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Crewe Alexandra have been warned to conduct a proper investigation into what they knew about paedophile coach Barry Bennell or else face one being imposed upon them. It can be revealed that the head of the independent inquiry into child abuse in football, Clive Sheldon QC, has demanded a ‘structured report’ from some of the clubs at the centre of the scandal into the accusations and revelations to have engulfed them. Among them are Crewe, who reneged on a promise to launch an independent inquiry into their seven-year association with Bennell after he was jailed for 31 years last month and branded the “devil incarnate” for abusing 12 boys as young as eight. It is feared his victims may number more than 100. The Football Association, which in 2016 commissioned an independent probe of its own into what chairman Greg Clarke admitted was the biggest crisis he could recall the game facing, has empowered Sheldon to step in if any of the clubs in question fail to produce an adequate structured report. That would include him being able to summon officials and order the disclosure of documents with the threat of FA sanctions for anyone refusing to cooperate. Crewe provoked outrage earlier this month by announcing they would no longer be launching a planned internal review after claiming there was no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, which they said had found no evidence anyone at the club knew about Bennell’s offending. Laura Smith, the Crewe MP, Damian Collins, the chairman of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee, and Simon Yates, the leader of Crewe Town council, all condemned the move and urged the League Two side to reconsider. Two of the approximately dozen clubs on which Sheldon’s inquiry has focused - Manchester City and Chelsea - have long been conducting their own QC-led investigations, with which he is able to liaise. It is 18 months since former Crewe defender Andy Woodward first spoke out Credit: PA Several others have carried out either external or internal probes or been asked to provide structured reports, with these given a deadline of around the start of the World Cup to submit their findings to Sheldon and his team. That is not the primary reason why it can also be revealed that there has been another delay to the conclusion of his £1 million-plus inquiry, which had previously been extended until at least Easter. Sheldon is now not expected to submit his final report to the FA until the end of September, almost two years since former Crewe defender Andy Woodward’s revelation he had been a victim of Bennell triggered the current scandal. The sheer scale of the task facing Sheldon and his team is being blamed for what will end up a delay of almost nine months to an inquiry focusing on what the FA and clubs knew and did about child abuse in the game between 1970-2005. Paralegals have been forced to open a third of 9,000 boxes stored in a poorly-indexed FA archive estimated to contain up to five million documents of up to 2,000 pages. Almost a third of those opened were found to contain potentially-relevant material, from which around half a million pages have now been digitised. More than 350 highly-relevant documents have been identified for Sheldon to examine personally, of which he has still to view more than half. He is also keen to meet around a dozen more survivors of abuse - having already interviewed more than two dozen to date - in order to produce a report planned to focus on 10-12 case studies. That report will name and shame clubs and individuals if it is determined they did not take the correct steps when informed of abuse allegations and could also recommend potential sanctions to the FA.
Crewe Alexandra told to start investigation into child abuse scandal or face being subject of one themselves
Crewe Alexandra have been warned to conduct a proper investigation into what they knew about paedophile coach Barry Bennell or else face one being imposed upon them. It can be revealed that the head of the independent inquiry into child abuse in football, Clive Sheldon QC, has demanded a ‘structured report’ from some of the clubs at the centre of the scandal into the accusations and revelations to have engulfed them. Among them are Crewe, who reneged on a promise to launch an independent inquiry into their seven-year association with Bennell after he was jailed for 31 years last month and branded the “devil incarnate” for abusing 12 boys as young as eight. It is feared his victims may number more than 100. The Football Association, which in 2016 commissioned an independent probe of its own into what chairman Greg Clarke admitted was the biggest crisis he could recall the game facing, has empowered Sheldon to step in if any of the clubs in question fail to produce an adequate structured report. That would include him being able to summon officials and order the disclosure of documents with the threat of FA sanctions for anyone refusing to cooperate. Crewe provoked outrage earlier this month by announcing they would no longer be launching a planned internal review after claiming there was no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, which they said had found no evidence anyone at the club knew about Bennell’s offending. Laura Smith, the Crewe MP, Damian Collins, the chairman of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee, and Simon Yates, the leader of Crewe Town council, all condemned the move and urged the League Two side to reconsider. Two of the approximately dozen clubs on which Sheldon’s inquiry has focused - Manchester City and Chelsea - have long been conducting their own QC-led investigations, with which he is able to liaise. It is 18 months since former Crewe defender Andy Woodward first spoke out Credit: PA Several others have carried out either external or internal probes or been asked to provide structured reports, with these given a deadline of around the start of the World Cup to submit their findings to Sheldon and his team. That is not the primary reason why it can also be revealed that there has been another delay to the conclusion of his £1 million-plus inquiry, which had previously been extended until at least Easter. Sheldon is now not expected to submit his final report to the FA until the end of September, almost two years since former Crewe defender Andy Woodward’s revelation he had been a victim of Bennell triggered the current scandal. The sheer scale of the task facing Sheldon and his team is being blamed for what will end up a delay of almost nine months to an inquiry focusing on what the FA and clubs knew and did about child abuse in the game between 1970-2005. Paralegals have been forced to open a third of 9,000 boxes stored in a poorly-indexed FA archive estimated to contain up to five million documents of up to 2,000 pages. Almost a third of those opened were found to contain potentially-relevant material, from which around half a million pages have now been digitised. More than 350 highly-relevant documents have been identified for Sheldon to examine personally, of which he has still to view more than half. He is also keen to meet around a dozen more survivors of abuse - having already interviewed more than two dozen to date - in order to produce a report planned to focus on 10-12 case studies. That report will name and shame clubs and individuals if it is determined they did not take the correct steps when informed of abuse allegations and could also recommend potential sanctions to the FA.
Crewe Alexandra have been warned to conduct a proper investigation into what they knew about paedophile coach Barry Bennell or else face one being imposed upon them. It can be revealed that the head of the independent inquiry into child abuse in football, Clive Sheldon QC, has demanded a ‘structured report’ from some of the clubs at the centre of the scandal into the accusations and revelations to have engulfed them. Among them are Crewe, who reneged on a promise to launch an independent inquiry into their seven-year association with Bennell after he was jailed for 31 years last month and branded the “devil incarnate” for abusing 12 boys as young as eight. It is feared his victims may number more than 100. The Football Association, which in 2016 commissioned an independent probe of its own into what chairman Greg Clarke admitted was the biggest crisis he could recall the game facing, has empowered Sheldon to step in if any of the clubs in question fail to produce an adequate structured report. That would include him being able to summon officials and order the disclosure of documents with the threat of FA sanctions for anyone refusing to cooperate. Crewe provoked outrage earlier this month by announcing they would no longer be launching a planned internal review after claiming there was no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, which they said had found no evidence anyone at the club knew about Bennell’s offending. Laura Smith, the Crewe MP, Damian Collins, the chairman of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee, and Simon Yates, the leader of Crewe Town council, all condemned the move and urged the League Two side to reconsider. Two of the approximately dozen clubs on which Sheldon’s inquiry has focused - Manchester City and Chelsea - have long been conducting their own QC-led investigations, with which he is able to liaise. It is 18 months since former Crewe defender Andy Woodward first spoke out Credit: PA Several others have carried out either external or internal probes or been asked to provide structured reports, with these given a deadline of around the start of the World Cup to submit their findings to Sheldon and his team. That is not the primary reason why it can also be revealed that there has been another delay to the conclusion of his £1 million-plus inquiry, which had previously been extended until at least Easter. Sheldon is now not expected to submit his final report to the FA until the end of September, almost two years since former Crewe defender Andy Woodward’s revelation he had been a victim of Bennell triggered the current scandal. The sheer scale of the task facing Sheldon and his team is being blamed for what will end up a delay of almost nine months to an inquiry focusing on what the FA and clubs knew and did about child abuse in the game between 1970-2005. Paralegals have been forced to open a third of 9,000 boxes stored in a poorly-indexed FA archive estimated to contain up to five million documents of up to 2,000 pages. Almost a third of those opened were found to contain potentially-relevant material, from which around half a million pages have now been digitised. More than 350 highly-relevant documents have been identified for Sheldon to examine personally, of which he has still to view more than half. He is also keen to meet around a dozen more survivors of abuse - having already interviewed more than two dozen to date - in order to produce a report planned to focus on 10-12 case studies. That report will name and shame clubs and individuals if it is determined they did not take the correct steps when informed of abuse allegations and could also recommend potential sanctions to the FA.
Crewe Alexandra told to start investigation into child abuse scandal or face being subject of one themselves
Crewe Alexandra have been warned to conduct a proper investigation into what they knew about paedophile coach Barry Bennell or else face one being imposed upon them. It can be revealed that the head of the independent inquiry into child abuse in football, Clive Sheldon QC, has demanded a ‘structured report’ from some of the clubs at the centre of the scandal into the accusations and revelations to have engulfed them. Among them are Crewe, who reneged on a promise to launch an independent inquiry into their seven-year association with Bennell after he was jailed for 31 years last month and branded the “devil incarnate” for abusing 12 boys as young as eight. It is feared his victims may number more than 100. The Football Association, which in 2016 commissioned an independent probe of its own into what chairman Greg Clarke admitted was the biggest crisis he could recall the game facing, has empowered Sheldon to step in if any of the clubs in question fail to produce an adequate structured report. That would include him being able to summon officials and order the disclosure of documents with the threat of FA sanctions for anyone refusing to cooperate. Crewe provoked outrage earlier this month by announcing they would no longer be launching a planned internal review after claiming there was no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, which they said had found no evidence anyone at the club knew about Bennell’s offending. Laura Smith, the Crewe MP, Damian Collins, the chairman of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee, and Simon Yates, the leader of Crewe Town council, all condemned the move and urged the League Two side to reconsider. Two of the approximately dozen clubs on which Sheldon’s inquiry has focused - Manchester City and Chelsea - have long been conducting their own QC-led investigations, with which he is able to liaise. It is 18 months since former Crewe defender Andy Woodward first spoke out Credit: PA Several others have carried out either external or internal probes or been asked to provide structured reports, with these given a deadline of around the start of the World Cup to submit their findings to Sheldon and his team. That is not the primary reason why it can also be revealed that there has been another delay to the conclusion of his £1 million-plus inquiry, which had previously been extended until at least Easter. Sheldon is now not expected to submit his final report to the FA until the end of September, almost two years since former Crewe defender Andy Woodward’s revelation he had been a victim of Bennell triggered the current scandal. The sheer scale of the task facing Sheldon and his team is being blamed for what will end up a delay of almost nine months to an inquiry focusing on what the FA and clubs knew and did about child abuse in the game between 1970-2005. Paralegals have been forced to open a third of 9,000 boxes stored in a poorly-indexed FA archive estimated to contain up to five million documents of up to 2,000 pages. Almost a third of those opened were found to contain potentially-relevant material, from which around half a million pages have now been digitised. More than 350 highly-relevant documents have been identified for Sheldon to examine personally, of which he has still to view more than half. He is also keen to meet around a dozen more survivors of abuse - having already interviewed more than two dozen to date - in order to produce a report planned to focus on 10-12 case studies. That report will name and shame clubs and individuals if it is determined they did not take the correct steps when informed of abuse allegations and could also recommend potential sanctions to the FA.
Crewe Alexandra told to start investigation into child abuse scandal or face being subject of one themselves
Crewe Alexandra told to start investigation into child abuse scandal or face being subject of one themselves
Crewe Alexandra told to start investigation into child abuse scandal or face being subject of one themselves
Crewe Alexandra told to start investigation into child abuse scandal or face being subject of one themselves
Crewe Alexandra told to start investigation into child abuse scandal or face being subject of one themselves
Crewe Alexandra told to start investigation into child abuse scandal or face being subject of one themselves
Crewe Alexandra’s main sponsor has vowed to stand by the club despite the backlash that has greeted their decision to renege on the promise of an independent investigation into the Barry Bennell child abuse scandal. Laura Smith, the Crewe MP, Damian Collins, the chairman of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee, and Simon Yates, the leader of Crewe Town council, have all condemned the move and urged the League Two club to reconsider its stance over its former coach. Victims of the serial paedophile, who was sentenced last month to 30 years in prison after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s, reacted angrily to the news and the club have also been expelled from the North West Football Awards over their handling of arguably the worst scandal in English football history. But Mornflake, Crewe’s shirt sponsor with whom they have involved for over a decade, have said they intend to continue their association with the club. The Crewe based producer of oat and oat-based breakfast cereals said there had not been any discussions with the club to date over the matter but said they felt they would be “punishing” the club’s next generation of players and their families if they withdrew their sponsorship. In a statement, Mornflake - who are a prominent sponsor of companies and organisations in South Cheshire - told Telegraph Sport: “Firstly and most importantly, we extend our deepest sympathies to the victims involved in these horrific events – we are utterly appalled by what has happened and our thoughts are with everybody affected. “In this dreadful situation, both as sponsors and as a Crewe business, we also feel that we have a responsibility to support our local football team and do not want to punish the next generation of rising young stars or the families that look forward to watching their team play each week. Andy Woodward, one of Bennell's victims, says Crewe are burying their heads in the sand Credit: Peter Byrne/PA Wire “We were not involved with Crewe Alexandra Football Club in any way during these unspeakable events and our sponsorship of the football team for over the last ten years is one of the many local community initiatives we support.” Crewe announced earlier this month that they would no longer be launching a planned internal review after claiming there was no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending.
Sponsor vows to stand by Crewe Alexandra despite club reneging on Barry Bennell investigation
Crewe Alexandra’s main sponsor has vowed to stand by the club despite the backlash that has greeted their decision to renege on the promise of an independent investigation into the Barry Bennell child abuse scandal. Laura Smith, the Crewe MP, Damian Collins, the chairman of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee, and Simon Yates, the leader of Crewe Town council, have all condemned the move and urged the League Two club to reconsider its stance over its former coach. Victims of the serial paedophile, who was sentenced last month to 30 years in prison after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s, reacted angrily to the news and the club have also been expelled from the North West Football Awards over their handling of arguably the worst scandal in English football history. But Mornflake, Crewe’s shirt sponsor with whom they have involved for over a decade, have said they intend to continue their association with the club. The Crewe based producer of oat and oat-based breakfast cereals said there had not been any discussions with the club to date over the matter but said they felt they would be “punishing” the club’s next generation of players and their families if they withdrew their sponsorship. In a statement, Mornflake - who are a prominent sponsor of companies and organisations in South Cheshire - told Telegraph Sport: “Firstly and most importantly, we extend our deepest sympathies to the victims involved in these horrific events – we are utterly appalled by what has happened and our thoughts are with everybody affected. “In this dreadful situation, both as sponsors and as a Crewe business, we also feel that we have a responsibility to support our local football team and do not want to punish the next generation of rising young stars or the families that look forward to watching their team play each week. Andy Woodward, one of Bennell's victims, says Crewe are burying their heads in the sand Credit: Peter Byrne/PA Wire “We were not involved with Crewe Alexandra Football Club in any way during these unspeakable events and our sponsorship of the football team for over the last ten years is one of the many local community initiatives we support.” Crewe announced earlier this month that they would no longer be launching a planned internal review after claiming there was no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending.
Sponsor vows to stand by Crewe Alexandra despite club reneging on Barry Bennell investigation
Sponsor vows to stand by Crewe Alexandra despite club reneging on Barry Bennell investigation
Sponsor vows to stand by Crewe Alexandra despite club reneging on Barry Bennell investigation
Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to launch an independent investigation into the Barry Bennell child abuse scandal after the chairman of the culture, media and sport select committee joined the chorus of condemnation over the club’s decision to renege on their promise of an internal review. Damian Collins also warned that Crewe’s handling of the situation had generated such a “lack of trust” that, if the League Two club was shamed into an about-turn, the Football Association should intervene to ensure any review process was properly conducted. Failing that, Collins insisted it was imperative the FA’s own independent inquiry into child abuse in football, led by Clive Sheldon QC, thoroughly investigates Crewe and other clubs. The Conservative MP has also called on the FA to explain the reasons behind Dario Gradi’s suspension as Crewe’s director of football, 15 months after he was barred from all football related activity, or provide a clear time frame for when that will happen. Victims of Bennell – a former youth coach at Crewe, among other clubs, who was jailed for 30 years last month after being convicted of 43 counts of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s – and Laura Smith, the Labour MP for Crewe, have already hit out at the club for abandoning plans to conduct their own inquiry. Damian Collins also warned that Crewe's handling of the situation had generated a "lack of trust" Credit: GETTY IMAGES Crewe claimed they felt no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at the club knew about Bennell’s offending. But Smith told The Daily Telegraph last week that a criminal investigation was “limited in its scope” and “no substitute” for a thorough, transparent independent investigation that left “no stone unturned.” Now Collins has voiced his dismay at Crewe’s stance, branding their decision as “totally unacceptable” and suggesting it raises serious concerns about “the values of the club” that could lead people to avoid future association with it. “It is totally unacceptable because it needs to be done and they promised they would do it but it can’t be left there,” Collins told The Daily Telegraph. “The FA were clear when they set up the Sheldon inquiry that it has the power to go into clubs as well. So the FA should say that they will expect to conduct their own inquiry, through Clive Sheldon, or separately if need be, as part of this process and within that club. It would be better for Crewe and the victims to conduct their own inquiry but if they won’t, the FA should require it. But I also think the FA have got a responsibility, if Crewe do their own inquiry, to make sure it’s being done properly. What the club should do is bring in someone independent of themselves to run the inquiry and give them full access to all documents, information and people that they need. “There will be a lack of trust now because of the way the club has behaved. That’s why, even if Crewe do end up doing one themselves, the FA should check how they are doing it. If Crewe, and other clubs, don’t respond to this by treating it seriously and making sure there is a proper investigation, I think the way people will judge them is by saying, ‘This says something about the values of the club and those are values I don’t want to be associated with’.” The FA has yet to explain why Gradi – who was Crewe’s manager throughout the seven years Bennell worked for the club – was suspended in November 2016, shortly after an interview in The Guardian newspaper with one of Bennell’s victims at Crewe, Andy Woodward, sparked a mass of revelations into arguably the biggest scandal in English football history. But Collins believes it is time the FA speak up about that matter and explain the reasons behind Gradi’s suspension since the governing body has still to divulge what it relates to. “It would be helpful for them to do that,” Collins said. “I don’t know the issues behind it but it would be helpful to explain now why that suspension is there. Or, if the FA can’t explain now, then say when they will be able to talk about it. That would be helpful for all concerned.” Gradi has always denied any knowledge of Bennell’s offending. His suspension from the FA came amid claims he, as assistant manager of Chelsea, “smoothed over” a complaint of sex assault by a Chelsea scout, Eddie Heath, on a 15-year-old former youth team player in the 1970s. Gradi insisted he did nothing wrong and would assist in the FA’s review. Collins said it was imperative “for the credibility” of the Sheldon inquiry that there is “full disclosure” once the independent investigation is complete. “The test for people having confidence in the report is that Sheldon is free to publish in full and that the only redactions needed might be names of victims who need to be protected but otherwise there should be full disclosure,” Collins said. “In some ways, the best [outcome] would be for Clive Sheldon to publish the report himself, with the full support of the FA. For it to be an independent report, even though the FA have commissioned it, the author needs to be able to speak freely about what he has found.”
Crewe's refusal to conduct internal Barry Bennell inquiry is 'totally unacceptable', says Damian Collins
Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to launch an independent investigation into the Barry Bennell child abuse scandal after the chairman of the culture, media and sport select committee joined the chorus of condemnation over the club’s decision to renege on their promise of an internal review. Damian Collins also warned that Crewe’s handling of the situation had generated such a “lack of trust” that, if the League Two club was shamed into an about-turn, the Football Association should intervene to ensure any review process was properly conducted. Failing that, Collins insisted it was imperative the FA’s own independent inquiry into child abuse in football, led by Clive Sheldon QC, thoroughly investigates Crewe and other clubs. The Conservative MP has also called on the FA to explain the reasons behind Dario Gradi’s suspension as Crewe’s director of football, 15 months after he was barred from all football related activity, or provide a clear time frame for when that will happen. Victims of Bennell – a former youth coach at Crewe, among other clubs, who was jailed for 30 years last month after being convicted of 43 counts of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s – and Laura Smith, the Labour MP for Crewe, have already hit out at the club for abandoning plans to conduct their own inquiry. Damian Collins also warned that Crewe's handling of the situation had generated a "lack of trust" Credit: GETTY IMAGES Crewe claimed they felt no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at the club knew about Bennell’s offending. But Smith told The Daily Telegraph last week that a criminal investigation was “limited in its scope” and “no substitute” for a thorough, transparent independent investigation that left “no stone unturned.” Now Collins has voiced his dismay at Crewe’s stance, branding their decision as “totally unacceptable” and suggesting it raises serious concerns about “the values of the club” that could lead people to avoid future association with it. “It is totally unacceptable because it needs to be done and they promised they would do it but it can’t be left there,” Collins told The Daily Telegraph. “The FA were clear when they set up the Sheldon inquiry that it has the power to go into clubs as well. So the FA should say that they will expect to conduct their own inquiry, through Clive Sheldon, or separately if need be, as part of this process and within that club. It would be better for Crewe and the victims to conduct their own inquiry but if they won’t, the FA should require it. But I also think the FA have got a responsibility, if Crewe do their own inquiry, to make sure it’s being done properly. What the club should do is bring in someone independent of themselves to run the inquiry and give them full access to all documents, information and people that they need. “There will be a lack of trust now because of the way the club has behaved. That’s why, even if Crewe do end up doing one themselves, the FA should check how they are doing it. If Crewe, and other clubs, don’t respond to this by treating it seriously and making sure there is a proper investigation, I think the way people will judge them is by saying, ‘This says something about the values of the club and those are values I don’t want to be associated with’.” The FA has yet to explain why Gradi – who was Crewe’s manager throughout the seven years Bennell worked for the club – was suspended in November 2016, shortly after an interview in The Guardian newspaper with one of Bennell’s victims at Crewe, Andy Woodward, sparked a mass of revelations into arguably the biggest scandal in English football history. But Collins believes it is time the FA speak up about that matter and explain the reasons behind Gradi’s suspension since the governing body has still to divulge what it relates to. “It would be helpful for them to do that,” Collins said. “I don’t know the issues behind it but it would be helpful to explain now why that suspension is there. Or, if the FA can’t explain now, then say when they will be able to talk about it. That would be helpful for all concerned.” Gradi has always denied any knowledge of Bennell’s offending. His suspension from the FA came amid claims he, as assistant manager of Chelsea, “smoothed over” a complaint of sex assault by a Chelsea scout, Eddie Heath, on a 15-year-old former youth team player in the 1970s. Gradi insisted he did nothing wrong and would assist in the FA’s review. Collins said it was imperative “for the credibility” of the Sheldon inquiry that there is “full disclosure” once the independent investigation is complete. “The test for people having confidence in the report is that Sheldon is free to publish in full and that the only redactions needed might be names of victims who need to be protected but otherwise there should be full disclosure,” Collins said. “In some ways, the best [outcome] would be for Clive Sheldon to publish the report himself, with the full support of the FA. For it to be an independent report, even though the FA have commissioned it, the author needs to be able to speak freely about what he has found.”
Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to launch an independent investigation into the Barry Bennell child abuse scandal after the chairman of the culture, media and sport select committee joined the chorus of condemnation over the club’s decision to renege on their promise of an internal review. Damian Collins also warned that Crewe’s handling of the situation had generated such a “lack of trust” that, if the League Two club was shamed into an about-turn, the Football Association should intervene to ensure any review process was properly conducted. Failing that, Collins insisted it was imperative the FA’s own independent inquiry into child abuse in football, led by Clive Sheldon QC, thoroughly investigates Crewe and other clubs. The Conservative MP has also called on the FA to explain the reasons behind Dario Gradi’s suspension as Crewe’s director of football, 15 months after he was barred from all football related activity, or provide a clear time frame for when that will happen. Victims of Bennell – a former youth coach at Crewe, among other clubs, who was jailed for 30 years last month after being convicted of 43 counts of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s – and Laura Smith, the Labour MP for Crewe, have already hit out at the club for abandoning plans to conduct their own inquiry. Damian Collins also warned that Crewe's handling of the situation had generated a "lack of trust" Credit: GETTY IMAGES Crewe claimed they felt no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at the club knew about Bennell’s offending. But Smith told The Daily Telegraph last week that a criminal investigation was “limited in its scope” and “no substitute” for a thorough, transparent independent investigation that left “no stone unturned.” Now Collins has voiced his dismay at Crewe’s stance, branding their decision as “totally unacceptable” and suggesting it raises serious concerns about “the values of the club” that could lead people to avoid future association with it. “It is totally unacceptable because it needs to be done and they promised they would do it but it can’t be left there,” Collins told The Daily Telegraph. “The FA were clear when they set up the Sheldon inquiry that it has the power to go into clubs as well. So the FA should say that they will expect to conduct their own inquiry, through Clive Sheldon, or separately if need be, as part of this process and within that club. It would be better for Crewe and the victims to conduct their own inquiry but if they won’t, the FA should require it. But I also think the FA have got a responsibility, if Crewe do their own inquiry, to make sure it’s being done properly. What the club should do is bring in someone independent of themselves to run the inquiry and give them full access to all documents, information and people that they need. “There will be a lack of trust now because of the way the club has behaved. That’s why, even if Crewe do end up doing one themselves, the FA should check how they are doing it. If Crewe, and other clubs, don’t respond to this by treating it seriously and making sure there is a proper investigation, I think the way people will judge them is by saying, ‘This says something about the values of the club and those are values I don’t want to be associated with’.” The FA has yet to explain why Gradi – who was Crewe’s manager throughout the seven years Bennell worked for the club – was suspended in November 2016, shortly after an interview in The Guardian newspaper with one of Bennell’s victims at Crewe, Andy Woodward, sparked a mass of revelations into arguably the biggest scandal in English football history. But Collins believes it is time the FA speak up about that matter and explain the reasons behind Gradi’s suspension since the governing body has still to divulge what it relates to. “It would be helpful for them to do that,” Collins said. “I don’t know the issues behind it but it would be helpful to explain now why that suspension is there. Or, if the FA can’t explain now, then say when they will be able to talk about it. That would be helpful for all concerned.” Gradi has always denied any knowledge of Bennell’s offending. His suspension from the FA came amid claims he, as assistant manager of Chelsea, “smoothed over” a complaint of sex assault by a Chelsea scout, Eddie Heath, on a 15-year-old former youth team player in the 1970s. Gradi insisted he did nothing wrong and would assist in the FA’s review. Collins said it was imperative “for the credibility” of the Sheldon inquiry that there is “full disclosure” once the independent investigation is complete. “The test for people having confidence in the report is that Sheldon is free to publish in full and that the only redactions needed might be names of victims who need to be protected but otherwise there should be full disclosure,” Collins said. “In some ways, the best [outcome] would be for Clive Sheldon to publish the report himself, with the full support of the FA. For it to be an independent report, even though the FA have commissioned it, the author needs to be able to speak freely about what he has found.”
Crewe's refusal to conduct internal Barry Bennell inquiry is 'totally unacceptable', says Damian Collins
Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to launch an independent investigation into the Barry Bennell child abuse scandal after the chairman of the culture, media and sport select committee joined the chorus of condemnation over the club’s decision to renege on their promise of an internal review. Damian Collins also warned that Crewe’s handling of the situation had generated such a “lack of trust” that, if the League Two club was shamed into an about-turn, the Football Association should intervene to ensure any review process was properly conducted. Failing that, Collins insisted it was imperative the FA’s own independent inquiry into child abuse in football, led by Clive Sheldon QC, thoroughly investigates Crewe and other clubs. The Conservative MP has also called on the FA to explain the reasons behind Dario Gradi’s suspension as Crewe’s director of football, 15 months after he was barred from all football related activity, or provide a clear time frame for when that will happen. Victims of Bennell – a former youth coach at Crewe, among other clubs, who was jailed for 30 years last month after being convicted of 43 counts of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s – and Laura Smith, the Labour MP for Crewe, have already hit out at the club for abandoning plans to conduct their own inquiry. Damian Collins also warned that Crewe's handling of the situation had generated a "lack of trust" Credit: GETTY IMAGES Crewe claimed they felt no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at the club knew about Bennell’s offending. But Smith told The Daily Telegraph last week that a criminal investigation was “limited in its scope” and “no substitute” for a thorough, transparent independent investigation that left “no stone unturned.” Now Collins has voiced his dismay at Crewe’s stance, branding their decision as “totally unacceptable” and suggesting it raises serious concerns about “the values of the club” that could lead people to avoid future association with it. “It is totally unacceptable because it needs to be done and they promised they would do it but it can’t be left there,” Collins told The Daily Telegraph. “The FA were clear when they set up the Sheldon inquiry that it has the power to go into clubs as well. So the FA should say that they will expect to conduct their own inquiry, through Clive Sheldon, or separately if need be, as part of this process and within that club. It would be better for Crewe and the victims to conduct their own inquiry but if they won’t, the FA should require it. But I also think the FA have got a responsibility, if Crewe do their own inquiry, to make sure it’s being done properly. What the club should do is bring in someone independent of themselves to run the inquiry and give them full access to all documents, information and people that they need. “There will be a lack of trust now because of the way the club has behaved. That’s why, even if Crewe do end up doing one themselves, the FA should check how they are doing it. If Crewe, and other clubs, don’t respond to this by treating it seriously and making sure there is a proper investigation, I think the way people will judge them is by saying, ‘This says something about the values of the club and those are values I don’t want to be associated with’.” The FA has yet to explain why Gradi – who was Crewe’s manager throughout the seven years Bennell worked for the club – was suspended in November 2016, shortly after an interview in The Guardian newspaper with one of Bennell’s victims at Crewe, Andy Woodward, sparked a mass of revelations into arguably the biggest scandal in English football history. But Collins believes it is time the FA speak up about that matter and explain the reasons behind Gradi’s suspension since the governing body has still to divulge what it relates to. “It would be helpful for them to do that,” Collins said. “I don’t know the issues behind it but it would be helpful to explain now why that suspension is there. Or, if the FA can’t explain now, then say when they will be able to talk about it. That would be helpful for all concerned.” Gradi has always denied any knowledge of Bennell’s offending. His suspension from the FA came amid claims he, as assistant manager of Chelsea, “smoothed over” a complaint of sex assault by a Chelsea scout, Eddie Heath, on a 15-year-old former youth team player in the 1970s. Gradi insisted he did nothing wrong and would assist in the FA’s review. Collins said it was imperative “for the credibility” of the Sheldon inquiry that there is “full disclosure” once the independent investigation is complete. “The test for people having confidence in the report is that Sheldon is free to publish in full and that the only redactions needed might be names of victims who need to be protected but otherwise there should be full disclosure,” Collins said. “In some ways, the best [outcome] would be for Clive Sheldon to publish the report himself, with the full support of the FA. For it to be an independent report, even though the FA have commissioned it, the author needs to be able to speak freely about what he has found.”
Crewe Alexandra have been told they owe the victims of serial paedophile Barry Bennell “nothing less than a thorough investigation” into the failings that allowed the club’s former coach to sexually abuse dozens of young boys. Laura Smith, the Labour MP for Crewe and Nantwich, has criticised the League Two club’s decision to renege on its promise of an internal review into one of the worst scandals in the history of English football. Smith, the daughter of Hamilton Smith, the former Crewe managing director who claims his warnings about Bennell in the late 1980s were ignored by the club, has urged Crewe’s directors to reconsider its decision. Crewe said in a statement last Friday that there was no need to “duplicate the thorough inquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending. But Smith, a former teacher, believes any criminal investigation is “limited in its scope” and was “not a substitute for a wider independent investigation” that could examine why Bennell’s crimes were able to go unreported for so long and potentially provide answers she feels the victims deserve. Bennell was described in court as a “child molester on an industrial scale” and “the devil incarnate” when sentenced last month to 30 years in prison after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s. Another 86 people have since come forward to make complaints of abuse against him. Bennell had previously been convicted in 1995, 1998 and 2015 of sexually abusing young boys. “The victims of this horrific abuse deserve nothing less than a thorough investigation into every aspect of the awful events that occurred during this time,” Smith said. “That investigation should be transparent and leave no stone unturned. “My understanding is that any criminal investigation will be limited in its scope by its very nature and is therefore not a substitute for a wider independent investigation. “It is regrettable that the club has now decided to renege on the Board’s original promise to commission an independent investigation and I would urge the club to reconsider its decision.” Bennell has been sentenced to 31 years for his multiple convictions Credit: BBC Smith’s calls come only 24 hours after her father, Hamilton, called on the club to be “honest about the past” after expressing his shock and deep disappointment at Crewe’s attempts to discredit him. Crewe had claimed in their statement last Friday that nobody at the club had any recollection of their former managing director airing his concerns about Bennell’s behaviour. But Hamilton Smith, standing by his accusations, responded by questioning how people could believe “that cultures and attitudes have changed” at Crewe “or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first” if the club was “not prepared to be honest about the past”. He said that, during his time as manager director between May 1987 and February 1990, he was “made aware of concerns about Barry Bennell’s relationship with the boys at the club” and raised them at a meeting he called at the house of then chairman, Norman Rowlinson, which he said was attended by several directors, including current chairman John Bowler. “I am shocked to hear that other individuals have denied any recollection of these events and it is a shame that police have been unable to find any other evidence of this meeting, which took place almost 30 years ago,” he told the BBC on Wednesday. “I think it is important that those who held positions of authority have a duty to be honest about what happened. It is the least we can do now for those victims who have suffered the most horrific abuse whilst at the club. I have given my honest account.”
Crewe MP tells club they owe Barry Bennell victims a thorough investigation
Crewe Alexandra have been told they owe the victims of serial paedophile Barry Bennell “nothing less than a thorough investigation” into the failings that allowed the club’s former coach to sexually abuse dozens of young boys. Laura Smith, the Labour MP for Crewe and Nantwich, has criticised the League Two club’s decision to renege on its promise of an internal review into one of the worst scandals in the history of English football. Smith, the daughter of Hamilton Smith, the former Crewe managing director who claims his warnings about Bennell in the late 1980s were ignored by the club, has urged Crewe’s directors to reconsider its decision. Crewe said in a statement last Friday that there was no need to “duplicate the thorough inquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending. But Smith, a former teacher, believes any criminal investigation is “limited in its scope” and was “not a substitute for a wider independent investigation” that could examine why Bennell’s crimes were able to go unreported for so long and potentially provide answers she feels the victims deserve. Bennell was described in court as a “child molester on an industrial scale” and “the devil incarnate” when sentenced last month to 30 years in prison after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s. Another 86 people have since come forward to make complaints of abuse against him. Bennell had previously been convicted in 1995, 1998 and 2015 of sexually abusing young boys. “The victims of this horrific abuse deserve nothing less than a thorough investigation into every aspect of the awful events that occurred during this time,” Smith said. “That investigation should be transparent and leave no stone unturned. “My understanding is that any criminal investigation will be limited in its scope by its very nature and is therefore not a substitute for a wider independent investigation. “It is regrettable that the club has now decided to renege on the Board’s original promise to commission an independent investigation and I would urge the club to reconsider its decision.” Bennell has been sentenced to 31 years for his multiple convictions Credit: BBC Smith’s calls come only 24 hours after her father, Hamilton, called on the club to be “honest about the past” after expressing his shock and deep disappointment at Crewe’s attempts to discredit him. Crewe had claimed in their statement last Friday that nobody at the club had any recollection of their former managing director airing his concerns about Bennell’s behaviour. But Hamilton Smith, standing by his accusations, responded by questioning how people could believe “that cultures and attitudes have changed” at Crewe “or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first” if the club was “not prepared to be honest about the past”. He said that, during his time as manager director between May 1987 and February 1990, he was “made aware of concerns about Barry Bennell’s relationship with the boys at the club” and raised them at a meeting he called at the house of then chairman, Norman Rowlinson, which he said was attended by several directors, including current chairman John Bowler. “I am shocked to hear that other individuals have denied any recollection of these events and it is a shame that police have been unable to find any other evidence of this meeting, which took place almost 30 years ago,” he told the BBC on Wednesday. “I think it is important that those who held positions of authority have a duty to be honest about what happened. It is the least we can do now for those victims who have suffered the most horrific abuse whilst at the club. I have given my honest account.”
Crewe Alexandra have been told they owe the victims of serial paedophile Barry Bennell “nothing less than a thorough investigation” into the failings that allowed the club’s former coach to sexually abuse dozens of young boys. Laura Smith, the Labour MP for Crewe and Nantwich, has criticised the League Two club’s decision to renege on its promise of an internal review into one of the worst scandals in the history of English football. Smith, the daughter of Hamilton Smith, the former Crewe managing director who claims his warnings about Bennell in the late 1980s were ignored by the club, has urged Crewe’s directors to reconsider its decision. Crewe said in a statement last Friday that there was no need to “duplicate the thorough inquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending. But Smith, a former teacher, believes any criminal investigation is “limited in its scope” and was “not a substitute for a wider independent investigation” that could examine why Bennell’s crimes were able to go unreported for so long and potentially provide answers she feels the victims deserve. Bennell was described in court as a “child molester on an industrial scale” and “the devil incarnate” when sentenced last month to 30 years in prison after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s. Another 86 people have since come forward to make complaints of abuse against him. Bennell had previously been convicted in 1995, 1998 and 2015 of sexually abusing young boys. “The victims of this horrific abuse deserve nothing less than a thorough investigation into every aspect of the awful events that occurred during this time,” Smith said. “That investigation should be transparent and leave no stone unturned. “My understanding is that any criminal investigation will be limited in its scope by its very nature and is therefore not a substitute for a wider independent investigation. “It is regrettable that the club has now decided to renege on the Board’s original promise to commission an independent investigation and I would urge the club to reconsider its decision.” Bennell has been sentenced to 31 years for his multiple convictions Credit: BBC Smith’s calls come only 24 hours after her father, Hamilton, called on the club to be “honest about the past” after expressing his shock and deep disappointment at Crewe’s attempts to discredit him. Crewe had claimed in their statement last Friday that nobody at the club had any recollection of their former managing director airing his concerns about Bennell’s behaviour. But Hamilton Smith, standing by his accusations, responded by questioning how people could believe “that cultures and attitudes have changed” at Crewe “or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first” if the club was “not prepared to be honest about the past”. He said that, during his time as manager director between May 1987 and February 1990, he was “made aware of concerns about Barry Bennell’s relationship with the boys at the club” and raised them at a meeting he called at the house of then chairman, Norman Rowlinson, which he said was attended by several directors, including current chairman John Bowler. “I am shocked to hear that other individuals have denied any recollection of these events and it is a shame that police have been unable to find any other evidence of this meeting, which took place almost 30 years ago,” he told the BBC on Wednesday. “I think it is important that those who held positions of authority have a duty to be honest about what happened. It is the least we can do now for those victims who have suffered the most horrific abuse whilst at the club. I have given my honest account.”
Crewe MP tells club they owe Barry Bennell victims a thorough investigation
Crewe Alexandra have been told they owe the victims of serial paedophile Barry Bennell “nothing less than a thorough investigation” into the failings that allowed the club’s former coach to sexually abuse dozens of young boys. Laura Smith, the Labour MP for Crewe and Nantwich, has criticised the League Two club’s decision to renege on its promise of an internal review into one of the worst scandals in the history of English football. Smith, the daughter of Hamilton Smith, the former Crewe managing director who claims his warnings about Bennell in the late 1980s were ignored by the club, has urged Crewe’s directors to reconsider its decision. Crewe said in a statement last Friday that there was no need to “duplicate the thorough inquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending. But Smith, a former teacher, believes any criminal investigation is “limited in its scope” and was “not a substitute for a wider independent investigation” that could examine why Bennell’s crimes were able to go unreported for so long and potentially provide answers she feels the victims deserve. Bennell was described in court as a “child molester on an industrial scale” and “the devil incarnate” when sentenced last month to 30 years in prison after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s. Another 86 people have since come forward to make complaints of abuse against him. Bennell had previously been convicted in 1995, 1998 and 2015 of sexually abusing young boys. “The victims of this horrific abuse deserve nothing less than a thorough investigation into every aspect of the awful events that occurred during this time,” Smith said. “That investigation should be transparent and leave no stone unturned. “My understanding is that any criminal investigation will be limited in its scope by its very nature and is therefore not a substitute for a wider independent investigation. “It is regrettable that the club has now decided to renege on the Board’s original promise to commission an independent investigation and I would urge the club to reconsider its decision.” Bennell has been sentenced to 31 years for his multiple convictions Credit: BBC Smith’s calls come only 24 hours after her father, Hamilton, called on the club to be “honest about the past” after expressing his shock and deep disappointment at Crewe’s attempts to discredit him. Crewe had claimed in their statement last Friday that nobody at the club had any recollection of their former managing director airing his concerns about Bennell’s behaviour. But Hamilton Smith, standing by his accusations, responded by questioning how people could believe “that cultures and attitudes have changed” at Crewe “or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first” if the club was “not prepared to be honest about the past”. He said that, during his time as manager director between May 1987 and February 1990, he was “made aware of concerns about Barry Bennell’s relationship with the boys at the club” and raised them at a meeting he called at the house of then chairman, Norman Rowlinson, which he said was attended by several directors, including current chairman John Bowler. “I am shocked to hear that other individuals have denied any recollection of these events and it is a shame that police have been unable to find any other evidence of this meeting, which took place almost 30 years ago,” he told the BBC on Wednesday. “I think it is important that those who held positions of authority have a duty to be honest about what happened. It is the least we can do now for those victims who have suffered the most horrific abuse whilst at the club. I have given my honest account.”
The former managing director of Crewe Alexandra who claims his warnings about Barry Bennell 30 years ago were ignored by the board has called on the club to “honest about the past” after expressing shock and deep disappointment at attempts to discredit him. Hamilton Smith has stood by his accusations of a cover-up at Crewe after the League Two club released a statement last Friday in which they claimed nobody at the club had any recollection of their former managing director airing his concerns about Bennell’s behaviour. Smith responded to the statement on Wednesday by questioning how people could believe “that cultures and attitudes have changed” at Crewe “or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first” if the club was “not prepared to be honest about the past”. In the statement, Crewe reneged on a promise to conduct an internal inquiry into the failures that allowed their former coach’s crimes to go unreported after claiming they was no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending. “I was deeply disappointed when I read the statement by Crewe Alex last week,” Smith added. Crewe have been heavily criticised for their handling of the situation Credit: Getty Images Smith said he had never received a complaint about Bennell, who sentenced to 30 years in prison last month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse through the 1980s, from a victim or from a parent of a victim. But he insisted that, during his time as manager director between May 1987 and February 1990, he was “made aware of concerns about Barry Bennell’s relationship with the boys at the club” and raised them at a meeting he called at the house of then chairman, Norman Rowlinson. “Several directors were present including the then vice chairman John Bowler [now Crewe’s chairman],” said Smith. “I stand by the account that I have given publicly and to the police,” Smith told the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. “I am shocked to hear that other individuals have denied any recollection of these events and it is a shame that police have been unable to find any other evidence of this meeting, which took place almost 30 years ago. “I think it is important that those who held positions of authority have a duty to be honest about what happened. It is the least we can do now for those victims who have suffered the most horrific abuse whilst at the club. I have given my honest account.” Smith has previously claimed that, after leaving Crewe in 1990, he went to see Bowler years later after being alarmed that Crewe were maintaining they had never received any warnings about Bennell, who was in jail at the time following his first convictions for abusing children. Smith said Bowler denied then that their conversation ever took place. “I knew immediately this was a cover up and I said [to Bowler], ‘You’re a lying b------“ Smith told the Channel 4 documentary Football’s Wall of Silence that aired last month. Crewe said in their statement last week that they were “concerned to note” why Smith did not report “his knowledge of Mr Bennell’s offending in 1988” to the police until 2016 or the Football Association until 2001. Smith responded by saying: “To be absolutely clear, I had received no complaint from a victim or from a parent of any of the victims. Had I had any evidence that these despicable acts were being committed against boys at the club, I would have provided the police with the evidence at the time.” Smith insisted Crewe “could have done more to protect” the boys who were raped, molested and psychologically scarred by Bennell, who was described as “the devil incarnate” in court, and said he did not “discount myself in that.” “If we are not prepared to be honest about the past, how can we expect people to believe that cultures and attitudes have changed or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first?” Smith said.
Former Crewe director whose Barry Bennell warnings were ignored calls on club to be 'honest about the past'
The former managing director of Crewe Alexandra who claims his warnings about Barry Bennell 30 years ago were ignored by the board has called on the club to “honest about the past” after expressing shock and deep disappointment at attempts to discredit him. Hamilton Smith has stood by his accusations of a cover-up at Crewe after the League Two club released a statement last Friday in which they claimed nobody at the club had any recollection of their former managing director airing his concerns about Bennell’s behaviour. Smith responded to the statement on Wednesday by questioning how people could believe “that cultures and attitudes have changed” at Crewe “or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first” if the club was “not prepared to be honest about the past”. In the statement, Crewe reneged on a promise to conduct an internal inquiry into the failures that allowed their former coach’s crimes to go unreported after claiming they was no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending. “I was deeply disappointed when I read the statement by Crewe Alex last week,” Smith added. Crewe have been heavily criticised for their handling of the situation Credit: Getty Images Smith said he had never received a complaint about Bennell, who sentenced to 30 years in prison last month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse through the 1980s, from a victim or from a parent of a victim. But he insisted that, during his time as manager director between May 1987 and February 1990, he was “made aware of concerns about Barry Bennell’s relationship with the boys at the club” and raised them at a meeting he called at the house of then chairman, Norman Rowlinson. “Several directors were present including the then vice chairman John Bowler [now Crewe’s chairman],” said Smith. “I stand by the account that I have given publicly and to the police,” Smith told the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. “I am shocked to hear that other individuals have denied any recollection of these events and it is a shame that police have been unable to find any other evidence of this meeting, which took place almost 30 years ago. “I think it is important that those who held positions of authority have a duty to be honest about what happened. It is the least we can do now for those victims who have suffered the most horrific abuse whilst at the club. I have given my honest account.” Smith has previously claimed that, after leaving Crewe in 1990, he went to see Bowler years later after being alarmed that Crewe were maintaining they had never received any warnings about Bennell, who was in jail at the time following his first convictions for abusing children. Smith said Bowler denied then that their conversation ever took place. “I knew immediately this was a cover up and I said [to Bowler], ‘You’re a lying b------“ Smith told the Channel 4 documentary Football’s Wall of Silence that aired last month. Crewe said in their statement last week that they were “concerned to note” why Smith did not report “his knowledge of Mr Bennell’s offending in 1988” to the police until 2016 or the Football Association until 2001. Smith responded by saying: “To be absolutely clear, I had received no complaint from a victim or from a parent of any of the victims. Had I had any evidence that these despicable acts were being committed against boys at the club, I would have provided the police with the evidence at the time.” Smith insisted Crewe “could have done more to protect” the boys who were raped, molested and psychologically scarred by Bennell, who was described as “the devil incarnate” in court, and said he did not “discount myself in that.” “If we are not prepared to be honest about the past, how can we expect people to believe that cultures and attitudes have changed or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first?” Smith said.
The former managing director of Crewe Alexandra who claims his warnings about Barry Bennell 30 years ago were ignored by the board has called on the club to “honest about the past” after expressing shock and deep disappointment at attempts to discredit him. Hamilton Smith has stood by his accusations of a cover-up at Crewe after the League Two club released a statement last Friday in which they claimed nobody at the club had any recollection of their former managing director airing his concerns about Bennell’s behaviour. Smith responded to the statement on Wednesday by questioning how people could believe “that cultures and attitudes have changed” at Crewe “or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first” if the club was “not prepared to be honest about the past”. In the statement, Crewe reneged on a promise to conduct an internal inquiry into the failures that allowed their former coach’s crimes to go unreported after claiming they was no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending. “I was deeply disappointed when I read the statement by Crewe Alex last week,” Smith added. Crewe have been heavily criticised for their handling of the situation Credit: Getty Images Smith said he had never received a complaint about Bennell, who sentenced to 30 years in prison last month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse through the 1980s, from a victim or from a parent of a victim. But he insisted that, during his time as manager director between May 1987 and February 1990, he was “made aware of concerns about Barry Bennell’s relationship with the boys at the club” and raised them at a meeting he called at the house of then chairman, Norman Rowlinson. “Several directors were present including the then vice chairman John Bowler [now Crewe’s chairman],” said Smith. “I stand by the account that I have given publicly and to the police,” Smith told the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. “I am shocked to hear that other individuals have denied any recollection of these events and it is a shame that police have been unable to find any other evidence of this meeting, which took place almost 30 years ago. “I think it is important that those who held positions of authority have a duty to be honest about what happened. It is the least we can do now for those victims who have suffered the most horrific abuse whilst at the club. I have given my honest account.” Smith has previously claimed that, after leaving Crewe in 1990, he went to see Bowler years later after being alarmed that Crewe were maintaining they had never received any warnings about Bennell, who was in jail at the time following his first convictions for abusing children. Smith said Bowler denied then that their conversation ever took place. “I knew immediately this was a cover up and I said [to Bowler], ‘You’re a lying b------“ Smith told the Channel 4 documentary Football’s Wall of Silence that aired last month. Crewe said in their statement last week that they were “concerned to note” why Smith did not report “his knowledge of Mr Bennell’s offending in 1988” to the police until 2016 or the Football Association until 2001. Smith responded by saying: “To be absolutely clear, I had received no complaint from a victim or from a parent of any of the victims. Had I had any evidence that these despicable acts were being committed against boys at the club, I would have provided the police with the evidence at the time.” Smith insisted Crewe “could have done more to protect” the boys who were raped, molested and psychologically scarred by Bennell, who was described as “the devil incarnate” in court, and said he did not “discount myself in that.” “If we are not prepared to be honest about the past, how can we expect people to believe that cultures and attitudes have changed or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first?” Smith said.
Former Crewe director whose Barry Bennell warnings were ignored calls on club to be 'honest about the past'
The former managing director of Crewe Alexandra who claims his warnings about Barry Bennell 30 years ago were ignored by the board has called on the club to “honest about the past” after expressing shock and deep disappointment at attempts to discredit him. Hamilton Smith has stood by his accusations of a cover-up at Crewe after the League Two club released a statement last Friday in which they claimed nobody at the club had any recollection of their former managing director airing his concerns about Bennell’s behaviour. Smith responded to the statement on Wednesday by questioning how people could believe “that cultures and attitudes have changed” at Crewe “or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first” if the club was “not prepared to be honest about the past”. In the statement, Crewe reneged on a promise to conduct an internal inquiry into the failures that allowed their former coach’s crimes to go unreported after claiming they was no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending. “I was deeply disappointed when I read the statement by Crewe Alex last week,” Smith added. Crewe have been heavily criticised for their handling of the situation Credit: Getty Images Smith said he had never received a complaint about Bennell, who sentenced to 30 years in prison last month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse through the 1980s, from a victim or from a parent of a victim. But he insisted that, during his time as manager director between May 1987 and February 1990, he was “made aware of concerns about Barry Bennell’s relationship with the boys at the club” and raised them at a meeting he called at the house of then chairman, Norman Rowlinson. “Several directors were present including the then vice chairman John Bowler [now Crewe’s chairman],” said Smith. “I stand by the account that I have given publicly and to the police,” Smith told the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. “I am shocked to hear that other individuals have denied any recollection of these events and it is a shame that police have been unable to find any other evidence of this meeting, which took place almost 30 years ago. “I think it is important that those who held positions of authority have a duty to be honest about what happened. It is the least we can do now for those victims who have suffered the most horrific abuse whilst at the club. I have given my honest account.” Smith has previously claimed that, after leaving Crewe in 1990, he went to see Bowler years later after being alarmed that Crewe were maintaining they had never received any warnings about Bennell, who was in jail at the time following his first convictions for abusing children. Smith said Bowler denied then that their conversation ever took place. “I knew immediately this was a cover up and I said [to Bowler], ‘You’re a lying b------“ Smith told the Channel 4 documentary Football’s Wall of Silence that aired last month. Crewe said in their statement last week that they were “concerned to note” why Smith did not report “his knowledge of Mr Bennell’s offending in 1988” to the police until 2016 or the Football Association until 2001. Smith responded by saying: “To be absolutely clear, I had received no complaint from a victim or from a parent of any of the victims. Had I had any evidence that these despicable acts were being committed against boys at the club, I would have provided the police with the evidence at the time.” Smith insisted Crewe “could have done more to protect” the boys who were raped, molested and psychologically scarred by Bennell, who was described as “the devil incarnate” in court, and said he did not “discount myself in that.” “If we are not prepared to be honest about the past, how can we expect people to believe that cultures and attitudes have changed or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first?” Smith said.
Victims of Barry Bennell have accused Crewe Alexandra of “burying their heads in the sand” after the club reneged on their promise to conduct an independent inquiry into child sexual abuse by its jailed youth football coach. The League Two club issued a 925-word statement on Friday afternoon in which they said they would no longer be launching a planned internal review after claiming there was no need to “duplicate the thorough inquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending. Crewe also appeared to question the veracity of claims by the club’s former managing director, Hamilton Smith, that he had reported a complaint of abuse by Bennell in the late 1980s by saying nobody at the club, including current chairman John Bowler and director of football Dario Gradi, had any recollections of Smith ever raising the matter. In a further move to discredit Smith, the club also questioned why he waited until 2016 to report his concerns to the police, and 2001 to the Football Association, by which time Bennell had already been convicted of offences. The former Crewe and Manchester City coach was described as a “child molester on an industrial scale” and “the devil incarnate” when sentenced last month to 30 years in prison after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s. Another 86 people have since come forward to make complaints of abuse against him. It was alleged this week that Bennell was fired by Crewe in January 1992 shortly after he was confronted by parents about his behaviour, rumours of which were claimed to be widespread at the time. Andy Woodward, one of Bennell's victims, said Crewe were buying their heads in the sand Credit: Peter Byrne/PA Wire But Crewe said the police investigation “concluded that there was no suggestion that Bennell was dismissed by the club for anything other than football-related reasons” and added that an “extremely thorough” investigation by Cheshire Police had persuaded them to pull the plug on the independent review they promised in November 2016. By contrast, Manchester City are more than a year into their own internal review. One of Bennell’s victims, Andy Woodward, whose interview with The Guardian at that time gave others the strength to come forward and triggered a wave of allegations that culminated in the coach’s trial at Liverpool Crown Court, reacted furiously to Crewe’s statement and accused the club of hiding behind the police. The statement also made no comments on allegations by the BBC this week that a Crewe employee was asked to remove pornography from the home computer of then manager Gradi in 2001. Gradi has always denied any wrongdoing. “This statement speaks for itself,” Woodward said. “Once again the victims come last, after the reputation of the club. What has happened has ruined mine, my family and many, many others that played for the club as vulnerable children. I’m bitterly disappointed with their response, but I’d rather focus my energy on driving change, so no club can let this happen again, than dwell on the past. “Crewe had a moral responsibility to investigate their own failings. Instead they seem to want to bury their heads in the sand and, if nothing else, at least people can now see the way the club operate. “As far as I know, they have not asked to speak to any of the former players from this harrowing court case to learn about how this scandal happened and what could have been done to prevent it. A police investigation, looking for possible crimes, is entirely different to an independent inquiry being set up to investigate what went wrong and make sure it never happens again. For the many victims, this is just another kick in the teeth but, as shocking as it is, nothing should really surprise us about Crewe any more.” Woodward’s sentiments were echoed in a statement by The Offside Trust, the charity set up by some of Bennell’s victims to support survivors of child sexual abuse in sport. “We believe that these clubs have a moral responsibility to open their doors to a truly independent investigation,” the trust said. “If clubs having nothing to hide, they should not shirk from this duty. “The healing process for survivors will not be easy. But it is made more difficult when individuals and institutions refuse to properly address the past and fail to demonstrate any empathy and remorse. We sincerely hope that clubs will acknowledge this and agree to appropriate independent scrutiny.”
Crewe 'burying heads in sand' after reneging on promise to conduct independent inquiry into Barry Bennell's crimes
Victims of Barry Bennell have accused Crewe Alexandra of “burying their heads in the sand” after the club reneged on their promise to conduct an independent inquiry into child sexual abuse by its jailed youth football coach. The League Two club issued a 925-word statement on Friday afternoon in which they said they would no longer be launching a planned internal review after claiming there was no need to “duplicate the thorough inquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending. Crewe also appeared to question the veracity of claims by the club’s former managing director, Hamilton Smith, that he had reported a complaint of abuse by Bennell in the late 1980s by saying nobody at the club, including current chairman John Bowler and director of football Dario Gradi, had any recollections of Smith ever raising the matter. In a further move to discredit Smith, the club also questioned why he waited until 2016 to report his concerns to the police, and 2001 to the Football Association, by which time Bennell had already been convicted of offences. The former Crewe and Manchester City coach was described as a “child molester on an industrial scale” and “the devil incarnate” when sentenced last month to 30 years in prison after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s. Another 86 people have since come forward to make complaints of abuse against him. It was alleged this week that Bennell was fired by Crewe in January 1992 shortly after he was confronted by parents about his behaviour, rumours of which were claimed to be widespread at the time. Andy Woodward, one of Bennell's victims, said Crewe were buying their heads in the sand Credit: Peter Byrne/PA Wire But Crewe said the police investigation “concluded that there was no suggestion that Bennell was dismissed by the club for anything other than football-related reasons” and added that an “extremely thorough” investigation by Cheshire Police had persuaded them to pull the plug on the independent review they promised in November 2016. By contrast, Manchester City are more than a year into their own internal review. One of Bennell’s victims, Andy Woodward, whose interview with The Guardian at that time gave others the strength to come forward and triggered a wave of allegations that culminated in the coach’s trial at Liverpool Crown Court, reacted furiously to Crewe’s statement and accused the club of hiding behind the police. The statement also made no comments on allegations by the BBC this week that a Crewe employee was asked to remove pornography from the home computer of then manager Gradi in 2001. Gradi has always denied any wrongdoing. “This statement speaks for itself,” Woodward said. “Once again the victims come last, after the reputation of the club. What has happened has ruined mine, my family and many, many others that played for the club as vulnerable children. I’m bitterly disappointed with their response, but I’d rather focus my energy on driving change, so no club can let this happen again, than dwell on the past. “Crewe had a moral responsibility to investigate their own failings. Instead they seem to want to bury their heads in the sand and, if nothing else, at least people can now see the way the club operate. “As far as I know, they have not asked to speak to any of the former players from this harrowing court case to learn about how this scandal happened and what could have been done to prevent it. A police investigation, looking for possible crimes, is entirely different to an independent inquiry being set up to investigate what went wrong and make sure it never happens again. For the many victims, this is just another kick in the teeth but, as shocking as it is, nothing should really surprise us about Crewe any more.” Woodward’s sentiments were echoed in a statement by The Offside Trust, the charity set up by some of Bennell’s victims to support survivors of child sexual abuse in sport. “We believe that these clubs have a moral responsibility to open their doors to a truly independent investigation,” the trust said. “If clubs having nothing to hide, they should not shirk from this duty. “The healing process for survivors will not be easy. But it is made more difficult when individuals and institutions refuse to properly address the past and fail to demonstrate any empathy and remorse. We sincerely hope that clubs will acknowledge this and agree to appropriate independent scrutiny.”
Crewe Alexandra said it would not ‘duplicate the thorough inquiries’ carried out by the police.
Crewe reject calls for inquiry into Barry Bennell sexual abuse
Crewe Alexandra said it would not ‘duplicate the thorough inquiries’ carried out by the police.
Crewe Alexandra said it would not ‘duplicate the thorough inquiries’ carried out by the police.
Crewe reject calls for inquiry into Barry Bennell sexual abuse
Crewe Alexandra said it would not ‘duplicate the thorough inquiries’ carried out by the police.
After former youth coach Barry Bennell was sentenced to 31 years for child sexual abuse crimes, Crewe Alexandra denied a cover-up.
Crewe deny Barry Bennell cover-up but will not hold investigation
After former youth coach Barry Bennell was sentenced to 31 years for child sexual abuse crimes, Crewe Alexandra denied a cover-up.
Crewe Alexandra director of football Dario Gradi had to 'delete pornography on home computer'
Crewe Alexandra director of football Dario Gradi had to 'delete pornography on home computer'
Crewe Alexandra director of football Dario Gradi had to 'delete pornography on home computer'
Dario Gradi, the Crewe Alexandra director of football who is currently suspended by the Football Association, had to have pornography wiped off his home computer in 2001, it has been alleged. A former Crewe employee has claimed he was asked by a senior official at the club to help remove the material from the computer. According to a statement given to the NSPCC in 2011, the man was told that Gradi, at the time Crewe’s manager, had been hosting a group of young Irish Under-13 players at his house and they had been viewing the pornography on his computer. The revelations were made by the BBC on Tuesday with the man – who asked not to be named – claiming he was “amazed” that Gradi was allowed to host boys “in this manner” given the history of Crewe’s former youth coach, Barry Bennell. Bennell had been convicted of child sex crimes in 1994 and 1998. The serial paedophile was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse. Barry Bennell was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse Credit: BBC The man, now aged 47, told the NSPCC it “all seemed odd” and spoke to Cheshire police as well as raising his concerns with the Crewe chairman, John Bowler, who reputedly dismissed the behaviour as “quirky and nothing more”. In November 2016, after fresh allegations were made against Bennell, the former employee contacted the NSPCC and police for a second time. In a statement, Cheshire Police said: “In December 2012 Cheshire Police received reports regarding concerns about material on a computer. Following enquiries, it was established that no criminal activity had taken place. The person who made the report was updated at the time.” The BBC said on Tuesday that Crewe had declined to comment when asked what steps to safeguard young players had been taken after Bennell’s two convictions in the 1990s. The Telegraph has also contacted Crewe for comment. Gradi was suspended by the FA in late 2016. He and Crewe have always maintained they did not know about any abuse by Bennell and did not receive a complaint of sexual abuse by him. It was also alleged on Tuesday by one of Bennell’s former players and his mother – both of whom asked not to be named by the BBC - that Bennell was sacked by Crewe in January 1992 shortly after parents reputedly confronted him about his behaviour. Crewe have previously said Bennell left for football related reasons. The club declined to comment on that allegation on Tuesday.
Crewe Alexandra director of football Dario Gradi had to 'delete pornography on home computer'
Dario Gradi, the Crewe Alexandra director of football who is currently suspended by the Football Association, had to have pornography wiped off his home computer in 2001, it has been alleged. A former Crewe employee has claimed he was asked by a senior official at the club to help remove the material from the computer. According to a statement given to the NSPCC in 2011, the man was told that Gradi, at the time Crewe’s manager, had been hosting a group of young Irish Under-13 players at his house and they had been viewing the pornography on his computer. The revelations were made by the BBC on Tuesday with the man – who asked not to be named – claiming he was “amazed” that Gradi was allowed to host boys “in this manner” given the history of Crewe’s former youth coach, Barry Bennell. Bennell had been convicted of child sex crimes in 1994 and 1998. The serial paedophile was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse. Barry Bennell was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse Credit: BBC The man, now aged 47, told the NSPCC it “all seemed odd” and spoke to Cheshire police as well as raising his concerns with the Crewe chairman, John Bowler, who reputedly dismissed the behaviour as “quirky and nothing more”. In November 2016, after fresh allegations were made against Bennell, the former employee contacted the NSPCC and police for a second time. In a statement, Cheshire Police said: “In December 2012 Cheshire Police received reports regarding concerns about material on a computer. Following enquiries, it was established that no criminal activity had taken place. The person who made the report was updated at the time.” The BBC said on Tuesday that Crewe had declined to comment when asked what steps to safeguard young players had been taken after Bennell’s two convictions in the 1990s. The Telegraph has also contacted Crewe for comment. Gradi was suspended by the FA in late 2016. He and Crewe have always maintained they did not know about any abuse by Bennell and did not receive a complaint of sexual abuse by him. It was also alleged on Tuesday by one of Bennell’s former players and his mother – both of whom asked not to be named by the BBC - that Bennell was sacked by Crewe in January 1992 shortly after parents reputedly confronted him about his behaviour. Crewe have previously said Bennell left for football related reasons. The club declined to comment on that allegation on Tuesday.
Crewe Alexandra director of football Dario Gradi had to 'delete pornography on home computer'
Crewe Alexandra director of football Dario Gradi had to 'delete pornography on home computer'
Crewe Alexandra director of football Dario Gradi had to 'delete pornography on home computer'
Dario Gradi, the Crewe Alexandra director of football who is currently suspended by the Football Association, had to have pornography wiped off his home computer in 2001, it has been alleged. A former Crewe employee has claimed he was asked by a senior official at the club to help remove the material from the computer. According to a statement given to the NSPCC in 2011, the man was told that Gradi, at the time Crewe’s manager, had been hosting a group of young Irish Under-13 players at his house and they had been viewing the pornography on his computer. The revelations were made by the BBC on Tuesday with the man – who asked not to be named – claiming he was “amazed” that Gradi was allowed to host boys “in this manner” given the history of Crewe’s former youth coach, Barry Bennell. Bennell had been convicted of child sex crimes in 1994 and 1998. The serial paedophile was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse. Barry Bennell was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse Credit: BBC The man, now aged 47, told the NSPCC it “all seemed odd” and spoke to Cheshire police as well as raising his concerns with the Crewe chairman, John Bowler, who reputedly dismissed the behaviour as “quirky and nothing more”. In November 2016, after fresh allegations were made against Bennell, the former employee contacted the NSPCC and police for a second time. In a statement, Cheshire Police said: “In December 2012 Cheshire Police received reports regarding concerns about material on a computer. Following enquiries, it was established that no criminal activity had taken place. The person who made the report was updated at the time.” The BBC said on Tuesday that Crewe had declined to comment when asked what steps to safeguard young players had been taken after Bennell’s two convictions in the 1990s. The Telegraph has also contacted Crewe for comment. Gradi was suspended by the FA in late 2016. He and Crewe have always maintained they did not know about any abuse by Bennell and did not receive a complaint of sexual abuse by him. It was also alleged on Tuesday by one of Bennell’s former players and his mother – both of whom asked not to be named by the BBC - that Bennell was sacked by Crewe in January 1992 shortly after parents reputedly confronted him about his behaviour. Crewe have previously said Bennell left for football related reasons. The club declined to comment on that allegation on Tuesday.
Crewe Alexandra director of football Dario Gradi had to 'delete pornography on home computer'
Dario Gradi, the Crewe Alexandra director of football who is currently suspended by the Football Association, had to have pornography wiped off his home computer in 2001, it has been alleged. A former Crewe employee has claimed he was asked by a senior official at the club to help remove the material from the computer. According to a statement given to the NSPCC in 2011, the man was told that Gradi, at the time Crewe’s manager, had been hosting a group of young Irish Under-13 players at his house and they had been viewing the pornography on his computer. The revelations were made by the BBC on Tuesday with the man – who asked not to be named – claiming he was “amazed” that Gradi was allowed to host boys “in this manner” given the history of Crewe’s former youth coach, Barry Bennell. Bennell had been convicted of child sex crimes in 1994 and 1998. The serial paedophile was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse. Barry Bennell was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse Credit: BBC The man, now aged 47, told the NSPCC it “all seemed odd” and spoke to Cheshire police as well as raising his concerns with the Crewe chairman, John Bowler, who reputedly dismissed the behaviour as “quirky and nothing more”. In November 2016, after fresh allegations were made against Bennell, the former employee contacted the NSPCC and police for a second time. In a statement, Cheshire Police said: “In December 2012 Cheshire Police received reports regarding concerns about material on a computer. Following enquiries, it was established that no criminal activity had taken place. The person who made the report was updated at the time.” The BBC said on Tuesday that Crewe had declined to comment when asked what steps to safeguard young players had been taken after Bennell’s two convictions in the 1990s. The Telegraph has also contacted Crewe for comment. Gradi was suspended by the FA in late 2016. He and Crewe have always maintained they did not know about any abuse by Bennell and did not receive a complaint of sexual abuse by him. It was also alleged on Tuesday by one of Bennell’s former players and his mother – both of whom asked not to be named by the BBC - that Bennell was sacked by Crewe in January 1992 shortly after parents reputedly confronted him about his behaviour. Crewe have previously said Bennell left for football related reasons. The club declined to comment on that allegation on Tuesday.
Dario Gradi is facing further scrutiny over his time in charge of Crewe Alexandra after computer pornography allegations were made against him. The former boss and current director of football of the League Two side, who were embroiled in the Barry Bennell child sex abuse case, is at the centre of more accusations over wrongdoing from a former Crewe employee. ​BBC Sport understands that the unnamed individual was asked to wipe pornography off Gradi's computer back in 2001 after Gradi hosted a...
Ex-Crewe Boss Gradi Embroiled in Online Pornography Storm as Fallout From Bennell Case Continues
Dario Gradi is facing further scrutiny over his time in charge of Crewe Alexandra after computer pornography allegations were made against him. The former boss and current director of football of the League Two side, who were embroiled in the Barry Bennell child sex abuse case, is at the centre of more accusations over wrongdoing from a former Crewe employee. ​BBC Sport understands that the unnamed individual was asked to wipe pornography off Gradi's computer back in 2001 after Gradi hosted a...
Dario Gradi is facing further scrutiny over his time in charge of Crewe Alexandra after computer pornography allegations were made against him. The former boss and current director of football of the League Two side, who were embroiled in the Barry Bennell child sex abuse case, is at the centre of more accusations over wrongdoing from a former Crewe employee. ​BBC Sport understands that the unnamed individual was asked to wipe pornography off Gradi's computer back in 2001 after Gradi hosted a...
Ex-Crewe Boss Gradi Embroiled in Online Pornography Storm as Fallout From Bennell Case Continues
Dario Gradi is facing further scrutiny over his time in charge of Crewe Alexandra after computer pornography allegations were made against him. The former boss and current director of football of the League Two side, who were embroiled in the Barry Bennell child sex abuse case, is at the centre of more accusations over wrongdoing from a former Crewe employee. ​BBC Sport understands that the unnamed individual was asked to wipe pornography off Gradi's computer back in 2001 after Gradi hosted a...
Barry Bennell, the convicted serial paedophile, was allegedly sacked as Crewe Alexandra’s youth coach shortly after parents reputedly confronted him about his behaviour. One of Bennell’s former players and his mother have claimed Bennell was challenged by a group of parents a short time before the then coach abruptly left Crewe in January 1992. It is alleged the parents threatened to report Bennell to the police and that he was later sacked by Crewe, according to the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. Bennell was replaced days later by Steve Holland, now Gareth Southgate’s assistant with England. Crewe declined to comment on whether Bennell was sacked when approached by the BBC. The club has previously said Bennell – who was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse - left in January 1992 for football related reasons. The former Crewe youth player, who is now in his late 30s, said: “There was a group of parents who confronted Barry because there were rumours. One of the dads in the group had said that his son had gone to him and he’d been touching his son.” Bennell was sentenced to 30 years in prison earlier this month Credit: PA Both the player and his mother claimed the parents had threatened to report Bennell to the police but were unaware if any concerns were raised with the club or then manager Dario Gradi. In May 1992, four months after Bennell left Crewe, Gradi wrote to the player asking him to continue at the club’s centre of excellence and asked that he did not attend any other coaching sessions or games organised by Bennell. The former player said he had not been abused by Bennell but did not want to be named in order to protect his family’s privacy. According to the BBC, the letter from Gradi said: “I do not want any of the boys who attended the centre to go to other coaching sessions or games organised by our former youth coach Barry Bennell. If this is going to cause you a problem then I will be pleased to talk to you about it personally.” After leaving Crewe, Bennell is believed to have flown to Atlanta in the US where he ran a video rental store before returning to the UK. Crewe issued a statement this month insisting the club was not aware of any sexual abuse by Bennell and did not receive a complaint about sexual abuse by him. The latest accusations surrounding Bennell came as it emerged a number of Crewe fans applauded John Bowler, the club’s chairman since 1987, at a fans’ forum on Monday night when asked to comment on former director Hamilton Smith’s claims the club ignored his warnings about Bennell. Bennell's victims outside court last week following the verdict Credit: AFP Crewe said the fans’ forum was intended for supporters and was a ticket only event that had been sold out. People with a ticket for the event were granted access. When asked by one supporter about the Bennell case, Bowler said: “In view of ongoing legal action it would be inappropriate to talk about that further or for us to make further comment upon it. When we have more comments to make you can be sure the club will issue a statement. And therefore tonight we're talking football.” Bowler’s comments were followed by applause from people in the room. When pressed on Smith’s allegations by the BBC’s Graham McGarry, who has commented on Crewe for 25 years, Bowler added: “No, none at all.” That comment was also followed by applause from the room.
Barry Bennell was allegedly sacked by Crewe after parents confronted him about his behaviour
Barry Bennell, the convicted serial paedophile, was allegedly sacked as Crewe Alexandra’s youth coach shortly after parents reputedly confronted him about his behaviour. One of Bennell’s former players and his mother have claimed Bennell was challenged by a group of parents a short time before the then coach abruptly left Crewe in January 1992. It is alleged the parents threatened to report Bennell to the police and that he was later sacked by Crewe, according to the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. Bennell was replaced days later by Steve Holland, now Gareth Southgate’s assistant with England. Crewe declined to comment on whether Bennell was sacked when approached by the BBC. The club has previously said Bennell – who was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse - left in January 1992 for football related reasons. The former Crewe youth player, who is now in his late 30s, said: “There was a group of parents who confronted Barry because there were rumours. One of the dads in the group had said that his son had gone to him and he’d been touching his son.” Bennell was sentenced to 30 years in prison earlier this month Credit: PA Both the player and his mother claimed the parents had threatened to report Bennell to the police but were unaware if any concerns were raised with the club or then manager Dario Gradi. In May 1992, four months after Bennell left Crewe, Gradi wrote to the player asking him to continue at the club’s centre of excellence and asked that he did not attend any other coaching sessions or games organised by Bennell. The former player said he had not been abused by Bennell but did not want to be named in order to protect his family’s privacy. According to the BBC, the letter from Gradi said: “I do not want any of the boys who attended the centre to go to other coaching sessions or games organised by our former youth coach Barry Bennell. If this is going to cause you a problem then I will be pleased to talk to you about it personally.” After leaving Crewe, Bennell is believed to have flown to Atlanta in the US where he ran a video rental store before returning to the UK. Crewe issued a statement this month insisting the club was not aware of any sexual abuse by Bennell and did not receive a complaint about sexual abuse by him. The latest accusations surrounding Bennell came as it emerged a number of Crewe fans applauded John Bowler, the club’s chairman since 1987, at a fans’ forum on Monday night when asked to comment on former director Hamilton Smith’s claims the club ignored his warnings about Bennell. Bennell's victims outside court last week following the verdict Credit: AFP Crewe said the fans’ forum was intended for supporters and was a ticket only event that had been sold out. People with a ticket for the event were granted access. When asked by one supporter about the Bennell case, Bowler said: “In view of ongoing legal action it would be inappropriate to talk about that further or for us to make further comment upon it. When we have more comments to make you can be sure the club will issue a statement. And therefore tonight we're talking football.” Bowler’s comments were followed by applause from people in the room. When pressed on Smith’s allegations by the BBC’s Graham McGarry, who has commented on Crewe for 25 years, Bowler added: “No, none at all.” That comment was also followed by applause from the room.
Barry Bennell, the convicted serial paedophile, was allegedly sacked as Crewe Alexandra’s youth coach shortly after parents reputedly confronted him about his behaviour. One of Bennell’s former players and his mother have claimed Bennell was challenged by a group of parents a short time before the then coach abruptly left Crewe in January 1992. It is alleged the parents threatened to report Bennell to the police and that he was later sacked by Crewe, according to the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. Bennell was replaced days later by Steve Holland, now Gareth Southgate’s assistant with England. Crewe declined to comment on whether Bennell was sacked when approached by the BBC. The club has previously said Bennell – who was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse - left in January 1992 for football related reasons. The former Crewe youth player, who is now in his late 30s, said: “There was a group of parents who confronted Barry because there were rumours. One of the dads in the group had said that his son had gone to him and he’d been touching his son.” Bennell was sentenced to 30 years in prison earlier this month Credit: PA Both the player and his mother claimed the parents had threatened to report Bennell to the police but were unaware if any concerns were raised with the club or then manager Dario Gradi. In May 1992, four months after Bennell left Crewe, Gradi wrote to the player asking him to continue at the club’s centre of excellence and asked that he did not attend any other coaching sessions or games organised by Bennell. The former player said he had not been abused by Bennell but did not want to be named in order to protect his family’s privacy. According to the BBC, the letter from Gradi said: “I do not want any of the boys who attended the centre to go to other coaching sessions or games organised by our former youth coach Barry Bennell. If this is going to cause you a problem then I will be pleased to talk to you about it personally.” After leaving Crewe, Bennell is believed to have flown to Atlanta in the US where he ran a video rental store before returning to the UK. Crewe issued a statement this month insisting the club was not aware of any sexual abuse by Bennell and did not receive a complaint about sexual abuse by him. The latest accusations surrounding Bennell came as it emerged a number of Crewe fans applauded John Bowler, the club’s chairman since 1987, at a fans’ forum on Monday night when asked to comment on former director Hamilton Smith’s claims the club ignored his warnings about Bennell. Bennell's victims outside court last week following the verdict Credit: AFP Crewe said the fans’ forum was intended for supporters and was a ticket only event that had been sold out. People with a ticket for the event were granted access. When asked by one supporter about the Bennell case, Bowler said: “In view of ongoing legal action it would be inappropriate to talk about that further or for us to make further comment upon it. When we have more comments to make you can be sure the club will issue a statement. And therefore tonight we're talking football.” Bowler’s comments were followed by applause from people in the room. When pressed on Smith’s allegations by the BBC’s Graham McGarry, who has commented on Crewe for 25 years, Bowler added: “No, none at all.” That comment was also followed by applause from the room.
Barry Bennell was allegedly sacked by Crewe after parents confronted him about his behaviour
Barry Bennell, the convicted serial paedophile, was allegedly sacked as Crewe Alexandra’s youth coach shortly after parents reputedly confronted him about his behaviour. One of Bennell’s former players and his mother have claimed Bennell was challenged by a group of parents a short time before the then coach abruptly left Crewe in January 1992. It is alleged the parents threatened to report Bennell to the police and that he was later sacked by Crewe, according to the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. Bennell was replaced days later by Steve Holland, now Gareth Southgate’s assistant with England. Crewe declined to comment on whether Bennell was sacked when approached by the BBC. The club has previously said Bennell – who was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse - left in January 1992 for football related reasons. The former Crewe youth player, who is now in his late 30s, said: “There was a group of parents who confronted Barry because there were rumours. One of the dads in the group had said that his son had gone to him and he’d been touching his son.” Bennell was sentenced to 30 years in prison earlier this month Credit: PA Both the player and his mother claimed the parents had threatened to report Bennell to the police but were unaware if any concerns were raised with the club or then manager Dario Gradi. In May 1992, four months after Bennell left Crewe, Gradi wrote to the player asking him to continue at the club’s centre of excellence and asked that he did not attend any other coaching sessions or games organised by Bennell. The former player said he had not been abused by Bennell but did not want to be named in order to protect his family’s privacy. According to the BBC, the letter from Gradi said: “I do not want any of the boys who attended the centre to go to other coaching sessions or games organised by our former youth coach Barry Bennell. If this is going to cause you a problem then I will be pleased to talk to you about it personally.” After leaving Crewe, Bennell is believed to have flown to Atlanta in the US where he ran a video rental store before returning to the UK. Crewe issued a statement this month insisting the club was not aware of any sexual abuse by Bennell and did not receive a complaint about sexual abuse by him. The latest accusations surrounding Bennell came as it emerged a number of Crewe fans applauded John Bowler, the club’s chairman since 1987, at a fans’ forum on Monday night when asked to comment on former director Hamilton Smith’s claims the club ignored his warnings about Bennell. Bennell's victims outside court last week following the verdict Credit: AFP Crewe said the fans’ forum was intended for supporters and was a ticket only event that had been sold out. People with a ticket for the event were granted access. When asked by one supporter about the Bennell case, Bowler said: “In view of ongoing legal action it would be inappropriate to talk about that further or for us to make further comment upon it. When we have more comments to make you can be sure the club will issue a statement. And therefore tonight we're talking football.” Bowler’s comments were followed by applause from people in the room. When pressed on Smith’s allegations by the BBC’s Graham McGarry, who has commented on Crewe for 25 years, Bowler added: “No, none at all.” That comment was also followed by applause from the room.
Barry Bennell, the convicted serial paedophile, was allegedly sacked as Crewe Alexandra’s youth coach shortly after parents reputedly confronted him about his behaviour. One of Bennell’s former players and his mother have claimed Bennell was challenged by a group of parents a short time before the then coach abruptly left Crewe in January 1992. It is alleged the parents threatened to report Bennell to the police and that he was later sacked by Crewe, according to the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. Bennell was replaced days later by Steve Holland, now Gareth Southgate’s assistant with England. Crewe declined to comment on whether Bennell was sacked when approached by the BBC. The club has previously said Bennell – who was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse - left in January 1992 for football related reasons. The former Crewe youth player, who is now in his late 30s, said: “There was a group of parents who confronted Barry because there were rumours. One of the dads in the group had said that his son had gone to him and he’d been touching his son.” Bennell was sentenced to 30 years in prison earlier this month Credit: PA Both the player and his mother claimed the parents had threatened to report Bennell to the police but were unaware if any concerns were raised with the club or then manager Dario Gradi. In May 1992, four months after Bennell left Crewe, Gradi wrote to the player asking him to continue at the club’s centre of excellence and asked that he did not attend any other coaching sessions or games organised by Bennell. The former player said he had not been abused by Bennell but did not want to be named in order to protect his family’s privacy. According to the BBC, the letter from Gradi said: “I do not want any of the boys who attended the centre to go to other coaching sessions or games organised by our former youth coach Barry Bennell. If this is going to cause you a problem then I will be pleased to talk to you about it personally.” After leaving Crewe, Bennell is believed to have flown to Atlanta in the US where he ran a video rental store before returning to the UK. Crewe issued a statement this month insisting the club was not aware of any sexual abuse by Bennell and did not receive a complaint about sexual abuse by him. The latest accusations surrounding Bennell came as it emerged a number of Crewe fans applauded John Bowler, the club’s chairman since 1987, at a fans’ forum on Monday night when asked to comment on former director Hamilton Smith’s claims the club ignored his warnings about Bennell. Bennell's victims outside court last week following the verdict Credit: AFP Crewe said the fans’ forum was intended for supporters and was a ticket only event that had been sold out. People with a ticket for the event were granted access. When asked by one supporter about the Bennell case, Bowler said: “In view of ongoing legal action it would be inappropriate to talk about that further or for us to make further comment upon it. When we have more comments to make you can be sure the club will issue a statement. And therefore tonight we're talking football.” Bowler’s comments were followed by applause from people in the room. When pressed on Smith’s allegations by the BBC’s Graham McGarry, who has commented on Crewe for 25 years, Bowler added: “No, none at all.” That comment was also followed by applause from the room.
Barry Bennell was allegedly sacked by Crewe after parents confronted him about his behaviour
Barry Bennell, the convicted serial paedophile, was allegedly sacked as Crewe Alexandra’s youth coach shortly after parents reputedly confronted him about his behaviour. One of Bennell’s former players and his mother have claimed Bennell was challenged by a group of parents a short time before the then coach abruptly left Crewe in January 1992. It is alleged the parents threatened to report Bennell to the police and that he was later sacked by Crewe, according to the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. Bennell was replaced days later by Steve Holland, now Gareth Southgate’s assistant with England. Crewe declined to comment on whether Bennell was sacked when approached by the BBC. The club has previously said Bennell – who was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse - left in January 1992 for football related reasons. The former Crewe youth player, who is now in his late 30s, said: “There was a group of parents who confronted Barry because there were rumours. One of the dads in the group had said that his son had gone to him and he’d been touching his son.” Bennell was sentenced to 30 years in prison earlier this month Credit: PA Both the player and his mother claimed the parents had threatened to report Bennell to the police but were unaware if any concerns were raised with the club or then manager Dario Gradi. In May 1992, four months after Bennell left Crewe, Gradi wrote to the player asking him to continue at the club’s centre of excellence and asked that he did not attend any other coaching sessions or games organised by Bennell. The former player said he had not been abused by Bennell but did not want to be named in order to protect his family’s privacy. According to the BBC, the letter from Gradi said: “I do not want any of the boys who attended the centre to go to other coaching sessions or games organised by our former youth coach Barry Bennell. If this is going to cause you a problem then I will be pleased to talk to you about it personally.” After leaving Crewe, Bennell is believed to have flown to Atlanta in the US where he ran a video rental store before returning to the UK. Crewe issued a statement this month insisting the club was not aware of any sexual abuse by Bennell and did not receive a complaint about sexual abuse by him. The latest accusations surrounding Bennell came as it emerged a number of Crewe fans applauded John Bowler, the club’s chairman since 1987, at a fans’ forum on Monday night when asked to comment on former director Hamilton Smith’s claims the club ignored his warnings about Bennell. Bennell's victims outside court last week following the verdict Credit: AFP Crewe said the fans’ forum was intended for supporters and was a ticket only event that had been sold out. People with a ticket for the event were granted access. When asked by one supporter about the Bennell case, Bowler said: “In view of ongoing legal action it would be inappropriate to talk about that further or for us to make further comment upon it. When we have more comments to make you can be sure the club will issue a statement. And therefore tonight we're talking football.” Bowler’s comments were followed by applause from people in the room. When pressed on Smith’s allegations by the BBC’s Graham McGarry, who has commented on Crewe for 25 years, Bowler added: “No, none at all.” That comment was also followed by applause from the room.
One of the beauties of sport is that it populates its landscape with young people dreaming of making it into the big time. Among its darkest aspects is the violation of those dreams by predators who see aspiration as a vulnerability they can exploit. From the depravity of Barry Bennell right down to the spiv who tries to get rich on the back of a child’s talent, young people are in need of protection by families, institutions, vigilant individuals and of course the rule of law, which has caught up with Bennell – jailed at Liverpool Crown Court for 30 years for abusing 12 young footballers between 1979 and 1991. Those protective structures failed abysmally for a generation of children who were defenceless against Bennell’s brazen and routine sex crimes, which, as the court heard, occurred on an “industrial scale.” As we know from the Jimmy Savile case and others, this level of sexual criminality is not possible unless those with the power to stop it are blinded by the perpetrator or place their own self-interest first. In this case, parts of the Football Association, Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra – in that period – refused or failed to see Bennell’s interest in scouting and coaching was incidental to his main reason for working in football. His chief purpose was to gain access to children. He played a double game to satisfy his appetites, conning the clubs into thinking he was a talent-spotter par excellence and the children and their families into believing he held the key to a future in the game. The NSPCC’s statement after sentencing pointed out that Bennell “ruthlessly preyed on the hopes and aspirations of young footballers who believed he held the key to their dreams”. Procedures are much tighter in football now. Awareness has improved exponentially since the Seventies, Eighties and Nineties. Yet, as the many recent welfare-in-sport scandals have demonstrated, there is still a phase in which young people are vulnerable if they have not attained full adulthood or the power that comes with success. That stage of life, where children are most open to being exploited, is the one that requires the most careful policing, because sex offenders are drawn to professions in which they have access to, and can exploit the ambitions of, young people. Thus it falls not only to governing bodies but also coaches, parents – all of us, in fact – to recognise the danger signs and intervene, as opposed to merely muttering our concerns. From Bennell’s perspective, reptilian deceit was effective. One member of City’s staff called him “the star-maker”. Concerns raised by Len Davies at City and Hamilton Smith at Crewe gained no real traction. Now, a further 86 alleged victims have reportedly come forward, which accentuates one of the truly shocking features of this tragedy: the impunity with which Bennell abused children, and the breadth of his crimes, in homes, holiday camps, football clubs and even on the pitch at Maine Road. The FA have a responsibility to show negligence and complicity have consequences Only the victims who came forward to testify can know how long the “relief” will last. And relief was certainly the most conspicuous first response. No quest for justice – even one so obviously grounded in fact – guarantees the kind of outcome that exposed Bennell’s sadism and perversion. The first emotion, one assumes, is one of vindication. The lie has been broken. An expectation now, however, is that thoughts will turn quickly to those who excused Bennell’s paedophilia, looked the other way, or facilitated it in ways that require them to be held to account. Lord Carlile, one of the country’s leading legal figures, has said Bennell’s behaviour was “brushed under the carpet” by Crewe. These failures, where they existed, cannot be marked down as unfortunate accidents. The victims are entitled to justice from football as well as the legal system. The FA bear a responsibility in their forthcoming report to show that negligence and complicity have consequences, not least for the FA of that time. The societal nature of this crime was grimly apparent when a “Cambridge-educated” geophysicist from a “privileged” background, Matthew Falder, was jailed for 32 years at Birmingham Crown Court after admitting 137 offences including blackmail, voyeurism, encouraging child rape and sharing indecent images – on the same day Bennell began his latest prison sentence. Football is not uniquely blighted by child sex abuse, and its safeguards now are better. But in all cases it needs to think first of child protection, of child welfare, and punish those who have failed in that duty.
Why it is all our duty to prioritise child safety
One of the beauties of sport is that it populates its landscape with young people dreaming of making it into the big time. Among its darkest aspects is the violation of those dreams by predators who see aspiration as a vulnerability they can exploit. From the depravity of Barry Bennell right down to the spiv who tries to get rich on the back of a child’s talent, young people are in need of protection by families, institutions, vigilant individuals and of course the rule of law, which has caught up with Bennell – jailed at Liverpool Crown Court for 30 years for abusing 12 young footballers between 1979 and 1991. Those protective structures failed abysmally for a generation of children who were defenceless against Bennell’s brazen and routine sex crimes, which, as the court heard, occurred on an “industrial scale.” As we know from the Jimmy Savile case and others, this level of sexual criminality is not possible unless those with the power to stop it are blinded by the perpetrator or place their own self-interest first. In this case, parts of the Football Association, Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra – in that period – refused or failed to see Bennell’s interest in scouting and coaching was incidental to his main reason for working in football. His chief purpose was to gain access to children. He played a double game to satisfy his appetites, conning the clubs into thinking he was a talent-spotter par excellence and the children and their families into believing he held the key to a future in the game. The NSPCC’s statement after sentencing pointed out that Bennell “ruthlessly preyed on the hopes and aspirations of young footballers who believed he held the key to their dreams”. Procedures are much tighter in football now. Awareness has improved exponentially since the Seventies, Eighties and Nineties. Yet, as the many recent welfare-in-sport scandals have demonstrated, there is still a phase in which young people are vulnerable if they have not attained full adulthood or the power that comes with success. That stage of life, where children are most open to being exploited, is the one that requires the most careful policing, because sex offenders are drawn to professions in which they have access to, and can exploit the ambitions of, young people. Thus it falls not only to governing bodies but also coaches, parents – all of us, in fact – to recognise the danger signs and intervene, as opposed to merely muttering our concerns. From Bennell’s perspective, reptilian deceit was effective. One member of City’s staff called him “the star-maker”. Concerns raised by Len Davies at City and Hamilton Smith at Crewe gained no real traction. Now, a further 86 alleged victims have reportedly come forward, which accentuates one of the truly shocking features of this tragedy: the impunity with which Bennell abused children, and the breadth of his crimes, in homes, holiday camps, football clubs and even on the pitch at Maine Road. The FA have a responsibility to show negligence and complicity have consequences Only the victims who came forward to testify can know how long the “relief” will last. And relief was certainly the most conspicuous first response. No quest for justice – even one so obviously grounded in fact – guarantees the kind of outcome that exposed Bennell’s sadism and perversion. The first emotion, one assumes, is one of vindication. The lie has been broken. An expectation now, however, is that thoughts will turn quickly to those who excused Bennell’s paedophilia, looked the other way, or facilitated it in ways that require them to be held to account. Lord Carlile, one of the country’s leading legal figures, has said Bennell’s behaviour was “brushed under the carpet” by Crewe. These failures, where they existed, cannot be marked down as unfortunate accidents. The victims are entitled to justice from football as well as the legal system. The FA bear a responsibility in their forthcoming report to show that negligence and complicity have consequences, not least for the FA of that time. The societal nature of this crime was grimly apparent when a “Cambridge-educated” geophysicist from a “privileged” background, Matthew Falder, was jailed for 32 years at Birmingham Crown Court after admitting 137 offences including blackmail, voyeurism, encouraging child rape and sharing indecent images – on the same day Bennell began his latest prison sentence. Football is not uniquely blighted by child sex abuse, and its safeguards now are better. But in all cases it needs to think first of child protection, of child welfare, and punish those who have failed in that duty.
A judge at Liverpool Crown Court branded the ex-Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra youth coach "sheer evil" as he announced his punishment
Ex-football coach Bennell labelled 'devil incarnate' and sentenced to 31 years
A judge at Liverpool Crown Court branded the ex-Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra youth coach "sheer evil" as he announced his punishment
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell’s victims amid further accusations they failed to stop him sexually abusing countless boys. One of the lawyers representing survivors of serial paedophile Bennell, who was convicted on Thursday of a total of 43 child sexual abuse offences, condemned the two clubs’ responses to this week’s guilty verdicts. City and Crewe, the professional teams with whom Bennell has been most closely linked, both issued statements following the conclusion of a trial that has brought further shame on the game. But, despite the emergence of fresh allegations they ignored warnings about a man described as football’s Jimmy Savile, neither club admitted any responsibility for his crimes as they braced themselves for a wave of compensation claims from his victims. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country's leading lawyers representing child abuse survivors - including a substantial number of ex-footballers - told The Daily Telegraph that City and Crewe’s responses were “just not good enough”. Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football's paedophile scandal, speaks to the press Credit: PA “I would have hoped for City and Crewe to have admitted some element of blame for their close connections to Bennell,” he said. “It’s not about them; it’s about survivors. They need to admit their failings.” Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football’s paedophile scandal 15 months ago, has also demanded apologies from the clubs involved. City declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “heartfelt sympathy” to Bennell’s victims, who they said were “entitled to expect full protection from the kind of harm they endured”. The club was expected to say more following the conclusion of a QC-led review it commissioned into allegations of child sexual abuse there. Manager Pep Guardiola did discuss the outcome of Bennell’s trial at a press conference on Friday to preview the club’s FA Cup tie at Wigan Athletic. Pep Guardiola discusses the outcome of Barry Bennell’s trial at a press conference Credit: GETTY IMAGES He said: “All the people in this room know it’s a terrible history, so my feelings and thoughts are for the victims. “Hopefully, everyone can learn from that, society can learn from that because I’m a father. So, when you see what has happened, it can happen with my sons and daughters. “The authorities and judges have to decide in a better way to try to make a good example for the future so it doesn't happen again.” Crewe declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “deepest sympathies” to Bennell’s victims as well as denying being aware of any sexual abuse by him or receiving any such complaint about him. Invited to apologise on Friday, chairman John Bowl replied: “No comment.” City’s statement also revealed their review had identified a second alleged child abuser with potential connections to the club, John Broome. An early TV interview with Barry Bennell Credit: BBC Broome, who the club said was deceased, was manager of a junior side thought to be a feeder team for City in the 1960s, Whitehill FC. The Manchester Evening News published an interview with a former player at the now-defunct club who said he had been abused by Broome. “Twice, I was in his house and he grabbed my groin,” he recalled. “He used to try ways of getting you into his house, like saying, ‘The new kit has arrived, come and have a look’. “Even on match days, you would see him trying to grope other boys that were on the touchline, pretending he was larking around. “I would get invites to his house to try on the new kit he had for the next cup final that we were in. I always refused.”
Man City and Crewe under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell victims
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell’s victims amid further accusations they failed to stop him sexually abusing countless boys. One of the lawyers representing survivors of serial paedophile Bennell, who was convicted on Thursday of a total of 43 child sexual abuse offences, condemned the two clubs’ responses to this week’s guilty verdicts. City and Crewe, the professional teams with whom Bennell has been most closely linked, both issued statements following the conclusion of a trial that has brought further shame on the game. But, despite the emergence of fresh allegations they ignored warnings about a man described as football’s Jimmy Savile, neither club admitted any responsibility for his crimes as they braced themselves for a wave of compensation claims from his victims. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country's leading lawyers representing child abuse survivors - including a substantial number of ex-footballers - told The Daily Telegraph that City and Crewe’s responses were “just not good enough”. Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football's paedophile scandal, speaks to the press Credit: PA “I would have hoped for City and Crewe to have admitted some element of blame for their close connections to Bennell,” he said. “It’s not about them; it’s about survivors. They need to admit their failings.” Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football’s paedophile scandal 15 months ago, has also demanded apologies from the clubs involved. City declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “heartfelt sympathy” to Bennell’s victims, who they said were “entitled to expect full protection from the kind of harm they endured”. The club was expected to say more following the conclusion of a QC-led review it commissioned into allegations of child sexual abuse there. Manager Pep Guardiola did discuss the outcome of Bennell’s trial at a press conference on Friday to preview the club’s FA Cup tie at Wigan Athletic. Pep Guardiola discusses the outcome of Barry Bennell’s trial at a press conference Credit: GETTY IMAGES He said: “All the people in this room know it’s a terrible history, so my feelings and thoughts are for the victims. “Hopefully, everyone can learn from that, society can learn from that because I’m a father. So, when you see what has happened, it can happen with my sons and daughters. “The authorities and judges have to decide in a better way to try to make a good example for the future so it doesn't happen again.” Crewe declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “deepest sympathies” to Bennell’s victims as well as denying being aware of any sexual abuse by him or receiving any such complaint about him. Invited to apologise on Friday, chairman John Bowl replied: “No comment.” City’s statement also revealed their review had identified a second alleged child abuser with potential connections to the club, John Broome. An early TV interview with Barry Bennell Credit: BBC Broome, who the club said was deceased, was manager of a junior side thought to be a feeder team for City in the 1960s, Whitehill FC. The Manchester Evening News published an interview with a former player at the now-defunct club who said he had been abused by Broome. “Twice, I was in his house and he grabbed my groin,” he recalled. “He used to try ways of getting you into his house, like saying, ‘The new kit has arrived, come and have a look’. “Even on match days, you would see him trying to grope other boys that were on the touchline, pretending he was larking around. “I would get invites to his house to try on the new kit he had for the next cup final that we were in. I always refused.”
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell’s victims amid further accusations they failed to stop him sexually abusing countless boys. One of the lawyers representing survivors of serial paedophile Bennell, who was convicted on Thursday of a total of 43 child sexual abuse offences, condemned the two clubs’ responses to this week’s guilty verdicts. City and Crewe, the professional teams with whom Bennell has been most closely linked, both issued statements following the conclusion of a trial that has brought further shame on the game. But, despite the emergence of fresh allegations they ignored warnings about a man described as football’s Jimmy Savile, neither club admitted any responsibility for his crimes as they braced themselves for a wave of compensation claims from his victims. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country's leading lawyers representing child abuse survivors - including a substantial number of ex-footballers - told The Daily Telegraph that City and Crewe’s responses were “just not good enough”. Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football's paedophile scandal, speaks to the press Credit: PA “I would have hoped for City and Crewe to have admitted some element of blame for their close connections to Bennell,” he said. “It’s not about them; it’s about survivors. They need to admit their failings.” Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football’s paedophile scandal 15 months ago, has also demanded apologies from the clubs involved. City declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “heartfelt sympathy” to Bennell’s victims, who they said were “entitled to expect full protection from the kind of harm they endured”. The club was expected to say more following the conclusion of a QC-led review it commissioned into allegations of child sexual abuse there. Manager Pep Guardiola did discuss the outcome of Bennell’s trial at a press conference on Friday to preview the club’s FA Cup tie at Wigan Athletic. Pep Guardiola discusses the outcome of Barry Bennell’s trial at a press conference Credit: GETTY IMAGES He said: “All the people in this room know it’s a terrible history, so my feelings and thoughts are for the victims. “Hopefully, everyone can learn from that, society can learn from that because I’m a father. So, when you see what has happened, it can happen with my sons and daughters. “The authorities and judges have to decide in a better way to try to make a good example for the future so it doesn't happen again.” Crewe declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “deepest sympathies” to Bennell’s victims as well as denying being aware of any sexual abuse by him or receiving any such complaint about him. Invited to apologise on Friday, chairman John Bowl replied: “No comment.” City’s statement also revealed their review had identified a second alleged child abuser with potential connections to the club, John Broome. An early TV interview with Barry Bennell Credit: BBC Broome, who the club said was deceased, was manager of a junior side thought to be a feeder team for City in the 1960s, Whitehill FC. The Manchester Evening News published an interview with a former player at the now-defunct club who said he had been abused by Broome. “Twice, I was in his house and he grabbed my groin,” he recalled. “He used to try ways of getting you into his house, like saying, ‘The new kit has arrived, come and have a look’. “Even on match days, you would see him trying to grope other boys that were on the touchline, pretending he was larking around. “I would get invites to his house to try on the new kit he had for the next cup final that we were in. I always refused.”
Man City and Crewe under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell victims
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell’s victims amid further accusations they failed to stop him sexually abusing countless boys. One of the lawyers representing survivors of serial paedophile Bennell, who was convicted on Thursday of a total of 43 child sexual abuse offences, condemned the two clubs’ responses to this week’s guilty verdicts. City and Crewe, the professional teams with whom Bennell has been most closely linked, both issued statements following the conclusion of a trial that has brought further shame on the game. But, despite the emergence of fresh allegations they ignored warnings about a man described as football’s Jimmy Savile, neither club admitted any responsibility for his crimes as they braced themselves for a wave of compensation claims from his victims. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country's leading lawyers representing child abuse survivors - including a substantial number of ex-footballers - told The Daily Telegraph that City and Crewe’s responses were “just not good enough”. Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football's paedophile scandal, speaks to the press Credit: PA “I would have hoped for City and Crewe to have admitted some element of blame for their close connections to Bennell,” he said. “It’s not about them; it’s about survivors. They need to admit their failings.” Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football’s paedophile scandal 15 months ago, has also demanded apologies from the clubs involved. City declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “heartfelt sympathy” to Bennell’s victims, who they said were “entitled to expect full protection from the kind of harm they endured”. The club was expected to say more following the conclusion of a QC-led review it commissioned into allegations of child sexual abuse there. Manager Pep Guardiola did discuss the outcome of Bennell’s trial at a press conference on Friday to preview the club’s FA Cup tie at Wigan Athletic. Pep Guardiola discusses the outcome of Barry Bennell’s trial at a press conference Credit: GETTY IMAGES He said: “All the people in this room know it’s a terrible history, so my feelings and thoughts are for the victims. “Hopefully, everyone can learn from that, society can learn from that because I’m a father. So, when you see what has happened, it can happen with my sons and daughters. “The authorities and judges have to decide in a better way to try to make a good example for the future so it doesn't happen again.” Crewe declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “deepest sympathies” to Bennell’s victims as well as denying being aware of any sexual abuse by him or receiving any such complaint about him. Invited to apologise on Friday, chairman John Bowl replied: “No comment.” City’s statement also revealed their review had identified a second alleged child abuser with potential connections to the club, John Broome. An early TV interview with Barry Bennell Credit: BBC Broome, who the club said was deceased, was manager of a junior side thought to be a feeder team for City in the 1960s, Whitehill FC. The Manchester Evening News published an interview with a former player at the now-defunct club who said he had been abused by Broome. “Twice, I was in his house and he grabbed my groin,” he recalled. “He used to try ways of getting you into his house, like saying, ‘The new kit has arrived, come and have a look’. “Even on match days, you would see him trying to grope other boys that were on the touchline, pretending he was larking around. “I would get invites to his house to try on the new kit he had for the next cup final that we were in. I always refused.”
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell’s victims amid further accusations they failed to stop him sexually abusing countless boys. One of the lawyers representing survivors of serial paedophile Bennell, who was convicted on Thursday of a total of 43 child sexual abuse offences, condemned the two clubs’ responses to this week’s guilty verdicts. City and Crewe, the professional teams with whom Bennell has been most closely linked, both issued statements following the conclusion of a trial that has brought further shame on the game. But, despite the emergence of fresh allegations they ignored warnings about a man described as football’s Jimmy Savile, neither club admitted any responsibility for his crimes as they braced themselves for a wave of compensation claims from his victims. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country's leading lawyers representing child abuse survivors - including a substantial number of ex-footballers - told The Daily Telegraph that City and Crewe’s responses were “just not good enough”. Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football's paedophile scandal, speaks to the press Credit: PA “I would have hoped for City and Crewe to have admitted some element of blame for their close connections to Bennell,” he said. “It’s not about them; it’s about survivors. They need to admit their failings.” Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football’s paedophile scandal 15 months ago, has also demanded apologies from the clubs involved. City declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “heartfelt sympathy” to Bennell’s victims, who they said were “entitled to expect full protection from the kind of harm they endured”. The club was expected to say more following the conclusion of a QC-led review it commissioned into allegations of child sexual abuse there. Manager Pep Guardiola did discuss the outcome of Bennell’s trial at a press conference on Friday to preview the club’s FA Cup tie at Wigan Athletic. Pep Guardiola discusses the outcome of Barry Bennell’s trial at a press conference Credit: GETTY IMAGES He said: “All the people in this room know it’s a terrible history, so my feelings and thoughts are for the victims. “Hopefully, everyone can learn from that, society can learn from that because I’m a father. So, when you see what has happened, it can happen with my sons and daughters. “The authorities and judges have to decide in a better way to try to make a good example for the future so it doesn't happen again.” Crewe declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “deepest sympathies” to Bennell’s victims as well as denying being aware of any sexual abuse by him or receiving any such complaint about him. Invited to apologise on Friday, chairman John Bowl replied: “No comment.” City’s statement also revealed their review had identified a second alleged child abuser with potential connections to the club, John Broome. An early TV interview with Barry Bennell Credit: BBC Broome, who the club said was deceased, was manager of a junior side thought to be a feeder team for City in the 1960s, Whitehill FC. The Manchester Evening News published an interview with a former player at the now-defunct club who said he had been abused by Broome. “Twice, I was in his house and he grabbed my groin,” he recalled. “He used to try ways of getting you into his house, like saying, ‘The new kit has arrived, come and have a look’. “Even on match days, you would see him trying to grope other boys that were on the touchline, pretending he was larking around. “I would get invites to his house to try on the new kit he had for the next cup final that we were in. I always refused.”
Man City and Crewe under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell victims
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell’s victims amid further accusations they failed to stop him sexually abusing countless boys. One of the lawyers representing survivors of serial paedophile Bennell, who was convicted on Thursday of a total of 43 child sexual abuse offences, condemned the two clubs’ responses to this week’s guilty verdicts. City and Crewe, the professional teams with whom Bennell has been most closely linked, both issued statements following the conclusion of a trial that has brought further shame on the game. But, despite the emergence of fresh allegations they ignored warnings about a man described as football’s Jimmy Savile, neither club admitted any responsibility for his crimes as they braced themselves for a wave of compensation claims from his victims. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country's leading lawyers representing child abuse survivors - including a substantial number of ex-footballers - told The Daily Telegraph that City and Crewe’s responses were “just not good enough”. Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football's paedophile scandal, speaks to the press Credit: PA “I would have hoped for City and Crewe to have admitted some element of blame for their close connections to Bennell,” he said. “It’s not about them; it’s about survivors. They need to admit their failings.” Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football’s paedophile scandal 15 months ago, has also demanded apologies from the clubs involved. City declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “heartfelt sympathy” to Bennell’s victims, who they said were “entitled to expect full protection from the kind of harm they endured”. The club was expected to say more following the conclusion of a QC-led review it commissioned into allegations of child sexual abuse there. Manager Pep Guardiola did discuss the outcome of Bennell’s trial at a press conference on Friday to preview the club’s FA Cup tie at Wigan Athletic. Pep Guardiola discusses the outcome of Barry Bennell’s trial at a press conference Credit: GETTY IMAGES He said: “All the people in this room know it’s a terrible history, so my feelings and thoughts are for the victims. “Hopefully, everyone can learn from that, society can learn from that because I’m a father. So, when you see what has happened, it can happen with my sons and daughters. “The authorities and judges have to decide in a better way to try to make a good example for the future so it doesn't happen again.” Crewe declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “deepest sympathies” to Bennell’s victims as well as denying being aware of any sexual abuse by him or receiving any such complaint about him. Invited to apologise on Friday, chairman John Bowl replied: “No comment.” City’s statement also revealed their review had identified a second alleged child abuser with potential connections to the club, John Broome. An early TV interview with Barry Bennell Credit: BBC Broome, who the club said was deceased, was manager of a junior side thought to be a feeder team for City in the 1960s, Whitehill FC. The Manchester Evening News published an interview with a former player at the now-defunct club who said he had been abused by Broome. “Twice, I was in his house and he grabbed my groin,” he recalled. “He used to try ways of getting you into his house, like saying, ‘The new kit has arrived, come and have a look’. “Even on match days, you would see him trying to grope other boys that were on the touchline, pretending he was larking around. “I would get invites to his house to try on the new kit he had for the next cup final that we were in. I always refused.”
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell’s victims amid further accusations they failed to stop him sexually abusing countless boys. One of the lawyers representing survivors of serial paedophile Bennell, who was convicted on Thursday of a total of 43 child sexual abuse offences, condemned the two clubs’ responses to this week’s guilty verdicts. City and Crewe, the professional teams with whom Bennell has been most closely linked, both issued statements following the conclusion of a trial that has brought further shame on the game. But, despite the emergence of fresh allegations they ignored warnings about a man described as football’s Jimmy Savile, neither club admitted any responsibility for his crimes as they braced themselves for a wave of compensation claims from his victims. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country's leading lawyers representing child abuse survivors - including a substantial number of ex-footballers - told The Daily Telegraph that City and Crewe’s responses were “just not good enough”. Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football's paedophile scandal, speaks to the press Credit: PA “I would have hoped for City and Crewe to have admitted some element of blame for their close connections to Bennell,” he said. “It’s not about them; it’s about survivors. They need to admit their failings.” Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football’s paedophile scandal 15 months ago, has also demanded apologies from the clubs involved. City declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “heartfelt sympathy” to Bennell’s victims, who they said were “entitled to expect full protection from the kind of harm they endured”. The club was expected to say more following the conclusion of a QC-led review it commissioned into allegations of child sexual abuse there. Manager Pep Guardiola did discuss the outcome of Bennell’s trial at a press conference on Friday to preview the club’s FA Cup tie at Wigan Athletic. Pep Guardiola discusses the outcome of Barry Bennell’s trial at a press conference Credit: GETTY IMAGES He said: “All the people in this room know it’s a terrible history, so my feelings and thoughts are for the victims. “Hopefully, everyone can learn from that, society can learn from that because I’m a father. So, when you see what has happened, it can happen with my sons and daughters. “The authorities and judges have to decide in a better way to try to make a good example for the future so it doesn't happen again.” Crewe declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “deepest sympathies” to Bennell’s victims as well as denying being aware of any sexual abuse by him or receiving any such complaint about him. Invited to apologise on Friday, chairman John Bowl replied: “No comment.” City’s statement also revealed their review had identified a second alleged child abuser with potential connections to the club, John Broome. An early TV interview with Barry Bennell Credit: BBC Broome, who the club said was deceased, was manager of a junior side thought to be a feeder team for City in the 1960s, Whitehill FC. The Manchester Evening News published an interview with a former player at the now-defunct club who said he had been abused by Broome. “Twice, I was in his house and he grabbed my groin,” he recalled. “He used to try ways of getting you into his house, like saying, ‘The new kit has arrived, come and have a look’. “Even on match days, you would see him trying to grope other boys that were on the touchline, pretending he was larking around. “I would get invites to his house to try on the new kit he had for the next cup final that we were in. I always refused.”
Man City and Crewe under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell victims
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell’s victims amid further accusations they failed to stop him sexually abusing countless boys. One of the lawyers representing survivors of serial paedophile Bennell, who was convicted on Thursday of a total of 43 child sexual abuse offences, condemned the two clubs’ responses to this week’s guilty verdicts. City and Crewe, the professional teams with whom Bennell has been most closely linked, both issued statements following the conclusion of a trial that has brought further shame on the game. But, despite the emergence of fresh allegations they ignored warnings about a man described as football’s Jimmy Savile, neither club admitted any responsibility for his crimes as they braced themselves for a wave of compensation claims from his victims. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country's leading lawyers representing child abuse survivors - including a substantial number of ex-footballers - told The Daily Telegraph that City and Crewe’s responses were “just not good enough”. Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football's paedophile scandal, speaks to the press Credit: PA “I would have hoped for City and Crewe to have admitted some element of blame for their close connections to Bennell,” he said. “It’s not about them; it’s about survivors. They need to admit their failings.” Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football’s paedophile scandal 15 months ago, has also demanded apologies from the clubs involved. City declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “heartfelt sympathy” to Bennell’s victims, who they said were “entitled to expect full protection from the kind of harm they endured”. The club was expected to say more following the conclusion of a QC-led review it commissioned into allegations of child sexual abuse there. Manager Pep Guardiola did discuss the outcome of Bennell’s trial at a press conference on Friday to preview the club’s FA Cup tie at Wigan Athletic. Pep Guardiola discusses the outcome of Barry Bennell’s trial at a press conference Credit: GETTY IMAGES He said: “All the people in this room know it’s a terrible history, so my feelings and thoughts are for the victims. “Hopefully, everyone can learn from that, society can learn from that because I’m a father. So, when you see what has happened, it can happen with my sons and daughters. “The authorities and judges have to decide in a better way to try to make a good example for the future so it doesn't happen again.” Crewe declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “deepest sympathies” to Bennell’s victims as well as denying being aware of any sexual abuse by him or receiving any such complaint about him. Invited to apologise on Friday, chairman John Bowl replied: “No comment.” City’s statement also revealed their review had identified a second alleged child abuser with potential connections to the club, John Broome. An early TV interview with Barry Bennell Credit: BBC Broome, who the club said was deceased, was manager of a junior side thought to be a feeder team for City in the 1960s, Whitehill FC. The Manchester Evening News published an interview with a former player at the now-defunct club who said he had been abused by Broome. “Twice, I was in his house and he grabbed my groin,” he recalled. “He used to try ways of getting you into his house, like saying, ‘The new kit has arrived, come and have a look’. “Even on match days, you would see him trying to grope other boys that were on the touchline, pretending he was larking around. “I would get invites to his house to try on the new kit he had for the next cup final that we were in. I always refused.”
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are facing the prospect of large-scale legal action and compensation bills running into millions of pounds from victims of the serial paedophile Barry Bennell. Bennell, who worked as a youth coach and scout for City and Crewe among others, was found guilty at Liverpool Crown Court on Thursday of 43 counts of child sexual abuse against 11 victims as the horrifying scale of his crimes begins to emerge. It is understood the number of victims assaulted by Bennell – who is still under police investigation – could easily exceed 100 after 86 more people came forward to report abuse by him. Bennell, 64, described at the trial as a “child molester on an industrial scale”, had already been convicted of abusing 15 boys in the UK and one in the United States. Bennell will be sentenced on Monday. City and Crewe are two of the clubs most seriously implicated and could be the subject of a civil group action from victims. The court heard three former junior footballers are already suing City after civil cases were lodged in March 2016 while one is planning to sue Crewe and the FA for damages. Three other complainants in the current trial have sought legal ­advice on a potential compensation claim and it is believed others could follow. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country’s leading lawyers for child abuse victims who is representing a substantial number of victims in this case, said: “They have got quite a large-scale problem on their hands.” Three of Bennell's victims talk to the media outside court on Thursday Credit: PA City have been accused of putting hundreds of boys in danger after it emerged one of their coaches, Steve Fleet, had warned in the Seventies that it was “general knowledge” Bennell was a risk to children, long before he joined Crewe in 1985. “People would say he [Bennell] was ‘dodgy’ and if his name was brought up everyone would shake their heads,” said Fleet. One of Bennell’s victims, Gary Cliffe, who was at City when he was abused between the ages of 11 and 15, told how Bennell even once abused them on the club’s Maine Road pitch. “If those in positions of responsibility had challenged Bennell, hundreds of wrecked lives could have been saved,” Cliffe, 47, told The Guardian. One of Bennell’s victims told ­Liverpool Crown Court he was targeted “straight away” in Bennell’s Mercedes when he started to give him lifts to and from City’s then training ground at Platt Lane. Bennell was said by another complainant to have been treated like “God” at Maine Road. Jurors also heard from a third complainant that he thought City officials Ken Barnes and Mike Grimsley had known Bennell was targeting boys. One City director at the time of Bennell’s association with the club, Simon Cussons, was interviewed by the BBC last year, although he died before City had been able to conduct their own interview with him. It is understood City were scheduled to interview Cussons. In Channel 4’s Dispatches documentary in 1997, Chris Muir, a City director at the time, was asked about one parent writing to City to complain Bennell had boys in his room late at night on trips away and explained “football allowed him to stay because he was producing the goods”. An artist's sketch of Bennell in court Credit: PA Yet it has emerged police had interviewed Barnes and Muir, in addition to Fleet and another member of City’s youth team staff, Terry Farrell, when Bennell was arrested in Florida in 1994. A Dispatches documentary Football’s Wall of Silence, which aired on Channel 4 last night, reported detectives investigating that 1994 case said Barnes was “very cagey”. City began their QC-led inquiry 15 months ago and said on Thursday they had identified another alleged paedophile, John Broome, now deceased, with whom they have “potential historic connections”. City added Broome was “not believed to be linked to Bennell”. City are thought to have taken more than 100 statements from victims, family members, coaches, former employees and other figures and dedicated around 5,000 hours to a review that has so far cost in excess of £1 million. Crewe expressed its “deepest sympathies to the victims of Barry Bennell” but insisted it was “not aware of any sexual abuse by Mr Bennell, nor did it receive any complaint about sexual abuse by him. CLUB STATEMENT: Barry Bennell #CreweAlexhttps://t.co/nKXRpwko49pic.twitter.com/gYhmBYB6JC— Crewe Alexandra F.C. (@crewealexfc) February 15, 2018 “The club wishes to make it absolutely clear that had it had any suspicion or belief that Mr Bennell was committing acts of abuse... the club would have informed the police.” Lord Carlile, the eminent barrister who prosecuted Bennell in 1998, claimed the scandal was “brushed under the carpet” by Crewe, whom he accused of “institutional failure” over their former youth coach. It has also emerged that former Crewe manager Dario Gradi, the club’s director of football who has been suspended by the FA pending an investigation into sexual abuse in football, wrote a letter to a court in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1994 in support of Bennell, who was facing six charges of child abuse to which he later pleaded guilty. Gradi is expected to face fresh scrutiny after praising Bennell for his “great ability to communicate with kids.”
Man City and Crewe could face paying millions in compensation to Barry Bennell's victims
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are facing the prospect of large-scale legal action and compensation bills running into millions of pounds from victims of the serial paedophile Barry Bennell. Bennell, who worked as a youth coach and scout for City and Crewe among others, was found guilty at Liverpool Crown Court on Thursday of 43 counts of child sexual abuse against 11 victims as the horrifying scale of his crimes begins to emerge. It is understood the number of victims assaulted by Bennell – who is still under police investigation – could easily exceed 100 after 86 more people came forward to report abuse by him. Bennell, 64, described at the trial as a “child molester on an industrial scale”, had already been convicted of abusing 15 boys in the UK and one in the United States. Bennell will be sentenced on Monday. City and Crewe are two of the clubs most seriously implicated and could be the subject of a civil group action from victims. The court heard three former junior footballers are already suing City after civil cases were lodged in March 2016 while one is planning to sue Crewe and the FA for damages. Three other complainants in the current trial have sought legal ­advice on a potential compensation claim and it is believed others could follow. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country’s leading lawyers for child abuse victims who is representing a substantial number of victims in this case, said: “They have got quite a large-scale problem on their hands.” Three of Bennell's victims talk to the media outside court on Thursday Credit: PA City have been accused of putting hundreds of boys in danger after it emerged one of their coaches, Steve Fleet, had warned in the Seventies that it was “general knowledge” Bennell was a risk to children, long before he joined Crewe in 1985. “People would say he [Bennell] was ‘dodgy’ and if his name was brought up everyone would shake their heads,” said Fleet. One of Bennell’s victims, Gary Cliffe, who was at City when he was abused between the ages of 11 and 15, told how Bennell even once abused them on the club’s Maine Road pitch. “If those in positions of responsibility had challenged Bennell, hundreds of wrecked lives could have been saved,” Cliffe, 47, told The Guardian. One of Bennell’s victims told ­Liverpool Crown Court he was targeted “straight away” in Bennell’s Mercedes when he started to give him lifts to and from City’s then training ground at Platt Lane. Bennell was said by another complainant to have been treated like “God” at Maine Road. Jurors also heard from a third complainant that he thought City officials Ken Barnes and Mike Grimsley had known Bennell was targeting boys. One City director at the time of Bennell’s association with the club, Simon Cussons, was interviewed by the BBC last year, although he died before City had been able to conduct their own interview with him. It is understood City were scheduled to interview Cussons. In Channel 4’s Dispatches documentary in 1997, Chris Muir, a City director at the time, was asked about one parent writing to City to complain Bennell had boys in his room late at night on trips away and explained “football allowed him to stay because he was producing the goods”. An artist's sketch of Bennell in court Credit: PA Yet it has emerged police had interviewed Barnes and Muir, in addition to Fleet and another member of City’s youth team staff, Terry Farrell, when Bennell was arrested in Florida in 1994. A Dispatches documentary Football’s Wall of Silence, which aired on Channel 4 last night, reported detectives investigating that 1994 case said Barnes was “very cagey”. City began their QC-led inquiry 15 months ago and said on Thursday they had identified another alleged paedophile, John Broome, now deceased, with whom they have “potential historic connections”. City added Broome was “not believed to be linked to Bennell”. City are thought to have taken more than 100 statements from victims, family members, coaches, former employees and other figures and dedicated around 5,000 hours to a review that has so far cost in excess of £1 million. Crewe expressed its “deepest sympathies to the victims of Barry Bennell” but insisted it was “not aware of any sexual abuse by Mr Bennell, nor did it receive any complaint about sexual abuse by him. CLUB STATEMENT: Barry Bennell #CreweAlexhttps://t.co/nKXRpwko49pic.twitter.com/gYhmBYB6JC— Crewe Alexandra F.C. (@crewealexfc) February 15, 2018 “The club wishes to make it absolutely clear that had it had any suspicion or belief that Mr Bennell was committing acts of abuse... the club would have informed the police.” Lord Carlile, the eminent barrister who prosecuted Bennell in 1998, claimed the scandal was “brushed under the carpet” by Crewe, whom he accused of “institutional failure” over their former youth coach. It has also emerged that former Crewe manager Dario Gradi, the club’s director of football who has been suspended by the FA pending an investigation into sexual abuse in football, wrote a letter to a court in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1994 in support of Bennell, who was facing six charges of child abuse to which he later pleaded guilty. Gradi is expected to face fresh scrutiny after praising Bennell for his “great ability to communicate with kids.”
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are facing the prospect of large-scale legal action and compensation bills running into millions of pounds from victims of the serial paedophile Barry Bennell. Bennell, who worked as a youth coach and scout for City and Crewe among others, was found guilty at Liverpool Crown Court on Thursday of 43 counts of child sexual abuse against 11 victims as the horrifying scale of his crimes begins to emerge. It is understood the number of victims assaulted by Bennell – who is still under police investigation – could easily exceed 100 after 86 more people came forward to report abuse by him. Bennell, 64, described at the trial as a “child molester on an industrial scale”, had already been convicted of abusing 15 boys in the UK and one in the United States. Bennell will be sentenced on Monday. City and Crewe are two of the clubs most seriously implicated and could be the subject of a civil group action from victims. The court heard three former junior footballers are already suing City after civil cases were lodged in March 2016 while one is planning to sue Crewe and the FA for damages. Three other complainants in the current trial have sought legal ­advice on a potential compensation claim and it is believed others could follow. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country’s leading lawyers for child abuse victims who is representing a substantial number of victims in this case, said: “They have got quite a large-scale problem on their hands.” Three of Bennell's victims talk to the media outside court on Thursday Credit: PA City have been accused of putting hundreds of boys in danger after it emerged one of their coaches, Steve Fleet, had warned in the Seventies that it was “general knowledge” Bennell was a risk to children, long before he joined Crewe in 1985. “People would say he [Bennell] was ‘dodgy’ and if his name was brought up everyone would shake their heads,” said Fleet. One of Bennell’s victims, Gary Cliffe, who was at City when he was abused between the ages of 11 and 15, told how Bennell even once abused them on the club’s Maine Road pitch. “If those in positions of responsibility had challenged Bennell, hundreds of wrecked lives could have been saved,” Cliffe, 47, told The Guardian. One of Bennell’s victims told ­Liverpool Crown Court he was targeted “straight away” in Bennell’s Mercedes when he started to give him lifts to and from City’s then training ground at Platt Lane. Bennell was said by another complainant to have been treated like “God” at Maine Road. Jurors also heard from a third complainant that he thought City officials Ken Barnes and Mike Grimsley had known Bennell was targeting boys. One City director at the time of Bennell’s association with the club, Simon Cussons, was interviewed by the BBC last year, although he died before City had been able to conduct their own interview with him. It is understood City were scheduled to interview Cussons. In Channel 4’s Dispatches documentary in 1997, Chris Muir, a City director at the time, was asked about one parent writing to City to complain Bennell had boys in his room late at night on trips away and explained “football allowed him to stay because he was producing the goods”. An artist's sketch of Bennell in court Credit: PA Yet it has emerged police had interviewed Barnes and Muir, in addition to Fleet and another member of City’s youth team staff, Terry Farrell, when Bennell was arrested in Florida in 1994. A Dispatches documentary Football’s Wall of Silence, which aired on Channel 4 last night, reported detectives investigating that 1994 case said Barnes was “very cagey”. City began their QC-led inquiry 15 months ago and said on Thursday they had identified another alleged paedophile, John Broome, now deceased, with whom they have “potential historic connections”. City added Broome was “not believed to be linked to Bennell”. City are thought to have taken more than 100 statements from victims, family members, coaches, former employees and other figures and dedicated around 5,000 hours to a review that has so far cost in excess of £1 million. Crewe expressed its “deepest sympathies to the victims of Barry Bennell” but insisted it was “not aware of any sexual abuse by Mr Bennell, nor did it receive any complaint about sexual abuse by him. CLUB STATEMENT: Barry Bennell #CreweAlexhttps://t.co/nKXRpwko49pic.twitter.com/gYhmBYB6JC— Crewe Alexandra F.C. (@crewealexfc) February 15, 2018 “The club wishes to make it absolutely clear that had it had any suspicion or belief that Mr Bennell was committing acts of abuse... the club would have informed the police.” Lord Carlile, the eminent barrister who prosecuted Bennell in 1998, claimed the scandal was “brushed under the carpet” by Crewe, whom he accused of “institutional failure” over their former youth coach. It has also emerged that former Crewe manager Dario Gradi, the club’s director of football who has been suspended by the FA pending an investigation into sexual abuse in football, wrote a letter to a court in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1994 in support of Bennell, who was facing six charges of child abuse to which he later pleaded guilty. Gradi is expected to face fresh scrutiny after praising Bennell for his “great ability to communicate with kids.”
Man City and Crewe could face paying millions in compensation to Barry Bennell's victims
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are facing the prospect of large-scale legal action and compensation bills running into millions of pounds from victims of the serial paedophile Barry Bennell. Bennell, who worked as a youth coach and scout for City and Crewe among others, was found guilty at Liverpool Crown Court on Thursday of 43 counts of child sexual abuse against 11 victims as the horrifying scale of his crimes begins to emerge. It is understood the number of victims assaulted by Bennell – who is still under police investigation – could easily exceed 100 after 86 more people came forward to report abuse by him. Bennell, 64, described at the trial as a “child molester on an industrial scale”, had already been convicted of abusing 15 boys in the UK and one in the United States. Bennell will be sentenced on Monday. City and Crewe are two of the clubs most seriously implicated and could be the subject of a civil group action from victims. The court heard three former junior footballers are already suing City after civil cases were lodged in March 2016 while one is planning to sue Crewe and the FA for damages. Three other complainants in the current trial have sought legal ­advice on a potential compensation claim and it is believed others could follow. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country’s leading lawyers for child abuse victims who is representing a substantial number of victims in this case, said: “They have got quite a large-scale problem on their hands.” Three of Bennell's victims talk to the media outside court on Thursday Credit: PA City have been accused of putting hundreds of boys in danger after it emerged one of their coaches, Steve Fleet, had warned in the Seventies that it was “general knowledge” Bennell was a risk to children, long before he joined Crewe in 1985. “People would say he [Bennell] was ‘dodgy’ and if his name was brought up everyone would shake their heads,” said Fleet. One of Bennell’s victims, Gary Cliffe, who was at City when he was abused between the ages of 11 and 15, told how Bennell even once abused them on the club’s Maine Road pitch. “If those in positions of responsibility had challenged Bennell, hundreds of wrecked lives could have been saved,” Cliffe, 47, told The Guardian. One of Bennell’s victims told ­Liverpool Crown Court he was targeted “straight away” in Bennell’s Mercedes when he started to give him lifts to and from City’s then training ground at Platt Lane. Bennell was said by another complainant to have been treated like “God” at Maine Road. Jurors also heard from a third complainant that he thought City officials Ken Barnes and Mike Grimsley had known Bennell was targeting boys. One City director at the time of Bennell’s association with the club, Simon Cussons, was interviewed by the BBC last year, although he died before City had been able to conduct their own interview with him. It is understood City were scheduled to interview Cussons. In Channel 4’s Dispatches documentary in 1997, Chris Muir, a City director at the time, was asked about one parent writing to City to complain Bennell had boys in his room late at night on trips away and explained “football allowed him to stay because he was producing the goods”. An artist's sketch of Bennell in court Credit: PA Yet it has emerged police had interviewed Barnes and Muir, in addition to Fleet and another member of City’s youth team staff, Terry Farrell, when Bennell was arrested in Florida in 1994. A Dispatches documentary Football’s Wall of Silence, which aired on Channel 4 last night, reported detectives investigating that 1994 case said Barnes was “very cagey”. City began their QC-led inquiry 15 months ago and said on Thursday they had identified another alleged paedophile, John Broome, now deceased, with whom they have “potential historic connections”. City added Broome was “not believed to be linked to Bennell”. City are thought to have taken more than 100 statements from victims, family members, coaches, former employees and other figures and dedicated around 5,000 hours to a review that has so far cost in excess of £1 million. Crewe expressed its “deepest sympathies to the victims of Barry Bennell” but insisted it was “not aware of any sexual abuse by Mr Bennell, nor did it receive any complaint about sexual abuse by him. CLUB STATEMENT: Barry Bennell #CreweAlexhttps://t.co/nKXRpwko49pic.twitter.com/gYhmBYB6JC— Crewe Alexandra F.C. (@crewealexfc) February 15, 2018 “The club wishes to make it absolutely clear that had it had any suspicion or belief that Mr Bennell was committing acts of abuse... the club would have informed the police.” Lord Carlile, the eminent barrister who prosecuted Bennell in 1998, claimed the scandal was “brushed under the carpet” by Crewe, whom he accused of “institutional failure” over their former youth coach. It has also emerged that former Crewe manager Dario Gradi, the club’s director of football who has been suspended by the FA pending an investigation into sexual abuse in football, wrote a letter to a court in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1994 in support of Bennell, who was facing six charges of child abuse to which he later pleaded guilty. Gradi is expected to face fresh scrutiny after praising Bennell for his “great ability to communicate with kids.”
Barry Bennell, the former Crewe Alexandra coach and Manchester City scout, has been found guilty of seven further offences against boys.
Former youth coach Bennell guilty of seven more sex assaults
Barry Bennell, the former Crewe Alexandra coach and Manchester City scout, has been found guilty of seven further offences against boys.
Alexis Sanchez and Henrikh Mkhitaryan completed their swap deal between Manchester United and Arsenal on Monday, treading a well-worn path of transfers between the two clubs over the years. Here, we look back at 14 players who switched sides and how they got on. Paddy Sloan Manchester United: 1938-1939 (0 apps; 0 goals); Arsenal: 1946-48 (33 apps, 1 goal) Irish footballer who left Manchester United for Tranmere before the Second World War without making an appearance. After, he decided to join Arsenal where he established himself as a first-team regular in the 1946-47 season before losing his place and moving to Italy. Among footballers who played for both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland national teams. Verdict: [Performed better for] Arsenal David Herd Arsenal: 1954-1961 (166 apps, 99 goals); Manchester United: 1961-1968 (265 apps, 145 goals) Herd enjoyed fruitful spells at both clubs, acquiring strike-rates that bettered a goal every two games. After helping Arsenal to third place in the league 1959, Sir Matt Busby swooped for the former Stockport player in 1961. Herd went on to score two goals in a victorious FA Cup final for United against Leicester City in 1963 before becoming Division One champions in 1965. Verdict: Manchester United Ian Ure Arsenal: 1963-1969 (202 apps, 2 goals); Manchester United: 1969-1971 (65 apps, 1 goal) Arsenal manager Billy Wright moved hastily to bring the Scottish defender to London following an impressive spell at Dundee. However, Ure struggled with his move south of the border culminating in a shocking display in the 1969 League Cup final against Swindon. He departed for United that summer where he stayed for just two seasons before moving to Motherwell. Verdict: Neither George Graham Arsenal: 1966-1972 (308 apps, 77 goals); Manchester United: 1972-1974 (46 apps, 2 goals) As a midfielder or forward Graham’s playing career at the London club was impressive. He was a pivotal creative figure as Arsenal achieved the First Division and FA Cup double in 1971. He crossed to United in 1972 following the arrival of Alan Ball at Highbury but stayed for just under two years. The Scot would go on to win two First Division titles with Arsenal (1989 and 1991), the Uefa Cup (1994), the FA Cup (1993), two League Cups (1987 and 1993) in a nine-year spell. Verdict: Arsenal Graham won two First Division titles with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Jimmy Rimmer Manchester United: 1965-1974 (46 apps, 0 goals); Arsenal: 1974-1977 (apps, 146, 0 goals) After spending nine years as understudy to Alex Stepney, Rimmer’s impressive loan spell at Swansea was enough to convince Bertie Mee that he could succeed as No1 at Highbury. By the following season Rimmer had become Arsenal's first-choice 'keeper. In 1975, he won Arsenal’s Player of the Year award and an England cap followed a year later. Verdict: Arsenal Brian Kidd Manchester United 1967-1974 (264 apps, 70 goals); Arsenal 1974-1976 (90 apps, 34 goals) The forward’s time at United was one of immense highs and lows. From scoring in United’s European Cup final triumph over Benfica in 1968, he suffered relegation with the same club six years later. He was top goal-scorer for Arsenal in his first season at the club, but failed to leave a lasting impact on the club. Verdict: Manchester United Kidd, here playing in the 1968 European Cup final at Wembley Credit: Getty/ALLSPORT Frank Stapleton Arsenal: 1971-1981 (300 apps, 108 goals); Manchester United: 1981-1987 (288 apps, 78 goals) The original RVP, Stapleton’s time at Arsenal was one of disappointment due to a lack of team success. He participated in three successive FA Cup finals, two of which ended in defeat. A familiar tale of Arsenal finishing fourth and failing to sign star players frustrated Stapleton. In 1981 he moved to the more ambitious United where he claimed two FA Cup winners’ medals in 1983 and 1985. Verdict: Manchester United Viv Anderson Arsenal: 1984-1987 (150 apps, 15 goals); Manchester United: 1987-1991 (64 apps, 4 goals) Widely known for being the first black footballer to represent England in a full international, defender Anderson was part of the Arsenal side that claimed the League Cup in 1987 and famously scored against Tottenham in the semi-final. Shortly afterwards, however, Anderson moved up north, achieving the rather impressive title of being Sir Alex Ferguson’s first signing at Manchester United. Verdict: Arsenal Leighton moved to Arsenal but did not feature for the club Credit: Getty Images Jim Leighton Manchester United 1988-1991 (94 caps); Arsenal 1991 (0 apps) After following Sir Alex Ferguson to Manchester from Aberdeen, Scottish goalkeeper Leighton struggled to hold down a position in the first team. His loan spell at Arsenal proved even more difficult to secure game-time, he never made a senior appearance for the north Londoners. Verdict: Manchester United David Platt Manchester United 1982-1985 (0 apps); Arsenal 1995-1998 (108 apps, 15 goals) Platt signed his first professional contract at Manchester United but moved on to Crewe Alexandra after failing to break in to the first team at Old Trafford. The dynamic midfielder fared much better at Arsenal, later in his career after successful stints in Italy with Juventus and Sampdoria. In his first season with Arsenal, Platt helped the Gunners secure Uefa Cup football with a fifth-placed finish. A Premier League triumph followed in 1998 in Platt’s final season at the club. Verdict: Arsenal Cole won the treble with Manchester United Credit: Andrew Budd/Action Images Andy Cole Arsenal: 1989-1992 (2 apps, 0 goals); Manchester United: 1995-2001 (195 apps, 93 goals) The striker began a peripatetic journey across a variety of top-division clubs at Arsenal, having graduated from the academy, but never managed to start a game for the Gunners, appearing twice as off the subs' bench. It was quite a different story at United however. After a £7million move from Newcastle in 1995, Cole won three Premier League titles at Old Trafford, including one as part of the stunning Treble winning season of 1998/1999. Verdict: Manchester United Mikael Silvestre Manchester United 1999-2008 (361 apps, 10 goals); Arsenal 2008-2010 (46 apps, 6 goals) French international defender Silvestre enjoyed vast success during his time at Old Trafford. The Frenchman earned four Premier League titles, one Champions League winners’ medal and FA Cup and League Cup triumphs before Sir Alex Ferguson deemed him surplus to requirements. A move to Arsenal followed in 2008 by which time his peak had passed. Verdict: Manchester United Robin van Persie and Danny Welbeck were more successful at Manchester United Credit: Getty Images Robin van Persie Arsenal: 2004-2012 (279 apps, 132 goals); Manchester United: 2012-2015 (105 apps, 58 goals) A player that has best epitomised the difference between the two clubs in recent times, the Dutch striker was captain when he departed the Emirates Stadium in 2012 to hunt trophies under Sir Alex Ferguson. It worked, securing the Premier League title in his first season at Old Trafford while also being the top scorer in the division. Verdict: Manchester United Alexis Sanchez-Henrikh Mkhitarayan swap deal | All you need to know around the big football transfer Danny Welbeck Manchester United: 2008-2014 (142 apps, 29 goals); Arsenal: 2014-present (91 apps, 22 goals) Left Manchester United for Arsenal in 2014 after a promising, though short of fulfilling, spell in the first-team, featuring 27 times in Manchester United's 2012-13 title-winning season. His time at the Emirates has been hampered by injury, while he has only featured four times for England in the last three seasons. Verdict: Manchester United
14 players who featured for both Arsenal and Manchester United – and where they performed best
Alexis Sanchez and Henrikh Mkhitaryan completed their swap deal between Manchester United and Arsenal on Monday, treading a well-worn path of transfers between the two clubs over the years. Here, we look back at 14 players who switched sides and how they got on. Paddy Sloan Manchester United: 1938-1939 (0 apps; 0 goals); Arsenal: 1946-48 (33 apps, 1 goal) Irish footballer who left Manchester United for Tranmere before the Second World War without making an appearance. After, he decided to join Arsenal where he established himself as a first-team regular in the 1946-47 season before losing his place and moving to Italy. Among footballers who played for both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland national teams. Verdict: [Performed better for] Arsenal David Herd Arsenal: 1954-1961 (166 apps, 99 goals); Manchester United: 1961-1968 (265 apps, 145 goals) Herd enjoyed fruitful spells at both clubs, acquiring strike-rates that bettered a goal every two games. After helping Arsenal to third place in the league 1959, Sir Matt Busby swooped for the former Stockport player in 1961. Herd went on to score two goals in a victorious FA Cup final for United against Leicester City in 1963 before becoming Division One champions in 1965. Verdict: Manchester United Ian Ure Arsenal: 1963-1969 (202 apps, 2 goals); Manchester United: 1969-1971 (65 apps, 1 goal) Arsenal manager Billy Wright moved hastily to bring the Scottish defender to London following an impressive spell at Dundee. However, Ure struggled with his move south of the border culminating in a shocking display in the 1969 League Cup final against Swindon. He departed for United that summer where he stayed for just two seasons before moving to Motherwell. Verdict: Neither George Graham Arsenal: 1966-1972 (308 apps, 77 goals); Manchester United: 1972-1974 (46 apps, 2 goals) As a midfielder or forward Graham’s playing career at the London club was impressive. He was a pivotal creative figure as Arsenal achieved the First Division and FA Cup double in 1971. He crossed to United in 1972 following the arrival of Alan Ball at Highbury but stayed for just under two years. The Scot would go on to win two First Division titles with Arsenal (1989 and 1991), the Uefa Cup (1994), the FA Cup (1993), two League Cups (1987 and 1993) in a nine-year spell. Verdict: Arsenal Graham won two First Division titles with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Jimmy Rimmer Manchester United: 1965-1974 (46 apps, 0 goals); Arsenal: 1974-1977 (apps, 146, 0 goals) After spending nine years as understudy to Alex Stepney, Rimmer’s impressive loan spell at Swansea was enough to convince Bertie Mee that he could succeed as No1 at Highbury. By the following season Rimmer had become Arsenal's first-choice 'keeper. In 1975, he won Arsenal’s Player of the Year award and an England cap followed a year later. Verdict: Arsenal Brian Kidd Manchester United 1967-1974 (264 apps, 70 goals); Arsenal 1974-1976 (90 apps, 34 goals) The forward’s time at United was one of immense highs and lows. From scoring in United’s European Cup final triumph over Benfica in 1968, he suffered relegation with the same club six years later. He was top goal-scorer for Arsenal in his first season at the club, but failed to leave a lasting impact on the club. Verdict: Manchester United Kidd, here playing in the 1968 European Cup final at Wembley Credit: Getty/ALLSPORT Frank Stapleton Arsenal: 1971-1981 (300 apps, 108 goals); Manchester United: 1981-1987 (288 apps, 78 goals) The original RVP, Stapleton’s time at Arsenal was one of disappointment due to a lack of team success. He participated in three successive FA Cup finals, two of which ended in defeat. A familiar tale of Arsenal finishing fourth and failing to sign star players frustrated Stapleton. In 1981 he moved to the more ambitious United where he claimed two FA Cup winners’ medals in 1983 and 1985. Verdict: Manchester United Viv Anderson Arsenal: 1984-1987 (150 apps, 15 goals); Manchester United: 1987-1991 (64 apps, 4 goals) Widely known for being the first black footballer to represent England in a full international, defender Anderson was part of the Arsenal side that claimed the League Cup in 1987 and famously scored against Tottenham in the semi-final. Shortly afterwards, however, Anderson moved up north, achieving the rather impressive title of being Sir Alex Ferguson’s first signing at Manchester United. Verdict: Arsenal Leighton moved to Arsenal but did not feature for the club Credit: Getty Images Jim Leighton Manchester United 1988-1991 (94 caps); Arsenal 1991 (0 apps) After following Sir Alex Ferguson to Manchester from Aberdeen, Scottish goalkeeper Leighton struggled to hold down a position in the first team. His loan spell at Arsenal proved even more difficult to secure game-time, he never made a senior appearance for the north Londoners. Verdict: Manchester United David Platt Manchester United 1982-1985 (0 apps); Arsenal 1995-1998 (108 apps, 15 goals) Platt signed his first professional contract at Manchester United but moved on to Crewe Alexandra after failing to break in to the first team at Old Trafford. The dynamic midfielder fared much better at Arsenal, later in his career after successful stints in Italy with Juventus and Sampdoria. In his first season with Arsenal, Platt helped the Gunners secure Uefa Cup football with a fifth-placed finish. A Premier League triumph followed in 1998 in Platt’s final season at the club. Verdict: Arsenal Cole won the treble with Manchester United Credit: Andrew Budd/Action Images Andy Cole Arsenal: 1989-1992 (2 apps, 0 goals); Manchester United: 1995-2001 (195 apps, 93 goals) The striker began a peripatetic journey across a variety of top-division clubs at Arsenal, having graduated from the academy, but never managed to start a game for the Gunners, appearing twice as off the subs' bench. It was quite a different story at United however. After a £7million move from Newcastle in 1995, Cole won three Premier League titles at Old Trafford, including one as part of the stunning Treble winning season of 1998/1999. Verdict: Manchester United Mikael Silvestre Manchester United 1999-2008 (361 apps, 10 goals); Arsenal 2008-2010 (46 apps, 6 goals) French international defender Silvestre enjoyed vast success during his time at Old Trafford. The Frenchman earned four Premier League titles, one Champions League winners’ medal and FA Cup and League Cup triumphs before Sir Alex Ferguson deemed him surplus to requirements. A move to Arsenal followed in 2008 by which time his peak had passed. Verdict: Manchester United Robin van Persie and Danny Welbeck were more successful at Manchester United Credit: Getty Images Robin van Persie Arsenal: 2004-2012 (279 apps, 132 goals); Manchester United: 2012-2015 (105 apps, 58 goals) A player that has best epitomised the difference between the two clubs in recent times, the Dutch striker was captain when he departed the Emirates Stadium in 2012 to hunt trophies under Sir Alex Ferguson. It worked, securing the Premier League title in his first season at Old Trafford while also being the top scorer in the division. Verdict: Manchester United Alexis Sanchez-Henrikh Mkhitarayan swap deal | All you need to know around the big football transfer Danny Welbeck Manchester United: 2008-2014 (142 apps, 29 goals); Arsenal: 2014-present (91 apps, 22 goals) Left Manchester United for Arsenal in 2014 after a promising, though short of fulfilling, spell in the first-team, featuring 27 times in Manchester United's 2012-13 title-winning season. His time at the Emirates has been hampered by injury, while he has only featured four times for England in the last three seasons. Verdict: Manchester United
Alexis Sanchez and Henrikh Mkhitaryan completed their swap deal between Manchester United and Arsenal on Monday, treading a well-worn path of transfers between the two clubs over the years. Here, we look back at 14 players who switched sides and how they got on. Paddy Sloan Manchester United: 1938-1939 (0 apps; 0 goals); Arsenal: 1946-48 (33 apps, 1 goal) Irish footballer who left Manchester United for Tranmere before the Second World War without making an appearance. After, he decided to join Arsenal where he established himself as a first-team regular in the 1946-47 season before losing his place and moving to Italy. Among footballers who played for both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland national teams. Verdict: [Performed better for] Arsenal David Herd Arsenal: 1954-1961 (166 apps, 99 goals); Manchester United: 1961-1968 (265 apps, 145 goals) Herd enjoyed fruitful spells at both clubs, acquiring strike-rates that bettered a goal every two games. After helping Arsenal to third place in the league 1959, Sir Matt Busby swooped for the former Stockport player in 1961. Herd went on to score two goals in a victorious FA Cup final for United against Leicester City in 1963 before becoming Division One champions in 1965. Verdict: Manchester United Ian Ure Arsenal: 1963-1969 (202 apps, 2 goals); Manchester United: 1969-1971 (65 apps, 1 goal) Arsenal manager Billy Wright moved hastily to bring the Scottish defender to London following an impressive spell at Dundee. However, Ure struggled with his move south of the border culminating in a shocking display in the 1969 League Cup final against Swindon. He departed for United that summer where he stayed for just two seasons before moving to Motherwell. Verdict: Neither George Graham Arsenal: 1966-1972 (308 apps, 77 goals); Manchester United: 1972-1974 (46 apps, 2 goals) As a midfielder or forward Graham’s playing career at the London club was impressive. He was a pivotal creative figure as Arsenal achieved the First Division and FA Cup double in 1971. He crossed to United in 1972 following the arrival of Alan Ball at Highbury but stayed for just under two years. The Scot would go on to win two First Division titles with Arsenal (1989 and 1991), the Uefa Cup (1994), the FA Cup (1993), two League Cups (1987 and 1993) in a nine-year spell. Verdict: Arsenal Graham won two First Division titles with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Jimmy Rimmer Manchester United: 1965-1974 (46 apps, 0 goals); Arsenal: 1974-1977 (apps, 146, 0 goals) After spending nine years as understudy to Alex Stepney, Rimmer’s impressive loan spell at Swansea was enough to convince Bertie Mee that he could succeed as No1 at Highbury. By the following season Rimmer had become Arsenal's first-choice 'keeper. In 1975, he won Arsenal’s Player of the Year award and an England cap followed a year later. Verdict: Arsenal Brian Kidd Manchester United 1967-1974 (264 apps, 70 goals); Arsenal 1974-1976 (90 apps, 34 goals) The forward’s time at United was one of immense highs and lows. From scoring in United’s European Cup final triumph over Benfica in 1968, he suffered relegation with the same club six years later. He was top goal-scorer for Arsenal in his first season at the club, but failed to leave a lasting impact on the club. Verdict: Manchester United Kidd, here playing in the 1968 European Cup final at Wembley Credit: Getty/ALLSPORT Frank Stapleton Arsenal: 1971-1981 (300 apps, 108 goals); Manchester United: 1981-1987 (288 apps, 78 goals) The original RVP, Stapleton’s time at Arsenal was one of disappointment due to a lack of team success. He participated in three successive FA Cup finals, two of which ended in defeat. A familiar tale of Arsenal finishing fourth and failing to sign star players frustrated Stapleton. In 1981 he moved to the more ambitious United where he claimed two FA Cup winners’ medals in 1983 and 1985. Verdict: Manchester United Viv Anderson Arsenal: 1984-1987 (150 apps, 15 goals); Manchester United: 1987-1991 (64 apps, 4 goals) Widely known for being the first black footballer to represent England in a full international, defender Anderson was part of the Arsenal side that claimed the League Cup in 1987 and famously scored against Tottenham in the semi-final. Shortly afterwards, however, Anderson moved up north, achieving the rather impressive title of being Sir Alex Ferguson’s first signing at Manchester United. Verdict: Arsenal Leighton moved to Arsenal but did not feature for the club Credit: Getty Images Jim Leighton Manchester United 1988-1991 (94 caps); Arsenal 1991 (0 apps) After following Sir Alex Ferguson to Manchester from Aberdeen, Scottish goalkeeper Leighton struggled to hold down a position in the first team. His loan spell at Arsenal proved even more difficult to secure game-time, he never made a senior appearance for the north Londoners. Verdict: Manchester United David Platt Manchester United 1982-1985 (0 apps); Arsenal 1995-1998 (108 apps, 15 goals) Platt signed his first professional contract at Manchester United but moved on to Crewe Alexandra after failing to break in to the first team at Old Trafford. The dynamic midfielder fared much better at Arsenal, later in his career after successful stints in Italy with Juventus and Sampdoria. In his first season with Arsenal, Platt helped the Gunners secure Uefa Cup football with a fifth-placed finish. A Premier League triumph followed in 1998 in Platt’s final season at the club. Verdict: Arsenal Cole won the treble with Manchester United Credit: Andrew Budd/Action Images Andy Cole Arsenal: 1989-1992 (2 apps, 0 goals); Manchester United: 1995-2001 (195 apps, 93 goals) The striker began a peripatetic journey across a variety of top-division clubs at Arsenal, having graduated from the academy, but never managed to start a game for the Gunners, appearing twice as off the subs' bench. It was quite a different story at United however. After a £7million move from Newcastle in 1995, Cole won three Premier League titles at Old Trafford, including one as part of the stunning Treble winning season of 1998/1999. Verdict: Manchester United Mikael Silvestre Manchester United 1999-2008 (361 apps, 10 goals); Arsenal 2008-2010 (46 apps, 6 goals) French international defender Silvestre enjoyed vast success during his time at Old Trafford. The Frenchman earned four Premier League titles, one Champions League winners’ medal and FA Cup and League Cup triumphs before Sir Alex Ferguson deemed him surplus to requirements. A move to Arsenal followed in 2008 by which time his peak had passed. Verdict: Manchester United Robin van Persie and Danny Welbeck were more successful at Manchester United Credit: Getty Images Robin van Persie Arsenal: 2004-2012 (279 apps, 132 goals); Manchester United: 2012-2015 (105 apps, 58 goals) A player that has best epitomised the difference between the two clubs in recent times, the Dutch striker was captain when he departed the Emirates Stadium in 2012 to hunt trophies under Sir Alex Ferguson. It worked, securing the Premier League title in his first season at Old Trafford while also being the top scorer in the division. Verdict: Manchester United Alexis Sanchez-Henrikh Mkhitarayan swap deal | All you need to know around the big football transfer Danny Welbeck Manchester United: 2008-2014 (142 apps, 29 goals); Arsenal: 2014-present (91 apps, 22 goals) Left Manchester United for Arsenal in 2014 after a promising, though short of fulfilling, spell in the first-team, featuring 27 times in Manchester United's 2012-13 title-winning season. His time at the Emirates has been hampered by injury, while he has only featured four times for England in the last three seasons. Verdict: Manchester United
14 players who featured for both Arsenal and Manchester United – and where they performed best
Alexis Sanchez and Henrikh Mkhitaryan completed their swap deal between Manchester United and Arsenal on Monday, treading a well-worn path of transfers between the two clubs over the years. Here, we look back at 14 players who switched sides and how they got on. Paddy Sloan Manchester United: 1938-1939 (0 apps; 0 goals); Arsenal: 1946-48 (33 apps, 1 goal) Irish footballer who left Manchester United for Tranmere before the Second World War without making an appearance. After, he decided to join Arsenal where he established himself as a first-team regular in the 1946-47 season before losing his place and moving to Italy. Among footballers who played for both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland national teams. Verdict: [Performed better for] Arsenal David Herd Arsenal: 1954-1961 (166 apps, 99 goals); Manchester United: 1961-1968 (265 apps, 145 goals) Herd enjoyed fruitful spells at both clubs, acquiring strike-rates that bettered a goal every two games. After helping Arsenal to third place in the league 1959, Sir Matt Busby swooped for the former Stockport player in 1961. Herd went on to score two goals in a victorious FA Cup final for United against Leicester City in 1963 before becoming Division One champions in 1965. Verdict: Manchester United Ian Ure Arsenal: 1963-1969 (202 apps, 2 goals); Manchester United: 1969-1971 (65 apps, 1 goal) Arsenal manager Billy Wright moved hastily to bring the Scottish defender to London following an impressive spell at Dundee. However, Ure struggled with his move south of the border culminating in a shocking display in the 1969 League Cup final against Swindon. He departed for United that summer where he stayed for just two seasons before moving to Motherwell. Verdict: Neither George Graham Arsenal: 1966-1972 (308 apps, 77 goals); Manchester United: 1972-1974 (46 apps, 2 goals) As a midfielder or forward Graham’s playing career at the London club was impressive. He was a pivotal creative figure as Arsenal achieved the First Division and FA Cup double in 1971. He crossed to United in 1972 following the arrival of Alan Ball at Highbury but stayed for just under two years. The Scot would go on to win two First Division titles with Arsenal (1989 and 1991), the Uefa Cup (1994), the FA Cup (1993), two League Cups (1987 and 1993) in a nine-year spell. Verdict: Arsenal Graham won two First Division titles with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Jimmy Rimmer Manchester United: 1965-1974 (46 apps, 0 goals); Arsenal: 1974-1977 (apps, 146, 0 goals) After spending nine years as understudy to Alex Stepney, Rimmer’s impressive loan spell at Swansea was enough to convince Bertie Mee that he could succeed as No1 at Highbury. By the following season Rimmer had become Arsenal's first-choice 'keeper. In 1975, he won Arsenal’s Player of the Year award and an England cap followed a year later. Verdict: Arsenal Brian Kidd Manchester United 1967-1974 (264 apps, 70 goals); Arsenal 1974-1976 (90 apps, 34 goals) The forward’s time at United was one of immense highs and lows. From scoring in United’s European Cup final triumph over Benfica in 1968, he suffered relegation with the same club six years later. He was top goal-scorer for Arsenal in his first season at the club, but failed to leave a lasting impact on the club. Verdict: Manchester United Kidd, here playing in the 1968 European Cup final at Wembley Credit: Getty/ALLSPORT Frank Stapleton Arsenal: 1971-1981 (300 apps, 108 goals); Manchester United: 1981-1987 (288 apps, 78 goals) The original RVP, Stapleton’s time at Arsenal was one of disappointment due to a lack of team success. He participated in three successive FA Cup finals, two of which ended in defeat. A familiar tale of Arsenal finishing fourth and failing to sign star players frustrated Stapleton. In 1981 he moved to the more ambitious United where he claimed two FA Cup winners’ medals in 1983 and 1985. Verdict: Manchester United Viv Anderson Arsenal: 1984-1987 (150 apps, 15 goals); Manchester United: 1987-1991 (64 apps, 4 goals) Widely known for being the first black footballer to represent England in a full international, defender Anderson was part of the Arsenal side that claimed the League Cup in 1987 and famously scored against Tottenham in the semi-final. Shortly afterwards, however, Anderson moved up north, achieving the rather impressive title of being Sir Alex Ferguson’s first signing at Manchester United. Verdict: Arsenal Leighton moved to Arsenal but did not feature for the club Credit: Getty Images Jim Leighton Manchester United 1988-1991 (94 caps); Arsenal 1991 (0 apps) After following Sir Alex Ferguson to Manchester from Aberdeen, Scottish goalkeeper Leighton struggled to hold down a position in the first team. His loan spell at Arsenal proved even more difficult to secure game-time, he never made a senior appearance for the north Londoners. Verdict: Manchester United David Platt Manchester United 1982-1985 (0 apps); Arsenal 1995-1998 (108 apps, 15 goals) Platt signed his first professional contract at Manchester United but moved on to Crewe Alexandra after failing to break in to the first team at Old Trafford. The dynamic midfielder fared much better at Arsenal, later in his career after successful stints in Italy with Juventus and Sampdoria. In his first season with Arsenal, Platt helped the Gunners secure Uefa Cup football with a fifth-placed finish. A Premier League triumph followed in 1998 in Platt’s final season at the club. Verdict: Arsenal Cole won the treble with Manchester United Credit: Andrew Budd/Action Images Andy Cole Arsenal: 1989-1992 (2 apps, 0 goals); Manchester United: 1995-2001 (195 apps, 93 goals) The striker began a peripatetic journey across a variety of top-division clubs at Arsenal, having graduated from the academy, but never managed to start a game for the Gunners, appearing twice as off the subs' bench. It was quite a different story at United however. After a £7million move from Newcastle in 1995, Cole won three Premier League titles at Old Trafford, including one as part of the stunning Treble winning season of 1998/1999. Verdict: Manchester United Mikael Silvestre Manchester United 1999-2008 (361 apps, 10 goals); Arsenal 2008-2010 (46 apps, 6 goals) French international defender Silvestre enjoyed vast success during his time at Old Trafford. The Frenchman earned four Premier League titles, one Champions League winners’ medal and FA Cup and League Cup triumphs before Sir Alex Ferguson deemed him surplus to requirements. A move to Arsenal followed in 2008 by which time his peak had passed. Verdict: Manchester United Robin van Persie and Danny Welbeck were more successful at Manchester United Credit: Getty Images Robin van Persie Arsenal: 2004-2012 (279 apps, 132 goals); Manchester United: 2012-2015 (105 apps, 58 goals) A player that has best epitomised the difference between the two clubs in recent times, the Dutch striker was captain when he departed the Emirates Stadium in 2012 to hunt trophies under Sir Alex Ferguson. It worked, securing the Premier League title in his first season at Old Trafford while also being the top scorer in the division. Verdict: Manchester United Alexis Sanchez-Henrikh Mkhitarayan swap deal | All you need to know around the big football transfer Danny Welbeck Manchester United: 2008-2014 (142 apps, 29 goals); Arsenal: 2014-present (91 apps, 22 goals) Left Manchester United for Arsenal in 2014 after a promising, though short of fulfilling, spell in the first-team, featuring 27 times in Manchester United's 2012-13 title-winning season. His time at the Emirates has been hampered by injury, while he has only featured four times for England in the last three seasons. Verdict: Manchester United
Alexis Sanchez and Henrikh Mkhitaryan completed their swap deal between Manchester United and Arsenal on Monday, treading a well-worn path of transfers between the two clubs over the years. Here, we look back at 14 players who switched sides and how they got on. Paddy Sloan Manchester United: 1938-1939 (0 apps; 0 goals); Arsenal: 1946-48 (33 apps, 1 goal) Irish footballer who left Manchester United for Tranmere before the Second World War without making an appearance. After, he decided to join Arsenal where he established himself as a first-team regular in the 1946-47 season before losing his place and moving to Italy. Among footballers who played for both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland national teams. Verdict: [Performed better for] Arsenal David Herd Arsenal: 1954-1961 (166 apps, 99 goals); Manchester United: 1961-1968 (265 apps, 145 goals) Herd enjoyed fruitful spells at both clubs, acquiring strike-rates that bettered a goal every two games. After helping Arsenal to third place in the league 1959, Sir Matt Busby swooped for the former Stockport player in 1961. Herd went on to score two goals in a victorious FA Cup final for United against Leicester City in 1963 before becoming Division One champions in 1965. Verdict: Manchester United Ian Ure Arsenal: 1963-1969 (202 apps, 2 goals); Manchester United: 1969-1971 (65 apps, 1 goal) Arsenal manager Billy Wright moved hastily to bring the Scottish defender to London following an impressive spell at Dundee. However, Ure struggled with his move south of the border culminating in a shocking display in the 1969 League Cup final against Swindon. He departed for United that summer where he stayed for just two seasons before moving to Motherwell. Verdict: Neither George Graham Arsenal: 1966-1972 (308 apps, 77 goals); Manchester United: 1972-1974 (46 apps, 2 goals) As a midfielder or forward Graham’s playing career at the London club was impressive. He was a pivotal creative figure as Arsenal achieved the First Division and FA Cup double in 1971. He crossed to United in 1972 following the arrival of Alan Ball at Highbury but stayed for just under two years. The Scot would go on to win two First Division titles with Arsenal (1989 and 1991), the Uefa Cup (1994), the FA Cup (1993), two League Cups (1987 and 1993) in a nine-year spell. Verdict: Arsenal Graham won two First Division titles with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Jimmy Rimmer Manchester United: 1965-1974 (46 apps, 0 goals); Arsenal: 1974-1977 (apps, 146, 0 goals) After spending nine years as understudy to Alex Stepney, Rimmer’s impressive loan spell at Swansea was enough to convince Bertie Mee that he could succeed as No1 at Highbury. By the following season Rimmer had become Arsenal's first-choice 'keeper. In 1975, he won Arsenal’s Player of the Year award and an England cap followed a year later. Verdict: Arsenal Brian Kidd Manchester United 1967-1974 (264 apps, 70 goals); Arsenal 1974-1976 (90 apps, 34 goals) The forward’s time at United was one of immense highs and lows. From scoring in United’s European Cup final triumph over Benfica in 1968, he suffered relegation with the same club six years later. He was top goal-scorer for Arsenal in his first season at the club, but failed to leave a lasting impact on the club. Verdict: Manchester United Kidd, here playing in the 1968 European Cup final at Wembley Credit: Getty/ALLSPORT Frank Stapleton Arsenal: 1971-1981 (300 apps, 108 goals); Manchester United: 1981-1987 (288 apps, 78 goals) The original RVP, Stapleton’s time at Arsenal was one of disappointment due to a lack of team success. He participated in three successive FA Cup finals, two of which ended in defeat. A familiar tale of Arsenal finishing fourth and failing to sign star players frustrated Stapleton. In 1981 he moved to the more ambitious United where he claimed two FA Cup winners’ medals in 1983 and 1985. Verdict: Manchester United Viv Anderson Arsenal: 1984-1987 (150 apps, 15 goals); Manchester United: 1987-1991 (64 apps, 4 goals) Widely known for being the first black footballer to represent England in a full international, defender Anderson was part of the Arsenal side that claimed the League Cup in 1987 and famously scored against Tottenham in the semi-final. Shortly afterwards, however, Anderson moved up north, achieving the rather impressive title of being Sir Alex Ferguson’s first signing at Manchester United. Verdict: Arsenal Leighton moved to Arsenal but did not feature for the club Credit: Getty Images Jim Leighton Manchester United 1988-1991 (94 caps); Arsenal 1991 (0 apps) After following Sir Alex Ferguson to Manchester from Aberdeen, Scottish goalkeeper Leighton struggled to hold down a position in the first team. His loan spell at Arsenal proved even more difficult to secure game-time, he never made a senior appearance for the north Londoners. Verdict: Manchester United David Platt Manchester United 1982-1985 (0 apps); Arsenal 1995-1998 (108 apps, 15 goals) Platt signed his first professional contract at Manchester United but moved on to Crewe Alexandra after failing to break in to the first team at Old Trafford. The dynamic midfielder fared much better at Arsenal, later in his career after successful stints in Italy with Juventus and Sampdoria. In his first season with Arsenal, Platt helped the Gunners secure Uefa Cup football with a fifth-placed finish. A Premier League triumph followed in 1998 in Platt’s final season at the club. Verdict: Arsenal Cole won the treble with Manchester United Credit: Andrew Budd/Action Images Andy Cole Arsenal: 1989-1992 (2 apps, 0 goals); Manchester United: 1995-2001 (195 apps, 93 goals) The striker began a peripatetic journey across a variety of top-division clubs at Arsenal, having graduated from the academy, but never managed to start a game for the Gunners, appearing twice as off the subs' bench. It was quite a different story at United however. After a £7million move from Newcastle in 1995, Cole won three Premier League titles at Old Trafford, including one as part of the stunning Treble winning season of 1998/1999. Verdict: Manchester United Mikael Silvestre Manchester United 1999-2008 (361 apps, 10 goals); Arsenal 2008-2010 (46 apps, 6 goals) French international defender Silvestre enjoyed vast success during his time at Old Trafford. The Frenchman earned four Premier League titles, one Champions League winners’ medal and FA Cup and League Cup triumphs before Sir Alex Ferguson deemed him surplus to requirements. A move to Arsenal followed in 2008 by which time his peak had passed. Verdict: Manchester United Robin van Persie and Danny Welbeck were more successful at Manchester United Credit: Getty Images Robin van Persie Arsenal: 2004-2012 (279 apps, 132 goals); Manchester United: 2012-2015 (105 apps, 58 goals) A player that has best epitomised the difference between the two clubs in recent times, the Dutch striker was captain when he departed the Emirates Stadium in 2012 to hunt trophies under Sir Alex Ferguson. It worked, securing the Premier League title in his first season at Old Trafford while also being the top scorer in the division. Verdict: Manchester United Alexis Sanchez-Henrikh Mkhitarayan swap deal | All you need to know around the big football transfer Danny Welbeck Manchester United: 2008-2014 (142 apps, 29 goals); Arsenal: 2014-present (91 apps, 22 goals) Left Manchester United for Arsenal in 2014 after a promising, though short of fulfilling, spell in the first-team, featuring 27 times in Manchester United's 2012-13 title-winning season. His time at the Emirates has been hampered by injury, while he has only featured four times for England in the last three seasons. Verdict: Manchester United
14 players who featured for both Arsenal and Manchester United – and where they performed best
Alexis Sanchez and Henrikh Mkhitaryan completed their swap deal between Manchester United and Arsenal on Monday, treading a well-worn path of transfers between the two clubs over the years. Here, we look back at 14 players who switched sides and how they got on. Paddy Sloan Manchester United: 1938-1939 (0 apps; 0 goals); Arsenal: 1946-48 (33 apps, 1 goal) Irish footballer who left Manchester United for Tranmere before the Second World War without making an appearance. After, he decided to join Arsenal where he established himself as a first-team regular in the 1946-47 season before losing his place and moving to Italy. Among footballers who played for both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland national teams. Verdict: [Performed better for] Arsenal David Herd Arsenal: 1954-1961 (166 apps, 99 goals); Manchester United: 1961-1968 (265 apps, 145 goals) Herd enjoyed fruitful spells at both clubs, acquiring strike-rates that bettered a goal every two games. After helping Arsenal to third place in the league 1959, Sir Matt Busby swooped for the former Stockport player in 1961. Herd went on to score two goals in a victorious FA Cup final for United against Leicester City in 1963 before becoming Division One champions in 1965. Verdict: Manchester United Ian Ure Arsenal: 1963-1969 (202 apps, 2 goals); Manchester United: 1969-1971 (65 apps, 1 goal) Arsenal manager Billy Wright moved hastily to bring the Scottish defender to London following an impressive spell at Dundee. However, Ure struggled with his move south of the border culminating in a shocking display in the 1969 League Cup final against Swindon. He departed for United that summer where he stayed for just two seasons before moving to Motherwell. Verdict: Neither George Graham Arsenal: 1966-1972 (308 apps, 77 goals); Manchester United: 1972-1974 (46 apps, 2 goals) As a midfielder or forward Graham’s playing career at the London club was impressive. He was a pivotal creative figure as Arsenal achieved the First Division and FA Cup double in 1971. He crossed to United in 1972 following the arrival of Alan Ball at Highbury but stayed for just under two years. The Scot would go on to win two First Division titles with Arsenal (1989 and 1991), the Uefa Cup (1994), the FA Cup (1993), two League Cups (1987 and 1993) in a nine-year spell. Verdict: Arsenal Graham won two First Division titles with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Jimmy Rimmer Manchester United: 1965-1974 (46 apps, 0 goals); Arsenal: 1974-1977 (apps, 146, 0 goals) After spending nine years as understudy to Alex Stepney, Rimmer’s impressive loan spell at Swansea was enough to convince Bertie Mee that he could succeed as No1 at Highbury. By the following season Rimmer had become Arsenal's first-choice 'keeper. In 1975, he won Arsenal’s Player of the Year award and an England cap followed a year later. Verdict: Arsenal Brian Kidd Manchester United 1967-1974 (264 apps, 70 goals); Arsenal 1974-1976 (90 apps, 34 goals) The forward’s time at United was one of immense highs and lows. From scoring in United’s European Cup final triumph over Benfica in 1968, he suffered relegation with the same club six years later. He was top goal-scorer for Arsenal in his first season at the club, but failed to leave a lasting impact on the club. Verdict: Manchester United Kidd, here playing in the 1968 European Cup final at Wembley Credit: Getty/ALLSPORT Frank Stapleton Arsenal: 1971-1981 (300 apps, 108 goals); Manchester United: 1981-1987 (288 apps, 78 goals) The original RVP, Stapleton’s time at Arsenal was one of disappointment due to a lack of team success. He participated in three successive FA Cup finals, two of which ended in defeat. A familiar tale of Arsenal finishing fourth and failing to sign star players frustrated Stapleton. In 1981 he moved to the more ambitious United where he claimed two FA Cup winners’ medals in 1983 and 1985. Verdict: Manchester United Viv Anderson Arsenal: 1984-1987 (150 apps, 15 goals); Manchester United: 1987-1991 (64 apps, 4 goals) Widely known for being the first black footballer to represent England in a full international, defender Anderson was part of the Arsenal side that claimed the League Cup in 1987 and famously scored against Tottenham in the semi-final. Shortly afterwards, however, Anderson moved up north, achieving the rather impressive title of being Sir Alex Ferguson’s first signing at Manchester United. Verdict: Arsenal Leighton moved to Arsenal but did not feature for the club Credit: Getty Images Jim Leighton Manchester United 1988-1991 (94 caps); Arsenal 1991 (0 apps) After following Sir Alex Ferguson to Manchester from Aberdeen, Scottish goalkeeper Leighton struggled to hold down a position in the first team. His loan spell at Arsenal proved even more difficult to secure game-time, he never made a senior appearance for the north Londoners. Verdict: Manchester United David Platt Manchester United 1982-1985 (0 apps); Arsenal 1995-1998 (108 apps, 15 goals) Platt signed his first professional contract at Manchester United but moved on to Crewe Alexandra after failing to break in to the first team at Old Trafford. The dynamic midfielder fared much better at Arsenal, later in his career after successful stints in Italy with Juventus and Sampdoria. In his first season with Arsenal, Platt helped the Gunners secure Uefa Cup football with a fifth-placed finish. A Premier League triumph followed in 1998 in Platt’s final season at the club. Verdict: Arsenal Cole won the treble with Manchester United Credit: Andrew Budd/Action Images Andy Cole Arsenal: 1989-1992 (2 apps, 0 goals); Manchester United: 1995-2001 (195 apps, 93 goals) The striker began a peripatetic journey across a variety of top-division clubs at Arsenal, having graduated from the academy, but never managed to start a game for the Gunners, appearing twice as off the subs' bench. It was quite a different story at United however. After a £7million move from Newcastle in 1995, Cole won three Premier League titles at Old Trafford, including one as part of the stunning Treble winning season of 1998/1999. Verdict: Manchester United Mikael Silvestre Manchester United 1999-2008 (361 apps, 10 goals); Arsenal 2008-2010 (46 apps, 6 goals) French international defender Silvestre enjoyed vast success during his time at Old Trafford. The Frenchman earned four Premier League titles, one Champions League winners’ medal and FA Cup and League Cup triumphs before Sir Alex Ferguson deemed him surplus to requirements. A move to Arsenal followed in 2008 by which time his peak had passed. Verdict: Manchester United Robin van Persie and Danny Welbeck were more successful at Manchester United Credit: Getty Images Robin van Persie Arsenal: 2004-2012 (279 apps, 132 goals); Manchester United: 2012-2015 (105 apps, 58 goals) A player that has best epitomised the difference between the two clubs in recent times, the Dutch striker was captain when he departed the Emirates Stadium in 2012 to hunt trophies under Sir Alex Ferguson. It worked, securing the Premier League title in his first season at Old Trafford while also being the top scorer in the division. Verdict: Manchester United Alexis Sanchez-Henrikh Mkhitarayan swap deal | All you need to know around the big football transfer Danny Welbeck Manchester United: 2008-2014 (142 apps, 29 goals); Arsenal: 2014-present (91 apps, 22 goals) Left Manchester United for Arsenal in 2014 after a promising, though short of fulfilling, spell in the first-team, featuring 27 times in Manchester United's 2012-13 title-winning season. His time at the Emirates has been hampered by injury, while he has only featured four times for England in the last three seasons. Verdict: Manchester United
Alexis Sanchez and Henrikh Mkhitaryan completed their swap deal between Manchester United and Arsenal on Monday, treading a well-worn path of transfers between the two clubs over the years. Here, we look back at 14 players who switched sides and how they got on. Paddy Sloan Manchester United: 1938-1939 (0 apps; 0 goals); Arsenal: 1946-48 (33 apps, 1 goal) Irish footballer who left Manchester United for Tranmere before the Second World War without making an appearance. After, he decided to join Arsenal where he established himself as a first-team regular in the 1946-47 season before losing his place and moving to Italy. Among footballers who played for both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland national teams. Verdict: [Performed better for] Arsenal David Herd Arsenal: 1954-1961 (166 apps, 99 goals); Manchester United: 1961-1968 (265 apps, 145 goals) Herd enjoyed fruitful spells at both clubs, acquiring strike-rates that bettered a goal every two games. After helping Arsenal to third place in the league 1959, Sir Matt Busby swooped for the former Stockport player in 1961. Herd went on to score two goals in a victorious FA Cup final for United against Leicester City in 1963 before becoming Division One champions in 1965. Verdict: Manchester United Ian Ure Arsenal: 1963-1969 (202 apps, 2 goals); Manchester United: 1969-1971 (65 apps, 1 goal) Arsenal manager Billy Wright moved hastily to bring the Scottish defender to London following an impressive spell at Dundee. However, Ure struggled with his move south of the border culminating in a shocking display in the 1969 League Cup final against Swindon. He departed for United that summer where he stayed for just two seasons before moving to Motherwell. Verdict: Neither George Graham Arsenal: 1966-1972 (308 apps, 77 goals); Manchester United: 1972-1974 (46 apps, 2 goals) As a midfielder or forward Graham’s playing career at the London club was impressive. He was a pivotal creative figure as Arsenal achieved the First Division and FA Cup double in 1971. He crossed to United in 1972 following the arrival of Alan Ball at Highbury but stayed for just under two years. The Scot would go on to win two First Division titles with Arsenal (1989 and 1991), the Uefa Cup (1994), the FA Cup (1993), two League Cups (1987 and 1993) in a nine-year spell. Verdict: Arsenal Graham won two First Division titles with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Jimmy Rimmer Manchester United: 1965-1974 (46 apps, 0 goals); Arsenal: 1974-1977 (apps, 146, 0 goals) After spending nine years as understudy to Alex Stepney, Rimmer’s impressive loan spell at Swansea was enough to convince Bertie Mee that he could succeed as No1 at Highbury. By the following season Rimmer had become Arsenal's first-choice 'keeper. In 1975, he won Arsenal’s Player of the Year award and an England cap followed a year later. Verdict: Arsenal Brian Kidd Manchester United 1967-1974 (264 apps, 70 goals); Arsenal 1974-1976 (90 apps, 34 goals) The forward’s time at United was one of immense highs and lows. From scoring in United’s European Cup final triumph over Benfica in 1968, he suffered relegation with the same club six years later. He was top goal-scorer for Arsenal in his first season at the club, but failed to leave a lasting impact on the club. Verdict: Manchester United Kidd, here playing in the 1968 European Cup final at Wembley Credit: Getty/ALLSPORT Frank Stapleton Arsenal: 1971-1981 (300 apps, 108 goals); Manchester United: 1981-1987 (288 apps, 78 goals) The original RVP, Stapleton’s time at Arsenal was one of disappointment due to a lack of team success. He participated in three successive FA Cup finals, two of which ended in defeat. A familiar tale of Arsenal finishing fourth and failing to sign star players frustrated Stapleton. In 1981 he moved to the more ambitious United where he claimed two FA Cup winners’ medals in 1983 and 1985. Verdict: Manchester United Viv Anderson Arsenal: 1984-1987 (150 apps, 15 goals); Manchester United: 1987-1991 (64 apps, 4 goals) Widely known for being the first black footballer to represent England in a full international, defender Anderson was part of the Arsenal side that claimed the League Cup in 1987 and famously scored against Tottenham in the semi-final. Shortly afterwards, however, Anderson moved up north, achieving the rather impressive title of being Sir Alex Ferguson’s first signing at Manchester United. Verdict: Arsenal Leighton moved to Arsenal but did not feature for the club Credit: Getty Images Jim Leighton Manchester United 1988-1991 (94 caps); Arsenal 1991 (0 apps) After following Sir Alex Ferguson to Manchester from Aberdeen, Scottish goalkeeper Leighton struggled to hold down a position in the first team. His loan spell at Arsenal proved even more difficult to secure game-time, he never made a senior appearance for the north Londoners. Verdict: Manchester United David Platt Manchester United 1982-1985 (0 apps); Arsenal 1995-1998 (108 apps, 15 goals) Platt signed his first professional contract at Manchester United but moved on to Crewe Alexandra after failing to break in to the first team at Old Trafford. The dynamic midfielder fared much better at Arsenal, later in his career after successful stints in Italy with Juventus and Sampdoria. In his first season with Arsenal, Platt helped the Gunners secure Uefa Cup football with a fifth-placed finish. A Premier League triumph followed in 1998 in Platt’s final season at the club. Verdict: Arsenal Cole won the treble with Manchester United Credit: Andrew Budd/Action Images Andy Cole Arsenal: 1989-1992 (2 apps, 0 goals); Manchester United: 1995-2001 (195 apps, 93 goals) The striker began a peripatetic journey across a variety of top-division clubs at Arsenal, having graduated from the academy, but never managed to start a game for the Gunners, appearing twice as off the subs' bench. It was quite a different story at United however. After a £7million move from Newcastle in 1995, Cole won three Premier League titles at Old Trafford, including one as part of the stunning Treble winning season of 1998/1999. Verdict: Manchester United Mikael Silvestre Manchester United 1999-2008 (361 apps, 10 goals); Arsenal 2008-2010 (46 apps, 6 goals) French international defender Silvestre enjoyed vast success during his time at Old Trafford. The Frenchman earned four Premier League titles, one Champions League winners’ medal and FA Cup and League Cup triumphs before Sir Alex Ferguson deemed him surplus to requirements. A move to Arsenal followed in 2008 by which time his peak had passed. Verdict: Manchester United Robin van Persie and Danny Welbeck were more successful at Manchester United Credit: Getty Images Robin van Persie Arsenal: 2004-2012 (279 apps, 132 goals); Manchester United: 2012-2015 (105 apps, 58 goals) A player that has best epitomised the difference between the two clubs in recent times, the Dutch striker was captain when he departed the Emirates Stadium in 2012 to hunt trophies under Sir Alex Ferguson. It worked, securing the Premier League title in his first season at Old Trafford while also being the top scorer in the division. Verdict: Manchester United Alexis Sanchez-Henrikh Mkhitarayan swap deal | All you need to know around the big football transfer Danny Welbeck Manchester United: 2008-2014 (142 apps, 29 goals); Arsenal: 2014-present (91 apps, 22 goals) Left Manchester United for Arsenal in 2014 after a promising, though short of fulfilling, spell in the first-team, featuring 27 times in Manchester United's 2012-13 title-winning season. His time at the Emirates has been hampered by injury, while he has only featured four times for England in the last three seasons. Verdict: Manchester United
14 players who featured for both Arsenal and Manchester United – and where they performed best
Alexis Sanchez and Henrikh Mkhitaryan completed their swap deal between Manchester United and Arsenal on Monday, treading a well-worn path of transfers between the two clubs over the years. Here, we look back at 14 players who switched sides and how they got on. Paddy Sloan Manchester United: 1938-1939 (0 apps; 0 goals); Arsenal: 1946-48 (33 apps, 1 goal) Irish footballer who left Manchester United for Tranmere before the Second World War without making an appearance. After, he decided to join Arsenal where he established himself as a first-team regular in the 1946-47 season before losing his place and moving to Italy. Among footballers who played for both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland national teams. Verdict: [Performed better for] Arsenal David Herd Arsenal: 1954-1961 (166 apps, 99 goals); Manchester United: 1961-1968 (265 apps, 145 goals) Herd enjoyed fruitful spells at both clubs, acquiring strike-rates that bettered a goal every two games. After helping Arsenal to third place in the league 1959, Sir Matt Busby swooped for the former Stockport player in 1961. Herd went on to score two goals in a victorious FA Cup final for United against Leicester City in 1963 before becoming Division One champions in 1965. Verdict: Manchester United Ian Ure Arsenal: 1963-1969 (202 apps, 2 goals); Manchester United: 1969-1971 (65 apps, 1 goal) Arsenal manager Billy Wright moved hastily to bring the Scottish defender to London following an impressive spell at Dundee. However, Ure struggled with his move south of the border culminating in a shocking display in the 1969 League Cup final against Swindon. He departed for United that summer where he stayed for just two seasons before moving to Motherwell. Verdict: Neither George Graham Arsenal: 1966-1972 (308 apps, 77 goals); Manchester United: 1972-1974 (46 apps, 2 goals) As a midfielder or forward Graham’s playing career at the London club was impressive. He was a pivotal creative figure as Arsenal achieved the First Division and FA Cup double in 1971. He crossed to United in 1972 following the arrival of Alan Ball at Highbury but stayed for just under two years. The Scot would go on to win two First Division titles with Arsenal (1989 and 1991), the Uefa Cup (1994), the FA Cup (1993), two League Cups (1987 and 1993) in a nine-year spell. Verdict: Arsenal Graham won two First Division titles with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Jimmy Rimmer Manchester United: 1965-1974 (46 apps, 0 goals); Arsenal: 1974-1977 (apps, 146, 0 goals) After spending nine years as understudy to Alex Stepney, Rimmer’s impressive loan spell at Swansea was enough to convince Bertie Mee that he could succeed as No1 at Highbury. By the following season Rimmer had become Arsenal's first-choice 'keeper. In 1975, he won Arsenal’s Player of the Year award and an England cap followed a year later. Verdict: Arsenal Brian Kidd Manchester United 1967-1974 (264 apps, 70 goals); Arsenal 1974-1976 (90 apps, 34 goals) The forward’s time at United was one of immense highs and lows. From scoring in United’s European Cup final triumph over Benfica in 1968, he suffered relegation with the same club six years later. He was top goal-scorer for Arsenal in his first season at the club, but failed to leave a lasting impact on the club. Verdict: Manchester United Kidd, here playing in the 1968 European Cup final at Wembley Credit: Getty/ALLSPORT Frank Stapleton Arsenal: 1971-1981 (300 apps, 108 goals); Manchester United: 1981-1987 (288 apps, 78 goals) The original RVP, Stapleton’s time at Arsenal was one of disappointment due to a lack of team success. He participated in three successive FA Cup finals, two of which ended in defeat. A familiar tale of Arsenal finishing fourth and failing to sign star players frustrated Stapleton. In 1981 he moved to the more ambitious United where he claimed two FA Cup winners’ medals in 1983 and 1985. Verdict: Manchester United Viv Anderson Arsenal: 1984-1987 (150 apps, 15 goals); Manchester United: 1987-1991 (64 apps, 4 goals) Widely known for being the first black footballer to represent England in a full international, defender Anderson was part of the Arsenal side that claimed the League Cup in 1987 and famously scored against Tottenham in the semi-final. Shortly afterwards, however, Anderson moved up north, achieving the rather impressive title of being Sir Alex Ferguson’s first signing at Manchester United. Verdict: Arsenal Leighton moved to Arsenal but did not feature for the club Credit: Getty Images Jim Leighton Manchester United 1988-1991 (94 caps); Arsenal 1991 (0 apps) After following Sir Alex Ferguson to Manchester from Aberdeen, Scottish goalkeeper Leighton struggled to hold down a position in the first team. His loan spell at Arsenal proved even more difficult to secure game-time, he never made a senior appearance for the north Londoners. Verdict: Manchester United David Platt Manchester United 1982-1985 (0 apps); Arsenal 1995-1998 (108 apps, 15 goals) Platt signed his first professional contract at Manchester United but moved on to Crewe Alexandra after failing to break in to the first team at Old Trafford. The dynamic midfielder fared much better at Arsenal, later in his career after successful stints in Italy with Juventus and Sampdoria. In his first season with Arsenal, Platt helped the Gunners secure Uefa Cup football with a fifth-placed finish. A Premier League triumph followed in 1998 in Platt’s final season at the club. Verdict: Arsenal Cole won the treble with Manchester United Credit: Andrew Budd/Action Images Andy Cole Arsenal: 1989-1992 (2 apps, 0 goals); Manchester United: 1995-2001 (195 apps, 93 goals) The striker began a peripatetic journey across a variety of top-division clubs at Arsenal, having graduated from the academy, but never managed to start a game for the Gunners, appearing twice as off the subs' bench. It was quite a different story at United however. After a £7million move from Newcastle in 1995, Cole won three Premier League titles at Old Trafford, including one as part of the stunning Treble winning season of 1998/1999. Verdict: Manchester United Mikael Silvestre Manchester United 1999-2008 (361 apps, 10 goals); Arsenal 2008-2010 (46 apps, 6 goals) French international defender Silvestre enjoyed vast success during his time at Old Trafford. The Frenchman earned four Premier League titles, one Champions League winners’ medal and FA Cup and League Cup triumphs before Sir Alex Ferguson deemed him surplus to requirements. A move to Arsenal followed in 2008 by which time his peak had passed. Verdict: Manchester United Robin van Persie and Danny Welbeck were more successful at Manchester United Credit: Getty Images Robin van Persie Arsenal: 2004-2012 (279 apps, 132 goals); Manchester United: 2012-2015 (105 apps, 58 goals) A player that has best epitomised the difference between the two clubs in recent times, the Dutch striker was captain when he departed the Emirates Stadium in 2012 to hunt trophies under Sir Alex Ferguson. It worked, securing the Premier League title in his first season at Old Trafford while also being the top scorer in the division. Verdict: Manchester United Alexis Sanchez-Henrikh Mkhitarayan swap deal | All you need to know around the big football transfer Danny Welbeck Manchester United: 2008-2014 (142 apps, 29 goals); Arsenal: 2014-present (91 apps, 22 goals) Left Manchester United for Arsenal in 2014 after a promising, though short of fulfilling, spell in the first-team, featuring 27 times in Manchester United's 2012-13 title-winning season. His time at the Emirates has been hampered by injury, while he has only featured four times for England in the last three seasons. Verdict: Manchester United
Alexis Sanchez and Henrikh Mkhitaryan completed their swap deal between Manchester United and Arsenal on Monday, treading a well-worn path of transfers between the two clubs over the years. Here, we look back at 14 players who switched sides and how they got on. Paddy Sloan Manchester United: 1938-1939 (0 apps; 0 goals); Arsenal: 1946-48 (33 apps, 1 goal) Irish footballer who left Manchester United for Tranmere before the Second World War without making an appearance. After, he decided to join Arsenal where he established himself as a first-team regular in the 1946-47 season before losing his place and moving to Italy. Among footballers who played for both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland national teams. Verdict: [Performed better for] Arsenal David Herd Arsenal: 1954-1961 (166 apps, 99 goals); Manchester United: 1961-1968 (265 apps, 145 goals) Herd enjoyed fruitful spells at both clubs, acquiring strike-rates that bettered a goal every two games. After helping Arsenal to third place in the league 1959, Sir Matt Busby swooped for the former Stockport player in 1961. Herd went on to score two goals in a victorious FA Cup final for United against Leicester City in 1963 before becoming Division One champions in 1965. Verdict: Manchester United Ian Ure Arsenal: 1963-1969 (202 apps, 2 goals); Manchester United: 1969-1971 (65 apps, 1 goal) Arsenal manager Billy Wright moved hastily to bring the Scottish defender to London following an impressive spell at Dundee. However, Ure struggled with his move south of the border culminating in a shocking display in the 1969 League Cup final against Swindon. He departed for United that summer where he stayed for just two seasons before moving to Motherwell. Verdict: Neither George Graham Arsenal: 1966-1972 (308 apps, 77 goals); Manchester United: 1972-1974 (46 apps, 2 goals) As a midfielder or forward Graham’s playing career at the London club was impressive. He was a pivotal creative figure as Arsenal achieved the First Division and FA Cup double in 1971. He crossed to United in 1972 following the arrival of Alan Ball at Highbury but stayed for just under two years. The Scot would go on to win two First Division titles with Arsenal (1989 and 1991), the Uefa Cup (1994), the FA Cup (1993), two League Cups (1987 and 1993) in a nine-year spell. Verdict: Arsenal Graham won two First Division titles with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Jimmy Rimmer Manchester United: 1965-1974 (46 apps, 0 goals); Arsenal: 1974-1977 (apps, 146, 0 goals) After spending nine years as understudy to Alex Stepney, Rimmer’s impressive loan spell at Swansea was enough to convince Bertie Mee that he could succeed as No1 at Highbury. By the following season Rimmer had become Arsenal's first-choice 'keeper. In 1975, he won Arsenal’s Player of the Year award and an England cap followed a year later. Verdict: Arsenal Brian Kidd Manchester United 1967-1974 (264 apps, 70 goals); Arsenal 1974-1976 (90 apps, 34 goals) The forward’s time at United was one of immense highs and lows. From scoring in United’s European Cup final triumph over Benfica in 1968, he suffered relegation with the same club six years later. He was top goal-scorer for Arsenal in his first season at the club, but failed to leave a lasting impact on the club. Verdict: Manchester United Kidd, here playing in the 1968 European Cup final at Wembley Credit: Getty/ALLSPORT Frank Stapleton Arsenal: 1971-1981 (300 apps, 108 goals); Manchester United: 1981-1987 (288 apps, 78 goals) The original RVP, Stapleton’s time at Arsenal was one of disappointment due to a lack of team success. He participated in three successive FA Cup finals, two of which ended in defeat. A familiar tale of Arsenal finishing fourth and failing to sign star players frustrated Stapleton. In 1981 he moved to the more ambitious United where he claimed two FA Cup winners’ medals in 1983 and 1985. Verdict: Manchester United Viv Anderson Arsenal: 1984-1987 (150 apps, 15 goals); Manchester United: 1987-1991 (64 apps, 4 goals) Widely known for being the first black footballer to represent England in a full international, defender Anderson was part of the Arsenal side that claimed the League Cup in 1987 and famously scored against Tottenham in the semi-final. Shortly afterwards, however, Anderson moved up north, achieving the rather impressive title of being Sir Alex Ferguson’s first signing at Manchester United. Verdict: Arsenal Leighton moved to Arsenal but did not feature for the club Credit: Getty Images Jim Leighton Manchester United 1988-1991 (94 caps); Arsenal 1991 (0 apps) After following Sir Alex Ferguson to Manchester from Aberdeen, Scottish goalkeeper Leighton struggled to hold down a position in the first team. His loan spell at Arsenal proved even more difficult to secure game-time, he never made a senior appearance for the north Londoners. Verdict: Manchester United David Platt Manchester United 1982-1985 (0 apps); Arsenal 1995-1998 (108 apps, 15 goals) Platt signed his first professional contract at Manchester United but moved on to Crewe Alexandra after failing to break in to the first team at Old Trafford. The dynamic midfielder fared much better at Arsenal, later in his career after successful stints in Italy with Juventus and Sampdoria. In his first season with Arsenal, Platt helped the Gunners secure Uefa Cup football with a fifth-placed finish. A Premier League triumph followed in 1998 in Platt’s final season at the club. Verdict: Arsenal Cole won the treble with Manchester United Credit: Andrew Budd/Action Images Andy Cole Arsenal: 1989-1992 (2 apps, 0 goals); Manchester United: 1995-2001 (195 apps, 93 goals) The striker began a peripatetic journey across a variety of top-division clubs at Arsenal, having graduated from the academy, but never managed to start a game for the Gunners, appearing twice as off the subs' bench. It was quite a different story at United however. After a £7million move from Newcastle in 1995, Cole won three Premier League titles at Old Trafford, including one as part of the stunning Treble winning season of 1998/1999. Verdict: Manchester United Mikael Silvestre Manchester United 1999-2008 (361 apps, 10 goals); Arsenal 2008-2010 (46 apps, 6 goals) French international defender Silvestre enjoyed vast success during his time at Old Trafford. The Frenchman earned four Premier League titles, one Champions League winners’ medal and FA Cup and League Cup triumphs before Sir Alex Ferguson deemed him surplus to requirements. A move to Arsenal followed in 2008 by which time his peak had passed. Verdict: Manchester United Robin van Persie and Danny Welbeck were more successful at Manchester United Credit: Getty Images Robin van Persie Arsenal: 2004-2012 (279 apps, 132 goals); Manchester United: 2012-2015 (105 apps, 58 goals) A player that has best epitomised the difference between the two clubs in recent times, the Dutch striker was captain when he departed the Emirates Stadium in 2012 to hunt trophies under Sir Alex Ferguson. It worked, securing the Premier League title in his first season at Old Trafford while also being the top scorer in the division. Verdict: Manchester United Alexis Sanchez-Henrikh Mkhitarayan swap deal | All you need to know around the big football transfer Danny Welbeck Manchester United: 2008-2014 (142 apps, 29 goals); Arsenal: 2014-present (91 apps, 22 goals) Left Manchester United for Arsenal in 2014 after a promising, though short of fulfilling, spell in the first-team, featuring 27 times in Manchester United's 2012-13 title-winning season. His time at the Emirates has been hampered by injury, while he has only featured four times for England in the last three seasons. Verdict: Manchester United
14 players who featured for both Arsenal and Manchester United – and where they performed best
Alexis Sanchez and Henrikh Mkhitaryan completed their swap deal between Manchester United and Arsenal on Monday, treading a well-worn path of transfers between the two clubs over the years. Here, we look back at 14 players who switched sides and how they got on. Paddy Sloan Manchester United: 1938-1939 (0 apps; 0 goals); Arsenal: 1946-48 (33 apps, 1 goal) Irish footballer who left Manchester United for Tranmere before the Second World War without making an appearance. After, he decided to join Arsenal where he established himself as a first-team regular in the 1946-47 season before losing his place and moving to Italy. Among footballers who played for both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland national teams. Verdict: [Performed better for] Arsenal David Herd Arsenal: 1954-1961 (166 apps, 99 goals); Manchester United: 1961-1968 (265 apps, 145 goals) Herd enjoyed fruitful spells at both clubs, acquiring strike-rates that bettered a goal every two games. After helping Arsenal to third place in the league 1959, Sir Matt Busby swooped for the former Stockport player in 1961. Herd went on to score two goals in a victorious FA Cup final for United against Leicester City in 1963 before becoming Division One champions in 1965. Verdict: Manchester United Ian Ure Arsenal: 1963-1969 (202 apps, 2 goals); Manchester United: 1969-1971 (65 apps, 1 goal) Arsenal manager Billy Wright moved hastily to bring the Scottish defender to London following an impressive spell at Dundee. However, Ure struggled with his move south of the border culminating in a shocking display in the 1969 League Cup final against Swindon. He departed for United that summer where he stayed for just two seasons before moving to Motherwell. Verdict: Neither George Graham Arsenal: 1966-1972 (308 apps, 77 goals); Manchester United: 1972-1974 (46 apps, 2 goals) As a midfielder or forward Graham’s playing career at the London club was impressive. He was a pivotal creative figure as Arsenal achieved the First Division and FA Cup double in 1971. He crossed to United in 1972 following the arrival of Alan Ball at Highbury but stayed for just under two years. The Scot would go on to win two First Division titles with Arsenal (1989 and 1991), the Uefa Cup (1994), the FA Cup (1993), two League Cups (1987 and 1993) in a nine-year spell. Verdict: Arsenal Graham won two First Division titles with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Jimmy Rimmer Manchester United: 1965-1974 (46 apps, 0 goals); Arsenal: 1974-1977 (apps, 146, 0 goals) After spending nine years as understudy to Alex Stepney, Rimmer’s impressive loan spell at Swansea was enough to convince Bertie Mee that he could succeed as No1 at Highbury. By the following season Rimmer had become Arsenal's first-choice 'keeper. In 1975, he won Arsenal’s Player of the Year award and an England cap followed a year later. Verdict: Arsenal Brian Kidd Manchester United 1967-1974 (264 apps, 70 goals); Arsenal 1974-1976 (90 apps, 34 goals) The forward’s time at United was one of immense highs and lows. From scoring in United’s European Cup final triumph over Benfica in 1968, he suffered relegation with the same club six years later. He was top goal-scorer for Arsenal in his first season at the club, but failed to leave a lasting impact on the club. Verdict: Manchester United Kidd, here playing in the 1968 European Cup final at Wembley Credit: Getty/ALLSPORT Frank Stapleton Arsenal: 1971-1981 (300 apps, 108 goals); Manchester United: 1981-1987 (288 apps, 78 goals) The original RVP, Stapleton’s time at Arsenal was one of disappointment due to a lack of team success. He participated in three successive FA Cup finals, two of which ended in defeat. A familiar tale of Arsenal finishing fourth and failing to sign star players frustrated Stapleton. In 1981 he moved to the more ambitious United where he claimed two FA Cup winners’ medals in 1983 and 1985. Verdict: Manchester United Viv Anderson Arsenal: 1984-1987 (150 apps, 15 goals); Manchester United: 1987-1991 (64 apps, 4 goals) Widely known for being the first black footballer to represent England in a full international, defender Anderson was part of the Arsenal side that claimed the League Cup in 1987 and famously scored against Tottenham in the semi-final. Shortly afterwards, however, Anderson moved up north, achieving the rather impressive title of being Sir Alex Ferguson’s first signing at Manchester United. Verdict: Arsenal Leighton moved to Arsenal but did not feature for the club Credit: Getty Images Jim Leighton Manchester United 1988-1991 (94 caps); Arsenal 1991 (0 apps) After following Sir Alex Ferguson to Manchester from Aberdeen, Scottish goalkeeper Leighton struggled to hold down a position in the first team. His loan spell at Arsenal proved even more difficult to secure game-time, he never made a senior appearance for the north Londoners. Verdict: Manchester United David Platt Manchester United 1982-1985 (0 apps); Arsenal 1995-1998 (108 apps, 15 goals) Platt signed his first professional contract at Manchester United but moved on to Crewe Alexandra after failing to break in to the first team at Old Trafford. The dynamic midfielder fared much better at Arsenal, later in his career after successful stints in Italy with Juventus and Sampdoria. In his first season with Arsenal, Platt helped the Gunners secure Uefa Cup football with a fifth-placed finish. A Premier League triumph followed in 1998 in Platt’s final season at the club. Verdict: Arsenal Cole won the treble with Manchester United Credit: Andrew Budd/Action Images Andy Cole Arsenal: 1989-1992 (2 apps, 0 goals); Manchester United: 1995-2001 (195 apps, 93 goals) The striker began a peripatetic journey across a variety of top-division clubs at Arsenal, having graduated from the academy, but never managed to start a game for the Gunners, appearing twice as off the subs' bench. It was quite a different story at United however. After a £7million move from Newcastle in 1995, Cole won three Premier League titles at Old Trafford, including one as part of the stunning Treble winning season of 1998/1999. Verdict: Manchester United Mikael Silvestre Manchester United 1999-2008 (361 apps, 10 goals); Arsenal 2008-2010 (46 apps, 6 goals) French international defender Silvestre enjoyed vast success during his time at Old Trafford. The Frenchman earned four Premier League titles, one Champions League winners’ medal and FA Cup and League Cup triumphs before Sir Alex Ferguson deemed him surplus to requirements. A move to Arsenal followed in 2008 by which time his peak had passed. Verdict: Manchester United Robin van Persie and Danny Welbeck were more successful at Manchester United Credit: Getty Images Robin van Persie Arsenal: 2004-2012 (279 apps, 132 goals); Manchester United: 2012-2015 (105 apps, 58 goals) A player that has best epitomised the difference between the two clubs in recent times, the Dutch striker was captain when he departed the Emirates Stadium in 2012 to hunt trophies under Sir Alex Ferguson. It worked, securing the Premier League title in his first season at Old Trafford while also being the top scorer in the division. Verdict: Manchester United Alexis Sanchez-Henrikh Mkhitarayan swap deal | All you need to know around the big football transfer Danny Welbeck Manchester United: 2008-2014 (142 apps, 29 goals); Arsenal: 2014-present (91 apps, 22 goals) Left Manchester United for Arsenal in 2014 after a promising, though short of fulfilling, spell in the first-team, featuring 27 times in Manchester United's 2012-13 title-winning season. His time at the Emirates has been hampered by injury, while he has only featured four times for England in the last three seasons. Verdict: Manchester United
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 Crewe Alexandra manager David Artell Action Images/Craig Brough
FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 Crewe Alexandra manager David Artell Action Images/Craig Brough

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