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England Slideshow

Craig Brown added his voice to the calls for Hampden Park to remain Scotland’s home ground, as the Scottish Football Association consider whether or not to buy the stadium from its current owners, Queens Park. An agreement for a purchase in principle was agreed recently but, as Telegraph Sport revealed this week, some on the SFA board have yet to be convinced that their organisation should take on the task of stadium ownership. Their counterparts at the Scottish Rugby Union own Murrayfield and have been lobbying hard for that Edinburgh ground to stage international football. Hearts played at Murrayfield earlier this season while the main stand at their Tynecastle home was reconstructed and Brown, a non-executive director at Aberdeen, sampled the ground first-hand when the Pittodrie side visited in September. “The atmosphere wasn’t what you would want for a football match,” Brown said. Leader: Alex McLeish is unveiled by the SFA as the new Scotland National Team manager at Hampden Park Credit: Getty “The Hearts folk would definitely agree with that. Look at the upturn in their form when they went back to Tynecastle. They were yearning to get back to Tynecastle and they kept saying it. Craig Levein said that their fortunes would change when they got back – and they did. “Murrayfield has a great atmosphere for the rugby but our fans were so far behind the goals they needed a telescope to see the game. “We’ve surely got to be ambitious enough to own our own stadium. Hampden is a stadium of neutrality for cup semi-finals and finals. If they get a good new surface you can play under-21 games, which you couldn’t do the day before senior internationals, because the schedule for the U-21s is now different. “You can’t live in the past. You’ve got to look forward, but Hampden is the spiritual home of Scottish football. It needs a wee bit of revamping if we can afford it. What an impact it would make if Ian Maxwell, the new SFA chief executive, could do that, but the purse strings are the next question we’ve got. Where are we going to get the money? Hampden Park was an exciting place to be during the recent Old Firm Cup semi Credit: Getty “Look what Fergus McCann did at Celtic Park. Incredible. Doing that here would be great. I’m surprised and disappointed that it’s still in the balance but with a bit of expenditure here – bring the two ends in – what a stadium you’ve got. The main stand is good and the north stand is good. “It’s behind the goal that you’re a bit far from the action. Some Scotland players liked playing at Ibrox or Celtic Park because the atmosphere was slightly better but when Leigh Griffiths scored his two goals vs England here last year the country was in ecstasy for five minutes and there was no hint of ‘what are we doing at Hampden?’ The place was buzzing. “Those two goals confirmed what it would be like if Scottish football was a success. I’m sure big Alex McLeish will get it like that. I really fancy him as the manager here.” Brown was speaking at an event at Hampden to mark the publication of a memoir about Scotland’s participation in the finals of six World Cup tournaments between 1974 and 1998 by veteran commentator Archie McPherson.* History: Alfredo Di Stefano scores for Real Madrid during the legendary 7-3 demolition of Eintracht Frankfurt in 1960 Credit: Getty Alex McLeish, the current Scotland manager, was also in attendance after having appeared earlier at the stadium to publicise the next round of Scottish Football Hall of Fame inductions. Asked to predict the outcome of the three-way race to finish second in the Scottish Premiership - involving Rangers, Aberdeen and Hibernian – McLeish said: “Aberdeen bounced back really well last week after a poor Scottish Cup semi-final. They did have Kenny McLean and Shay Logan back. “You need to have the players. It’s not easy for a manager if he doesn't quite have the replacements for top players when they go out of the team and that's always something that has to be factored in. “It shows that Aberdeen are capable and their experience of getting the second place in the last few years is going to stand them in good stead. Hibs are coming like a train at the moment - an unstoppable train - but, again, it's hard not see Rangers in the top two.” 1980: Scotland v England at Hampden Park. Kenny Dalglish beats his club mate Phil Thompson to the ball. Credit: Getty Of Sunday’s Old Firm derby at Parkhead, at which Celtic are overwhelming favourites to clinch a seventh successive title against a Rangers side who were beaten comprehensively by Brendan Rodgers’ players in the William Hill Scottish Cup semi-finals, McLeish said: “A draw's a disaster, a defeat is even worse. I can imagine the week that Graeme Murty had after the Celtic game but he bounced back with a good result. “Celtic will be huge favourites and Rangers haven't done well these games and there's always anticipation - could this be the one that Rangers get the result?” * Adventures in the Golden Age, by Archie McPherson (Black & White Publishing, £11.99)
Hampden Park must remain Scotland's football ground, says Craig Brown
Craig Brown added his voice to the calls for Hampden Park to remain Scotland’s home ground, as the Scottish Football Association consider whether or not to buy the stadium from its current owners, Queens Park. An agreement for a purchase in principle was agreed recently but, as Telegraph Sport revealed this week, some on the SFA board have yet to be convinced that their organisation should take on the task of stadium ownership. Their counterparts at the Scottish Rugby Union own Murrayfield and have been lobbying hard for that Edinburgh ground to stage international football. Hearts played at Murrayfield earlier this season while the main stand at their Tynecastle home was reconstructed and Brown, a non-executive director at Aberdeen, sampled the ground first-hand when the Pittodrie side visited in September. “The atmosphere wasn’t what you would want for a football match,” Brown said. Leader: Alex McLeish is unveiled by the SFA as the new Scotland National Team manager at Hampden Park Credit: Getty “The Hearts folk would definitely agree with that. Look at the upturn in their form when they went back to Tynecastle. They were yearning to get back to Tynecastle and they kept saying it. Craig Levein said that their fortunes would change when they got back – and they did. “Murrayfield has a great atmosphere for the rugby but our fans were so far behind the goals they needed a telescope to see the game. “We’ve surely got to be ambitious enough to own our own stadium. Hampden is a stadium of neutrality for cup semi-finals and finals. If they get a good new surface you can play under-21 games, which you couldn’t do the day before senior internationals, because the schedule for the U-21s is now different. “You can’t live in the past. You’ve got to look forward, but Hampden is the spiritual home of Scottish football. It needs a wee bit of revamping if we can afford it. What an impact it would make if Ian Maxwell, the new SFA chief executive, could do that, but the purse strings are the next question we’ve got. Where are we going to get the money? Hampden Park was an exciting place to be during the recent Old Firm Cup semi Credit: Getty “Look what Fergus McCann did at Celtic Park. Incredible. Doing that here would be great. I’m surprised and disappointed that it’s still in the balance but with a bit of expenditure here – bring the two ends in – what a stadium you’ve got. The main stand is good and the north stand is good. “It’s behind the goal that you’re a bit far from the action. Some Scotland players liked playing at Ibrox or Celtic Park because the atmosphere was slightly better but when Leigh Griffiths scored his two goals vs England here last year the country was in ecstasy for five minutes and there was no hint of ‘what are we doing at Hampden?’ The place was buzzing. “Those two goals confirmed what it would be like if Scottish football was a success. I’m sure big Alex McLeish will get it like that. I really fancy him as the manager here.” Brown was speaking at an event at Hampden to mark the publication of a memoir about Scotland’s participation in the finals of six World Cup tournaments between 1974 and 1998 by veteran commentator Archie McPherson.* History: Alfredo Di Stefano scores for Real Madrid during the legendary 7-3 demolition of Eintracht Frankfurt in 1960 Credit: Getty Alex McLeish, the current Scotland manager, was also in attendance after having appeared earlier at the stadium to publicise the next round of Scottish Football Hall of Fame inductions. Asked to predict the outcome of the three-way race to finish second in the Scottish Premiership - involving Rangers, Aberdeen and Hibernian – McLeish said: “Aberdeen bounced back really well last week after a poor Scottish Cup semi-final. They did have Kenny McLean and Shay Logan back. “You need to have the players. It’s not easy for a manager if he doesn't quite have the replacements for top players when they go out of the team and that's always something that has to be factored in. “It shows that Aberdeen are capable and their experience of getting the second place in the last few years is going to stand them in good stead. Hibs are coming like a train at the moment - an unstoppable train - but, again, it's hard not see Rangers in the top two.” 1980: Scotland v England at Hampden Park. Kenny Dalglish beats his club mate Phil Thompson to the ball. Credit: Getty Of Sunday’s Old Firm derby at Parkhead, at which Celtic are overwhelming favourites to clinch a seventh successive title against a Rangers side who were beaten comprehensively by Brendan Rodgers’ players in the William Hill Scottish Cup semi-finals, McLeish said: “A draw's a disaster, a defeat is even worse. I can imagine the week that Graeme Murty had after the Celtic game but he bounced back with a good result. “Celtic will be huge favourites and Rangers haven't done well these games and there's always anticipation - could this be the one that Rangers get the result?” * Adventures in the Golden Age, by Archie McPherson (Black & White Publishing, £11.99)
Craig Brown added his voice to the calls for Hampden Park to remain Scotland’s home ground, as the Scottish Football Association consider whether or not to buy the stadium from its current owners, Queens Park. An agreement for a purchase in principle was agreed recently but, as Telegraph Sport revealed this week, some on the SFA board have yet to be convinced that their organisation should take on the task of stadium ownership. Their counterparts at the Scottish Rugby Union own Murrayfield and have been lobbying hard for that Edinburgh ground to stage international football. Hearts played at Murrayfield earlier this season while the main stand at their Tynecastle home was reconstructed and Brown, a non-executive director at Aberdeen, sampled the ground first-hand when the Pittodrie side visited in September. “The atmosphere wasn’t what you would want for a football match,” Brown said. Leader: Alex McLeish is unveiled by the SFA as the new Scotland National Team manager at Hampden Park Credit: Getty “The Hearts folk would definitely agree with that. Look at the upturn in their form when they went back to Tynecastle. They were yearning to get back to Tynecastle and they kept saying it. Craig Levein said that their fortunes would change when they got back – and they did. “Murrayfield has a great atmosphere for the rugby but our fans were so far behind the goals they needed a telescope to see the game. “We’ve surely got to be ambitious enough to own our own stadium. Hampden is a stadium of neutrality for cup semi-finals and finals. If they get a good new surface you can play under-21 games, which you couldn’t do the day before senior internationals, because the schedule for the U-21s is now different. “You can’t live in the past. You’ve got to look forward, but Hampden is the spiritual home of Scottish football. It needs a wee bit of revamping if we can afford it. What an impact it would make if Ian Maxwell, the new SFA chief executive, could do that, but the purse strings are the next question we’ve got. Where are we going to get the money? Hampden Park was an exciting place to be during the recent Old Firm Cup semi Credit: Getty “Look what Fergus McCann did at Celtic Park. Incredible. Doing that here would be great. I’m surprised and disappointed that it’s still in the balance but with a bit of expenditure here – bring the two ends in – what a stadium you’ve got. The main stand is good and the north stand is good. “It’s behind the goal that you’re a bit far from the action. Some Scotland players liked playing at Ibrox or Celtic Park because the atmosphere was slightly better but when Leigh Griffiths scored his two goals vs England here last year the country was in ecstasy for five minutes and there was no hint of ‘what are we doing at Hampden?’ The place was buzzing. “Those two goals confirmed what it would be like if Scottish football was a success. I’m sure big Alex McLeish will get it like that. I really fancy him as the manager here.” Brown was speaking at an event at Hampden to mark the publication of a memoir about Scotland’s participation in the finals of six World Cup tournaments between 1974 and 1998 by veteran commentator Archie McPherson.* History: Alfredo Di Stefano scores for Real Madrid during the legendary 7-3 demolition of Eintracht Frankfurt in 1960 Credit: Getty Alex McLeish, the current Scotland manager, was also in attendance after having appeared earlier at the stadium to publicise the next round of Scottish Football Hall of Fame inductions. Asked to predict the outcome of the three-way race to finish second in the Scottish Premiership - involving Rangers, Aberdeen and Hibernian – McLeish said: “Aberdeen bounced back really well last week after a poor Scottish Cup semi-final. They did have Kenny McLean and Shay Logan back. “You need to have the players. It’s not easy for a manager if he doesn't quite have the replacements for top players when they go out of the team and that's always something that has to be factored in. “It shows that Aberdeen are capable and their experience of getting the second place in the last few years is going to stand them in good stead. Hibs are coming like a train at the moment - an unstoppable train - but, again, it's hard not see Rangers in the top two.” 1980: Scotland v England at Hampden Park. Kenny Dalglish beats his club mate Phil Thompson to the ball. Credit: Getty Of Sunday’s Old Firm derby at Parkhead, at which Celtic are overwhelming favourites to clinch a seventh successive title against a Rangers side who were beaten comprehensively by Brendan Rodgers’ players in the William Hill Scottish Cup semi-finals, McLeish said: “A draw's a disaster, a defeat is even worse. I can imagine the week that Graeme Murty had after the Celtic game but he bounced back with a good result. “Celtic will be huge favourites and Rangers haven't done well these games and there's always anticipation - could this be the one that Rangers get the result?” * Adventures in the Golden Age, by Archie McPherson (Black & White Publishing, £11.99)
Hampden Park must remain Scotland's football ground, says Craig Brown
Craig Brown added his voice to the calls for Hampden Park to remain Scotland’s home ground, as the Scottish Football Association consider whether or not to buy the stadium from its current owners, Queens Park. An agreement for a purchase in principle was agreed recently but, as Telegraph Sport revealed this week, some on the SFA board have yet to be convinced that their organisation should take on the task of stadium ownership. Their counterparts at the Scottish Rugby Union own Murrayfield and have been lobbying hard for that Edinburgh ground to stage international football. Hearts played at Murrayfield earlier this season while the main stand at their Tynecastle home was reconstructed and Brown, a non-executive director at Aberdeen, sampled the ground first-hand when the Pittodrie side visited in September. “The atmosphere wasn’t what you would want for a football match,” Brown said. Leader: Alex McLeish is unveiled by the SFA as the new Scotland National Team manager at Hampden Park Credit: Getty “The Hearts folk would definitely agree with that. Look at the upturn in their form when they went back to Tynecastle. They were yearning to get back to Tynecastle and they kept saying it. Craig Levein said that their fortunes would change when they got back – and they did. “Murrayfield has a great atmosphere for the rugby but our fans were so far behind the goals they needed a telescope to see the game. “We’ve surely got to be ambitious enough to own our own stadium. Hampden is a stadium of neutrality for cup semi-finals and finals. If they get a good new surface you can play under-21 games, which you couldn’t do the day before senior internationals, because the schedule for the U-21s is now different. “You can’t live in the past. You’ve got to look forward, but Hampden is the spiritual home of Scottish football. It needs a wee bit of revamping if we can afford it. What an impact it would make if Ian Maxwell, the new SFA chief executive, could do that, but the purse strings are the next question we’ve got. Where are we going to get the money? Hampden Park was an exciting place to be during the recent Old Firm Cup semi Credit: Getty “Look what Fergus McCann did at Celtic Park. Incredible. Doing that here would be great. I’m surprised and disappointed that it’s still in the balance but with a bit of expenditure here – bring the two ends in – what a stadium you’ve got. The main stand is good and the north stand is good. “It’s behind the goal that you’re a bit far from the action. Some Scotland players liked playing at Ibrox or Celtic Park because the atmosphere was slightly better but when Leigh Griffiths scored his two goals vs England here last year the country was in ecstasy for five minutes and there was no hint of ‘what are we doing at Hampden?’ The place was buzzing. “Those two goals confirmed what it would be like if Scottish football was a success. I’m sure big Alex McLeish will get it like that. I really fancy him as the manager here.” Brown was speaking at an event at Hampden to mark the publication of a memoir about Scotland’s participation in the finals of six World Cup tournaments between 1974 and 1998 by veteran commentator Archie McPherson.* History: Alfredo Di Stefano scores for Real Madrid during the legendary 7-3 demolition of Eintracht Frankfurt in 1960 Credit: Getty Alex McLeish, the current Scotland manager, was also in attendance after having appeared earlier at the stadium to publicise the next round of Scottish Football Hall of Fame inductions. Asked to predict the outcome of the three-way race to finish second in the Scottish Premiership - involving Rangers, Aberdeen and Hibernian – McLeish said: “Aberdeen bounced back really well last week after a poor Scottish Cup semi-final. They did have Kenny McLean and Shay Logan back. “You need to have the players. It’s not easy for a manager if he doesn't quite have the replacements for top players when they go out of the team and that's always something that has to be factored in. “It shows that Aberdeen are capable and their experience of getting the second place in the last few years is going to stand them in good stead. Hibs are coming like a train at the moment - an unstoppable train - but, again, it's hard not see Rangers in the top two.” 1980: Scotland v England at Hampden Park. Kenny Dalglish beats his club mate Phil Thompson to the ball. Credit: Getty Of Sunday’s Old Firm derby at Parkhead, at which Celtic are overwhelming favourites to clinch a seventh successive title against a Rangers side who were beaten comprehensively by Brendan Rodgers’ players in the William Hill Scottish Cup semi-finals, McLeish said: “A draw's a disaster, a defeat is even worse. I can imagine the week that Graeme Murty had after the Celtic game but he bounced back with a good result. “Celtic will be huge favourites and Rangers haven't done well these games and there's always anticipation - could this be the one that Rangers get the result?” * Adventures in the Golden Age, by Archie McPherson (Black & White Publishing, £11.99)
Craig Brown added his voice to the calls for Hampden Park to remain Scotland’s home ground, as the Scottish Football Association consider whether or not to buy the stadium from its current owners, Queens Park. An agreement for a purchase in principle was agreed recently but, as Telegraph Sport revealed this week, some on the SFA board have yet to be convinced that their organisation should take on the task of stadium ownership. Their counterparts at the Scottish Rugby Union own Murrayfield and have been lobbying hard for that Edinburgh ground to stage international football. Hearts played at Murrayfield earlier this season while the main stand at their Tynecastle home was reconstructed and Brown, a non-executive director at Aberdeen, sampled the ground first-hand when the Pittodrie side visited in September. “The atmosphere wasn’t what you would want for a football match,” Brown said. Leader: Alex McLeish is unveiled by the SFA as the new Scotland National Team manager at Hampden Park Credit: Getty “The Hearts folk would definitely agree with that. Look at the upturn in their form when they went back to Tynecastle. They were yearning to get back to Tynecastle and they kept saying it. Craig Levein said that their fortunes would change when they got back – and they did. “Murrayfield has a great atmosphere for the rugby but our fans were so far behind the goals they needed a telescope to see the game. “We’ve surely got to be ambitious enough to own our own stadium. Hampden is a stadium of neutrality for cup semi-finals and finals. If they get a good new surface you can play under-21 games, which you couldn’t do the day before senior internationals, because the schedule for the U-21s is now different. “You can’t live in the past. You’ve got to look forward, but Hampden is the spiritual home of Scottish football. It needs a wee bit of revamping if we can afford it. What an impact it would make if Ian Maxwell, the new SFA chief executive, could do that, but the purse strings are the next question we’ve got. Where are we going to get the money? Hampden Park was an exciting place to be during the recent Old Firm Cup semi Credit: Getty “Look what Fergus McCann did at Celtic Park. Incredible. Doing that here would be great. I’m surprised and disappointed that it’s still in the balance but with a bit of expenditure here – bring the two ends in – what a stadium you’ve got. The main stand is good and the north stand is good. “It’s behind the goal that you’re a bit far from the action. Some Scotland players liked playing at Ibrox or Celtic Park because the atmosphere was slightly better but when Leigh Griffiths scored his two goals vs England here last year the country was in ecstasy for five minutes and there was no hint of ‘what are we doing at Hampden?’ The place was buzzing. “Those two goals confirmed what it would be like if Scottish football was a success. I’m sure big Alex McLeish will get it like that. I really fancy him as the manager here.” Brown was speaking at an event at Hampden to mark the publication of a memoir about Scotland’s participation in the finals of six World Cup tournaments between 1974 and 1998 by veteran commentator Archie McPherson.* History: Alfredo Di Stefano scores for Real Madrid during the legendary 7-3 demolition of Eintracht Frankfurt in 1960 Credit: Getty Alex McLeish, the current Scotland manager, was also in attendance after having appeared earlier at the stadium to publicise the next round of Scottish Football Hall of Fame inductions. Asked to predict the outcome of the three-way race to finish second in the Scottish Premiership - involving Rangers, Aberdeen and Hibernian – McLeish said: “Aberdeen bounced back really well last week after a poor Scottish Cup semi-final. They did have Kenny McLean and Shay Logan back. “You need to have the players. It’s not easy for a manager if he doesn't quite have the replacements for top players when they go out of the team and that's always something that has to be factored in. “It shows that Aberdeen are capable and their experience of getting the second place in the last few years is going to stand them in good stead. Hibs are coming like a train at the moment - an unstoppable train - but, again, it's hard not see Rangers in the top two.” 1980: Scotland v England at Hampden Park. Kenny Dalglish beats his club mate Phil Thompson to the ball. Credit: Getty Of Sunday’s Old Firm derby at Parkhead, at which Celtic are overwhelming favourites to clinch a seventh successive title against a Rangers side who were beaten comprehensively by Brendan Rodgers’ players in the William Hill Scottish Cup semi-finals, McLeish said: “A draw's a disaster, a defeat is even worse. I can imagine the week that Graeme Murty had after the Celtic game but he bounced back with a good result. “Celtic will be huge favourites and Rangers haven't done well these games and there's always anticipation - could this be the one that Rangers get the result?” * Adventures in the Golden Age, by Archie McPherson (Black & White Publishing, £11.99)
Hampden Park must remain Scotland's football ground, says Craig Brown
Craig Brown added his voice to the calls for Hampden Park to remain Scotland’s home ground, as the Scottish Football Association consider whether or not to buy the stadium from its current owners, Queens Park. An agreement for a purchase in principle was agreed recently but, as Telegraph Sport revealed this week, some on the SFA board have yet to be convinced that their organisation should take on the task of stadium ownership. Their counterparts at the Scottish Rugby Union own Murrayfield and have been lobbying hard for that Edinburgh ground to stage international football. Hearts played at Murrayfield earlier this season while the main stand at their Tynecastle home was reconstructed and Brown, a non-executive director at Aberdeen, sampled the ground first-hand when the Pittodrie side visited in September. “The atmosphere wasn’t what you would want for a football match,” Brown said. Leader: Alex McLeish is unveiled by the SFA as the new Scotland National Team manager at Hampden Park Credit: Getty “The Hearts folk would definitely agree with that. Look at the upturn in their form when they went back to Tynecastle. They were yearning to get back to Tynecastle and they kept saying it. Craig Levein said that their fortunes would change when they got back – and they did. “Murrayfield has a great atmosphere for the rugby but our fans were so far behind the goals they needed a telescope to see the game. “We’ve surely got to be ambitious enough to own our own stadium. Hampden is a stadium of neutrality for cup semi-finals and finals. If they get a good new surface you can play under-21 games, which you couldn’t do the day before senior internationals, because the schedule for the U-21s is now different. “You can’t live in the past. You’ve got to look forward, but Hampden is the spiritual home of Scottish football. It needs a wee bit of revamping if we can afford it. What an impact it would make if Ian Maxwell, the new SFA chief executive, could do that, but the purse strings are the next question we’ve got. Where are we going to get the money? Hampden Park was an exciting place to be during the recent Old Firm Cup semi Credit: Getty “Look what Fergus McCann did at Celtic Park. Incredible. Doing that here would be great. I’m surprised and disappointed that it’s still in the balance but with a bit of expenditure here – bring the two ends in – what a stadium you’ve got. The main stand is good and the north stand is good. “It’s behind the goal that you’re a bit far from the action. Some Scotland players liked playing at Ibrox or Celtic Park because the atmosphere was slightly better but when Leigh Griffiths scored his two goals vs England here last year the country was in ecstasy for five minutes and there was no hint of ‘what are we doing at Hampden?’ The place was buzzing. “Those two goals confirmed what it would be like if Scottish football was a success. I’m sure big Alex McLeish will get it like that. I really fancy him as the manager here.” Brown was speaking at an event at Hampden to mark the publication of a memoir about Scotland’s participation in the finals of six World Cup tournaments between 1974 and 1998 by veteran commentator Archie McPherson.* History: Alfredo Di Stefano scores for Real Madrid during the legendary 7-3 demolition of Eintracht Frankfurt in 1960 Credit: Getty Alex McLeish, the current Scotland manager, was also in attendance after having appeared earlier at the stadium to publicise the next round of Scottish Football Hall of Fame inductions. Asked to predict the outcome of the three-way race to finish second in the Scottish Premiership - involving Rangers, Aberdeen and Hibernian – McLeish said: “Aberdeen bounced back really well last week after a poor Scottish Cup semi-final. They did have Kenny McLean and Shay Logan back. “You need to have the players. It’s not easy for a manager if he doesn't quite have the replacements for top players when they go out of the team and that's always something that has to be factored in. “It shows that Aberdeen are capable and their experience of getting the second place in the last few years is going to stand them in good stead. Hibs are coming like a train at the moment - an unstoppable train - but, again, it's hard not see Rangers in the top two.” 1980: Scotland v England at Hampden Park. Kenny Dalglish beats his club mate Phil Thompson to the ball. Credit: Getty Of Sunday’s Old Firm derby at Parkhead, at which Celtic are overwhelming favourites to clinch a seventh successive title against a Rangers side who were beaten comprehensively by Brendan Rodgers’ players in the William Hill Scottish Cup semi-finals, McLeish said: “A draw's a disaster, a defeat is even worse. I can imagine the week that Graeme Murty had after the Celtic game but he bounced back with a good result. “Celtic will be huge favourites and Rangers haven't done well these games and there's always anticipation - could this be the one that Rangers get the result?” * Adventures in the Golden Age, by Archie McPherson (Black & White Publishing, £11.99)
Craig Brown added his voice to the calls for Hampden Park to remain Scotland’s home ground, as the Scottish Football Association consider whether or not to buy the stadium from its current owners, Queens Park. An agreement for a purchase in principle was agreed recently but, as Telegraph Sport revealed this week, some on the SFA board have yet to be convinced that their organisation should take on the task of stadium ownership. Their counterparts at the Scottish Rugby Union own Murrayfield and have been lobbying hard for that Edinburgh ground to stage international football. Hearts played at Murrayfield earlier this season while the main stand at their Tynecastle home was reconstructed and Brown, a non-executive director at Aberdeen, sampled the ground first-hand when the Pittodrie side visited in September. “The atmosphere wasn’t what you would want for a football match,” Brown said. Leader: Alex McLeish is unveiled by the SFA as the new Scotland National Team manager at Hampden Park Credit: Getty “The Hearts folk would definitely agree with that. Look at the upturn in their form when they went back to Tynecastle. They were yearning to get back to Tynecastle and they kept saying it. Craig Levein said that their fortunes would change when they got back – and they did. “Murrayfield has a great atmosphere for the rugby but our fans were so far behind the goals they needed a telescope to see the game. “We’ve surely got to be ambitious enough to own our own stadium. Hampden is a stadium of neutrality for cup semi-finals and finals. If they get a good new surface you can play under-21 games, which you couldn’t do the day before senior internationals, because the schedule for the U-21s is now different. “You can’t live in the past. You’ve got to look forward, but Hampden is the spiritual home of Scottish football. It needs a wee bit of revamping if we can afford it. What an impact it would make if Ian Maxwell, the new SFA chief executive, could do that, but the purse strings are the next question we’ve got. Where are we going to get the money? Hampden Park was an exciting place to be during the recent Old Firm Cup semi Credit: Getty “Look what Fergus McCann did at Celtic Park. Incredible. Doing that here would be great. I’m surprised and disappointed that it’s still in the balance but with a bit of expenditure here – bring the two ends in – what a stadium you’ve got. The main stand is good and the north stand is good. “It’s behind the goal that you’re a bit far from the action. Some Scotland players liked playing at Ibrox or Celtic Park because the atmosphere was slightly better but when Leigh Griffiths scored his two goals vs England here last year the country was in ecstasy for five minutes and there was no hint of ‘what are we doing at Hampden?’ The place was buzzing. “Those two goals confirmed what it would be like if Scottish football was a success. I’m sure big Alex McLeish will get it like that. I really fancy him as the manager here.” Brown was speaking at an event at Hampden to mark the publication of a memoir about Scotland’s participation in the finals of six World Cup tournaments between 1974 and 1998 by veteran commentator Archie McPherson.* History: Alfredo Di Stefano scores for Real Madrid during the legendary 7-3 demolition of Eintracht Frankfurt in 1960 Credit: Getty Alex McLeish, the current Scotland manager, was also in attendance after having appeared earlier at the stadium to publicise the next round of Scottish Football Hall of Fame inductions. Asked to predict the outcome of the three-way race to finish second in the Scottish Premiership - involving Rangers, Aberdeen and Hibernian – McLeish said: “Aberdeen bounced back really well last week after a poor Scottish Cup semi-final. They did have Kenny McLean and Shay Logan back. “You need to have the players. It’s not easy for a manager if he doesn't quite have the replacements for top players when they go out of the team and that's always something that has to be factored in. “It shows that Aberdeen are capable and their experience of getting the second place in the last few years is going to stand them in good stead. Hibs are coming like a train at the moment - an unstoppable train - but, again, it's hard not see Rangers in the top two.” 1980: Scotland v England at Hampden Park. Kenny Dalglish beats his club mate Phil Thompson to the ball. Credit: Getty Of Sunday’s Old Firm derby at Parkhead, at which Celtic are overwhelming favourites to clinch a seventh successive title against a Rangers side who were beaten comprehensively by Brendan Rodgers’ players in the William Hill Scottish Cup semi-finals, McLeish said: “A draw's a disaster, a defeat is even worse. I can imagine the week that Graeme Murty had after the Celtic game but he bounced back with a good result. “Celtic will be huge favourites and Rangers haven't done well these games and there's always anticipation - could this be the one that Rangers get the result?” * Adventures in the Golden Age, by Archie McPherson (Black & White Publishing, £11.99)
Hampden Park must remain Scotland's football ground, says Craig Brown
Craig Brown added his voice to the calls for Hampden Park to remain Scotland’s home ground, as the Scottish Football Association consider whether or not to buy the stadium from its current owners, Queens Park. An agreement for a purchase in principle was agreed recently but, as Telegraph Sport revealed this week, some on the SFA board have yet to be convinced that their organisation should take on the task of stadium ownership. Their counterparts at the Scottish Rugby Union own Murrayfield and have been lobbying hard for that Edinburgh ground to stage international football. Hearts played at Murrayfield earlier this season while the main stand at their Tynecastle home was reconstructed and Brown, a non-executive director at Aberdeen, sampled the ground first-hand when the Pittodrie side visited in September. “The atmosphere wasn’t what you would want for a football match,” Brown said. Leader: Alex McLeish is unveiled by the SFA as the new Scotland National Team manager at Hampden Park Credit: Getty “The Hearts folk would definitely agree with that. Look at the upturn in their form when they went back to Tynecastle. They were yearning to get back to Tynecastle and they kept saying it. Craig Levein said that their fortunes would change when they got back – and they did. “Murrayfield has a great atmosphere for the rugby but our fans were so far behind the goals they needed a telescope to see the game. “We’ve surely got to be ambitious enough to own our own stadium. Hampden is a stadium of neutrality for cup semi-finals and finals. If they get a good new surface you can play under-21 games, which you couldn’t do the day before senior internationals, because the schedule for the U-21s is now different. “You can’t live in the past. You’ve got to look forward, but Hampden is the spiritual home of Scottish football. It needs a wee bit of revamping if we can afford it. What an impact it would make if Ian Maxwell, the new SFA chief executive, could do that, but the purse strings are the next question we’ve got. Where are we going to get the money? Hampden Park was an exciting place to be during the recent Old Firm Cup semi Credit: Getty “Look what Fergus McCann did at Celtic Park. Incredible. Doing that here would be great. I’m surprised and disappointed that it’s still in the balance but with a bit of expenditure here – bring the two ends in – what a stadium you’ve got. The main stand is good and the north stand is good. “It’s behind the goal that you’re a bit far from the action. Some Scotland players liked playing at Ibrox or Celtic Park because the atmosphere was slightly better but when Leigh Griffiths scored his two goals vs England here last year the country was in ecstasy for five minutes and there was no hint of ‘what are we doing at Hampden?’ The place was buzzing. “Those two goals confirmed what it would be like if Scottish football was a success. I’m sure big Alex McLeish will get it like that. I really fancy him as the manager here.” Brown was speaking at an event at Hampden to mark the publication of a memoir about Scotland’s participation in the finals of six World Cup tournaments between 1974 and 1998 by veteran commentator Archie McPherson.* History: Alfredo Di Stefano scores for Real Madrid during the legendary 7-3 demolition of Eintracht Frankfurt in 1960 Credit: Getty Alex McLeish, the current Scotland manager, was also in attendance after having appeared earlier at the stadium to publicise the next round of Scottish Football Hall of Fame inductions. Asked to predict the outcome of the three-way race to finish second in the Scottish Premiership - involving Rangers, Aberdeen and Hibernian – McLeish said: “Aberdeen bounced back really well last week after a poor Scottish Cup semi-final. They did have Kenny McLean and Shay Logan back. “You need to have the players. It’s not easy for a manager if he doesn't quite have the replacements for top players when they go out of the team and that's always something that has to be factored in. “It shows that Aberdeen are capable and their experience of getting the second place in the last few years is going to stand them in good stead. Hibs are coming like a train at the moment - an unstoppable train - but, again, it's hard not see Rangers in the top two.” 1980: Scotland v England at Hampden Park. Kenny Dalglish beats his club mate Phil Thompson to the ball. Credit: Getty Of Sunday’s Old Firm derby at Parkhead, at which Celtic are overwhelming favourites to clinch a seventh successive title against a Rangers side who were beaten comprehensively by Brendan Rodgers’ players in the William Hill Scottish Cup semi-finals, McLeish said: “A draw's a disaster, a defeat is even worse. I can imagine the week that Graeme Murty had after the Celtic game but he bounced back with a good result. “Celtic will be huge favourites and Rangers haven't done well these games and there's always anticipation - could this be the one that Rangers get the result?” * Adventures in the Golden Age, by Archie McPherson (Black & White Publishing, £11.99)
Craig Brown added his voice to the calls for Hampden Park to remain Scotland’s home ground, as the Scottish Football Association consider whether or not to buy the stadium from its current owners, Queens Park. An agreement for a purchase in principle was agreed recently but, as Telegraph Sport revealed this week, some on the SFA board have yet to be convinced that their organisation should take on the task of stadium ownership. Their counterparts at the Scottish Rugby Union own Murrayfield and have been lobbying hard for that Edinburgh ground to stage international football. Hearts played at Murrayfield earlier this season while the main stand at their Tynecastle home was reconstructed and Brown, a non-executive director at Aberdeen, sampled the ground first-hand when the Pittodrie side visited in September. “The atmosphere wasn’t what you would want for a football match,” Brown said. Leader: Alex McLeish is unveiled by the SFA as the new Scotland National Team manager at Hampden Park Credit: Getty “The Hearts folk would definitely agree with that. Look at the upturn in their form when they went back to Tynecastle. They were yearning to get back to Tynecastle and they kept saying it. Craig Levein said that their fortunes would change when they got back – and they did. “Murrayfield has a great atmosphere for the rugby but our fans were so far behind the goals they needed a telescope to see the game. “We’ve surely got to be ambitious enough to own our own stadium. Hampden is a stadium of neutrality for cup semi-finals and finals. If they get a good new surface you can play under-21 games, which you couldn’t do the day before senior internationals, because the schedule for the U-21s is now different. “You can’t live in the past. You’ve got to look forward, but Hampden is the spiritual home of Scottish football. It needs a wee bit of revamping if we can afford it. What an impact it would make if Ian Maxwell, the new SFA chief executive, could do that, but the purse strings are the next question we’ve got. Where are we going to get the money? Hampden Park was an exciting place to be during the recent Old Firm Cup semi Credit: Getty “Look what Fergus McCann did at Celtic Park. Incredible. Doing that here would be great. I’m surprised and disappointed that it’s still in the balance but with a bit of expenditure here – bring the two ends in – what a stadium you’ve got. The main stand is good and the north stand is good. “It’s behind the goal that you’re a bit far from the action. Some Scotland players liked playing at Ibrox or Celtic Park because the atmosphere was slightly better but when Leigh Griffiths scored his two goals vs England here last year the country was in ecstasy for five minutes and there was no hint of ‘what are we doing at Hampden?’ The place was buzzing. “Those two goals confirmed what it would be like if Scottish football was a success. I’m sure big Alex McLeish will get it like that. I really fancy him as the manager here.” Brown was speaking at an event at Hampden to mark the publication of a memoir about Scotland’s participation in the finals of six World Cup tournaments between 1974 and 1998 by veteran commentator Archie McPherson.* History: Alfredo Di Stefano scores for Real Madrid during the legendary 7-3 demolition of Eintracht Frankfurt in 1960 Credit: Getty Alex McLeish, the current Scotland manager, was also in attendance after having appeared earlier at the stadium to publicise the next round of Scottish Football Hall of Fame inductions. Asked to predict the outcome of the three-way race to finish second in the Scottish Premiership - involving Rangers, Aberdeen and Hibernian – McLeish said: “Aberdeen bounced back really well last week after a poor Scottish Cup semi-final. They did have Kenny McLean and Shay Logan back. “You need to have the players. It’s not easy for a manager if he doesn't quite have the replacements for top players when they go out of the team and that's always something that has to be factored in. “It shows that Aberdeen are capable and their experience of getting the second place in the last few years is going to stand them in good stead. Hibs are coming like a train at the moment - an unstoppable train - but, again, it's hard not see Rangers in the top two.” 1980: Scotland v England at Hampden Park. Kenny Dalglish beats his club mate Phil Thompson to the ball. Credit: Getty Of Sunday’s Old Firm derby at Parkhead, at which Celtic are overwhelming favourites to clinch a seventh successive title against a Rangers side who were beaten comprehensively by Brendan Rodgers’ players in the William Hill Scottish Cup semi-finals, McLeish said: “A draw's a disaster, a defeat is even worse. I can imagine the week that Graeme Murty had after the Celtic game but he bounced back with a good result. “Celtic will be huge favourites and Rangers haven't done well these games and there's always anticipation - could this be the one that Rangers get the result?” * Adventures in the Golden Age, by Archie McPherson (Black & White Publishing, £11.99)
Hampden Park must remain Scotland's football ground, says Craig Brown
Craig Brown added his voice to the calls for Hampden Park to remain Scotland’s home ground, as the Scottish Football Association consider whether or not to buy the stadium from its current owners, Queens Park. An agreement for a purchase in principle was agreed recently but, as Telegraph Sport revealed this week, some on the SFA board have yet to be convinced that their organisation should take on the task of stadium ownership. Their counterparts at the Scottish Rugby Union own Murrayfield and have been lobbying hard for that Edinburgh ground to stage international football. Hearts played at Murrayfield earlier this season while the main stand at their Tynecastle home was reconstructed and Brown, a non-executive director at Aberdeen, sampled the ground first-hand when the Pittodrie side visited in September. “The atmosphere wasn’t what you would want for a football match,” Brown said. Leader: Alex McLeish is unveiled by the SFA as the new Scotland National Team manager at Hampden Park Credit: Getty “The Hearts folk would definitely agree with that. Look at the upturn in their form when they went back to Tynecastle. They were yearning to get back to Tynecastle and they kept saying it. Craig Levein said that their fortunes would change when they got back – and they did. “Murrayfield has a great atmosphere for the rugby but our fans were so far behind the goals they needed a telescope to see the game. “We’ve surely got to be ambitious enough to own our own stadium. Hampden is a stadium of neutrality for cup semi-finals and finals. If they get a good new surface you can play under-21 games, which you couldn’t do the day before senior internationals, because the schedule for the U-21s is now different. “You can’t live in the past. You’ve got to look forward, but Hampden is the spiritual home of Scottish football. It needs a wee bit of revamping if we can afford it. What an impact it would make if Ian Maxwell, the new SFA chief executive, could do that, but the purse strings are the next question we’ve got. Where are we going to get the money? Hampden Park was an exciting place to be during the recent Old Firm Cup semi Credit: Getty “Look what Fergus McCann did at Celtic Park. Incredible. Doing that here would be great. I’m surprised and disappointed that it’s still in the balance but with a bit of expenditure here – bring the two ends in – what a stadium you’ve got. The main stand is good and the north stand is good. “It’s behind the goal that you’re a bit far from the action. Some Scotland players liked playing at Ibrox or Celtic Park because the atmosphere was slightly better but when Leigh Griffiths scored his two goals vs England here last year the country was in ecstasy for five minutes and there was no hint of ‘what are we doing at Hampden?’ The place was buzzing. “Those two goals confirmed what it would be like if Scottish football was a success. I’m sure big Alex McLeish will get it like that. I really fancy him as the manager here.” Brown was speaking at an event at Hampden to mark the publication of a memoir about Scotland’s participation in the finals of six World Cup tournaments between 1974 and 1998 by veteran commentator Archie McPherson.* History: Alfredo Di Stefano scores for Real Madrid during the legendary 7-3 demolition of Eintracht Frankfurt in 1960 Credit: Getty Alex McLeish, the current Scotland manager, was also in attendance after having appeared earlier at the stadium to publicise the next round of Scottish Football Hall of Fame inductions. Asked to predict the outcome of the three-way race to finish second in the Scottish Premiership - involving Rangers, Aberdeen and Hibernian – McLeish said: “Aberdeen bounced back really well last week after a poor Scottish Cup semi-final. They did have Kenny McLean and Shay Logan back. “You need to have the players. It’s not easy for a manager if he doesn't quite have the replacements for top players when they go out of the team and that's always something that has to be factored in. “It shows that Aberdeen are capable and their experience of getting the second place in the last few years is going to stand them in good stead. Hibs are coming like a train at the moment - an unstoppable train - but, again, it's hard not see Rangers in the top two.” 1980: Scotland v England at Hampden Park. Kenny Dalglish beats his club mate Phil Thompson to the ball. Credit: Getty Of Sunday’s Old Firm derby at Parkhead, at which Celtic are overwhelming favourites to clinch a seventh successive title against a Rangers side who were beaten comprehensively by Brendan Rodgers’ players in the William Hill Scottish Cup semi-finals, McLeish said: “A draw's a disaster, a defeat is even worse. I can imagine the week that Graeme Murty had after the Celtic game but he bounced back with a good result. “Celtic will be huge favourites and Rangers haven't done well these games and there's always anticipation - could this be the one that Rangers get the result?” * Adventures in the Golden Age, by Archie McPherson (Black & White Publishing, £11.99)
FILE PHOTO: Rugby Union - England Press Conference - Bagshot, Britain - February 2, 2018 England's Dylan Hartley during the press conference Action Images via Reuters/Andrew Boyers/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: England Press Conference
FILE PHOTO: Rugby Union - England Press Conference - Bagshot, Britain - February 2, 2018 England's Dylan Hartley during the press conference Action Images via Reuters/Andrew Boyers/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: Rugby Union - Six Nations Championship - England vs Ireland - Twickenham Stadium, London, Britain - March 17, 2018 England's Dylan Hartley looks dejected at the end of the match Action Images via Reuters/Andrew Boyers/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: Six Nations Championship - England vs Ireland
FILE PHOTO: Rugby Union - Six Nations Championship - England vs Ireland - Twickenham Stadium, London, Britain - March 17, 2018 England's Dylan Hartley looks dejected at the end of the match Action Images via Reuters/Andrew Boyers/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: Rugby Union - Six Nations Championship - England vs Wales - Twickenham Stadium, London, Britain - February 10, 2018 England’s Dylan Hartley with a bandage Action Images via Reuters/Paul Childs/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: Six Nations Championship - England vs Wales
FILE PHOTO: Rugby Union - Six Nations Championship - England vs Wales - Twickenham Stadium, London, Britain - February 10, 2018 England’s Dylan Hartley with a bandage Action Images via Reuters/Paul Childs/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: England's Dylan Hartley, sings the national anthem before the Rugby Union Six Nations Championship match between England and Ireland at Twickenham Stadium, London, Britain, March 17, 2018. REUTERS/Toby Melville/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: England's Dylan Hartley, sings the national anthem before the Rugby Union Six Nations Championship match between England and Ireland at Twickenham Stadium, London
FILE PHOTO: England's Dylan Hartley, sings the national anthem before the Rugby Union Six Nations Championship match between England and Ireland at Twickenham Stadium, London, Britain, March 17, 2018. REUTERS/Toby Melville/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: Rugby Union - Six Nations Championship - England vs Wales - Twickenham Stadium, London, Britain - February 10, 2018 England’s Jonathan Joseph in action Action Images via Reuters/Paul Childs/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: Six Nations Championship - England vs Wales
FILE PHOTO: Rugby Union - Six Nations Championship - England vs Wales - Twickenham Stadium, London, Britain - February 10, 2018 England’s Jonathan Joseph in action Action Images via Reuters/Paul Childs/File Photo
England's centre Jonathan Joseph prepares to release during the Six Nations international rugby union match against Wales at the Twickenham, west London, on February 10, 2018
England's centre Jonathan Joseph prepares to release during the Six Nations international rugby union match against Wales at the Twickenham, west London, on February 10, 2018
England's centre Jonathan Joseph prepares to release during the Six Nations international rugby union match against Wales at the Twickenham, west London, on February 10, 2018
England's centre Jonathan Joseph prepares to release during the Six Nations international rugby union match against Wales at the Twickenham, west London, on February 10, 2018 (AFP Photo/Ben STANSALL)
England's centre Jonathan Joseph prepares to release during the Six Nations international rugby union match against Wales at the Twickenham, west London, on February 10, 2018
England's centre Jonathan Joseph prepares to release during the Six Nations international rugby union match against Wales at the Twickenham, west London, on February 10, 2018 (AFP Photo/Ben STANSALL)
England's centre Jonathan Joseph prepares to release during the Six Nations international rugby union match against Wales at the Twickenham, west London, on February 10, 2018
England's centre Jonathan Joseph prepares to release during the Six Nations international rugby union match against Wales at the Twickenham, west London, on February 10, 2018
England's centre Jonathan Joseph prepares to release during the Six Nations international rugby union match against Wales at the Twickenham, west London, on February 10, 2018
FILE PHOTO: Rugby Union - Six Nations Championship - England vs Wales - Twickenham Stadium, London, Britain - February 10, 2018 England’s Jonathan Joseph in action Action Images via Reuters/Paul Childs/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: Six Nations Championship - England vs Wales
FILE PHOTO: Rugby Union - Six Nations Championship - England vs Wales - Twickenham Stadium, London, Britain - February 10, 2018 England’s Jonathan Joseph in action Action Images via Reuters/Paul Childs/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: Australia's Israel Folou (L) fends off the challenge of England's Owen Farrell during their international rugby union test match at Twickenham in London, November 2, 2013. REUTERS/Toby Melville
FILE PHOTO: Australia's Folou fends off the challenge of England's Farrell during their international rugby union test match in London
FILE PHOTO: Australia's Israel Folou (L) fends off the challenge of England's Owen Farrell during their international rugby union test match at Twickenham in London, November 2, 2013. REUTERS/Toby Melville
<p>Steaming scrum: The British & Irish Lions and Maori All Blacks engage during a match at Rotorua International Stadium in Rotorua, New Zealand, June 17, 2017.<br>All players in the Maori All Blacks must have a confirmed Maori whakapapa, or genealogy. The British & Irish Lions is a composite squad formed every year by players from England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland, selected by the coach who oversees the tour. The squad tours every four years through one of the southern hemisphere’s big three rugby union nations: Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. The Rotorua match was played in wet conditions and ended with a 10-32 win for the Lions. (Photo: Stephen McCarthy/SportsFile) </p>
Sports, second prize singles: Stephen McCarthy, Ireland

Steaming scrum: The British & Irish Lions and Maori All Blacks engage during a match at Rotorua International Stadium in Rotorua, New Zealand, June 17, 2017.
All players in the Maori All Blacks must have a confirmed Maori whakapapa, or genealogy. The British & Irish Lions is a composite squad formed every year by players from England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland, selected by the coach who oversees the tour. The squad tours every four years through one of the southern hemisphere’s big three rugby union nations: Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. The Rotorua match was played in wet conditions and ended with a 10-32 win for the Lions. (Photo: Stephen McCarthy/SportsFile)

Rugby Union - Six Nations Championship - England vs Ireland - Twickenham Stadium, London, Britain - March 17, 2018 England’s Dylan Hartley looks dejected at the end of the match Action Images via Reuters/Andrew Boyers
Six Nations Championship - England vs Ireland
Rugby Union - Six Nations Championship - England vs Ireland - Twickenham Stadium, London, Britain - March 17, 2018 England’s Dylan Hartley looks dejected at the end of the match Action Images via Reuters/Andrew Boyers
FILE PHOTO: Rugby Union - England Training - Pennyhill Park, Bagshot, Britain - March 14, 2018 England&#39;s Denny Solomona during training Action Images via Reuters/Adam Holt/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: Rugby Union - England Training
FILE PHOTO: Rugby Union - England Training - Pennyhill Park, Bagshot, Britain - March 14, 2018 England's Denny Solomona during training Action Images via Reuters/Adam Holt/File Photo
Rugby Union - England Training - Pennyhill Park, Bagshot, Britain - March 14, 2018 England&#39;s Denny Solomona during training Action Images via Reuters/Adam Holt
Rugby Union - England Training
Rugby Union - England Training - Pennyhill Park, Bagshot, Britain - March 14, 2018 England's Denny Solomona during training Action Images via Reuters/Adam Holt
FILE PHOTO: England&#39;s Dylan Hartley, sings the national anthem before the Rugby Union Six Nations Championship match between England and Ireland at Twickenham Stadium, London, Britain, March 17, 2018. REUTERS/Toby Melville/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: England's Dylan Hartley, sings the national anthem before the Rugby Union Six Nations Championship match between England and Ireland at Twickenham Stadium, London
FILE PHOTO: England's Dylan Hartley, sings the national anthem before the Rugby Union Six Nations Championship match between England and Ireland at Twickenham Stadium, London, Britain, March 17, 2018. REUTERS/Toby Melville/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: Britain Rugby Union - England v Australia - 2016 Old Mutual Wealth Series - Twickenham Stadium, London, England - 3/12/16 England&#39;s Courtney Lawes in action with Australia&#39;s Israel Folau Action Images via Reuters / Henry Browne Livepic
FILE PHOTO: England's Courtney Lawes in action with Australia's Israel Folau
FILE PHOTO: Britain Rugby Union - England v Australia - 2016 Old Mutual Wealth Series - Twickenham Stadium, London, England - 3/12/16 England's Courtney Lawes in action with Australia's Israel Folau Action Images via Reuters / Henry Browne Livepic
FILE PHOTO: Britain Rugby Union - England v Australia - 2016 Old Mutual Wealth Series - Twickenham Stadium, London, England - 3/12/16 Australia&#39;s Israel Folau in action Action Images via Reuters / Henry Browne Livepic EDITORIAL USE ONLY.
FILE PHOTO: Australia's Israel Folau in action
FILE PHOTO: Britain Rugby Union - England v Australia - 2016 Old Mutual Wealth Series - Twickenham Stadium, London, England - 3/12/16 Australia's Israel Folau in action Action Images via Reuters / Henry Browne Livepic EDITORIAL USE ONLY.
Rugby Union - England Training - Bagshot, Britain - February 2, 2018 England&#39;s Ben Youngs during training Action Images via Reuters/Andrew Boyers
England Training
Rugby Union - England Training - Bagshot, Britain - February 2, 2018 England's Ben Youngs during training Action Images via Reuters/Andrew Boyers
Rugby Union - Six Nations Championship - England vs Ireland - Twickenham Stadium, London, Britain - March 17, 2018 Ireland’s Conor Murray celebrates at the end of the match REUTERS/Toby Melville
Six Nations Championship - England vs Ireland
Rugby Union - Six Nations Championship - England vs Ireland - Twickenham Stadium, London, Britain - March 17, 2018 Ireland’s Conor Murray celebrates at the end of the match REUTERS/Toby Melville
Rugby Union - Rugby Test - England v Australia&#39;s Wallabies - Brisbane, Australia - 11/06/16. Injured Wallaby David Pocock reacts in the second half. REUTERS/Jason O&#39;Brien
England v Australia Wallabies - Rugby Test
Rugby Union - Rugby Test - England v Australia's Wallabies - Brisbane, Australia - 11/06/16. Injured Wallaby David Pocock reacts in the second half. REUTERS/Jason O'Brien

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