more than $30,000 and is getting closer to the $50,000 goal. Her invaluable voice throughout the disaster has inspired other names in the sports world to contribute.

Ron Rivera

Occupation: Head Coach, Carolina Panthers
Hometown: Fort Ord, CA
Age: 55

Rivera, a former linebacker for the Chicago Bears, is the current head coach of the Carolina Panthers. Rivera was selected in the second round of the 1984 NFL draft, becoming the first person of Puerto Rican and Mexican descent to play in the NFL. After retiring in 1992, he worked in Chicago as a TV analyst covering the Bears before becoming the team's defensive coordinator from 2004-2006. In 2008, Rivera was named defensive coordinator of the San Diego Chargers and received his first NFL head coaching gig with the Panthers in 2011. He was named the NFL Coach of the Year in 2013 and 2015 and has led the Panthers to three straight division titles and an appearance in Super Bowl 50. Rivera, who is of Puerto Rican and Mexican descent, was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2003. Rivera is "the ideal image of a [Hispanic] father figure: stern, but fair," said José Hernández-París, executive director of Charlotte's Latin American Coalition, adding that Rivera and the Panthers do significant work of reaching out to local Hispanics.

Alex Rodriguez

Occupation: MLB Analyst, Fox
Hometown: Miami
Age:42

Rodriguez, nicknamed “A-Rod,” played 22 seasons in the MLB for the Seattle Mariners, Texas Rangers and New York Yankees and won three AL Most Valuable Player awards, 10 Silver Slugger awards and two Gold Glove awards. He has also hit the most home runs by a player of Hispanic descent with 696, fourth-most in MLB history. However, A-Rod has led a controversial career after incurring criticism from the media for his behavior and use of banned performance-enhancing drugs. After announcing his retirement in 2016, Rodriguez has become a media personality, serving as a broadcaster for Fox Sports 1, a cast member of Shark Tank and a member of the ABC News network.

In 2003, he gave $3.9 million to the University of Miami to renovate its baseball stadium and as a result it was re-named "Alex Rodriguez Park at Mark Light Field."

When he came back from suspension in 2015, A-Rod donated $1 million to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Miami-Dade, a donation that arrived in good timing with the Yankees's expansion initiative to serve more children. Rodriguez said of the act, "if it wasn't for the Boys & Girls Club, I wouldn't be in the big leagues today."

Angel Rodriguez

Occupation: Sports Editor, Los Angeles Times
Hometown: Houston
Age: 46

Rodriguez began his journalism career shortly after graduating from the University of Texas at Austin. He has covered U.S. Sports forEFE, helped launch ESPNDeportes, was an online sports producer at the Arizona Republic and was a sports editor at the Cincinnati Enquirer. Rodriguez joined the LA Times as a sports editor in 2015 after spending a year as deputy editor for mobile innovation at the Washington Post. Throughout his career, Rodriguez has consistently aimed to diversify sports by reporting through multiple languages and using digital tools.

Juan Carlos Rodriguez

Occupation: President, UnivisionDeportes
Hometown: Mexico City

Rodriguez began his business career when he co-founded and became CEO ofGrupoEstadio, which, under his leadership, became the leading partner for DIRECTV to product and distribute the 2002 FIFA World Cup. Since 2012, he has served as the president of UnivisionDeportes, the sports division of Univision Communications Inc. He has grown Univision Deportes Network to be the leading sports destination for Hispanic America and was named one of the “31 Most Powerful People in U.S. Soccer” by FourFourTwo. Rodriguez also received the Cynopsis Sports’ 2015 Navigator Award and has led Univision Deportes to four Sports Emmy Awards for excellence in sports coverage.

Tony Romo

Occupation: NFL Analyst, CBS
Hometown: Burlington, WI
Age: 37

Romo, whose grandfather emigrated to the U.S. from Mexico as a teenager, played quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys from 2004-16. In that time, he made four Pro Bowls, threw for over 34,000 yards and established himself as one of the NFL’s most popular athletes. His 97.1 passer rating is the fourth highest of all time.Romowas active in the Dallas community, hosting a youth football camp and participating in activities with United Way, the Make-A-Wish Foundation and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. During his playing days, he would often draw large Hispanic crowds to the Cowboys, telling ESPN he "really appreciates the support [The Hispanic Community] gives us." He announced his retirement in April and was quickly hired by CBS to serve as lead analyst for NFL games. In a short time, he’s established himself as one of the sport’s best broadcasters.

In the Dallas area, Romo has done much work in the community, as he has collaborated with United Way, the Make-A-Wish Foundation, and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. In 2012, as a speaker for "Miracle of the Million" Romo pledged $1 million to its “adopt-a-school” program where local churches help troubled schools.

Armando Salguero

Occupation: Sportswriter, Miami Herald
Hometown: Miami
Age: 54

Salguero, who was born in Havana, Cuba but raised in Miami, has covered South Florida sports since 1982 and the Dolphins and the NFL since 1990. He previously worked as a national reporter for ESPN and is well respected across the NFL and the sports media industry.Salgueroalso serves as a Pro Football Hall of Fame selector and is a voter for the Associated Press All-Pro team and its annual awards. He currently reports and writes for the Miami Herald, where his general sports columns garner frequent attention.

Shea Serrano

Occupation: Writer, The Ringer; Author of ?The Rap Year Book: The Most Important Rap Song From Every Year Since 1979, Discussed, Debated, and Deconstructed
Hometown: San Antonio
Age: 36

Serrano, who is of Mexican descent, began his career as a middle-school science teacher in Houston. After writing for the Near Northwest Banner, Serrano freelanced for the Houston Press in 2007, where he drew national attention for his work on hip-hop and pop culture. He was quickly offered a place at the LA Weekly before writing for ESPN’s Grantland and Bill Simmons’ website, The Ringer, where he currently works. Serrano is best known for his humor and activity on social media, which he frequently uses for charitable causes. In August, Serrano invited Twitter followers to join him in a “F--- Hurricane Harvey” round of donations to support Houston relief work; by the end of the night, they had raised more than $130,000. Serrano’s newest book Basketball (and Other Things) will be published in October 2017.

Mariano Trujillo

Occupation: Analyst, FoxDeportes
Hometown: Mexico City
Age: 40

Trujillo made his professional soccer debut with UNAM Pumas in 1996. After playing for three teams in Mexico from 1996-2007, he signed with Skoda Xanthi of Greece. In 2009, Trujillo signed for Chivas USA and became captain of the team in just his second season. He retired in 2013 and immediately thrived in a new role as host of the news magazine show Fox Deportes En Vivo alongside John Laguna.

Trujillo is an analyst for both English and Spanish markets, lending his talents to both Fox Deportes and Fox Sports as a voice of Mexican fútbol. This is extremely valuable to many US-born Latino soccer fans, who passionately follow the sport in both languages.

Luis Omar Tapia

Occupation: Reporter, Univision Deportes/Fox Sports
Hometown: Santiago, Chile
Age: 54

Tapia currently reports on MX League matches for Univision Deportes and Champions League matches for Fox Sports. He has also worked at ESPN, commentating on world football.Tapiais of Chilean descent and has strived to give back to his community. He founded the “The 90 Minutes Foundation” in the city of Miami to help low-income families and youth in education and sport. Tapia is best known for his catch phrases and nicknames for players and coaches as well as his classic comment before every football match, "Begin 90 minutes of the most beautiful sport in the world."

The 30 Most Influential Hispanics in Sports

Hispanics are reshaping sports in America. With Hispanic Heritage Month upon us, SI is honoring the 30 most influential Latinos in sports who aren’t athletes: the coaches, journalists, CEOs and other innovators who shape American sports culture and industry.This list, which is unranked, defines influence by how each person affects the fan experience. These household names don't just offer a diverse perspective—they enrich the American sports landscape.

Linda G. Alvarado

Occupation: Co-owner, Colorado Rockies
Hometown: Albuquerque
Age: 66

Alvarado is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Alvarado Construction and President of Palo Alto, Inc. Restaurant Company. After making her fortune in the business world, she turned to the sports world. Alvarado became the first Hispanic female co-owner of a major league team, and the first woman ever involved in a formal bid for ownership of a major league baseball team, when she became co-owner of the Rockies. Alvarado was inducted in the National Women’s Hall of Fame in 2003. She has long been a stout advocate for diversity in the work place, especially involving Hispanics. "We advocate for Hispanics and other ethnicities, genders and diverse groups because there is an underutilized talent pool seeking opportunity to create value to the growth and success of the company," she told Hispanic Executive in 2015.

Al Avila

Occupation: Executive Vice President of Baseball Operations/General Manager, Detroit Tigers
Hometown: Havana
Age: 59

Avila began his coaching career as an assistant at St. Thomas University, his alma mater. He was promoted to head coach and served as the school’s athletic director until 1992, when he joined the Florida Marlins and became the director of Latin American operations. Under Avila’s guidance, the Marlins signed 1997 World Series MVP Liván Hernández, who led Florida to their first title in franchise history. In 1998, Avila was promoted to director of scouting and signed 16-year-old Miguel Cabrera, who would become one of baseball’s best hitters, a year later. He was hired as the assistant general manager and vice president of the Detroit Tigers in 2002 and remained in the role until 2015, when he was promoted to general manager and executive vice president of baseball operations. With the promotion, Avila became the first Cuban-born general manager in baseball history. His son, Alex, currently plays catcher for the Chicago Cubs and was an All-Star for Detroit in 2011.

Hugo Balta

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Occupation: Senior Director of Hispanic Initiatives, ESPN
Hometown: Paterson, NJ
Age: 47

Balta began his reporting career as a producer for NY1 in 1994. Since then, he has worked for Telemundo, NBC, MSNBC, WCBS and most recently, ESPN. Baltais responsible for expanding ESPN Deportes’ coverage and was the creator of the bilingual Max y Marly audio podcast and Nación ESPN. He also served as President for the National Association of Hispanic Journalists from 2012-2014 and is the co-founder of the Latino Multimedia Communicators social media group, which shares, discusses and supports professionals and their products of interest to the Latino community. Balta is a passionate advocate for diversity, and his work constantly highlights the beauty of multiculturalism and Hispanic representation.

Luis Gerardo Bucci

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Occupation: Sportscaster, CNN Deportes
Hometown: Caracas, Venezuela
Age: 37

After specializing in sports journalism at the Universidad Simón Bolívar, Bucci began his professional career in radios in his native Venezuela. He first broke through in television at RCTV, where he was a producer and commentator of the 2004 Olympics. Bucci moved to Miami in 2008 where he worked as a reporter and presenter on the GOL TV network. In 2011, he was hired by CNN as a producer and presenter of CNN Sports, and in 2012 became the main driver of the program and sports segments of Our World, Direct USA and World Panorama. Bucci's work can be seen and heard across different CNN platforms including podcasts, radio, video and social media.

Wilmer Cabrera

Occupation: Head Coach, Houston Dynamo
Hometown: Cartagena, Colombia
Age: 50

Throughout an 18-year playing career, Cabrera played for clubs in Colombia, Argentina, Costa Rica and the United States. After retiring, he worked in Major League Soccer’s front office as a community development manager working on Hispanic grassroots and youth programs. He earned his coaching license in 2005 and in 2007, was named head coach of the United States men's national under-17 soccer team, becoming the first Latin American head coach in the U.S. national team system. Cabrera would then become the head coach for MLS clubs Chivas USA and Rio Grande Valley FC Toros before being named the head coach of the Houston Dynamo in 2016.

Andres Cantor

Occupation: Sports Commentator, NBC Deportes/Telemundo
Hometown: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Age: 54

Cantor moved from his hometown Buenos Aires to Southern California as a teenager before graduating from the University of Southern California. After college, he became a soccer play-by-play commentator for Univision and Telemundo, where he introduced his signature bellowing of “Gooooool!” after a score. He quickly became so popular in the U.S. that he appeared on the Late Show with David Letterman and even appeared in a Volkswagen commercial during the 1998 World Cup. Cantor currently works for Telemundo Deportes, where he introduced the first-ever U.S. Spanish-language broadcast of the Olympics. He has also won four Emmys, including the sports Emmy for Outstanding On-Air Personality in Spanish, twice in 2014 and 2017.

Cantor will lead as the Spanish-language voice of the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia on Telemundo.

Cantor also co-founded Fútbol de Primera Radio with his business partner Alejandro Gutman, the largest nationally-syndicated soccer radio network in the United States.Apart from the World Cup, FDP has broadcasted Copa América tournaments, Gold and Confederations Cups. FDP also has a daily sports talk show from Monday through Friday hosted by Cantor.

Oscar De La Hoya

Occupation: Founder,Golden Boy Promotions
Hometown: Montebello, CA
Age: 44

De La Hoya, who is of Mexican descent, competed in boxing from 1992 to 2008, winning ten world titles in six different world classes and finishing with a 39-6 record. De La Hoya has generated over $700 million in pay-per-view income and was the top-rated fighter in the world in 1997 and 1998. Nicknamed “The Golden Boy,” he won a gold medal in the 1992 Barcelona Olympics and is the first American of Mexican descent to own a national boxing promotional firm. His firm, Golden Boy Enterprises is one of boxing’s most active and respected promoters and holds a 25% interest in the Houston Dynamo MLS team. Throughout his career, De La Hoya has been active in the community. In 2005, Golden Boy Enterprises announced the formation of Golden Boy Partners, a company focused on urban development in Latino communities. In 2008, De La Hoya donated $3.5 million to the De La Hoya Animo Charter High School to help underprivileged youth to education. After losing to Manny Pacquiao in 2008, he decided to retire from boxing.

Fernando Fiore

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Occupation: Sportscaster
Hometown: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Age: 57

Fiore is best known as the host of Republica Deportiva, a weekly sports show for Univision, and for anchoring Univision’s FIFA World Cup coverage from 1999 until 2014. He is a two-time Emmy Award winner and is the author of The World Cup: The Ultimate Guide to the Greatest Sports Spectacle in the World. A legend among Spanish-speaking sports fans, Fiore is renowned for bringing his contagious energy and passion to the broadcast booth, resulting in a comedic analysis of the game. You will see more of Fiore when the World Cup comes around, as he is a vital member of Fox's coverage in Russia.

Esther Garcia

Occupation: Vice President, Heineken’s Tecate and TecateLight
Hometown: Madrid, Spain
Age: 40

Originally from Madrid, Garcia worked at Heineken Spain before taking a break to work for other consumer brands. In 2015, Garcia rejoined Heineken as the Vice President for Tecate beer, named after a city in Baja California, Mexico. The Tecate exec is best known for partnering Heineken with the Champions League, a soccer league that counts more than 4.2 billion fans globally. Garcia was named to Ad Week’s “Most Powerful Women in Sports” in June. She currently lives with her family in Dobbs Ferry, New York.

Mònica González

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Occupation: Announcer, Founder of Gonzo Soccer
Hometown: Corpus Christi, TX
Age: 38

Gonzalez was a founding member in 1998 of the Mexican Women’s National team and helped lead the team in the 1999 FIFA Women’s World Cup. She played for the Mexican National Team for 13 years and was captain from 2003-07. During her career, González played in 83 international games and scored 10 goals. In 2011, she was hired by ESPN as a studio analyst for the 2011 Women’s World Cup and has since become a sideline reporter for Major League Soccer. She has also announced games for NBC Universo and Fox Deportes and, in 2016, was the only woman calling games in the UEFA Champions League.

Gonzalez's most valuable job title, however, is her role as co-founder and director of Gonzo Soccer, a non-profit organization that teaches soccer, life and leaderships to girls in Hispanic communities. What started as a soccer clinic in the lower west side of Chicago in 2009, the program now helps more than 900 girls worldwide, with academies in the U.S, Mexico and Colombia.

Earlier this year, Gonzalez joined other ex-professionals and The Equal Playing Field (EPF) Initiative and climbed Mount Kilamanjaro to play the highest 90-minute match ever recorded to raise awareness for gender inequality.

Tony Gonzalez

Occupation: NFL studio analyst, FOX NFL Kickoff
Hometown: Torrance, CA
Age: 41

Gonzalez, who is of a mixed background, played 17 seasons in the NFL for the Kansas City Chiefs and the Atlanta Falcons. "One of the most common questions I get in my lifetime, and Tony gets it too: What are you?" said Gonzalez's older brother, Chris. "I just say we're mixed - black, white, Jamaican, Hispanic, Portuguese." Gonzalez has been selected to 14 Pro Bowls in his career and currently holds the NFL record for total receiving yards by a tight end with 15,127. He also has the second-most receptions by any player all-time with 1325 and was well known for his durability, missing just two games in his career. While playing for the Chiefs, he co-founded All-Pro Science, a sports nutrition company, and starred in xXx: Return of Xander Cage, playing Paul Donovan in his first feature film role. Immediately after retirement, Gonzalez became an analyst on CBS's NFL pregame show NFL Today. He worked for CBS until the end of the 2016 season before being added to FOX's pregame show in May.

In 2009, Gonzalez co-authored The All-Pro Diet with Mitzi Dulan, the former nutritionist for the Chiefs, detailing his diet and workout routine. The aim was to provide information and help for others (athletes and non-athletes) to follow the same path.

In his rookie year, Gonzalez joined the Shadow Buddies Foundation, an organization that provides support and knowledge to children with severe illnesses and disabilities. When he moved to Atlanta he continued this program with children's hospitals in the city.

Dan Le Batard

Occupation: Sportswriter/Television Host, Miami Herald, ESPN
Hometown: Miami
Age: 48

Le Batard, whose parents were exiled from Cuba, is an American sportswriter, radio host and television reporter. He is most known for his radio show The Dan Le Batard show and for hosting Highly Questionable, which airs daily on ESPN. "It's rare to have a show that embraces heritage," Erik Rydholm, executive producer at ESPN said of the show, which features Le Batard and his father and targets a Hispanic audience. "It has to have family and that connection with viewers." Le Batard also frequently serves as a host for Pardon the Interruption and writes for his hometown paper, the Miami Herald. He is lauded for his self-deprecating humor and often writes about controversial topics such as race. His candor has made him one of the most respected journalists in the industry and has led to a devoted fan base.

Valeria Marín

Occupation: Host/Reporter, Fox Deportes/NFLeros
Hometown: Mexico City

Marín joined Fox Deportes in 2013 as part of Central Fox, the network’s leading sports news program. In 2015, she began covering the NFL and MLB for Fox Deportes En Vivo. Marín began her career covering Mexican Tennis at the newspaper “Impacto” before becoming a host and reporter of La Aficion at Milenio TV. She was also a commentator for Telivisa Deportes Network and Televis Deportes W Radio. On her show NFLeros, Marín often highlights Hispanic athletes and uses social media to interact with the community.

Gerardo “Tata” Martino

Occupation: Head Coach, Atlanta United FC
Hometown: Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina
Age: 54

Martino is an icon in his native Rosario because of his success with local club Newell’s Old Boys. He holds the record of appearances with the team, playing a total of 505 matches in 14 years with the club. He was also selected in a fan’s poll as the best player throughout the club’s history. After retiring from soccer, Martino continued his success as a manager. In 2013, he was chosen as manager of FC Barcelona, but resigned just a year later after a runner-up La Liga finish. In 2015, he led Argentina to the Copa América Final, but resigned in 2016 after losing to Chile in two consecutive finals. Martino currently manages MLS expansion club Atlanta FC, who reached the playoffs in its first season. His presence in the U.S not only elevates the league's reputation, but due to his passion for youth, local development, Atlanta has a manager who has a vision that can help the city's multicultural talent.

Jessica Mendoza

Occupation: MLB Analyst, ESPN
Hometown: Camarillo, CA
Age: 36

Mendoza was a four-time First Team All-American softball player for the Stanford Cardinals between 1999-2002 and a former member of the US women’s national team between 2004-2010.She won gold at the 2004 Olympics in Athens, and a silver medal at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing.On August 24, 2015 she became the first female analyst in the history of Major League Baseball. She is currently a broadcaster for ESPN’s Sunday Night Baseball and analyzed her first MLB post-season series on ESPN radio on Saturday. On her Hispanic heritage, Mendoza told ESPN she felt Latinas needed to "Embrace the fact that you are different." She often points her source of inspiration to her father, who was a first-generation Mexican-American that taught her to love her Hispanic roots.

Mendoza is a past president of Women Sports Foundation, an organization founded by Billie Jean King in 1974 aimed to advance the lives of women and girls through sports and physical activity. During the 2008 Olympics, she was also an athletic ambassador for Team Darfur, which was devoted to raising awareness of humanitarian crises related to War in Darfur.

Arte Moreno

Occupation: Owner, Los Angeles Angels
Hometown: Tuscon, AZ
Age: 71

Moreno earned his fortune through advertising and was hired by billboard company Outdoor Systems in 1984. After taking Outdoor Systems public in 1996, Moreno sold the company to Infinity Broadcasting for $8 billion. In 2003, he became the first Mexican-American to own a major sports team in the United States when he purchased the Anaheim Angels from the Walt Disney Company. Moreno led the Angels to division titles from 2004-2009 and 2014. In the community, he established the Moreno Family Foundation, which supports non-profit organizations focusing on youth and education as well as athletic programs at the University of Arizona.

Marisabel Muñoz

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Occupation: Major League Soccer, Vice President of Communications
Hometown: Miami
Age: 37

Muñoz developed a passion for soccer while growing up in Miami, leading to her career in sports journalism with The Miami Herald and ESPN The Magazine. She became involved with the MLS in 2002 and has played an important role in establishing relationships with League broadcast partners, including Univision, ESPN and FOX.Muñozis also responsible for the league’s U.S. Hispanic initiatives, including the Sueño MLS reality show and the league’s Spanish-language digital platform, FutbolMLS.com. The strong relationship between Hispanic soccer fans and Major League Soccer is a testament to her work as both an executive and a passionate fútbol fan.

Sandy Nunez

Occupation: Coordinating Producer, ESPN
Hometown: Los Angeles
Age: 53

Sandy Nunez is a Coordinating Producing overseeing all SportsCenter production for ESPN in Los Angeles. SportsCenter production in LA includes SC Coast to Coast with anchors Cari Champion and David Lloyd as well as the late night SportsCenter Los Angeles with Neil Everett and Stan Verrett. Nunez is currently a member of the Los Angeles chapter of Women in Sports and Events (WISE). She also serves on the Board of Managers of Ketchum-Downtown YMCA.Earlier this month, Nunez was named one of “Los Angeles Most Influential Latina Journalists” by the California Chicano News Media Association (CCNMA.)

She is the only Latina who holds her position of coordinating producer at ESPN.

Fernando Palomo

Occupation: International Football Analyst, ESPN
Hometown: San Salvador, El Salvador
Age: 44

Palomo started his broadcasting career in 1999 with Channel 4 TV in San Salvador covering events including the Olympics and the Pan American Games. He joined ESPN in 2000 as a SportsCenter anchor for ESPN in Latin America and served as an anchor for Sportscenter for ESPN Deportes from 2004-06.Palomocurrently covers European soccer as a Spanish commentator and is the host of Fuera de Juego, ESPN Deportes’ highest-rated international program. In July 2012, he was chosen to be the voices for the FIFA video game franchise and has appeared in their Spanish versions since FIFA 13. This role has helped Palomo influence millions of young people who are introduced to the beautiful game.Palomowas also a member of the National Track and Field team of El Salvador and is the country’s record-holder in the javelin throw.

Rick Renteria

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Occupation: Manager, Chicago White Sox
Hometown: Harbor City, CA
Age: 55

After playing in South Gate, California, Renteria was drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates with the 20th overall pick in the 1980 Major League Baseball draft. Renteria played five seasons in the Majors and two seasons with the Mexican League's Jalisco Charros before coaching and managing in the Marlins organization until 2001, and in the San Diego Padres organization until 2013, the same year he managed the Mexico national team in the World Baseball Classic. He was hired to be the manager of the Chicago Cubs for the 2014 season, but was terminated just a year later. Renteria would stay in Chicago, though, serving as a bench coach for the Chicago White Sox before becoming manager in 2017. On his Mexican pride, Renteria told ESPN "I can't deny who I am. I am Mexican. My parents were both from Mexico. They came here. They gave us an opportunity." As the only Hispanic manager in Major League Baseball, Renteria's influence for Latino youth ball players are not taken for granted.

Marly Rivera

Occupation: MLB Writer/TV Host,ESPN
Hometown: San Juan, Puerto Rico
Age: 42

Rivera, who was born and raised in San Juan before moving to the United States as a teenager, is a bilingual sportswriter and reporter for ESPN and ESPN Deportes. She started her career as an editorial producer and writer at Major League Baseball and an editor at Univision communications before becoming an ESPN beat writer for the New York Yankees as one of the few Hispanic females in the BBWAA (Baseball Writers’ Association of America). More recently, Rivera has been a guest contributor on Béisbol Esta Noche, Sunday Night Baseball, Outside the Lines and SportsCenter. On her Hispanic culture, Rivera told ESPN "I have an accent. My first language is Spanish. I try, I am trying to help your culture, but I still have my culture. You have to respect it. I am not going to give up everything that makes me me just because you don't like it."

Rivera has done tremendous work for her native Puerto Rico, as the island deals with the devastation of Hurricane Maria. Her campaign has accumulated more than $30,000 and is getting closer to the $50,000 goal. Her invaluable voice throughout the disaster has inspired other names in the sports world to contribute.

Ron Rivera

Occupation: Head Coach, Carolina Panthers
Hometown: Fort Ord, CA
Age: 55

Rivera, a former linebacker for the Chicago Bears, is the current head coach of the Carolina Panthers. Rivera was selected in the second round of the 1984 NFL draft, becoming the first person of Puerto Rican and Mexican descent to play in the NFL. After retiring in 1992, he worked in Chicago as a TV analyst covering the Bears before becoming the team's defensive coordinator from 2004-2006. In 2008, Rivera was named defensive coordinator of the San Diego Chargers and received his first NFL head coaching gig with the Panthers in 2011. He was named the NFL Coach of the Year in 2013 and 2015 and has led the Panthers to three straight division titles and an appearance in Super Bowl 50. Rivera, who is of Puerto Rican and Mexican descent, was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2003. Rivera is "the ideal image of a [Hispanic] father figure: stern, but fair," said José Hernández-París, executive director of Charlotte's Latin American Coalition, adding that Rivera and the Panthers do significant work of reaching out to local Hispanics.

Alex Rodriguez

Occupation: MLB Analyst, Fox
Hometown: Miami
Age:42

Rodriguez, nicknamed “A-Rod,” played 22 seasons in the MLB for the Seattle Mariners, Texas Rangers and New York Yankees and won three AL Most Valuable Player awards, 10 Silver Slugger awards and two Gold Glove awards. He has also hit the most home runs by a player of Hispanic descent with 696, fourth-most in MLB history. However, A-Rod has led a controversial career after incurring criticism from the media for his behavior and use of banned performance-enhancing drugs. After announcing his retirement in 2016, Rodriguez has become a media personality, serving as a broadcaster for Fox Sports 1, a cast member of Shark Tank and a member of the ABC News network.

In 2003, he gave $3.9 million to the University of Miami to renovate its baseball stadium and as a result it was re-named "Alex Rodriguez Park at Mark Light Field."

When he came back from suspension in 2015, A-Rod donated $1 million to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Miami-Dade, a donation that arrived in good timing with the Yankees's expansion initiative to serve more children. Rodriguez said of the act, "if it wasn't for the Boys & Girls Club, I wouldn't be in the big leagues today."

Angel Rodriguez

Occupation: Sports Editor, Los Angeles Times
Hometown: Houston
Age: 46

Rodriguez began his journalism career shortly after graduating from the University of Texas at Austin. He has covered U.S. Sports forEFE, helped launch ESPNDeportes, was an online sports producer at the Arizona Republic and was a sports editor at the Cincinnati Enquirer. Rodriguez joined the LA Times as a sports editor in 2015 after spending a year as deputy editor for mobile innovation at the Washington Post. Throughout his career, Rodriguez has consistently aimed to diversify sports by reporting through multiple languages and using digital tools.

Juan Carlos Rodriguez

Occupation: President, UnivisionDeportes
Hometown: Mexico City

Rodriguez began his business career when he co-founded and became CEO ofGrupoEstadio, which, under his leadership, became the leading partner for DIRECTV to product and distribute the 2002 FIFA World Cup. Since 2012, he has served as the president of UnivisionDeportes, the sports division of Univision Communications Inc. He has grown Univision Deportes Network to be the leading sports destination for Hispanic America and was named one of the “31 Most Powerful People in U.S. Soccer” by FourFourTwo. Rodriguez also received the Cynopsis Sports’ 2015 Navigator Award and has led Univision Deportes to four Sports Emmy Awards for excellence in sports coverage.

Tony Romo

Occupation: NFL Analyst, CBS
Hometown: Burlington, WI
Age: 37

Romo, whose grandfather emigrated to the U.S. from Mexico as a teenager, played quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys from 2004-16. In that time, he made four Pro Bowls, threw for over 34,000 yards and established himself as one of the NFL’s most popular athletes. His 97.1 passer rating is the fourth highest of all time.Romowas active in the Dallas community, hosting a youth football camp and participating in activities with United Way, the Make-A-Wish Foundation and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. During his playing days, he would often draw large Hispanic crowds to the Cowboys, telling ESPN he "really appreciates the support [The Hispanic Community] gives us." He announced his retirement in April and was quickly hired by CBS to serve as lead analyst for NFL games. In a short time, he’s established himself as one of the sport’s best broadcasters.

In the Dallas area, Romo has done much work in the community, as he has collaborated with United Way, the Make-A-Wish Foundation, and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. In 2012, as a speaker for "Miracle of the Million" Romo pledged $1 million to its “adopt-a-school” program where local churches help troubled schools.

Armando Salguero

Occupation: Sportswriter, Miami Herald
Hometown: Miami
Age: 54

Salguero, who was born in Havana, Cuba but raised in Miami, has covered South Florida sports since 1982 and the Dolphins and the NFL since 1990. He previously worked as a national reporter for ESPN and is well respected across the NFL and the sports media industry.Salgueroalso serves as a Pro Football Hall of Fame selector and is a voter for the Associated Press All-Pro team and its annual awards. He currently reports and writes for the Miami Herald, where his general sports columns garner frequent attention.

Shea Serrano

Occupation: Writer, The Ringer; Author of ?The Rap Year Book: The Most Important Rap Song From Every Year Since 1979, Discussed, Debated, and Deconstructed
Hometown: San Antonio
Age: 36

Serrano, who is of Mexican descent, began his career as a middle-school science teacher in Houston. After writing for the Near Northwest Banner, Serrano freelanced for the Houston Press in 2007, where he drew national attention for his work on hip-hop and pop culture. He was quickly offered a place at the LA Weekly before writing for ESPN’s Grantland and Bill Simmons’ website, The Ringer, where he currently works. Serrano is best known for his humor and activity on social media, which he frequently uses for charitable causes. In August, Serrano invited Twitter followers to join him in a “F--- Hurricane Harvey” round of donations to support Houston relief work; by the end of the night, they had raised more than $130,000. Serrano’s newest book Basketball (and Other Things) will be published in October 2017.

Mariano Trujillo

Occupation: Analyst, FoxDeportes
Hometown: Mexico City
Age: 40

Trujillo made his professional soccer debut with UNAM Pumas in 1996. After playing for three teams in Mexico from 1996-2007, he signed with Skoda Xanthi of Greece. In 2009, Trujillo signed for Chivas USA and became captain of the team in just his second season. He retired in 2013 and immediately thrived in a new role as host of the news magazine show Fox Deportes En Vivo alongside John Laguna.

Trujillo is an analyst for both English and Spanish markets, lending his talents to both Fox Deportes and Fox Sports as a voice of Mexican fútbol. This is extremely valuable to many US-born Latino soccer fans, who passionately follow the sport in both languages.

Luis Omar Tapia

Occupation: Reporter, Univision Deportes/Fox Sports
Hometown: Santiago, Chile
Age: 54

Tapia currently reports on MX League matches for Univision Deportes and Champions League matches for Fox Sports. He has also worked at ESPN, commentating on world football.Tapiais of Chilean descent and has strived to give back to his community. He founded the “The 90 Minutes Foundation” in the city of Miami to help low-income families and youth in education and sport. Tapia is best known for his catch phrases and nicknames for players and coaches as well as his classic comment before every football match, "Begin 90 minutes of the most beautiful sport in the world."

The 30 Most Influential Hispanics in Sports

Hispanics are reshaping sports in America. With Hispanic Heritage Month upon us, SI is honoring the 30 most influential Latinos in sports who aren’t athletes: the coaches, journalists, CEOs and other innovators who shape American sports culture and industry.This list, which is unranked, defines influence by how each person affects the fan experience. These household names don't just offer a diverse perspective—they enrich the American sports landscape.

Linda G. Alvarado

Occupation: Co-owner, Colorado Rockies
Hometown: Albuquerque
Age: 66

Alvarado is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Alvarado Construction and President of Palo Alto, Inc. Restaurant Company. After making her fortune in the business world, she turned to the sports world. Alvarado became the first Hispanic female co-owner of a major league team, and the first woman ever involved in a formal bid for ownership of a major league baseball team, when she became co-owner of the Rockies. Alvarado was inducted in the National Women’s Hall of Fame in 2003. She has long been a stout advocate for diversity in the work place, especially involving Hispanics. "We advocate for Hispanics and other ethnicities, genders and diverse groups because there is an underutilized talent pool seeking opportunity to create value to the growth and success of the company," she told Hispanic Executive in 2015.

Al Avila

Occupation: Executive Vice President of Baseball Operations/General Manager, Detroit Tigers
Hometown: Havana
Age: 59

Avila began his coaching career as an assistant at St. Thomas University, his alma mater. He was promoted to head coach and served as the school’s athletic director until 1992, when he joined the Florida Marlins and became the director of Latin American operations. Under Avila’s guidance, the Marlins signed 1997 World Series MVP Liván Hernández, who led Florida to their first title in franchise history. In 1998, Avila was promoted to director of scouting and signed 16-year-old Miguel Cabrera, who would become one of baseball’s best hitters, a year later. He was hired as the assistant general manager and vice president of the Detroit Tigers in 2002 and remained in the role until 2015, when he was promoted to general manager and executive vice president of baseball operations. With the promotion, Avila became the first Cuban-born general manager in baseball history. His son, Alex, currently plays catcher for the Chicago Cubs and was an All-Star for Detroit in 2011.

Hugo Balta

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Occupation: Senior Director of Hispanic Initiatives, ESPN
Hometown: Paterson, NJ
Age: 47

Balta began his reporting career as a producer for NY1 in 1994. Since then, he has worked for Telemundo, NBC, MSNBC, WCBS and most recently, ESPN. Baltais responsible for expanding ESPN Deportes’ coverage and was the creator of the bilingual Max y Marly audio podcast and Nación ESPN. He also served as President for the National Association of Hispanic Journalists from 2012-2014 and is the co-founder of the Latino Multimedia Communicators social media group, which shares, discusses and supports professionals and their products of interest to the Latino community. Balta is a passionate advocate for diversity, and his work constantly highlights the beauty of multiculturalism and Hispanic representation.

Luis Gerardo Bucci

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Occupation: Sportscaster, CNN Deportes
Hometown: Caracas, Venezuela
Age: 37

After specializing in sports journalism at the Universidad Simón Bolívar, Bucci began his professional career in radios in his native Venezuela. He first broke through in television at RCTV, where he was a producer and commentator of the 2004 Olympics. Bucci moved to Miami in 2008 where he worked as a reporter and presenter on the GOL TV network. In 2011, he was hired by CNN as a producer and presenter of CNN Sports, and in 2012 became the main driver of the program and sports segments of Our World, Direct USA and World Panorama. Bucci's work can be seen and heard across different CNN platforms including podcasts, radio, video and social media.

Wilmer Cabrera

Occupation: Head Coach, Houston Dynamo
Hometown: Cartagena, Colombia
Age: 50

Throughout an 18-year playing career, Cabrera played for clubs in Colombia, Argentina, Costa Rica and the United States. After retiring, he worked in Major League Soccer’s front office as a community development manager working on Hispanic grassroots and youth programs. He earned his coaching license in 2005 and in 2007, was named head coach of the United States men's national under-17 soccer team, becoming the first Latin American head coach in the U.S. national team system. Cabrera would then become the head coach for MLS clubs Chivas USA and Rio Grande Valley FC Toros before being named the head coach of the Houston Dynamo in 2016.

Andres Cantor

Occupation: Sports Commentator, NBC Deportes/Telemundo
Hometown: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Age: 54

Cantor moved from his hometown Buenos Aires to Southern California as a teenager before graduating from the University of Southern California. After college, he became a soccer play-by-play commentator for Univision and Telemundo, where he introduced his signature bellowing of “Gooooool!” after a score. He quickly became so popular in the U.S. that he appeared on the Late Show with David Letterman and even appeared in a Volkswagen commercial during the 1998 World Cup. Cantor currently works for Telemundo Deportes, where he introduced the first-ever U.S. Spanish-language broadcast of the Olympics. He has also won four Emmys, including the sports Emmy for Outstanding On-Air Personality in Spanish, twice in 2014 and 2017.

Cantor will lead as the Spanish-language voice of the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia on Telemundo.

Cantor also co-founded Fútbol de Primera Radio with his business partner Alejandro Gutman, the largest nationally-syndicated soccer radio network in the United States.Apart from the World Cup, FDP has broadcasted Copa América tournaments, Gold and Confederations Cups. FDP also has a daily sports talk show from Monday through Friday hosted by Cantor.

Oscar De La Hoya

Occupation: Founder,Golden Boy Promotions
Hometown: Montebello, CA
Age: 44

De La Hoya, who is of Mexican descent, competed in boxing from 1992 to 2008, winning ten world titles in six different world classes and finishing with a 39-6 record. De La Hoya has generated over $700 million in pay-per-view income and was the top-rated fighter in the world in 1997 and 1998. Nicknamed “The Golden Boy,” he won a gold medal in the 1992 Barcelona Olympics and is the first American of Mexican descent to own a national boxing promotional firm. His firm, Golden Boy Enterprises is one of boxing’s most active and respected promoters and holds a 25% interest in the Houston Dynamo MLS team. Throughout his career, De La Hoya has been active in the community. In 2005, Golden Boy Enterprises announced the formation of Golden Boy Partners, a company focused on urban development in Latino communities. In 2008, De La Hoya donated $3.5 million to the De La Hoya Animo Charter High School to help underprivileged youth to education. After losing to Manny Pacquiao in 2008, he decided to retire from boxing.

Fernando Fiore

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Occupation: Sportscaster
Hometown: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Age: 57

Fiore is best known as the host of Republica Deportiva, a weekly sports show for Univision, and for anchoring Univision’s FIFA World Cup coverage from 1999 until 2014. He is a two-time Emmy Award winner and is the author of The World Cup: The Ultimate Guide to the Greatest Sports Spectacle in the World. A legend among Spanish-speaking sports fans, Fiore is renowned for bringing his contagious energy and passion to the broadcast booth, resulting in a comedic analysis of the game. You will see more of Fiore when the World Cup comes around, as he is a vital member of Fox's coverage in Russia.

Esther Garcia

Occupation: Vice President, Heineken’s Tecate and TecateLight
Hometown: Madrid, Spain
Age: 40

Originally from Madrid, Garcia worked at Heineken Spain before taking a break to work for other consumer brands. In 2015, Garcia rejoined Heineken as the Vice President for Tecate beer, named after a city in Baja California, Mexico. The Tecate exec is best known for partnering Heineken with the Champions League, a soccer league that counts more than 4.2 billion fans globally. Garcia was named to Ad Week’s “Most Powerful Women in Sports” in June. She currently lives with her family in Dobbs Ferry, New York.

Mònica González

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Occupation: Announcer, Founder of Gonzo Soccer
Hometown: Corpus Christi, TX
Age: 38

Gonzalez was a founding member in 1998 of the Mexican Women’s National team and helped lead the team in the 1999 FIFA Women’s World Cup. She played for the Mexican National Team for 13 years and was captain from 2003-07. During her career, González played in 83 international games and scored 10 goals. In 2011, she was hired by ESPN as a studio analyst for the 2011 Women’s World Cup and has since become a sideline reporter for Major League Soccer. She has also announced games for NBC Universo and Fox Deportes and, in 2016, was the only woman calling games in the UEFA Champions League.

Gonzalez's most valuable job title, however, is her role as co-founder and director of Gonzo Soccer, a non-profit organization that teaches soccer, life and leaderships to girls in Hispanic communities. What started as a soccer clinic in the lower west side of Chicago in 2009, the program now helps more than 900 girls worldwide, with academies in the U.S, Mexico and Colombia.

Earlier this year, Gonzalez joined other ex-professionals and The Equal Playing Field (EPF) Initiative and climbed Mount Kilamanjaro to play the highest 90-minute match ever recorded to raise awareness for gender inequality.

Tony Gonzalez

Occupation: NFL studio analyst, FOX NFL Kickoff
Hometown: Torrance, CA
Age: 41

Gonzalez, who is of a mixed background, played 17 seasons in the NFL for the Kansas City Chiefs and the Atlanta Falcons. "One of the most common questions I get in my lifetime, and Tony gets it too: What are you?" said Gonzalez's older brother, Chris. "I just say we're mixed - black, white, Jamaican, Hispanic, Portuguese." Gonzalez has been selected to 14 Pro Bowls in his career and currently holds the NFL record for total receiving yards by a tight end with 15,127. He also has the second-most receptions by any player all-time with 1325 and was well known for his durability, missing just two games in his career. While playing for the Chiefs, he co-founded All-Pro Science, a sports nutrition company, and starred in xXx: Return of Xander Cage, playing Paul Donovan in his first feature film role. Immediately after retirement, Gonzalez became an analyst on CBS's NFL pregame show NFL Today. He worked for CBS until the end of the 2016 season before being added to FOX's pregame show in May.

In 2009, Gonzalez co-authored The All-Pro Diet with Mitzi Dulan, the former nutritionist for the Chiefs, detailing his diet and workout routine. The aim was to provide information and help for others (athletes and non-athletes) to follow the same path.

In his rookie year, Gonzalez joined the Shadow Buddies Foundation, an organization that provides support and knowledge to children with severe illnesses and disabilities. When he moved to Atlanta he continued this program with children's hospitals in the city.

Dan Le Batard

Occupation: Sportswriter/Television Host, Miami Herald, ESPN
Hometown: Miami
Age: 48

Le Batard, whose parents were exiled from Cuba, is an American sportswriter, radio host and television reporter. He is most known for his radio show The Dan Le Batard show and for hosting Highly Questionable, which airs daily on ESPN. "It's rare to have a show that embraces heritage," Erik Rydholm, executive producer at ESPN said of the show, which features Le Batard and his father and targets a Hispanic audience. "It has to have family and that connection with viewers." Le Batard also frequently serves as a host for Pardon the Interruption and writes for his hometown paper, the Miami Herald. He is lauded for his self-deprecating humor and often writes about controversial topics such as race. His candor has made him one of the most respected journalists in the industry and has led to a devoted fan base.

Valeria Marín

Occupation: Host/Reporter, Fox Deportes/NFLeros
Hometown: Mexico City

Marín joined Fox Deportes in 2013 as part of Central Fox, the network’s leading sports news program. In 2015, she began covering the NFL and MLB for Fox Deportes En Vivo. Marín began her career covering Mexican Tennis at the newspaper “Impacto” before becoming a host and reporter of La Aficion at Milenio TV. She was also a commentator for Telivisa Deportes Network and Televis Deportes W Radio. On her show NFLeros, Marín often highlights Hispanic athletes and uses social media to interact with the community.

Gerardo “Tata” Martino

Occupation: Head Coach, Atlanta United FC
Hometown: Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina
Age: 54

Martino is an icon in his native Rosario because of his success with local club Newell’s Old Boys. He holds the record of appearances with the team, playing a total of 505 matches in 14 years with the club. He was also selected in a fan’s poll as the best player throughout the club’s history. After retiring from soccer, Martino continued his success as a manager. In 2013, he was chosen as manager of FC Barcelona, but resigned just a year later after a runner-up La Liga finish. In 2015, he led Argentina to the Copa América Final, but resigned in 2016 after losing to Chile in two consecutive finals. Martino currently manages MLS expansion club Atlanta FC, who reached the playoffs in its first season. His presence in the U.S not only elevates the league's reputation, but due to his passion for youth, local development, Atlanta has a manager who has a vision that can help the city's multicultural talent.

Jessica Mendoza

Occupation: MLB Analyst, ESPN
Hometown: Camarillo, CA
Age: 36

Mendoza was a four-time First Team All-American softball player for the Stanford Cardinals between 1999-2002 and a former member of the US women’s national team between 2004-2010.She won gold at the 2004 Olympics in Athens, and a silver medal at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing.On August 24, 2015 she became the first female analyst in the history of Major League Baseball. She is currently a broadcaster for ESPN’s Sunday Night Baseball and analyzed her first MLB post-season series on ESPN radio on Saturday. On her Hispanic heritage, Mendoza told ESPN she felt Latinas needed to "Embrace the fact that you are different." She often points her source of inspiration to her father, who was a first-generation Mexican-American that taught her to love her Hispanic roots.

Mendoza is a past president of Women Sports Foundation, an organization founded by Billie Jean King in 1974 aimed to advance the lives of women and girls through sports and physical activity. During the 2008 Olympics, she was also an athletic ambassador for Team Darfur, which was devoted to raising awareness of humanitarian crises related to War in Darfur.

Arte Moreno

Occupation: Owner, Los Angeles Angels
Hometown: Tuscon, AZ
Age: 71

Moreno earned his fortune through advertising and was hired by billboard company Outdoor Systems in 1984. After taking Outdoor Systems public in 1996, Moreno sold the company to Infinity Broadcasting for $8 billion. In 2003, he became the first Mexican-American to own a major sports team in the United States when he purchased the Anaheim Angels from the Walt Disney Company. Moreno led the Angels to division titles from 2004-2009 and 2014. In the community, he established the Moreno Family Foundation, which supports non-profit organizations focusing on youth and education as well as athletic programs at the University of Arizona.

Marisabel Muñoz

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Occupation: Major League Soccer, Vice President of Communications
Hometown: Miami
Age: 37

Muñoz developed a passion for soccer while growing up in Miami, leading to her career in sports journalism with The Miami Herald and ESPN The Magazine. She became involved with the MLS in 2002 and has played an important role in establishing relationships with League broadcast partners, including Univision, ESPN and FOX.Muñozis also responsible for the league’s U.S. Hispanic initiatives, including the Sueño MLS reality show and the league’s Spanish-language digital platform, FutbolMLS.com. The strong relationship between Hispanic soccer fans and Major League Soccer is a testament to her work as both an executive and a passionate fútbol fan.

Sandy Nunez

Occupation: Coordinating Producer, ESPN
Hometown: Los Angeles
Age: 53

Sandy Nunez is a Coordinating Producing overseeing all SportsCenter production for ESPN in Los Angeles. SportsCenter production in LA includes SC Coast to Coast with anchors Cari Champion and David Lloyd as well as the late night SportsCenter Los Angeles with Neil Everett and Stan Verrett. Nunez is currently a member of the Los Angeles chapter of Women in Sports and Events (WISE). She also serves on the Board of Managers of Ketchum-Downtown YMCA.Earlier this month, Nunez was named one of “Los Angeles Most Influential Latina Journalists” by the California Chicano News Media Association (CCNMA.)

She is the only Latina who holds her position of coordinating producer at ESPN.

Fernando Palomo

Occupation: International Football Analyst, ESPN
Hometown: San Salvador, El Salvador
Age: 44

Palomo started his broadcasting career in 1999 with Channel 4 TV in San Salvador covering events including the Olympics and the Pan American Games. He joined ESPN in 2000 as a SportsCenter anchor for ESPN in Latin America and served as an anchor for Sportscenter for ESPN Deportes from 2004-06.Palomocurrently covers European soccer as a Spanish commentator and is the host of Fuera de Juego, ESPN Deportes’ highest-rated international program. In July 2012, he was chosen to be the voices for the FIFA video game franchise and has appeared in their Spanish versions since FIFA 13. This role has helped Palomo influence millions of young people who are introduced to the beautiful game.Palomowas also a member of the National Track and Field team of El Salvador and is the country’s record-holder in the javelin throw.

Rick Renteria

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Occupation: Manager, Chicago White Sox
Hometown: Harbor City, CA
Age: 55

After playing in South Gate, California, Renteria was drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates with the 20th overall pick in the 1980 Major League Baseball draft. Renteria played five seasons in the Majors and two seasons with the Mexican League's Jalisco Charros before coaching and managing in the Marlins organization until 2001, and in the San Diego Padres organization until 2013, the same year he managed the Mexico national team in the World Baseball Classic. He was hired to be the manager of the Chicago Cubs for the 2014 season, but was terminated just a year later. Renteria would stay in Chicago, though, serving as a bench coach for the Chicago White Sox before becoming manager in 2017. On his Mexican pride, Renteria told ESPN "I can't deny who I am. I am Mexican. My parents were both from Mexico. They came here. They gave us an opportunity." As the only Hispanic manager in Major League Baseball, Renteria's influence for Latino youth ball players are not taken for granted.

Marly Rivera

Occupation: MLB Writer/TV Host,ESPN
Hometown: San Juan, Puerto Rico
Age: 42

Rivera, who was born and raised in San Juan before moving to the United States as a teenager, is a bilingual sportswriter and reporter for ESPN and ESPN Deportes. She started her career as an editorial producer and writer at Major League Baseball and an editor at Univision communications before becoming an ESPN beat writer for the New York Yankees as one of the few Hispanic females in the BBWAA (Baseball Writers’ Association of America). More recently, Rivera has been a guest contributor on Béisbol Esta Noche, Sunday Night Baseball, Outside the Lines and SportsCenter. On her Hispanic culture, Rivera told ESPN "I have an accent. My first language is Spanish. I try, I am trying to help your culture, but I still have my culture. You have to respect it. I am not going to give up everything that makes me me just because you don't like it."

Rivera has done tremendous work for her native Puerto Rico, as the island deals with the devastation of Hurricane Maria. Her campaign has accumulated more than $30,000 and is getting closer to the $50,000 goal. Her invaluable voice throughout the disaster has inspired other names in the sports world to contribute.

Ron Rivera

Occupation: Head Coach, Carolina Panthers
Hometown: Fort Ord, CA
Age: 55

Rivera, a former linebacker for the Chicago Bears, is the current head coach of the Carolina Panthers. Rivera was selected in the second round of the 1984 NFL draft, becoming the first person of Puerto Rican and Mexican descent to play in the NFL. After retiring in 1992, he worked in Chicago as a TV analyst covering the Bears before becoming the team's defensive coordinator from 2004-2006. In 2008, Rivera was named defensive coordinator of the San Diego Chargers and received his first NFL head coaching gig with the Panthers in 2011. He was named the NFL Coach of the Year in 2013 and 2015 and has led the Panthers to three straight division titles and an appearance in Super Bowl 50. Rivera, who is of Puerto Rican and Mexican descent, was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2003. Rivera is "the ideal image of a [Hispanic] father figure: stern, but fair," said José Hernández-París, executive director of Charlotte's Latin American Coalition, adding that Rivera and the Panthers do significant work of reaching out to local Hispanics.

Alex Rodriguez

Occupation: MLB Analyst, Fox
Hometown: Miami
Age:42

Rodriguez, nicknamed “A-Rod,” played 22 seasons in the MLB for the Seattle Mariners, Texas Rangers and New York Yankees and won three AL Most Valuable Player awards, 10 Silver Slugger awards and two Gold Glove awards. He has also hit the most home runs by a player of Hispanic descent with 696, fourth-most in MLB history. However, A-Rod has led a controversial career after incurring criticism from the media for his behavior and use of banned performance-enhancing drugs. After announcing his retirement in 2016, Rodriguez has become a media personality, serving as a broadcaster for Fox Sports 1, a cast member of Shark Tank and a member of the ABC News network.

In 2003, he gave $3.9 million to the University of Miami to renovate its baseball stadium and as a result it was re-named "Alex Rodriguez Park at Mark Light Field."

When he came back from suspension in 2015, A-Rod donated $1 million to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Miami-Dade, a donation that arrived in good timing with the Yankees's expansion initiative to serve more children. Rodriguez said of the act, "if it wasn't for the Boys & Girls Club, I wouldn't be in the big leagues today."

Angel Rodriguez

Occupation: Sports Editor, Los Angeles Times
Hometown: Houston
Age: 46

Rodriguez began his journalism career shortly after graduating from the University of Texas at Austin. He has covered U.S. Sports forEFE, helped launch ESPNDeportes, was an online sports producer at the Arizona Republic and was a sports editor at the Cincinnati Enquirer. Rodriguez joined the LA Times as a sports editor in 2015 after spending a year as deputy editor for mobile innovation at the Washington Post. Throughout his career, Rodriguez has consistently aimed to diversify sports by reporting through multiple languages and using digital tools.

Juan Carlos Rodriguez

Occupation: President, UnivisionDeportes
Hometown: Mexico City

Rodriguez began his business career when he co-founded and became CEO ofGrupoEstadio, which, under his leadership, became the leading partner for DIRECTV to product and distribute the 2002 FIFA World Cup. Since 2012, he has served as the president of UnivisionDeportes, the sports division of Univision Communications Inc. He has grown Univision Deportes Network to be the leading sports destination for Hispanic America and was named one of the “31 Most Powerful People in U.S. Soccer” by FourFourTwo. Rodriguez also received the Cynopsis Sports’ 2015 Navigator Award and has led Univision Deportes to four Sports Emmy Awards for excellence in sports coverage.

Tony Romo

Occupation: NFL Analyst, CBS
Hometown: Burlington, WI
Age: 37

Romo, whose grandfather emigrated to the U.S. from Mexico as a teenager, played quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys from 2004-16. In that time, he made four Pro Bowls, threw for over 34,000 yards and established himself as one of the NFL’s most popular athletes. His 97.1 passer rating is the fourth highest of all time.Romowas active in the Dallas community, hosting a youth football camp and participating in activities with United Way, the Make-A-Wish Foundation and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. During his playing days, he would often draw large Hispanic crowds to the Cowboys, telling ESPN he "really appreciates the support [The Hispanic Community] gives us." He announced his retirement in April and was quickly hired by CBS to serve as lead analyst for NFL games. In a short time, he’s established himself as one of the sport’s best broadcasters.

In the Dallas area, Romo has done much work in the community, as he has collaborated with United Way, the Make-A-Wish Foundation, and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. In 2012, as a speaker for "Miracle of the Million" Romo pledged $1 million to its “adopt-a-school” program where local churches help troubled schools.

Armando Salguero

Occupation: Sportswriter, Miami Herald
Hometown: Miami
Age: 54

Salguero, who was born in Havana, Cuba but raised in Miami, has covered South Florida sports since 1982 and the Dolphins and the NFL since 1990. He previously worked as a national reporter for ESPN and is well respected across the NFL and the sports media industry.Salgueroalso serves as a Pro Football Hall of Fame selector and is a voter for the Associated Press All-Pro team and its annual awards. He currently reports and writes for the Miami Herald, where his general sports columns garner frequent attention.

Shea Serrano

Occupation: Writer, The Ringer; Author of ?The Rap Year Book: The Most Important Rap Song From Every Year Since 1979, Discussed, Debated, and Deconstructed
Hometown: San Antonio
Age: 36

Serrano, who is of Mexican descent, began his career as a middle-school science teacher in Houston. After writing for the Near Northwest Banner, Serrano freelanced for the Houston Press in 2007, where he drew national attention for his work on hip-hop and pop culture. He was quickly offered a place at the LA Weekly before writing for ESPN’s Grantland and Bill Simmons’ website, The Ringer, where he currently works. Serrano is best known for his humor and activity on social media, which he frequently uses for charitable causes. In August, Serrano invited Twitter followers to join him in a “F--- Hurricane Harvey” round of donations to support Houston relief work; by the end of the night, they had raised more than $130,000. Serrano’s newest book Basketball (and Other Things) will be published in October 2017.

Mariano Trujillo

Occupation: Analyst, FoxDeportes
Hometown: Mexico City
Age: 40

Trujillo made his professional soccer debut with UNAM Pumas in 1996. After playing for three teams in Mexico from 1996-2007, he signed with Skoda Xanthi of Greece. In 2009, Trujillo signed for Chivas USA and became captain of the team in just his second season. He retired in 2013 and immediately thrived in a new role as host of the news magazine show Fox Deportes En Vivo alongside John Laguna.

Trujillo is an analyst for both English and Spanish markets, lending his talents to both Fox Deportes and Fox Sports as a voice of Mexican fútbol. This is extremely valuable to many US-born Latino soccer fans, who passionately follow the sport in both languages.

Luis Omar Tapia

Occupation: Reporter, Univision Deportes/Fox Sports
Hometown: Santiago, Chile
Age: 54

Tapia currently reports on MX League matches for Univision Deportes and Champions League matches for Fox Sports. He has also worked at ESPN, commentating on world football.Tapiais of Chilean descent and has strived to give back to his community. He founded the “The 90 Minutes Foundation” in the city of Miami to help low-income families and youth in education and sport. Tapia is best known for his catch phrases and nicknames for players and coaches as well as his classic comment before every football match, "Begin 90 minutes of the most beautiful sport in the world."

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