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Brendan Rodgers welcomes mutually beneficial possible alliance with Michael O'Neill 

If Michael O’Neill becomes Scotland manager, Brendan Rodgers will form an alliance with his Northern Irish compatriot for their mutual benefit, according to the Celtic manager. O’Neill will meet the Scottish Football Association next week to discuss the national team job, vacant since Gordon Strachan’s departure last month. Should he accept, he will inherit a group of Celtic players who formed the backbone of Strachan’s team. Asked if he expected to be speaking regularly with O’Neill under such circumstances, Rodgers said: “Absolutely, and I want to help. There is a real energy about the Celtic players when they go there, a real core of them that can help. “He has lived in Scotland for a number of years, played in Scotland and knows what you are all like. “He has spent six years or so at Northern Ireland and has done a European Championship and just missed out on a World Cup. Their top players over the next few years will move on. “If you look at Scotland, it is an exciting group and if he can pull them together and develop them, then he would maybe have a chance of getting them to their first Euros in 20-odd years and then maybe on to a World Cup after that. I am sure it is one he will think about.” Rodgers thinks St Johnstone's Tommy Wright would be a perfect replacement for Michael O'Neill at Northern Ireland Credit: Jane Barlow/PA Rodgers also backed another fellow countryman to take over the Northern Ireland job should O’Neill quit. Tommy Wright, the St Johnstone manager, has surmounted the Perth club’s limited resources to post three successive fourth-place finishes and in 2014 guided them to their first major trophy success with a victory over Dundee United in the Scottish Cup final. Surprisingly to some, Wright has not been in the frame for the managerial vacancy at Rangers, for which the favourite remains Aberdeen’s Derek McInnes, but his feats have been noted by the Irish Football Association. “Tommy would be perfect for Northern Ireland if Michael moved on,” said Rodgers. “He has earned his stripes at St Johnstone. For me, for the Rangers job, Derek McInnes and him would be obvious stand-outs, but I really hope he gets the chance given the work he has done to do it on a bigger stage.” The resumption of domestic fixtures after the international break sees Celtic travel to Dingwall tomorrow where they will attempt to extend their run of successive unbeaten domestic fixtures to 64 against Ross County. “It’ll end at some point,” Rodgers said. “We only focus on the next game. The squad is coming back now. I see the competitiveness in the players – we have Patrick Roberts, Jozo Simunovic and Leigh Griffiths back training this week. Erik [Sviatchenko] played 45 minutes of a practice match last week. They are fit, if not football fit, but the availability is there.” That match will mark another milestone in the career path of Kieran Tierney, when the defender makes his 100th appearance for Celtic at the ripe old age of 20. He also earned the accolade of captain of Scotland in the recent friendly with The Netherlands. “He can be a great leader for Scotland and I think he will be a captain here at Celtic one day,” said Rodgers. “He is developing and maturing on and off the field. I heard him speak at the end of the season at the Scottish Football Writers’ Association dinner and thought he spoke so well. It is nice to see young players come on in all aspects.”

Brendan Rodgers welcomes mutually beneficial possible alliance with Michael O'Neill 

If Michael O’Neill becomes Scotland manager, Brendan Rodgers will form an alliance with his Northern Irish compatriot for their mutual benefit, according to the Celtic manager. O’Neill will meet the Scottish Football Association next week to discuss the national team job, vacant since Gordon Strachan’s departure last month. Should he accept, he will inherit a group of Celtic players who formed the backbone of Strachan’s team. Asked if he expected to be speaking regularly with O’Neill under such circumstances, Rodgers said: “Absolutely, and I want to help. There is a real energy about the Celtic players when they go there, a real core of them that can help. “He has lived in Scotland for a number of years, played in Scotland and knows what you are all like. “He has spent six years or so at Northern Ireland and has done a European Championship and just missed out on a World Cup. Their top players over the next few years will move on. “If you look at Scotland, it is an exciting group and if he can pull them together and develop them, then he would maybe have a chance of getting them to their first Euros in 20-odd years and then maybe on to a World Cup after that. I am sure it is one he will think about.” Rodgers thinks St Johnstone's Tommy Wright would be a perfect replacement for Michael O'Neill at Northern Ireland Credit: Jane Barlow/PA Rodgers also backed another fellow countryman to take over the Northern Ireland job should O’Neill quit. Tommy Wright, the St Johnstone manager, has surmounted the Perth club’s limited resources to post three successive fourth-place finishes and in 2014 guided them to their first major trophy success with a victory over Dundee United in the Scottish Cup final. Surprisingly to some, Wright has not been in the frame for the managerial vacancy at Rangers, for which the favourite remains Aberdeen’s Derek McInnes, but his feats have been noted by the Irish Football Association. “Tommy would be perfect for Northern Ireland if Michael moved on,” said Rodgers. “He has earned his stripes at St Johnstone. For me, for the Rangers job, Derek McInnes and him would be obvious stand-outs, but I really hope he gets the chance given the work he has done to do it on a bigger stage.” The resumption of domestic fixtures after the international break sees Celtic travel to Dingwall tomorrow where they will attempt to extend their run of successive unbeaten domestic fixtures to 64 against Ross County. “It’ll end at some point,” Rodgers said. “We only focus on the next game. The squad is coming back now. I see the competitiveness in the players – we have Patrick Roberts, Jozo Simunovic and Leigh Griffiths back training this week. Erik [Sviatchenko] played 45 minutes of a practice match last week. They are fit, if not football fit, but the availability is there.” That match will mark another milestone in the career path of Kieran Tierney, when the defender makes his 100th appearance for Celtic at the ripe old age of 20. He also earned the accolade of captain of Scotland in the recent friendly with The Netherlands. “He can be a great leader for Scotland and I think he will be a captain here at Celtic one day,” said Rodgers. “He is developing and maturing on and off the field. I heard him speak at the end of the season at the Scottish Football Writers’ Association dinner and thought he spoke so well. It is nice to see young players come on in all aspects.”

Scottish clubs set national charity records, with SPFL now 'fourth most community-focused league in the world'

Scottish football has not been at the top table of international competition for 20 years – hence the SFA’s urgent desire to find a manager with the Midas touch – but the country’s clubs have never been more successful at providing aid to charities and worthy causes in their communities. Independent research commissioned by the Scottish Professional Football League has revealed that 770,000 local people – an annual increase of over 60,000 - have been engaged in community initiatives involving all 42 league clubs. The research also found that season ticket holders were well served by making a commitment to back their team throughout the campaign. Headline figures show that clubs engaged with approximately 772,000 people via community activity in season 2016/17, many supported by programmes run and organised by the SPFL Trust, the charitable arm of the league. Around 86 per cent of all clubs provide free tickets to matches for community groups, charities and other worthy causes, with an estimated total of 84,000 donated last season. The number of clubs offering free admission to children has risen to 62 per cent, up 5 per cent on last year’s figure.      The average maximum saving for supporters across all four divisions buying a 2017/18 season ticket is £96.20, when compared with paying at the gate. Attendance figures also told an encouraging story, with total crowds for the four Ladbrokes divisions exceeding four million in season 2016/17, a 12 per cent increase year on year, while almost a quarter of a million supporters attended the first two matches of the 2017/18 season to set a new record for the SPFL. Nicky Reid, chief executive of the SPFL Trust, said: “The recent Responsiball annual report now places the SPFL as the fourth most community-focused league in the world, based on their analysis of the 25 biggest national competitions. “A rise of three places year on year, shows that this is an area of significant strength and opportunity for Scottish football.  In the past year, the SPFL Trust and our clubs have been trusted to work on projects funded by the Scottish Government, Big Lottery Fund, Erasmus, Scottish Water, Kinder+Sport, and the SPFL itself amongst others.  “Our Trusted Trophy Tour also visited more than 20 clubs and demonstrated the power that football has for good across a wide range of projects. Trust is hard-earned and we all accept the responsibilities that come with that, but the direction of travel is extremely positive.” The SFA, meanwhile, announced that its Elite club football academies are Aberdeen, Celtic, Hamilton, Heart of Midlothian, Hibernian, Kilmarnock, Motherwell and Rangers. The second-tier Progressive grade consists of Ayr United, Dundee United, Forth Valley, Inverness Caledonian Thistle, Partick Thistle, Ross County,St Mirren and St Johnstone. The third-tier Progressive level academies are Dundee, Fife, Greenock Morton and Queen’s Park. Scottish FA Performance Director Malky Mackay said: “What I would like to stress is that the bandings are not fixed and they will be reassessed in June 2018. No door is closed to clubs outside of the Elite bracket with aspirations to move up.”

Rangers interested in Scotland target Michael O'Neill for vacant manager role

Michael O’Neill returned to his Edinburgh home late on Monday afternoon to find that the bookmakers had not only installed him as favourite for the vacant Scotland manager’s job but had made him third favourite for the similarly unfilled position at Rangers. Sensibly, the Northern Ireland manager will take a couple of days to reflect on the outcome of the World Cup play-off which saw Switzerland progress to the finals in Russia next summer thanks to the award of a nonsensical penalty kick in the first leg in Belfast. O’Neill’s position, as stated after Sunday’s goalless draw in Basel, is that he is under contract to the Irish Football Association and that it would be improper to speak about other positions. That said, at the age of 48 and after six years with the Northern Ireland team, it would be remarkable if O’Neill were not contemplating a fresh start and there must also be an allure in the prospect of a switch to day-to-day involvement at club level rather than the spasmodic challenge of the international game. The utterances of Stewart Regan, chief executive of the Scottish Football Association, have been scrutinised for clues to what might transpire at Hampden Park. With no interest in the World Cup finals, following failure to clear the group stage qualifying hurdles under Gordon Strachan the Scots have a friendly in Morocco in March and another in early summer before they resume competitive action in the Uefa Nations League next September. “We might have a new manager in place for those friendlies, but if we haven’t, it’s not the end of the world,” Regan said last month when announcing that Malky Mackay would act as interim manager for the friendly meeting with Holland at Pittodrie, which Scotland lost 1-0 last Thursday. One immediate assumption was that the SFA had identified O’Neill as its principal target and were prepared to wait, if Northern Ireland were to reach the finals. Sam Wallace's Power Rankings 42:04 Regan also revealed on the day of the Dutch friendly that Mackay would not be considered as a long-term candidate, prompting speculation that the SFA was clearing the way for a speedy approach to the IFA if circumstances changed quickly, as they have done. Certainly, O’Neill is as familiar with the Scottish scene as any candidate could be. He played for Dundee United, Hibernian, St Johnstone, Clydebank and Ayr United and his first management job was at Brechin City between 2006 and 2008. Moreover, O’Neill has conscripted a core of players who either play or have played for Scottish clubs, to the extent that recent squad have featured no fewer than 17 with that experience, the newest recruit being Jordan Jones of Kilmarnock, who made his debut appearance in the play-off second leg against Switzerland on Sunday. Telegraph Sport can confirm, however, that although the SFA is considering O’Neill as a candidate, its still trimming its initial roster of possible targets and has not yet reached the stage of a short-list. O’Neill’s glowing credential is that he steered Northern Ireland to their first tournament finals in 30 years and their first ever European championship when they reached Euro 2016. He also got the team beyond the group stage, an accomplishment that has never been matched by any Scotland manager. One curiosity that will surely interest the SFA, though, is that O’Neill’s win rate with Northern Ireland stands at 34.35%, compared to Gordon Strachan’s return of 44.35%. Michael O'Neill has a worse win percentage than Gordon Strachan but almost took Northern Ireland to the World Cup Credit: GETTY IMAGES As for conjecture about Rangers, an appointment to the Ibrox job would be a fascinating cultural development, given that O’Neill is a Roman Catholic from Northern Ireland, whose education included a spell at Presentation Covent Primary School in Portadown and All Saints in Ballymana and who would certainly be the first manager of the Light Blues who played Gaelic football as a boy. It would be doubly intriguing were he ever to take over at Ibrox with his fellow countryman, Jimmy Nicholl, a former Rangers favourite, as his assistant. Nicholl, indeed, recently declared that O’Neill would not remain in international football in the event of Northern Ireland failing to make the World Cup finals. “He’s young enough – if he gets a good opportunity and a good challenge at a big club on a day-to-day basis, then he’ll go,” Nicholl told BBC Scotland last month. One other consideration which might yet materialise is a club job in Scotland, but not at Ibrox. Should Rangers make a successful move for Derek McInnes, the bookies’ favourite for their vacant position, then Aberdeen would be in the market for a new manager. In those circumstances an obvious candidate – very likely the favourite – would be a man who played six games for the Dons during a loan spell in 1998. Fellow by name of O’Neill, in case you hadn’t guessed.

Rangers interested in Scotland target Michael O'Neill for vacant manager role

Michael O’Neill returned to his Edinburgh home late on Monday afternoon to find that the bookmakers had not only installed him as favourite for the vacant Scotland manager’s job but had made him third favourite for the similarly unfilled position at Rangers. Sensibly, the Northern Ireland manager will take a couple of days to reflect on the outcome of the World Cup play-off which saw Switzerland progress to the finals in Russia next summer thanks to the award of a nonsensical penalty kick in the first leg in Belfast. O’Neill’s position, as stated after Sunday’s goalless draw in Basel, is that he is under contract to the Irish Football Association and that it would be improper to speak about other positions. That said, at the age of 48 and after six years with the Northern Ireland team, it would be remarkable if O’Neill were not contemplating a fresh start and there must also be an allure in the prospect of a switch to day-to-day involvement at club level rather than the spasmodic challenge of the international game. The utterances of Stewart Regan, chief executive of the Scottish Football Association, have been scrutinised for clues to what might transpire at Hampden Park. With no interest in the World Cup finals, following failure to clear the group stage qualifying hurdles under Gordon Strachan the Scots have a friendly in Morocco in March and another in early summer before they resume competitive action in the Uefa Nations League next September. “We might have a new manager in place for those friendlies, but if we haven’t, it’s not the end of the world,” Regan said last month when announcing that Malky Mackay would act as interim manager for the friendly meeting with Holland at Pittodrie, which Scotland lost 1-0 last Thursday. One immediate assumption was that the SFA had identified O’Neill as its principal target and were prepared to wait, if Northern Ireland were to reach the finals. Sam Wallace's Power Rankings 42:04 Regan also revealed on the day of the Dutch friendly that Mackay would not be considered as a long-term candidate, prompting speculation that the SFA was clearing the way for a speedy approach to the IFA if circumstances changed quickly, as they have done. Certainly, O’Neill is as familiar with the Scottish scene as any candidate could be. He played for Dundee United, Hibernian, St Johnstone, Clydebank and Ayr United and his first management job was at Brechin City between 2006 and 2008. Moreover, O’Neill has conscripted a core of players who either play or have played for Scottish clubs, to the extent that recent squad have featured no fewer than 17 with that experience, the newest recruit being Jordan Jones of Kilmarnock, who made his debut appearance in the play-off second leg against Switzerland on Sunday. Telegraph Sport can confirm, however, that although the SFA is considering O’Neill as a candidate, its still trimming its initial roster of possible targets and has not yet reached the stage of a short-list. O’Neill’s glowing credential is that he steered Northern Ireland to their first tournament finals in 30 years and their first ever European championship when they reached Euro 2016. He also got the team beyond the group stage, an accomplishment that has never been matched by any Scotland manager. One curiosity that will surely interest the SFA, though, is that O’Neill’s win rate with Northern Ireland stands at 34.35%, compared to Gordon Strachan’s return of 44.35%. Michael O'Neill has a worse win percentage than Gordon Strachan but almost took Northern Ireland to the World Cup Credit: GETTY IMAGES As for conjecture about Rangers, an appointment to the Ibrox job would be a fascinating cultural development, given that O’Neill is a Roman Catholic from Northern Ireland, whose education included a spell at Presentation Covent Primary School in Portadown and All Saints in Ballymana and who would certainly be the first manager of the Light Blues who played Gaelic football as a boy. It would be doubly intriguing were he ever to take over at Ibrox with his fellow countryman, Jimmy Nicholl, a former Rangers favourite, as his assistant. Nicholl, indeed, recently declared that O’Neill would not remain in international football in the event of Northern Ireland failing to make the World Cup finals. “He’s young enough – if he gets a good opportunity and a good challenge at a big club on a day-to-day basis, then he’ll go,” Nicholl told BBC Scotland last month. One other consideration which might yet materialise is a club job in Scotland, but not at Ibrox. Should Rangers make a successful move for Derek McInnes, the bookies’ favourite for their vacant position, then Aberdeen would be in the market for a new manager. In those circumstances an obvious candidate – very likely the favourite – would be a man who played six games for the Dons during a loan spell in 1998. Fellow by name of O’Neill, in case you hadn’t guessed.

Brendan Rodgers welcomes Neil Lennon back to Celtic Park and sings his praises

Were the rate of managerial attrition in Celtic’s Champions League group to continue, Brendan Rodgers would soon be out of a job. Happily for Celtic fans, the Northern Irishman is under no threat, by contrast to Rene Weiler and Carlo Ancelotti, who began the season in charge of Anderlecht and Bayern Munich respectively but who have been numbered amongst the early casualties of disappointing form. In Weiler’s case, a poor start to the Belgian league season saw him gone before Anderlecht lost to Celtic in their Champions League group encounter on Wednesday while Bayern parted company with Ancelotti on Thursday after the Bundesliga club lost by the same score to Paris Saint-Germain in the other game in the section. “Carlo will probably go to Barcelona or somewhere, but my feelings this week were for Jim McIntyre and Peter Houston,” said Rodgers, of the men sacked by Ross County and Falkirk. “I didn't really see or understand the role Jim played at Ross County until I came to Celtic. “I then analysed what he'd done - winning the League Cup and keeping them up. Roy MacGregor [the Staggies’ chairman] is a lovely guy and has done brilliant work for Ross County and the area, but I have real empathy for Jim losing his job. “Look at the work he's done and the fixtures he's had. They’ve played ourselves, Aberdeen, Rangers and Hibs. I watched the full game last week and it wasn't a performance where you say the players aren't really playing for him. “I have real empathy for Jim and Peter Houston, who has been about for a long time. He's a very good coach, who did a great job for Dundee United and then Falkirk.” It has been a great honour to form part of Bayern’s history. I would like to thank the Club, the Players and it's amazing fans. #MiaSanMiapic.twitter.com/oZ7mLllers— Carlo Ancelotti (@MrAncelotti) September 28, 2017 On Saturday, Rodgers comes up against one of his predecessors at Celtic, when Hibernian arrive in the east end of Glasgow, where their manager, Neil Lennon, was a favourite, both as a player and during his spell in charge between 2010 and 2014. “If I wasn’t here, if I was to say who’ll be Celtic manager I would say Neil Lennon,” said Rodgers of the man who won three titles for the Parkhead side. “He was very good in his time here and if it ever comes to him again he would do equally as well if not better.” When Lennon left, partly because of the absence of competition following Rangers’ financial meltdown and spell in the lower leagues, Rodgers imagined that he and his fellow countryman might engage in a Merseyside rivalry. “I was at Liverpool and there was talk then of David Moyes going to Manchester United and I thought that Everton would have been a perfect job for Neil. Neil Lennon returns to Celtic Park on Saturday to play the club he graced in midfield and the dugout Credit: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire “There is no doubt he deserved a better offer. That's no disrespect to Bolton - if they'd been in the Premier League, it would have been a great job. I felt Neil was a Premier League manager in waiting.  “Maybe that's because I know the size of Celtic and what the demands and challenges are at a club like this. I could see how he'd managed that and looked at what could be his next step.      “Part of my admiration for him comes from his openness and the courage he showed to come out and speak openly about his depression. I read his book and it was a real admission of his life and where he was at and it takes a lot of courage to do that.   “He was a real pioneer. That was nearly a decade ago. Then there was everything else that surrounded his time here too which wasn’t nice and you don’t want anyone to go through. This is a job that is big enough itself without any additional pressures.” Celtic are bidding for a 58th successive domestic game unbeaten but they must achieve it without Scott Brown and Stuart Armstrong, both of whom have hamstring injuries which will also keep them out of Scotland’s World Cup double header against Slovakia and Slovenia. “It’s just absolutely so unlucky for us and their unavailability for tomorrow but also for Scotland, which is a huge loss,” Rodgers said.  

Brendan Rodgers welcomes Neil Lennon back to Celtic Park and sings his praises

Were the rate of managerial attrition in Celtic’s Champions League group to continue, Brendan Rodgers would soon be out of a job. Happily for Celtic fans, the Northern Irishman is under no threat, by contrast to Rene Weiler and Carlo Ancelotti, who began the season in charge of Anderlecht and Bayern Munich respectively but who have been numbered amongst the early casualties of disappointing form. In Weiler’s case, a poor start to the Belgian league season saw him gone before Anderlecht lost to Celtic in their Champions League group encounter on Wednesday while Bayern parted company with Ancelotti on Thursday after the Bundesliga club lost by the same score to Paris Saint-Germain in the other game in the section. “Carlo will probably go to Barcelona or somewhere, but my feelings this week were for Jim McIntyre and Peter Houston,” said Rodgers, of the men sacked by Ross County and Falkirk. “I didn't really see or understand the role Jim played at Ross County until I came to Celtic. “I then analysed what he'd done - winning the League Cup and keeping them up. Roy MacGregor [the Staggies’ chairman] is a lovely guy and has done brilliant work for Ross County and the area, but I have real empathy for Jim losing his job. “Look at the work he's done and the fixtures he's had. They’ve played ourselves, Aberdeen, Rangers and Hibs. I watched the full game last week and it wasn't a performance where you say the players aren't really playing for him. “I have real empathy for Jim and Peter Houston, who has been about for a long time. He's a very good coach, who did a great job for Dundee United and then Falkirk.” It has been a great honour to form part of Bayern’s history. I would like to thank the Club, the Players and it's amazing fans. #MiaSanMiapic.twitter.com/oZ7mLllers— Carlo Ancelotti (@MrAncelotti) September 28, 2017 On Saturday, Rodgers comes up against one of his predecessors at Celtic, when Hibernian arrive in the east end of Glasgow, where their manager, Neil Lennon, was a favourite, both as a player and during his spell in charge between 2010 and 2014. “If I wasn’t here, if I was to say who’ll be Celtic manager I would say Neil Lennon,” said Rodgers of the man who won three titles for the Parkhead side. “He was very good in his time here and if it ever comes to him again he would do equally as well if not better.” When Lennon left, partly because of the absence of competition following Rangers’ financial meltdown and spell in the lower leagues, Rodgers imagined that he and his fellow countryman might engage in a Merseyside rivalry. “I was at Liverpool and there was talk then of David Moyes going to Manchester United and I thought that Everton would have been a perfect job for Neil. Neil Lennon returns to Celtic Park on Saturday to play the club he graced in midfield and the dugout Credit: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire “There is no doubt he deserved a better offer. That's no disrespect to Bolton - if they'd been in the Premier League, it would have been a great job. I felt Neil was a Premier League manager in waiting.  “Maybe that's because I know the size of Celtic and what the demands and challenges are at a club like this. I could see how he'd managed that and looked at what could be his next step.      “Part of my admiration for him comes from his openness and the courage he showed to come out and speak openly about his depression. I read his book and it was a real admission of his life and where he was at and it takes a lot of courage to do that.   “He was a real pioneer. That was nearly a decade ago. Then there was everything else that surrounded his time here too which wasn’t nice and you don’t want anyone to go through. This is a job that is big enough itself without any additional pressures.” Celtic are bidding for a 58th successive domestic game unbeaten but they must achieve it without Scott Brown and Stuart Armstrong, both of whom have hamstring injuries which will also keep them out of Scotland’s World Cup double header against Slovakia and Slovenia. “It’s just absolutely so unlucky for us and their unavailability for tomorrow but also for Scotland, which is a huge loss,” Rodgers said.  

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Dame Laura Davies plans to channel her inner Tom Watson to defy age and push for glory at Women's British Open

In her 37th successive Ricoh Women’s British Open, Dame Laura Davies plans to channel her inner Tom Watson and remind everyone of her enduring qualities at Kingsbarns. While Davies is 53 and Watson was 59 when he was beaten by a play-off at the Open at Turnberry in 2009, that was “only” his 32nd appearance in the British major. Davies ensured her staggering run continued by coming through qualifying on Monday. And the Godmother of English golf is not in Fife merely to wave at the galleries. “Obviously Tom Watson nearly won it a few years back and links golf is a great leveller. If ever you're going to have a chance, this would be the sort of course,” Davies said. “It would be as big a shock when Tom was in there, when, let's face it, he should have won it.” VIDEO: Tom Watson reacts to Open playoff 01:02 The four-time major winner, who lifted this title 31 years ago, is known for being fond of a gamble and, although she is not allowed to invest on golf events, she feels the ridiculous 1500-1 odds might represent some value. “I wouldn't put anyone off it,” she said. “The results say that I'm going to do rubbish, but I know and my caddie knows how well we're playing. I fully expect to have a half-decent week, I really do, because I'm driving it so well. "I'm not saying I can win it - obviously that'd be a ludicrous statement. But I think I can make the cut and have a good weekend. The last time at Birkdale, about three years ago, I finished ninth and I'm playing better now than I was then. There's no point being here if you don't back yourself to have a decent week. It does look very open this week.” Indeed, it is hard to pick out a winner. At least one of the Korean trio of world No 1 So Yeon Rui, Sung Hyun Park and Inbee Park must feature, while Lexi Thompson, the American who has climbed to a career-high world No 2, would be a popular winner after the rules controversy which cost her victory in the Ana Inspiration, the first major of the year. And the 22 year-old has a local connection, too. Thompson’s caddie, Kevin McAlpine, is the son of Hamish, the highly-popular goalkeeper for nearby Dundee United from the 60s through to the 80s.

Dundee United v Dynamo Moscow UEFA Europa League Third Qualifying Round First Leg

Football - Dundee United v Dynamo Moscow UEFA Europa League Third Qualifying Round First Leg - Tannadice Park - 12/13 , 2/8/12 Luke Wilkshire - Dynamo Moscow warms up Mandatory Credit: Action Images / Craig Brough

Liverpool defender Andy Robertson: 'I was at the bottom of the game - that drives me on'

Most successful sports people can recall one crossroads in a career, an event that made the difference between turning professional and reciting the “could have been a contender” speech. For Liverpool’s new £10 million left-back Andy Robertson, there is already a catalogue of such defining moments. At 15, Robertson was told by Celtic he was too small and timid to play at the highest level, a crushing disappointment he says inspired him to prove the sceptics wrong. By 18, now working in the corporate department at Hampden Park while playing amateur football for Queen’s Park, Robertson was given a deadline by his supportive but realistic parents; secure a professional contract in the next 12 months or consider alternatives. Whatever challenges face him at Anfield, Robertson is used to playing for the highest stakes. Robertson is on pre-season tour with Liverpool in Germany “For the first few years when I was in the youth side at Queen’s Park it was fine because I was still at school,” says Robertson. “I was grateful to my mum and dad because [after leaving school] they said, ‘We will give you this season to try and push on and make that dream a reality, but after that you might have to look at other options’. I was going down the line of needing to apply for university or college or maybe becoming a PE teacher or something in sports science. Queen’s Park was amateur so you do not get paid. You need to make a living with that. “I worked in Hampden Park taking phone calls and [ticket] orders for games. We trained twice a week at night and played games on Saturday, so I was working 9 to 5 and then having to train. “There was a guy, Andy McGlennan, who had worked at Queen’s Park for years and he was high up at Hampden so sorted a lot of the boys out with jobs. He looked after us and made sure I had some money in my pocket with a bit of hard work. He knew what the dream was and helped me.” Liverpool XI of great Scots Rejection by Celtic, Robertson’s boyhood side who as a fan he watched knock Liverpool out of the 2003 Uefa Cup (his father grew up worshipping Kenny Dalglish), left a scar. “There was a transition going on at Celtic at the time where a new head of youth had come in. I didn’t fit the bill,” said Robertson. “He came from Motherwell, who were full of big lads and were physical. That wasn’t my game. I was small. I’m not big now but it took me time to grow and fill out. “He saw a small guy playing centre-mid, left-mid or left-back who was quite weak. To be fair I was, but I believed in my ability. “That was the first time I had anyone doubt me. Tommy Burns [the former Celtic manager and head of youth development] was great with me and when he died it hit everyone hard. He was different class with me, he liked me as a player, he liked me as a person and he could see what potential I had. “He sadly passed away and Celtic went another route afterwards, one which was hard on some players, but good for others that maybe didn’t fit Tommy’s vision. How much has your Premier League club spent this summer? “Being rejected was quite hard because I was a Celtic fan from birth. It took nearly a full season to get over that disappointment. My first year at Queen’s Park, I just wasn’t good enough, but that tough period shaped me. “I’ve had a few doubters since then, but you’ve just got to continuously prove them wrong because if you are, it means you’re doing things right. Looking back on it now, being released was the best thing that could have happened to me.” So has there been any contact from those at Celtic’s academy who made such an expensive mistake? “I don’t want them being in touch just because of what’s happened now,” he says in the luxurious surrounding of Liverpool’s German training camp in Rottach-Egern. “Would they be in touch if it worked out the other way and I was a PE teacher somewhere? No.” Robertson impressed Jurgen Klopp with his performances as Hull Credit: Getty Images Robertson could not have imagined it was his response to this childhood setback, thriving at Dundee United and Hull City, that caught Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp’s attention as much as his stylish full-back performances. Klopp empathised with what he described as the 23-year-old’s “incredible personal journey”. “The manager wants to know the person as well as he knows the footballer,” said Robertson. “He was asking me about my story. He told me about himself and wanted to know all about me. “I saw the quotes when I signed for Liverpool and he obviously liked my journey from the bottom of Scottish football to where I am now. It has driven me along.” The Anfield interest in Robertson pre-dates Klopp – he was first under consideration two summers ago – but he left an impression on the German coach when shining for Hull last season. Steve Heighway’s most successful Liverpool Academy XI Robertson lived with the rumours of a Liverpool bid for a while, but said he only felt sure of their interest once an offer was made. “It’s hard because there are scouts at every game. They can tell your agent or whoever they are looking at you, but you never really know,” he said. “I’m sure they go there with an open mind and it is about who catches their eye. That’s the nature of football. You don’t take too much attention until there is a formal bid. There was a lot of speculation about it but that’s football. You just need to get your head down, work hard and make it a reality. “When Liverpool come in it’s a no-brainer and with a manager like here, the first time I spoke to him I was taken away by him and his plans. Obviously I’ve played against his side and know how hard it is against Jurgen Klopp’s team. I want to be part of that team and make it hard for teams to break us down and beat us. A team like Liverpool you are not going to turn down. I couldn’t wait to get here once the fee was agreed.” Robertson will have an immediate chance to impress during Liverpool’s German tour due to a thigh injury to James Milner, who will not feature in the three games. Many believe Roberston will initially be Milner’s deputy, but the youngster has loftier ambitions. Left-back has been a problem position for Liverpool Credit: Getty Images “I’ve come here wanting to be first choice,” he said. “Obviously it is up to the manager as the competition will be big for the position, but it’s one where I’m hoping to come out on top. I don’t like it if I’m not part of the starting team. I don’t like sitting on the bench even when it was very rare at Hull to rest during cup games. I’m not a good spectator, I’m a nightmare when I’m injured and I’m not playing. “I respect the other players and I know how good a job they can do but I’ve just got to bring my A-game and hopefully it’s enough for me to first choice.” With rival Premier League clubs paying £50 million for overlapping full-backs, Robertson could become one of this summer’s bargains. He laughs at the thought of a £10 million purchase being seen as such. “I wouldn’t quite say that,” he said. “We know over the last few years that football’s been a bit crazy. The investment all around the world that is making people spend kind of silly money. I think it’s going to keep going up and up. “You don’t focus on the price tag, you just try to focus on when you get there. The players, themselves, can’t control that. If you’re a wee bit more expensive then there’s maybe more pressure on you, but when you come to big clubs like this one, there is always pressure on you.” Andy Robertson is valued at £3.5m in Telegraph Fantasy Football, but is he good enough to make your team? - pick a team now >>

Liverpool defender Andy Robertson: 'I was at the bottom of the game - that drives me on'

Most successful sports people can recall one crossroads in a career, an event that made the difference between turning professional and reciting the “could have been a contender” speech. For Liverpool’s new £10 million left-back Andy Robertson, there is already a catalogue of such defining moments. At 15, Robertson was told by Celtic he was too small and timid to play at the highest level, a crushing disappointment he says inspired him to prove the sceptics wrong. By 18, now working in the corporate department at Hampden Park while playing amateur football for Queen’s Park, Robertson was given a deadline by his supportive but realistic parents; secure a professional contract in the next 12 months or consider alternatives. Whatever challenges face him at Anfield, Robertson is used to playing for the highest stakes. Robertson is on pre-season tour with Liverpool in Germany “For the first few years when I was in the youth side at Queen’s Park it was fine because I was still at school,” says Robertson. “I was grateful to my mum and dad because [after leaving school] they said, ‘We will give you this season to try and push on and make that dream a reality, but after that you might have to look at other options’. I was going down the line of needing to apply for university or college or maybe becoming a PE teacher or something in sports science. Queen’s Park was amateur so you do not get paid. You need to make a living with that. “I worked in Hampden Park taking phone calls and [ticket] orders for games. We trained twice a week at night and played games on Saturday, so I was working 9 to 5 and then having to train. “There was a guy, Andy McGlennan, who had worked at Queen’s Park for years and he was high up at Hampden so sorted a lot of the boys out with jobs. He looked after us and made sure I had some money in my pocket with a bit of hard work. He knew what the dream was and helped me.” Liverpool XI of great Scots Rejection by Celtic, Robertson’s boyhood side who as a fan he watched knock Liverpool out of the 2003 Uefa Cup (his father grew up worshipping Kenny Dalglish), left a scar. “There was a transition going on at Celtic at the time where a new head of youth had come in. I didn’t fit the bill,” said Robertson. “He came from Motherwell, who were full of big lads and were physical. That wasn’t my game. I was small. I’m not big now but it took me time to grow and fill out. “He saw a small guy playing centre-mid, left-mid or left-back who was quite weak. To be fair I was, but I believed in my ability. “That was the first time I had anyone doubt me. Tommy Burns [the former Celtic manager and head of youth development] was great with me and when he died it hit everyone hard. He was different class with me, he liked me as a player, he liked me as a person and he could see what potential I had. “He sadly passed away and Celtic went another route afterwards, one which was hard on some players, but good for others that maybe didn’t fit Tommy’s vision. How much has your Premier League club spent this summer? “Being rejected was quite hard because I was a Celtic fan from birth. It took nearly a full season to get over that disappointment. My first year at Queen’s Park, I just wasn’t good enough, but that tough period shaped me. “I’ve had a few doubters since then, but you’ve just got to continuously prove them wrong because if you are, it means you’re doing things right. Looking back on it now, being released was the best thing that could have happened to me.” So has there been any contact from those at Celtic’s academy who made such an expensive mistake? “I don’t want them being in touch just because of what’s happened now,” he says in the luxurious surrounding of Liverpool’s German training camp in Rottach-Egern. “Would they be in touch if it worked out the other way and I was a PE teacher somewhere? No.” Robertson impressed Jurgen Klopp with his performances as Hull Credit: Getty Images Robertson could not have imagined it was his response to this childhood setback, thriving at Dundee United and Hull City, that caught Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp’s attention as much as his stylish full-back performances. Klopp empathised with what he described as the 23-year-old’s “incredible personal journey”. “The manager wants to know the person as well as he knows the footballer,” said Robertson. “He was asking me about my story. He told me about himself and wanted to know all about me. “I saw the quotes when I signed for Liverpool and he obviously liked my journey from the bottom of Scottish football to where I am now. It has driven me along.” The Anfield interest in Robertson pre-dates Klopp – he was first under consideration two summers ago – but he left an impression on the German coach when shining for Hull last season. Steve Heighway’s most successful Liverpool Academy XI Robertson lived with the rumours of a Liverpool bid for a while, but said he only felt sure of their interest once an offer was made. “It’s hard because there are scouts at every game. They can tell your agent or whoever they are looking at you, but you never really know,” he said. “I’m sure they go there with an open mind and it is about who catches their eye. That’s the nature of football. You don’t take too much attention until there is a formal bid. There was a lot of speculation about it but that’s football. You just need to get your head down, work hard and make it a reality. “When Liverpool come in it’s a no-brainer and with a manager like here, the first time I spoke to him I was taken away by him and his plans. Obviously I’ve played against his side and know how hard it is against Jurgen Klopp’s team. I want to be part of that team and make it hard for teams to break us down and beat us. A team like Liverpool you are not going to turn down. I couldn’t wait to get here once the fee was agreed.” Robertson will have an immediate chance to impress during Liverpool’s German tour due to a thigh injury to James Milner, who will not feature in the three games. Many believe Roberston will initially be Milner’s deputy, but the youngster has loftier ambitions. Left-back has been a problem position for Liverpool Credit: Getty Images “I’ve come here wanting to be first choice,” he said. “Obviously it is up to the manager as the competition will be big for the position, but it’s one where I’m hoping to come out on top. I don’t like it if I’m not part of the starting team. I don’t like sitting on the bench even when it was very rare at Hull to rest during cup games. I’m not a good spectator, I’m a nightmare when I’m injured and I’m not playing. “I respect the other players and I know how good a job they can do but I’ve just got to bring my A-game and hopefully it’s enough for me to first choice.” With rival Premier League clubs paying £50 million for overlapping full-backs, Robertson could become one of this summer’s bargains. He laughs at the thought of a £10 million purchase being seen as such. “I wouldn’t quite say that,” he said. “We know over the last few years that football’s been a bit crazy. The investment all around the world that is making people spend kind of silly money. I think it’s going to keep going up and up. “You don’t focus on the price tag, you just try to focus on when you get there. The players, themselves, can’t control that. If you’re a wee bit more expensive then there’s maybe more pressure on you, but when you come to big clubs like this one, there is always pressure on you.” Andy Robertson is valued at £3.5m in Telegraph Fantasy Football, but is he good enough to make your team? - pick a team now >>

Liverpool defender Andy Robertson: 'I was at the bottom of the game - that drives me on'

Most successful sports people can recall one crossroads in a career, an event that made the difference between turning professional and reciting the “could have been a contender” speech. For Liverpool’s new £10 million left-back Andy Robertson, there is already a catalogue of such defining moments. At 15, Robertson was told by Celtic he was too small and timid to play at the highest level, a crushing disappointment he says inspired him to prove the sceptics wrong. By 18, now working in the corporate department at Hampden Park while playing amateur football for Queen’s Park, Robertson was given a deadline by his supportive but realistic parents; secure a professional contract in the next 12 months or consider alternatives. Whatever challenges face him at Anfield, Robertson is used to playing for the highest stakes. Robertson is on pre-season tour with Liverpool in Germany “For the first few years when I was in the youth side at Queen’s Park it was fine because I was still at school,” says Robertson. “I was grateful to my mum and dad because [after leaving school] they said, ‘We will give you this season to try and push on and make that dream a reality, but after that you might have to look at other options’. I was going down the line of needing to apply for university or college or maybe becoming a PE teacher or something in sports science. Queen’s Park was amateur so you do not get paid. You need to make a living with that. “I worked in Hampden Park taking phone calls and [ticket] orders for games. We trained twice a week at night and played games on Saturday, so I was working 9 to 5 and then having to train. “There was a guy, Andy McGlennan, who had worked at Queen’s Park for years and he was high up at Hampden so sorted a lot of the boys out with jobs. He looked after us and made sure I had some money in my pocket with a bit of hard work. He knew what the dream was and helped me.” Liverpool XI of great Scots Rejection by Celtic, Robertson’s boyhood side who as a fan he watched knock Liverpool out of the 2003 Uefa Cup (his father grew up worshipping Kenny Dalglish), left a scar. “There was a transition going on at Celtic at the time where a new head of youth had come in. I didn’t fit the bill,” said Robertson. “He came from Motherwell, who were full of big lads and were physical. That wasn’t my game. I was small. I’m not big now but it took me time to grow and fill out. “He saw a small guy playing centre-mid, left-mid or left-back who was quite weak. To be fair I was, but I believed in my ability. “That was the first time I had anyone doubt me. Tommy Burns [the former Celtic manager and head of youth development] was great with me and when he died it hit everyone hard. He was different class with me, he liked me as a player, he liked me as a person and he could see what potential I had. “He sadly passed away and Celtic went another route afterwards, one which was hard on some players, but good for others that maybe didn’t fit Tommy’s vision. How much has your Premier League club spent this summer? “Being rejected was quite hard because I was a Celtic fan from birth. It took nearly a full season to get over that disappointment. My first year at Queen’s Park, I just wasn’t good enough, but that tough period shaped me. “I’ve had a few doubters since then, but you’ve just got to continuously prove them wrong because if you are, it means you’re doing things right. Looking back on it now, being released was the best thing that could have happened to me.” So has there been any contact from those at Celtic’s academy who made such an expensive mistake? “I don’t want them being in touch just because of what’s happened now,” he says in the luxurious surrounding of Liverpool’s German training camp in Rottach-Egern. “Would they be in touch if it worked out the other way and I was a PE teacher somewhere? No.” Robertson impressed Jurgen Klopp with his performances as Hull Credit: Getty Images Robertson could not have imagined it was his response to this childhood setback, thriving at Dundee United and Hull City, that caught Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp’s attention as much as his stylish full-back performances. Klopp empathised with what he described as the 23-year-old’s “incredible personal journey”. “The manager wants to know the person as well as he knows the footballer,” said Robertson. “He was asking me about my story. He told me about himself and wanted to know all about me. “I saw the quotes when I signed for Liverpool and he obviously liked my journey from the bottom of Scottish football to where I am now. It has driven me along.” The Anfield interest in Robertson pre-dates Klopp – he was first under consideration two summers ago – but he left an impression on the German coach when shining for Hull last season. Steve Heighway’s most successful Liverpool Academy XI Robertson lived with the rumours of a Liverpool bid for a while, but said he only felt sure of their interest once an offer was made. “It’s hard because there are scouts at every game. They can tell your agent or whoever they are looking at you, but you never really know,” he said. “I’m sure they go there with an open mind and it is about who catches their eye. That’s the nature of football. You don’t take too much attention until there is a formal bid. There was a lot of speculation about it but that’s football. You just need to get your head down, work hard and make it a reality. “When Liverpool come in it’s a no-brainer and with a manager like here, the first time I spoke to him I was taken away by him and his plans. Obviously I’ve played against his side and know how hard it is against Jurgen Klopp’s team. I want to be part of that team and make it hard for teams to break us down and beat us. A team like Liverpool you are not going to turn down. I couldn’t wait to get here once the fee was agreed.” Robertson will have an immediate chance to impress during Liverpool’s German tour due to a thigh injury to James Milner, who will not feature in the three games. Many believe Roberston will initially be Milner’s deputy, but the youngster has loftier ambitions. Left-back has been a problem position for Liverpool Credit: Getty Images “I’ve come here wanting to be first choice,” he said. “Obviously it is up to the manager as the competition will be big for the position, but it’s one where I’m hoping to come out on top. I don’t like it if I’m not part of the starting team. I don’t like sitting on the bench even when it was very rare at Hull to rest during cup games. I’m not a good spectator, I’m a nightmare when I’m injured and I’m not playing. “I respect the other players and I know how good a job they can do but I’ve just got to bring my A-game and hopefully it’s enough for me to first choice.” With rival Premier League clubs paying £50 million for overlapping full-backs, Robertson could become one of this summer’s bargains. He laughs at the thought of a £10 million purchase being seen as such. “I wouldn’t quite say that,” he said. “We know over the last few years that football’s been a bit crazy. The investment all around the world that is making people spend kind of silly money. I think it’s going to keep going up and up. “You don’t focus on the price tag, you just try to focus on when you get there. The players, themselves, can’t control that. If you’re a wee bit more expensive then there’s maybe more pressure on you, but when you come to big clubs like this one, there is always pressure on you.” Andy Robertson is valued at £3.5m in Telegraph Fantasy Football, but is he good enough to make your team? - pick a team now >>

Liverpool defender Andy Robertson: 'I was at the bottom of the game - that drives me on'

Most successful sports people can recall one crossroads in a career, an event that made the difference between turning professional and reciting the “could have been a contender” speech. For Liverpool’s new £10 million left-back Andy Robertson, there is already a catalogue of such defining moments. At 15, Robertson was told by Celtic he was too small and timid to play at the highest level, a crushing disappointment he says inspired him to prove the sceptics wrong. By 18, now working in the corporate department at Hampden Park while playing amateur football for Queen’s Park, Robertson was given a deadline by his supportive but realistic parents; secure a professional contract in the next 12 months or consider alternatives. Whatever challenges face him at Anfield, Robertson is used to playing for the highest stakes. Robertson is on pre-season tour with Liverpool in Germany “For the first few years when I was in the youth side at Queen’s Park it was fine because I was still at school,” says Robertson. “I was grateful to my mum and dad because [after leaving school] they said, ‘We will give you this season to try and push on and make that dream a reality, but after that you might have to look at other options’. I was going down the line of needing to apply for university or college or maybe becoming a PE teacher or something in sports science. Queen’s Park was amateur so you do not get paid. You need to make a living with that. “I worked in Hampden Park taking phone calls and [ticket] orders for games. We trained twice a week at night and played games on Saturday, so I was working 9 to 5 and then having to train. “There was a guy, Andy McGlennan, who had worked at Queen’s Park for years and he was high up at Hampden so sorted a lot of the boys out with jobs. He looked after us and made sure I had some money in my pocket with a bit of hard work. He knew what the dream was and helped me.” Liverpool XI of great Scots Rejection by Celtic, Robertson’s boyhood side who as a fan he watched knock Liverpool out of the 2003 Uefa Cup (his father grew up worshipping Kenny Dalglish), left a scar. “There was a transition going on at Celtic at the time where a new head of youth had come in. I didn’t fit the bill,” said Robertson. “He came from Motherwell, who were full of big lads and were physical. That wasn’t my game. I was small. I’m not big now but it took me time to grow and fill out. “He saw a small guy playing centre-mid, left-mid or left-back who was quite weak. To be fair I was, but I believed in my ability. “That was the first time I had anyone doubt me. Tommy Burns [the former Celtic manager and head of youth development] was great with me and when he died it hit everyone hard. He was different class with me, he liked me as a player, he liked me as a person and he could see what potential I had. “He sadly passed away and Celtic went another route afterwards, one which was hard on some players, but good for others that maybe didn’t fit Tommy’s vision. How much has your Premier League club spent this summer? “Being rejected was quite hard because I was a Celtic fan from birth. It took nearly a full season to get over that disappointment. My first year at Queen’s Park, I just wasn’t good enough, but that tough period shaped me. “I’ve had a few doubters since then, but you’ve just got to continuously prove them wrong because if you are, it means you’re doing things right. Looking back on it now, being released was the best thing that could have happened to me.” So has there been any contact from those at Celtic’s academy who made such an expensive mistake? “I don’t want them being in touch just because of what’s happened now,” he says in the luxurious surrounding of Liverpool’s German training camp in Rottach-Egern. “Would they be in touch if it worked out the other way and I was a PE teacher somewhere? No.” Robertson impressed Jurgen Klopp with his performances as Hull Credit: Getty Images Robertson could not have imagined it was his response to this childhood setback, thriving at Dundee United and Hull City, that caught Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp’s attention as much as his stylish full-back performances. Klopp empathised with what he described as the 23-year-old’s “incredible personal journey”. “The manager wants to know the person as well as he knows the footballer,” said Robertson. “He was asking me about my story. He told me about himself and wanted to know all about me. “I saw the quotes when I signed for Liverpool and he obviously liked my journey from the bottom of Scottish football to where I am now. It has driven me along.” The Anfield interest in Robertson pre-dates Klopp – he was first under consideration two summers ago – but he left an impression on the German coach when shining for Hull last season. Steve Heighway’s most successful Liverpool Academy XI Robertson lived with the rumours of a Liverpool bid for a while, but said he only felt sure of their interest once an offer was made. “It’s hard because there are scouts at every game. They can tell your agent or whoever they are looking at you, but you never really know,” he said. “I’m sure they go there with an open mind and it is about who catches their eye. That’s the nature of football. You don’t take too much attention until there is a formal bid. There was a lot of speculation about it but that’s football. You just need to get your head down, work hard and make it a reality. “When Liverpool come in it’s a no-brainer and with a manager like here, the first time I spoke to him I was taken away by him and his plans. Obviously I’ve played against his side and know how hard it is against Jurgen Klopp’s team. I want to be part of that team and make it hard for teams to break us down and beat us. A team like Liverpool you are not going to turn down. I couldn’t wait to get here once the fee was agreed.” Robertson will have an immediate chance to impress during Liverpool’s German tour due to a thigh injury to James Milner, who will not feature in the three games. Many believe Roberston will initially be Milner’s deputy, but the youngster has loftier ambitions. Left-back has been a problem position for Liverpool Credit: Getty Images “I’ve come here wanting to be first choice,” he said. “Obviously it is up to the manager as the competition will be big for the position, but it’s one where I’m hoping to come out on top. I don’t like it if I’m not part of the starting team. I don’t like sitting on the bench even when it was very rare at Hull to rest during cup games. I’m not a good spectator, I’m a nightmare when I’m injured and I’m not playing. “I respect the other players and I know how good a job they can do but I’ve just got to bring my A-game and hopefully it’s enough for me to first choice.” With rival Premier League clubs paying £50 million for overlapping full-backs, Robertson could become one of this summer’s bargains. He laughs at the thought of a £10 million purchase being seen as such. “I wouldn’t quite say that,” he said. “We know over the last few years that football’s been a bit crazy. The investment all around the world that is making people spend kind of silly money. I think it’s going to keep going up and up. “You don’t focus on the price tag, you just try to focus on when you get there. The players, themselves, can’t control that. If you’re a wee bit more expensive then there’s maybe more pressure on you, but when you come to big clubs like this one, there is always pressure on you.” Andy Robertson is valued at £3.5m in Telegraph Fantasy Football, but is he good enough to make your team? - pick a team now >>

Liverpool's new signing Andy Robertson says move is 'surreal' after completing £8m switch from Hull

Liverpool have completed the signing of Scotland left-back Andy Robertson from Hull. Robertson spent three seasons with the Tigers following his arrival from Dundee United, and joins the Reds on a long-term contract. The fee is undisclosed but is thought to be worth around £8million to the Sky Bet Championship club. Robertson, who will wear the number 26 at Anfield, has won 15 caps for his country and scored his only international goal in a 3-1 friendly defeat by Roy Hodgson's England in 2014. He joins Mohamed Salah and Dominic Solanke as summer additions to Jurgen Klopp's squad. Robertson joins Solanke, pictured, and Mo Salah as new summer signings Credit: Action Plus Left-back has long been an area of concern for the Reds and former England midfielder James Milner spent much of the season in the position after Alberto Moreno failed to convince. Burnley made the early running for Robertson after Hull's relegation from the Premier League but no deal was forthcoming, opening the door for Klopp. The 23-year-old told Liverpoolfc.com: "It feels a wee bit surreal just now. Obviously I'm delighted. There's been a lot of speculation over the last couple of weeks but I'm glad that the deal's finally been done and I'm a Liverpool player. "My family are proud of what I've achieved so far and they're all over the moon with the move, as well as me of course. We're all just looking forward to being part of the Liverpool family now. "There's not many, if any, more special clubs than Liverpool. When you grow up as a kid you dream of playing with big clubs such as Liverpool and to make that a reality is a dream come true for me. Premier League done deals: each club's confirmed summer transfers "I just want to prove to people that I can do it at this level, and hopefully I manage to do that this season and go on to do good things for this club." Announcing his departure, Hull said: "The 23-year-old full-back left the Tigers' Portuguese training camp earlier this week to undergo a medical and finalise terms with the Merseyside club. "Robertson arrived at the KCOM Stadium from Dundee United in July 2014 and went on to make 116 appearances for the club in all competitions, scoring five goals. "Everybody at the club would like to thank Andy for his efforts in a black and amber shirt, and wish him well for the future." Midfielder Kevin Stewart has moved in the opposite direction on a three-year deal. The former Tottenham player made 20 appearances for Liverpool, including 11 in the Premier League, and has played for Crewe, Cheltenham, Burton and Swindon on loan. Having flown to Portugal for his medical, Stewart could make his first Hull appearance in Saturday's friendly against Benfica. Stewart told www.hullcitytigers.com: "I'm delighted to sign for the club, I can't wait to get started and get my boots on. "It's an exciting move for me and I'm looking forward to the challenge ahead."

Liverpool's new signing Andy Robertson says move is 'surreal' after completing £8m switch from Hull

Liverpool have completed the signing of Scotland left-back Andy Robertson from Hull. Robertson spent three seasons with the Tigers following his arrival from Dundee United, and joins the Reds on a long-term contract. The fee is undisclosed but is thought to be worth around £8million to the Sky Bet Championship club. Robertson, who will wear the number 26 at Anfield, has won 15 caps for his country and scored his only international goal in a 3-1 friendly defeat by Roy Hodgson's England in 2014. He joins Mohamed Salah and Dominic Solanke as summer additions to Jurgen Klopp's squad. Robertson joins Solanke, pictured, and Mo Salah as new summer signings Credit: Action Plus Left-back has long been an area of concern for the Reds and former England midfielder James Milner spent much of the season in the position after Alberto Moreno failed to convince. Burnley made the early running for Robertson after Hull's relegation from the Premier League but no deal was forthcoming, opening the door for Klopp. The 23-year-old told Liverpoolfc.com: "It feels a wee bit surreal just now. Obviously I'm delighted. There's been a lot of speculation over the last couple of weeks but I'm glad that the deal's finally been done and I'm a Liverpool player. "My family are proud of what I've achieved so far and they're all over the moon with the move, as well as me of course. We're all just looking forward to being part of the Liverpool family now. "There's not many, if any, more special clubs than Liverpool. When you grow up as a kid you dream of playing with big clubs such as Liverpool and to make that a reality is a dream come true for me. Premier League done deals: each club's confirmed summer transfers "I just want to prove to people that I can do it at this level, and hopefully I manage to do that this season and go on to do good things for this club." Announcing his departure, Hull said: "The 23-year-old full-back left the Tigers' Portuguese training camp earlier this week to undergo a medical and finalise terms with the Merseyside club. "Robertson arrived at the KCOM Stadium from Dundee United in July 2014 and went on to make 116 appearances for the club in all competitions, scoring five goals. "Everybody at the club would like to thank Andy for his efforts in a black and amber shirt, and wish him well for the future." Midfielder Kevin Stewart has moved in the opposite direction on a three-year deal. The former Tottenham player made 20 appearances for Liverpool, including 11 in the Premier League, and has played for Crewe, Cheltenham, Burton and Swindon on loan. Having flown to Portugal for his medical, Stewart could make his first Hull appearance in Saturday's friendly against Benfica. Stewart told www.hullcitytigers.com: "I'm delighted to sign for the club, I can't wait to get started and get my boots on. "It's an exciting move for me and I'm looking forward to the challenge ahead."

Dundee United 0 Hamilton Academical 0: Dundee's Simon Murray sent off for diving twice

Dundee United 0 Hamilton Academical 0: Dundee's Simon Murray sent off for diving twice

Hamilton 4 Dundee 0: Accies to face Dundee United in play-off as Inverness are relegated

Hamilton 4 Dundee 0: Accies to face Dundee United in play-off as Inverness are relegated

Tommy Gemmell and Dundee United anniversary reminders of a lost world | Barney Ronay

Tommy Gemmell and Dundee United anniversary reminders of a lost world | Barney Ronay

Tommy Gemmell and Dundee United anniversary reminders of a lost world | Barney Ronay

Tommy Gemmell and Dundee United anniversary reminders of a lost world | Barney Ronay

Ex-Man City Youth Star Recalls Bizarre Moment Citizens Fan Robbed Him at Knifepoint

​Ex-Manchester City youth player Willo Flood has revealed the shocking burglary he was subjected to during his time at the club. The Dundee United footballer, now in his fourth spell with the Scottish club, told ​BBC Sport about the time he was robbed at knifepoint by none other than a Manchester City supporter. Then only 19 years old, Flood recalled the remarkable sequence of events that led the Citizen fan to even chatting to him about the Manchester-based side while he stole the player's...

Ex-Man City Youth Star Recalls Bizarre Moment Citizens Fan Robbed Him at Knifepoint

​Ex-Manchester City youth player Willo Flood has revealed the shocking burglary he was subjected to during his time at the club. The Dundee United footballer, now in his fourth spell with the Scottish club, told ​BBC Sport about the time he was robbed at knifepoint by none other than a Manchester City supporter. Then only 19 years old, Flood recalled the remarkable sequence of events that led the Citizen fan to even chatting to him about the Manchester-based side while he stole the player's...

Ex-Man City Youth Star Recalls Bizarre Moment Citizens Fan Robbed Him at Knifepoint

​Ex-Manchester City youth player Willo Flood has revealed the shocking burglary he was subjected to during his time at the club. The Dundee United footballer, now in his fourth spell with the Scottish club, told ​BBC Sport about the time he was robbed at knifepoint by none other than a Manchester City supporter. Then only 19 years old, Flood recalled the remarkable sequence of events that led the Citizen fan to even chatting to him about the Manchester-based side while he stole the player's...

Le Buzz - VIDEO: Dundee United fan with one leg wins SPFL Goal of the Month

dundee

Football - VIDEO: Dundee United fan with one leg wins SPFL Goal of the Month

Goal of the Month

New Manchester United Scout Reveals Plan to Sign the World's Best Players

​Manchester United scout Armand Benneker claims that the Red Devils plan on having the best scouting network in the world as they want to add the very best talent to their ranks in the coming years. Benneker joined the club under the new Jose Mourinho regime, and was brought in by the Portuguese boss, who wants to make huge changes to the team's scouting staff. A former Dundee United defender, the 47-year-old previously worked as a coach at Austrian clubs RW Rankweil and Dornbirn, as well...

New Manchester United Scout Reveals Plan to Sign the World's Best Players

​Manchester United scout Armand Benneker claims that the Red Devils plan on having the best scouting network in the world as they want to add the very best talent to their ranks in the coming years. Benneker joined the club under the new Jose Mourinho regime, and was brought in by the Portuguese boss, who wants to make huge changes to the team's scouting staff. A former Dundee United defender, the 47-year-old previously worked as a coach at Austrian clubs RW Rankweil and Dornbirn, as well...

New Manchester United Scout Reveals Plan to Sign the World's Best Players

​Manchester United scout Armand Benneker claims that the Red Devils plan on having the best scouting network in the world as they want to add the very best talent to their ranks in the coming years. Benneker joined the club under the new Jose Mourinho regime, and was brought in by the Portuguese boss, who wants to make huge changes to the team's scouting staff. A former Dundee United defender, the 47-year-old previously worked as a coach at Austrian clubs RW Rankweil and Dornbirn, as well...

New Manchester United Scout Reveals Plan to Sign the World's Best Players

​Manchester United scout Armand Benneker claims that the Red Devils plan on having the best scouting network in the world as they want to add the very best talent to their ranks in the coming years. Benneker joined the club under the new Jose Mourinho regime, and was brought in by the Portuguese boss, who wants to make huge changes to the team's scouting staff. A former Dundee United defender, the 47-year-old previously worked as a coach at Austrian clubs RW Rankweil and Dornbirn, as well...

Remembered: When Dundee United beat Barça in 1987… twice

Almost 30 years on, Richard Edwards recalls the magical month when Jim McLeans side saw off El Tels Spanish giants home and away en route to the UEFA Cup final. Celtic: take heart...

Dundee United Goalkeeper Sets New World Record During Incredible First Half Display

By saving an incredible THREE penalties - all in the first half of Dundee's match against Dunfermline at East End Park - Dundee's 'keeper Cammy Bell earned himself a well-deserved spot in the record books. No other footballer in history can claim the same and, perhaps of even more importance, Bell's heroics played a massive role in earning Dundee a 3-1 victory. The maths is pretty simple: Had Bell not put in his match-winning display, the scoreline could easily have read very differently,...

Dundee United Goalkeeper Sets New World Record During Incredible First Half Display

By saving an incredible THREE penalties - all in the first half of Dundee's match against Dunfermline at East End Park - Dundee's 'keeper Cammy Bell earned himself a well-deserved spot in the record books. No other footballer in history can claim the same and, perhaps of even more importance, Bell's heroics played a massive role in earning Dundee a 3-1 victory. The maths is pretty simple: Had Bell not put in his match-winning display, the scoreline could easily have read very differently,...

Saved by the Bell - Dundee United keeper Cammy saves three penalties

In a barmy Scottish Championship clash, 10-man Dundee United triumphed thanks to three remarkable penalty saves from Cammy Bell.

Scottish Premiership Review: Inverness and Dundee United finish with a flourish

Inverness secured seventh place with a 4-0 win over Dundee, while Simon Murray scored twice as relegated Dundee United won 4-2 at Kilmarnock

Dundee United docked points for fielding unregistered players

Dundee United have three points stripped from their Scottish Premiership tally after failing to register Jamie Robson and Alistair Coote.

Dundee United 3 Partick Thistle 3: Gordon's salvage job continues

A late comeback saw Dundee United salvage some further late-season pride as they claimed a 3-3 draw with Partick Thistle.

Inverness CT 2 Dundee United 3: Murray nets twice to end losing streak

Dundee United beat Inverness CT 3-2 to end their four-game losing streak, with Simon Murray scoring a double.

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