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Georgia slideshow

Rugby Union - England Training - Latymer Upper School Playing Fields, London, Britain - February 13, 2018 England's Danny Care and Georgia players during training Action Images via Reuters/Peter Cziborra
England Training
Rugby Union - England Training - Latymer Upper School Playing Fields, London, Britain - February 13, 2018 England's Danny Care and Georgia players during training Action Images via Reuters/Peter Cziborra
Rugby Union - England Training - Latymer Upper School Playing Fields, London, Britain - February 13, 2018 England and Georgia players during scrum practice Action Images via Reuters/Peter Cziborra
England Training
Rugby Union - England Training - Latymer Upper School Playing Fields, London, Britain - February 13, 2018 England and Georgia players during scrum practice Action Images via Reuters/Peter Cziborra
Sunday 4 February Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: new Endeavour, a weepy Call the Midwife and McMafia reaches boiling point
Sunday 4 February Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Sunday 4 February Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: new Endeavour, a weepy Call the Midwife and McMafia reaches boiling point
Sunday 4 February Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Saturday 3 February Hard Sun BBC One, 9.30pm Five weeks in, and the BBC’s relentlessly dark, eye-wateringly violent thriller is not making much more sense than it did at the outset. All we really know is that those unlikely cops Hicks (Jim Sturgess) and Renko (Agyness Deyn) are still racing around London trying to outsmart MI5, using their belief that the world will end in a little under five years to justify doing indescribably horrible things to some indescribably horrible people. The bloody opening to this episode (suffice to say it involves an ice axe) follows on from last week’s ending in which uber-spook Grace Morrigan (Nikki Amuka-Bird) helpfully gave Renko’s psychopath son Daniel (Jojo Macari) details of who it was that raped his mother at the age 14, with predictable consequences. And guess who’s given the job of investigating the case? That’s the sort of circular plotting that gives Neil Cross’s drama its pace, intensity and throbbing sense of paranoia. But the only thing that’s truly mysterious here is how Hicks and Renko, with the security forces still breathing down their necks in pursuit of the flashdrive containing “proof” of the impending apocalypse, have any time left for the day job. Gerard O’Donovan Hugh’s Wild West BBC Two, 6.00pm; NI, 6.30pm; Wales, 5.30pm Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall heads for the Somerset Levels to witness a spectacular “murmuration” of starlings. He also discovers how one native species of butterfly was rescued from the brink of extinction. The Voice UK ITV, 8.00pm The singing contest’s second series on ITV continues to plod along, with singer Olly Murs making no great impact on the show, as yet. The blind auditions enter their fifth week with more contestants hoping that their performances will be enough to make the coaches spin their chairs. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm Jeremy Hunt may not have predicted this year’s winter NHS crisis, but the writers of Casualty did. Here, the emergency department is in gridlock, with trolleys blocking corridors and ambulances queuing outside to admit patients. It’s just as well then that new junior doctor Bea Kinsella (Michelle Fox) is keen to get stuck in. Or is it? Grand Tours of Scotland’s Lochs BBC Two, 8.30pm In an unexpectedly explosive edition, Paul Murton visits Loch Shin, where a meteor hit the Highlands 1.2 billion years ago. Then, at Kylesku, he recalls how Britain’s “X Men” helped to destroy one of Germany’s greatest battleships during the Second World War. Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears Sky Arts, 9.00pm This documentary celebrates one of the Man in Black’s lesser-known works, his 1964 album Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian. It was a pioneering – and at the time controversial – album, which he used to draw attention to the long-running oppression of America’s native peoples. The film also covers the making of a commemorative tribute album by Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Kris Kristofferson and other country music stars. Spiral BBC Four, 9.00pm & 10.00pm The sixth series of this wonderfully gritty French policier, that’s been fraught even by its own standards, comes to a nail-biting climax. As gangster Drissa Camara (Narcisse Mame-Zollo) is betrayed over a gold deal, Captain Laure (Caroline Proust) and her detective team get the break they need in the Mercier case and lawyer Joséphine (Audrey Fleurot) realises that sticking to her story could place her in real jeopardy. Hamlet (1948, b/w) ★★★★★ London Live, 3.00pm This version of Shakespeare’s Hamlet was adapted and directed by Laurence Olivier, who also starred as the troubled Prince of Denmark. Despite winning the Academy Award for Best Picture, purists felt that Olivier had taken liberties with the text, condensing four hours into two and removing the characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. But the action remains tight and Olivier is magnificent. Suffragette (2015) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Never mind the respectable cast and period costumes – Sarah Gavron’s fiery film about the fight for women’s suffrage is far from genteel. Carey Mulligan is on form showing the transformation of Maud from bystander to activist with riveting emotional precision. As Abi Morgan’s script strips away the reasons for her to fall back into line, her nerve soars through the roof. The Talented Mr Ripley (1999) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.30pm Anthony Minghella’s glossy take on Patricia Highsmith’s novel is an engaging noir thriller with a pitch-perfect ending. New York wannabe Tom Ripley’s life changes when he begins lusting after the lifestyle of an errant playboy (Jude Law) in Italy. Matt Damon is suitably sinister in the lead role, with Philip Seymour Hoffman equally as magnificent as a bulldozer who ruptures Tom’s cosy idyll. Sunday 4 February Endeavour: Shaun Evans and Roger Allam Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Hard Sun, The Voice UK and more
Saturday 3 February Hard Sun BBC One, 9.30pm Five weeks in, and the BBC’s relentlessly dark, eye-wateringly violent thriller is not making much more sense than it did at the outset. All we really know is that those unlikely cops Hicks (Jim Sturgess) and Renko (Agyness Deyn) are still racing around London trying to outsmart MI5, using their belief that the world will end in a little under five years to justify doing indescribably horrible things to some indescribably horrible people. The bloody opening to this episode (suffice to say it involves an ice axe) follows on from last week’s ending in which uber-spook Grace Morrigan (Nikki Amuka-Bird) helpfully gave Renko’s psychopath son Daniel (Jojo Macari) details of who it was that raped his mother at the age 14, with predictable consequences. And guess who’s given the job of investigating the case? That’s the sort of circular plotting that gives Neil Cross’s drama its pace, intensity and throbbing sense of paranoia. But the only thing that’s truly mysterious here is how Hicks and Renko, with the security forces still breathing down their necks in pursuit of the flashdrive containing “proof” of the impending apocalypse, have any time left for the day job. Gerard O’Donovan Hugh’s Wild West BBC Two, 6.00pm; NI, 6.30pm; Wales, 5.30pm Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall heads for the Somerset Levels to witness a spectacular “murmuration” of starlings. He also discovers how one native species of butterfly was rescued from the brink of extinction. The Voice UK ITV, 8.00pm The singing contest’s second series on ITV continues to plod along, with singer Olly Murs making no great impact on the show, as yet. The blind auditions enter their fifth week with more contestants hoping that their performances will be enough to make the coaches spin their chairs. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm Jeremy Hunt may not have predicted this year’s winter NHS crisis, but the writers of Casualty did. Here, the emergency department is in gridlock, with trolleys blocking corridors and ambulances queuing outside to admit patients. It’s just as well then that new junior doctor Bea Kinsella (Michelle Fox) is keen to get stuck in. Or is it? Grand Tours of Scotland’s Lochs BBC Two, 8.30pm In an unexpectedly explosive edition, Paul Murton visits Loch Shin, where a meteor hit the Highlands 1.2 billion years ago. Then, at Kylesku, he recalls how Britain’s “X Men” helped to destroy one of Germany’s greatest battleships during the Second World War. Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears Sky Arts, 9.00pm This documentary celebrates one of the Man in Black’s lesser-known works, his 1964 album Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian. It was a pioneering – and at the time controversial – album, which he used to draw attention to the long-running oppression of America’s native peoples. The film also covers the making of a commemorative tribute album by Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Kris Kristofferson and other country music stars. Spiral BBC Four, 9.00pm & 10.00pm The sixth series of this wonderfully gritty French policier, that’s been fraught even by its own standards, comes to a nail-biting climax. As gangster Drissa Camara (Narcisse Mame-Zollo) is betrayed over a gold deal, Captain Laure (Caroline Proust) and her detective team get the break they need in the Mercier case and lawyer Joséphine (Audrey Fleurot) realises that sticking to her story could place her in real jeopardy. Hamlet (1948, b/w) ★★★★★ London Live, 3.00pm This version of Shakespeare’s Hamlet was adapted and directed by Laurence Olivier, who also starred as the troubled Prince of Denmark. Despite winning the Academy Award for Best Picture, purists felt that Olivier had taken liberties with the text, condensing four hours into two and removing the characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. But the action remains tight and Olivier is magnificent. Suffragette (2015) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Never mind the respectable cast and period costumes – Sarah Gavron’s fiery film about the fight for women’s suffrage is far from genteel. Carey Mulligan is on form showing the transformation of Maud from bystander to activist with riveting emotional precision. As Abi Morgan’s script strips away the reasons for her to fall back into line, her nerve soars through the roof. The Talented Mr Ripley (1999) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.30pm Anthony Minghella’s glossy take on Patricia Highsmith’s novel is an engaging noir thriller with a pitch-perfect ending. New York wannabe Tom Ripley’s life changes when he begins lusting after the lifestyle of an errant playboy (Jude Law) in Italy. Matt Damon is suitably sinister in the lead role, with Philip Seymour Hoffman equally as magnificent as a bulldozer who ruptures Tom’s cosy idyll. Sunday 4 February Endeavour: Shaun Evans and Roger Allam Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Saturday 3 February Hard Sun BBC One, 9.30pm Five weeks in, and the BBC’s relentlessly dark, eye-wateringly violent thriller is not making much more sense than it did at the outset. All we really know is that those unlikely cops Hicks (Jim Sturgess) and Renko (Agyness Deyn) are still racing around London trying to outsmart MI5, using their belief that the world will end in a little under five years to justify doing indescribably horrible things to some indescribably horrible people. The bloody opening to this episode (suffice to say it involves an ice axe) follows on from last week’s ending in which uber-spook Grace Morrigan (Nikki Amuka-Bird) helpfully gave Renko’s psychopath son Daniel (Jojo Macari) details of who it was that raped his mother at the age 14, with predictable consequences. And guess who’s given the job of investigating the case? That’s the sort of circular plotting that gives Neil Cross’s drama its pace, intensity and throbbing sense of paranoia. But the only thing that’s truly mysterious here is how Hicks and Renko, with the security forces still breathing down their necks in pursuit of the flashdrive containing “proof” of the impending apocalypse, have any time left for the day job. Gerard O’Donovan Hugh’s Wild West BBC Two, 6.00pm; NI, 6.30pm; Wales, 5.30pm Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall heads for the Somerset Levels to witness a spectacular “murmuration” of starlings. He also discovers how one native species of butterfly was rescued from the brink of extinction. The Voice UK ITV, 8.00pm The singing contest’s second series on ITV continues to plod along, with singer Olly Murs making no great impact on the show, as yet. The blind auditions enter their fifth week with more contestants hoping that their performances will be enough to make the coaches spin their chairs. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm Jeremy Hunt may not have predicted this year’s winter NHS crisis, but the writers of Casualty did. Here, the emergency department is in gridlock, with trolleys blocking corridors and ambulances queuing outside to admit patients. It’s just as well then that new junior doctor Bea Kinsella (Michelle Fox) is keen to get stuck in. Or is it? Grand Tours of Scotland’s Lochs BBC Two, 8.30pm In an unexpectedly explosive edition, Paul Murton visits Loch Shin, where a meteor hit the Highlands 1.2 billion years ago. Then, at Kylesku, he recalls how Britain’s “X Men” helped to destroy one of Germany’s greatest battleships during the Second World War. Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears Sky Arts, 9.00pm This documentary celebrates one of the Man in Black’s lesser-known works, his 1964 album Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian. It was a pioneering – and at the time controversial – album, which he used to draw attention to the long-running oppression of America’s native peoples. The film also covers the making of a commemorative tribute album by Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Kris Kristofferson and other country music stars. Spiral BBC Four, 9.00pm & 10.00pm The sixth series of this wonderfully gritty French policier, that’s been fraught even by its own standards, comes to a nail-biting climax. As gangster Drissa Camara (Narcisse Mame-Zollo) is betrayed over a gold deal, Captain Laure (Caroline Proust) and her detective team get the break they need in the Mercier case and lawyer Joséphine (Audrey Fleurot) realises that sticking to her story could place her in real jeopardy. Hamlet (1948, b/w) ★★★★★ London Live, 3.00pm This version of Shakespeare’s Hamlet was adapted and directed by Laurence Olivier, who also starred as the troubled Prince of Denmark. Despite winning the Academy Award for Best Picture, purists felt that Olivier had taken liberties with the text, condensing four hours into two and removing the characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. But the action remains tight and Olivier is magnificent. Suffragette (2015) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Never mind the respectable cast and period costumes – Sarah Gavron’s fiery film about the fight for women’s suffrage is far from genteel. Carey Mulligan is on form showing the transformation of Maud from bystander to activist with riveting emotional precision. As Abi Morgan’s script strips away the reasons for her to fall back into line, her nerve soars through the roof. The Talented Mr Ripley (1999) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.30pm Anthony Minghella’s glossy take on Patricia Highsmith’s novel is an engaging noir thriller with a pitch-perfect ending. New York wannabe Tom Ripley’s life changes when he begins lusting after the lifestyle of an errant playboy (Jude Law) in Italy. Matt Damon is suitably sinister in the lead role, with Philip Seymour Hoffman equally as magnificent as a bulldozer who ruptures Tom’s cosy idyll. Sunday 4 February Endeavour: Shaun Evans and Roger Allam Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Hard Sun, The Voice UK and more
Saturday 3 February Hard Sun BBC One, 9.30pm Five weeks in, and the BBC’s relentlessly dark, eye-wateringly violent thriller is not making much more sense than it did at the outset. All we really know is that those unlikely cops Hicks (Jim Sturgess) and Renko (Agyness Deyn) are still racing around London trying to outsmart MI5, using their belief that the world will end in a little under five years to justify doing indescribably horrible things to some indescribably horrible people. The bloody opening to this episode (suffice to say it involves an ice axe) follows on from last week’s ending in which uber-spook Grace Morrigan (Nikki Amuka-Bird) helpfully gave Renko’s psychopath son Daniel (Jojo Macari) details of who it was that raped his mother at the age 14, with predictable consequences. And guess who’s given the job of investigating the case? That’s the sort of circular plotting that gives Neil Cross’s drama its pace, intensity and throbbing sense of paranoia. But the only thing that’s truly mysterious here is how Hicks and Renko, with the security forces still breathing down their necks in pursuit of the flashdrive containing “proof” of the impending apocalypse, have any time left for the day job. Gerard O’Donovan Hugh’s Wild West BBC Two, 6.00pm; NI, 6.30pm; Wales, 5.30pm Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall heads for the Somerset Levels to witness a spectacular “murmuration” of starlings. He also discovers how one native species of butterfly was rescued from the brink of extinction. The Voice UK ITV, 8.00pm The singing contest’s second series on ITV continues to plod along, with singer Olly Murs making no great impact on the show, as yet. The blind auditions enter their fifth week with more contestants hoping that their performances will be enough to make the coaches spin their chairs. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm Jeremy Hunt may not have predicted this year’s winter NHS crisis, but the writers of Casualty did. Here, the emergency department is in gridlock, with trolleys blocking corridors and ambulances queuing outside to admit patients. It’s just as well then that new junior doctor Bea Kinsella (Michelle Fox) is keen to get stuck in. Or is it? Grand Tours of Scotland’s Lochs BBC Two, 8.30pm In an unexpectedly explosive edition, Paul Murton visits Loch Shin, where a meteor hit the Highlands 1.2 billion years ago. Then, at Kylesku, he recalls how Britain’s “X Men” helped to destroy one of Germany’s greatest battleships during the Second World War. Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears Sky Arts, 9.00pm This documentary celebrates one of the Man in Black’s lesser-known works, his 1964 album Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian. It was a pioneering – and at the time controversial – album, which he used to draw attention to the long-running oppression of America’s native peoples. The film also covers the making of a commemorative tribute album by Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Kris Kristofferson and other country music stars. Spiral BBC Four, 9.00pm & 10.00pm The sixth series of this wonderfully gritty French policier, that’s been fraught even by its own standards, comes to a nail-biting climax. As gangster Drissa Camara (Narcisse Mame-Zollo) is betrayed over a gold deal, Captain Laure (Caroline Proust) and her detective team get the break they need in the Mercier case and lawyer Joséphine (Audrey Fleurot) realises that sticking to her story could place her in real jeopardy. Hamlet (1948, b/w) ★★★★★ London Live, 3.00pm This version of Shakespeare’s Hamlet was adapted and directed by Laurence Olivier, who also starred as the troubled Prince of Denmark. Despite winning the Academy Award for Best Picture, purists felt that Olivier had taken liberties with the text, condensing four hours into two and removing the characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. But the action remains tight and Olivier is magnificent. Suffragette (2015) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Never mind the respectable cast and period costumes – Sarah Gavron’s fiery film about the fight for women’s suffrage is far from genteel. Carey Mulligan is on form showing the transformation of Maud from bystander to activist with riveting emotional precision. As Abi Morgan’s script strips away the reasons for her to fall back into line, her nerve soars through the roof. The Talented Mr Ripley (1999) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.30pm Anthony Minghella’s glossy take on Patricia Highsmith’s novel is an engaging noir thriller with a pitch-perfect ending. New York wannabe Tom Ripley’s life changes when he begins lusting after the lifestyle of an errant playboy (Jude Law) in Italy. Matt Damon is suitably sinister in the lead role, with Philip Seymour Hoffman equally as magnificent as a bulldozer who ruptures Tom’s cosy idyll. Sunday 4 February Endeavour: Shaun Evans and Roger Allam Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Friday 2 February Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm The glut of psychological suspense dramas on our screens makes it hard for new thrillers to stand out but do make time for the BBC’s haunting and unusual Requiem. Smartly directed by rising star Mahalia Belo, who knows exactly what to do and when to raise the hairs on the back of your neck, this new six-part series melds horror with crime to tell the story of the highly strung Matilda (Lydia Wilson), a promising young cellist whose self-contained world is thrown into disarray by an unexpected and violent death. After walking out on her long-dreamt-of US tour, Matilda and her faithful accompanist Hal (Joel Fry, excellent in a rare serious role) head to Wales, where grief and past secrets threaten to engulf both her and everyone she comes into contact with. To say any more would be unfair but Australian writer Kris Mrksa (best known for crime drama Underbelly) plays a very clever game with the genre, referencing everything from Don’t Look Now to Rosemary’s Baby and ensuring that the audience is both on the back foot and desperate to find out more. Beautifully paced and intelligently told, the resulting story is worth staying in on a Friday night for. Sarah Hughes Altered Carbon Netflix, from today “The first thing you’ll learn is that nothing is as it seems,” intones the solemn voice-over in this adaptation of Richard Morgan’s excellent novel from 2002. Netflix’s latest foray into hardcore science fiction follows a prisoner who, after 250 years in suspended animation, returns to life in a new body with one chance to win his freedom: solving a mind-bending murder. It’s stylishly shot, and features a strong cast, including James Purefoy, Joel Kinnaman, and Hamilton star Renée Elise Goldsberry. Anglo-Welsh Cup: Northampton Saints v Harlequins BT Sport 1, 7.15pm Out-of-sorts Northampton, who’ve won just one of their last eight Premiership games, face Harlequins in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at Franklin’s Gardens. The last time these teams met, in December, Quins ran in seven tries, with Dave Ward, Danny Care and Tim Visser among the scorers, as Saints slumped to an embarrassing 50-21 defeat at Twickenham. Super League: St Helens v Castleford Tigers Sky Sports Main Event, 7.30pm The Totally Wicked Stadium host the action as St Helens and Castleford Tigers get their seasons under way. These sides last met in the semi-finals of last year’s competition in September, with the Tigers winning a dramatic match at the Mend-a-Hose Jungle 23-22 after extra-time, setting up a Grand Final meeting with Leeds Rhinos. Celebrity 5 Go Barging Channel 5, 8.00pm Last year, four celebrities gave us laughs as they took to the canals of England and Wales for the first run of this series. Now it returns with a new motley crew – Tom Conti, Diarmuid Gavin, Tessa Sanderson, Tony Christie and Penny Smith – and this time they are heading to France. So expect some crashes and fireworks. A Vicar’s Life BBC Two, 8.30pm; not Wales The likeable series about vicars in Herefordshire continues with assistant curate Father Matthew Cashmore joining a relief effort taking aid to refugees in Calais, while his boss, the Reverend Ruth Hulse comes up with a novel way of boosting church attendance. Nigel Slater’s Middle East BBC Two, 9.00pm; not Wales Nigel Slater is the sort of company you want on a food journey: enthusiastic, interesting and curious about the places he visits. This new series sees him heading throughout the Middle East, starting off in the food paradise of Beirut before moving on to the Beqaa Valley. Hits, Hype & Hustle: An Insider’s Guide to the Music Business BBC Four, 9.00pm The music industry guide concludes with a focus on reunions, presented by PR man Alan Edwards. “It was supposed to be edge of the seat stuff but, in reality, it was end of the pier,” he says, with a wicked grin, of the Sex Pistols reunion he engineered. Elsewhere, we’re treated to footage of Debbie Harry performing with a giant pair of horns on her head. SH Celebrity Big Brother: Live Final Channel 5, from 9.00pm This series of the reality show, which is celebrating the year of the woman, apparently, reaches its finale. Sadly, the all-female house was short lived and the series has been reduced to the usual mix of crude comments and bed-hopping. SH King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Guy Ritchie’s combat-heavy Camelot is a very silly place. It sets up Arthur (Charlie Hunnam) as a Moses figure who’s sent to Londinium when Vortigern (Jude Law) overthrows Camelot. What follows is a quick-witted caper, but the sword-pulling scene is sabotaged by a David Beckham cameo that saps the moment of its mythic excitement. Sorcerer (1977) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm Given the wild success that William Friedkin had achieved with The French Connection (1971) and The Exorcist (1973), the catastrophic failure of Sorcerer, a thrillingly downbeat action film about truck drivers, counted as the bitterest blow of his career: he’s always talked about it as his favourite film. Indeed, it’s far too technically accomplished and conceptually bold to have deserved such short shrift. This Is 40 (2012) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 12.10am Judd Apatow revisits two characters from his 2007 hit Knocked Up. Leslie Mann, Apatow’s wife, and Paul Rudd play a stressed-out Los Angeles couple whose 40th birthdays bookend the film. Apatow and Mann’s real-life daughters also play their children. It’s a perceptive comedy on middle-age and one that guarantees big laughs alongside some of Apatow’s most pertinent observations on love. Saturday 3 February Hard Sun: Agyness Deyn Hard Sun BBC One, 9.30pm Five weeks in, and the BBC’s relentlessly dark, eye-wateringly violent thriller is not making much more sense than it did at the outset. All we really know is that those unlikely cops Hicks (Jim Sturgess) and Renko (Agyness Deyn) are still racing around London trying to outsmart MI5, using their belief that the world will end in a little under five years to justify doing indescribably horrible things to some indescribably horrible people. The bloody opening to this episode (suffice to say it involves an ice axe) follows on from last week’s ending in which uber-spook Grace Morrigan (Nikki Amuka-Bird) helpfully gave Renko’s psychopath son Daniel (Jojo Macari) details of who it was that raped his mother at the age 14, with predictable consequences. And guess who’s given the job of investigating the case? That’s the sort of circular plotting that gives Neil Cross’s drama its pace, intensity and throbbing sense of paranoia. But the only thing that’s truly mysterious here is how Hicks and Renko, with the security forces still breathing down their necks in pursuit of the flashdrive containing “proof” of the impending apocalypse, have any time left for the day job. Gerard O’Donovan Hugh’s Wild West BBC Two, 6.00pm; NI, 6.30pm; Wales, 5.30pm Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall heads for the Somerset Levels to witness a spectacular “murmuration” of starlings. He also discovers how one native species of butterfly was rescued from the brink of extinction. The Voice UK ITV, 8.00pm The singing contest’s second series on ITV continues to plod along, with singer Olly Murs making no great impact on the show, as yet. The blind auditions enter their fifth week with more contestants hoping that their performances will be enough to make the coaches spin their chairs. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm Jeremy Hunt may not have predicted this year’s winter NHS crisis, but the writers of Casualty did. Here, the emergency department is in gridlock, with trolleys blocking corridors and ambulances queuing outside to admit patients. It’s just as well then that new junior doctor Bea Kinsella (Michelle Fox) is keen to get stuck in. Or is it? Grand Tours of Scotland’s Lochs BBC Two, 8.30pm In an unexpectedly explosive edition, Paul Murton visits Loch Shin, where a meteor hit the Highlands 1.2 billion years ago. Then, at Kylesku, he recalls how Britain’s “X Men” helped to destroy one of Germany’s greatest battleships during the Second World War. Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears Sky Arts, 9.00pm This documentary celebrates one of the Man in Black’s lesser-known works, his 1964 album Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian. It was a pioneering – and at the time controversial – album, which he used to draw attention to the long-running oppression of America’s native peoples. The film also covers the making of a commemorative tribute album by Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Kris Kristofferson and other country music stars. Spiral BBC Four, 9.00pm & 10.00pm The sixth series of this wonderfully gritty French policier, that’s been fraught even by its own standards, comes to a nail-biting climax. As gangster Drissa Camara (Narcisse Mame-Zollo) is betrayed over a gold deal, Captain Laure (Caroline Proust) and her detective team get the break they need in the Mercier case and lawyer Joséphine (Audrey Fleurot) realises that sticking to her story could place her in real jeopardy. Hamlet (1948, b/w) ★★★★★ London Live, 3.00pm This version of Shakespeare’s Hamlet was adapted and directed by Laurence Olivier, who also starred as the troubled Prince of Denmark. Despite winning the Academy Award for Best Picture, purists felt that Olivier had taken liberties with the text, condensing four hours into two and removing the characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. But the action remains tight and Olivier is magnificent. Suffragette (2015) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Never mind the respectable cast and period costumes – Sarah Gavron’s fiery film about the fight for women’s suffrage is far from genteel. Carey Mulligan is on form showing the transformation of Maud from bystander to activist with riveting emotional precision. As Abi Morgan’s script strips away the reasons for her to fall back into line, her nerve soars through the roof. The Talented Mr Ripley (1999) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.30pm Anthony Minghella’s glossy take on Patricia Highsmith’s novel is an engaging noir thriller with a pitch-perfect ending. New York wannabe Tom Ripley’s life changes when he begins lusting after the lifestyle of an errant playboy (Jude Law) in Italy. Matt Damon is suitably sinister in the lead role, with Philip Seymour Hoffman equally as magnificent as a bulldozer who ruptures Tom’s cosy idyll. Sunday 4 February Endeavour: Shaun Evans and Roger Allam Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Requiem, Altered Carbon and more
Friday 2 February Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm The glut of psychological suspense dramas on our screens makes it hard for new thrillers to stand out but do make time for the BBC’s haunting and unusual Requiem. Smartly directed by rising star Mahalia Belo, who knows exactly what to do and when to raise the hairs on the back of your neck, this new six-part series melds horror with crime to tell the story of the highly strung Matilda (Lydia Wilson), a promising young cellist whose self-contained world is thrown into disarray by an unexpected and violent death. After walking out on her long-dreamt-of US tour, Matilda and her faithful accompanist Hal (Joel Fry, excellent in a rare serious role) head to Wales, where grief and past secrets threaten to engulf both her and everyone she comes into contact with. To say any more would be unfair but Australian writer Kris Mrksa (best known for crime drama Underbelly) plays a very clever game with the genre, referencing everything from Don’t Look Now to Rosemary’s Baby and ensuring that the audience is both on the back foot and desperate to find out more. Beautifully paced and intelligently told, the resulting story is worth staying in on a Friday night for. Sarah Hughes Altered Carbon Netflix, from today “The first thing you’ll learn is that nothing is as it seems,” intones the solemn voice-over in this adaptation of Richard Morgan’s excellent novel from 2002. Netflix’s latest foray into hardcore science fiction follows a prisoner who, after 250 years in suspended animation, returns to life in a new body with one chance to win his freedom: solving a mind-bending murder. It’s stylishly shot, and features a strong cast, including James Purefoy, Joel Kinnaman, and Hamilton star Renée Elise Goldsberry. Anglo-Welsh Cup: Northampton Saints v Harlequins BT Sport 1, 7.15pm Out-of-sorts Northampton, who’ve won just one of their last eight Premiership games, face Harlequins in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at Franklin’s Gardens. The last time these teams met, in December, Quins ran in seven tries, with Dave Ward, Danny Care and Tim Visser among the scorers, as Saints slumped to an embarrassing 50-21 defeat at Twickenham. Super League: St Helens v Castleford Tigers Sky Sports Main Event, 7.30pm The Totally Wicked Stadium host the action as St Helens and Castleford Tigers get their seasons under way. These sides last met in the semi-finals of last year’s competition in September, with the Tigers winning a dramatic match at the Mend-a-Hose Jungle 23-22 after extra-time, setting up a Grand Final meeting with Leeds Rhinos. Celebrity 5 Go Barging Channel 5, 8.00pm Last year, four celebrities gave us laughs as they took to the canals of England and Wales for the first run of this series. Now it returns with a new motley crew – Tom Conti, Diarmuid Gavin, Tessa Sanderson, Tony Christie and Penny Smith – and this time they are heading to France. So expect some crashes and fireworks. A Vicar’s Life BBC Two, 8.30pm; not Wales The likeable series about vicars in Herefordshire continues with assistant curate Father Matthew Cashmore joining a relief effort taking aid to refugees in Calais, while his boss, the Reverend Ruth Hulse comes up with a novel way of boosting church attendance. Nigel Slater’s Middle East BBC Two, 9.00pm; not Wales Nigel Slater is the sort of company you want on a food journey: enthusiastic, interesting and curious about the places he visits. This new series sees him heading throughout the Middle East, starting off in the food paradise of Beirut before moving on to the Beqaa Valley. Hits, Hype & Hustle: An Insider’s Guide to the Music Business BBC Four, 9.00pm The music industry guide concludes with a focus on reunions, presented by PR man Alan Edwards. “It was supposed to be edge of the seat stuff but, in reality, it was end of the pier,” he says, with a wicked grin, of the Sex Pistols reunion he engineered. Elsewhere, we’re treated to footage of Debbie Harry performing with a giant pair of horns on her head. SH Celebrity Big Brother: Live Final Channel 5, from 9.00pm This series of the reality show, which is celebrating the year of the woman, apparently, reaches its finale. Sadly, the all-female house was short lived and the series has been reduced to the usual mix of crude comments and bed-hopping. SH King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Guy Ritchie’s combat-heavy Camelot is a very silly place. It sets up Arthur (Charlie Hunnam) as a Moses figure who’s sent to Londinium when Vortigern (Jude Law) overthrows Camelot. What follows is a quick-witted caper, but the sword-pulling scene is sabotaged by a David Beckham cameo that saps the moment of its mythic excitement. Sorcerer (1977) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm Given the wild success that William Friedkin had achieved with The French Connection (1971) and The Exorcist (1973), the catastrophic failure of Sorcerer, a thrillingly downbeat action film about truck drivers, counted as the bitterest blow of his career: he’s always talked about it as his favourite film. Indeed, it’s far too technically accomplished and conceptually bold to have deserved such short shrift. This Is 40 (2012) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 12.10am Judd Apatow revisits two characters from his 2007 hit Knocked Up. Leslie Mann, Apatow’s wife, and Paul Rudd play a stressed-out Los Angeles couple whose 40th birthdays bookend the film. Apatow and Mann’s real-life daughters also play their children. It’s a perceptive comedy on middle-age and one that guarantees big laughs alongside some of Apatow’s most pertinent observations on love. Saturday 3 February Hard Sun: Agyness Deyn Hard Sun BBC One, 9.30pm Five weeks in, and the BBC’s relentlessly dark, eye-wateringly violent thriller is not making much more sense than it did at the outset. All we really know is that those unlikely cops Hicks (Jim Sturgess) and Renko (Agyness Deyn) are still racing around London trying to outsmart MI5, using their belief that the world will end in a little under five years to justify doing indescribably horrible things to some indescribably horrible people. The bloody opening to this episode (suffice to say it involves an ice axe) follows on from last week’s ending in which uber-spook Grace Morrigan (Nikki Amuka-Bird) helpfully gave Renko’s psychopath son Daniel (Jojo Macari) details of who it was that raped his mother at the age 14, with predictable consequences. And guess who’s given the job of investigating the case? That’s the sort of circular plotting that gives Neil Cross’s drama its pace, intensity and throbbing sense of paranoia. But the only thing that’s truly mysterious here is how Hicks and Renko, with the security forces still breathing down their necks in pursuit of the flashdrive containing “proof” of the impending apocalypse, have any time left for the day job. Gerard O’Donovan Hugh’s Wild West BBC Two, 6.00pm; NI, 6.30pm; Wales, 5.30pm Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall heads for the Somerset Levels to witness a spectacular “murmuration” of starlings. He also discovers how one native species of butterfly was rescued from the brink of extinction. The Voice UK ITV, 8.00pm The singing contest’s second series on ITV continues to plod along, with singer Olly Murs making no great impact on the show, as yet. The blind auditions enter their fifth week with more contestants hoping that their performances will be enough to make the coaches spin their chairs. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm Jeremy Hunt may not have predicted this year’s winter NHS crisis, but the writers of Casualty did. Here, the emergency department is in gridlock, with trolleys blocking corridors and ambulances queuing outside to admit patients. It’s just as well then that new junior doctor Bea Kinsella (Michelle Fox) is keen to get stuck in. Or is it? Grand Tours of Scotland’s Lochs BBC Two, 8.30pm In an unexpectedly explosive edition, Paul Murton visits Loch Shin, where a meteor hit the Highlands 1.2 billion years ago. Then, at Kylesku, he recalls how Britain’s “X Men” helped to destroy one of Germany’s greatest battleships during the Second World War. Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears Sky Arts, 9.00pm This documentary celebrates one of the Man in Black’s lesser-known works, his 1964 album Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian. It was a pioneering – and at the time controversial – album, which he used to draw attention to the long-running oppression of America’s native peoples. The film also covers the making of a commemorative tribute album by Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Kris Kristofferson and other country music stars. Spiral BBC Four, 9.00pm & 10.00pm The sixth series of this wonderfully gritty French policier, that’s been fraught even by its own standards, comes to a nail-biting climax. As gangster Drissa Camara (Narcisse Mame-Zollo) is betrayed over a gold deal, Captain Laure (Caroline Proust) and her detective team get the break they need in the Mercier case and lawyer Joséphine (Audrey Fleurot) realises that sticking to her story could place her in real jeopardy. Hamlet (1948, b/w) ★★★★★ London Live, 3.00pm This version of Shakespeare’s Hamlet was adapted and directed by Laurence Olivier, who also starred as the troubled Prince of Denmark. Despite winning the Academy Award for Best Picture, purists felt that Olivier had taken liberties with the text, condensing four hours into two and removing the characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. But the action remains tight and Olivier is magnificent. Suffragette (2015) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Never mind the respectable cast and period costumes – Sarah Gavron’s fiery film about the fight for women’s suffrage is far from genteel. Carey Mulligan is on form showing the transformation of Maud from bystander to activist with riveting emotional precision. As Abi Morgan’s script strips away the reasons for her to fall back into line, her nerve soars through the roof. The Talented Mr Ripley (1999) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.30pm Anthony Minghella’s glossy take on Patricia Highsmith’s novel is an engaging noir thriller with a pitch-perfect ending. New York wannabe Tom Ripley’s life changes when he begins lusting after the lifestyle of an errant playboy (Jude Law) in Italy. Matt Damon is suitably sinister in the lead role, with Philip Seymour Hoffman equally as magnificent as a bulldozer who ruptures Tom’s cosy idyll. Sunday 4 February Endeavour: Shaun Evans and Roger Allam Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Friday 2 February Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm The glut of psychological suspense dramas on our screens makes it hard for new thrillers to stand out but do make time for the BBC’s haunting and unusual Requiem. Smartly directed by rising star Mahalia Belo, who knows exactly what to do and when to raise the hairs on the back of your neck, this new six-part series melds horror with crime to tell the story of the highly strung Matilda (Lydia Wilson), a promising young cellist whose self-contained world is thrown into disarray by an unexpected and violent death. After walking out on her long-dreamt-of US tour, Matilda and her faithful accompanist Hal (Joel Fry, excellent in a rare serious role) head to Wales, where grief and past secrets threaten to engulf both her and everyone she comes into contact with. To say any more would be unfair but Australian writer Kris Mrksa (best known for crime drama Underbelly) plays a very clever game with the genre, referencing everything from Don’t Look Now to Rosemary’s Baby and ensuring that the audience is both on the back foot and desperate to find out more. Beautifully paced and intelligently told, the resulting story is worth staying in on a Friday night for. Sarah Hughes Altered Carbon Netflix, from today “The first thing you’ll learn is that nothing is as it seems,” intones the solemn voice-over in this adaptation of Richard Morgan’s excellent novel from 2002. Netflix’s latest foray into hardcore science fiction follows a prisoner who, after 250 years in suspended animation, returns to life in a new body with one chance to win his freedom: solving a mind-bending murder. It’s stylishly shot, and features a strong cast, including James Purefoy, Joel Kinnaman, and Hamilton star Renée Elise Goldsberry. Anglo-Welsh Cup: Northampton Saints v Harlequins BT Sport 1, 7.15pm Out-of-sorts Northampton, who’ve won just one of their last eight Premiership games, face Harlequins in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at Franklin’s Gardens. The last time these teams met, in December, Quins ran in seven tries, with Dave Ward, Danny Care and Tim Visser among the scorers, as Saints slumped to an embarrassing 50-21 defeat at Twickenham. Super League: St Helens v Castleford Tigers Sky Sports Main Event, 7.30pm The Totally Wicked Stadium host the action as St Helens and Castleford Tigers get their seasons under way. These sides last met in the semi-finals of last year’s competition in September, with the Tigers winning a dramatic match at the Mend-a-Hose Jungle 23-22 after extra-time, setting up a Grand Final meeting with Leeds Rhinos. Celebrity 5 Go Barging Channel 5, 8.00pm Last year, four celebrities gave us laughs as they took to the canals of England and Wales for the first run of this series. Now it returns with a new motley crew – Tom Conti, Diarmuid Gavin, Tessa Sanderson, Tony Christie and Penny Smith – and this time they are heading to France. So expect some crashes and fireworks. A Vicar’s Life BBC Two, 8.30pm; not Wales The likeable series about vicars in Herefordshire continues with assistant curate Father Matthew Cashmore joining a relief effort taking aid to refugees in Calais, while his boss, the Reverend Ruth Hulse comes up with a novel way of boosting church attendance. Nigel Slater’s Middle East BBC Two, 9.00pm; not Wales Nigel Slater is the sort of company you want on a food journey: enthusiastic, interesting and curious about the places he visits. This new series sees him heading throughout the Middle East, starting off in the food paradise of Beirut before moving on to the Beqaa Valley. Hits, Hype & Hustle: An Insider’s Guide to the Music Business BBC Four, 9.00pm The music industry guide concludes with a focus on reunions, presented by PR man Alan Edwards. “It was supposed to be edge of the seat stuff but, in reality, it was end of the pier,” he says, with a wicked grin, of the Sex Pistols reunion he engineered. Elsewhere, we’re treated to footage of Debbie Harry performing with a giant pair of horns on her head. SH Celebrity Big Brother: Live Final Channel 5, from 9.00pm This series of the reality show, which is celebrating the year of the woman, apparently, reaches its finale. Sadly, the all-female house was short lived and the series has been reduced to the usual mix of crude comments and bed-hopping. SH King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Guy Ritchie’s combat-heavy Camelot is a very silly place. It sets up Arthur (Charlie Hunnam) as a Moses figure who’s sent to Londinium when Vortigern (Jude Law) overthrows Camelot. What follows is a quick-witted caper, but the sword-pulling scene is sabotaged by a David Beckham cameo that saps the moment of its mythic excitement. Sorcerer (1977) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm Given the wild success that William Friedkin had achieved with The French Connection (1971) and The Exorcist (1973), the catastrophic failure of Sorcerer, a thrillingly downbeat action film about truck drivers, counted as the bitterest blow of his career: he’s always talked about it as his favourite film. Indeed, it’s far too technically accomplished and conceptually bold to have deserved such short shrift. This Is 40 (2012) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 12.10am Judd Apatow revisits two characters from his 2007 hit Knocked Up. Leslie Mann, Apatow’s wife, and Paul Rudd play a stressed-out Los Angeles couple whose 40th birthdays bookend the film. Apatow and Mann’s real-life daughters also play their children. It’s a perceptive comedy on middle-age and one that guarantees big laughs alongside some of Apatow’s most pertinent observations on love. Saturday 3 February Hard Sun: Agyness Deyn Hard Sun BBC One, 9.30pm Five weeks in, and the BBC’s relentlessly dark, eye-wateringly violent thriller is not making much more sense than it did at the outset. All we really know is that those unlikely cops Hicks (Jim Sturgess) and Renko (Agyness Deyn) are still racing around London trying to outsmart MI5, using their belief that the world will end in a little under five years to justify doing indescribably horrible things to some indescribably horrible people. The bloody opening to this episode (suffice to say it involves an ice axe) follows on from last week’s ending in which uber-spook Grace Morrigan (Nikki Amuka-Bird) helpfully gave Renko’s psychopath son Daniel (Jojo Macari) details of who it was that raped his mother at the age 14, with predictable consequences. And guess who’s given the job of investigating the case? That’s the sort of circular plotting that gives Neil Cross’s drama its pace, intensity and throbbing sense of paranoia. But the only thing that’s truly mysterious here is how Hicks and Renko, with the security forces still breathing down their necks in pursuit of the flashdrive containing “proof” of the impending apocalypse, have any time left for the day job. Gerard O’Donovan Hugh’s Wild West BBC Two, 6.00pm; NI, 6.30pm; Wales, 5.30pm Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall heads for the Somerset Levels to witness a spectacular “murmuration” of starlings. He also discovers how one native species of butterfly was rescued from the brink of extinction. The Voice UK ITV, 8.00pm The singing contest’s second series on ITV continues to plod along, with singer Olly Murs making no great impact on the show, as yet. The blind auditions enter their fifth week with more contestants hoping that their performances will be enough to make the coaches spin their chairs. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm Jeremy Hunt may not have predicted this year’s winter NHS crisis, but the writers of Casualty did. Here, the emergency department is in gridlock, with trolleys blocking corridors and ambulances queuing outside to admit patients. It’s just as well then that new junior doctor Bea Kinsella (Michelle Fox) is keen to get stuck in. Or is it? Grand Tours of Scotland’s Lochs BBC Two, 8.30pm In an unexpectedly explosive edition, Paul Murton visits Loch Shin, where a meteor hit the Highlands 1.2 billion years ago. Then, at Kylesku, he recalls how Britain’s “X Men” helped to destroy one of Germany’s greatest battleships during the Second World War. Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears Sky Arts, 9.00pm This documentary celebrates one of the Man in Black’s lesser-known works, his 1964 album Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian. It was a pioneering – and at the time controversial – album, which he used to draw attention to the long-running oppression of America’s native peoples. The film also covers the making of a commemorative tribute album by Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Kris Kristofferson and other country music stars. Spiral BBC Four, 9.00pm & 10.00pm The sixth series of this wonderfully gritty French policier, that’s been fraught even by its own standards, comes to a nail-biting climax. As gangster Drissa Camara (Narcisse Mame-Zollo) is betrayed over a gold deal, Captain Laure (Caroline Proust) and her detective team get the break they need in the Mercier case and lawyer Joséphine (Audrey Fleurot) realises that sticking to her story could place her in real jeopardy. Hamlet (1948, b/w) ★★★★★ London Live, 3.00pm This version of Shakespeare’s Hamlet was adapted and directed by Laurence Olivier, who also starred as the troubled Prince of Denmark. Despite winning the Academy Award for Best Picture, purists felt that Olivier had taken liberties with the text, condensing four hours into two and removing the characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. But the action remains tight and Olivier is magnificent. Suffragette (2015) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Never mind the respectable cast and period costumes – Sarah Gavron’s fiery film about the fight for women’s suffrage is far from genteel. Carey Mulligan is on form showing the transformation of Maud from bystander to activist with riveting emotional precision. As Abi Morgan’s script strips away the reasons for her to fall back into line, her nerve soars through the roof. The Talented Mr Ripley (1999) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.30pm Anthony Minghella’s glossy take on Patricia Highsmith’s novel is an engaging noir thriller with a pitch-perfect ending. New York wannabe Tom Ripley’s life changes when he begins lusting after the lifestyle of an errant playboy (Jude Law) in Italy. Matt Damon is suitably sinister in the lead role, with Philip Seymour Hoffman equally as magnificent as a bulldozer who ruptures Tom’s cosy idyll. Sunday 4 February Endeavour: Shaun Evans and Roger Allam Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Requiem, Altered Carbon and more
Friday 2 February Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm The glut of psychological suspense dramas on our screens makes it hard for new thrillers to stand out but do make time for the BBC’s haunting and unusual Requiem. Smartly directed by rising star Mahalia Belo, who knows exactly what to do and when to raise the hairs on the back of your neck, this new six-part series melds horror with crime to tell the story of the highly strung Matilda (Lydia Wilson), a promising young cellist whose self-contained world is thrown into disarray by an unexpected and violent death. After walking out on her long-dreamt-of US tour, Matilda and her faithful accompanist Hal (Joel Fry, excellent in a rare serious role) head to Wales, where grief and past secrets threaten to engulf both her and everyone she comes into contact with. To say any more would be unfair but Australian writer Kris Mrksa (best known for crime drama Underbelly) plays a very clever game with the genre, referencing everything from Don’t Look Now to Rosemary’s Baby and ensuring that the audience is both on the back foot and desperate to find out more. Beautifully paced and intelligently told, the resulting story is worth staying in on a Friday night for. Sarah Hughes Altered Carbon Netflix, from today “The first thing you’ll learn is that nothing is as it seems,” intones the solemn voice-over in this adaptation of Richard Morgan’s excellent novel from 2002. Netflix’s latest foray into hardcore science fiction follows a prisoner who, after 250 years in suspended animation, returns to life in a new body with one chance to win his freedom: solving a mind-bending murder. It’s stylishly shot, and features a strong cast, including James Purefoy, Joel Kinnaman, and Hamilton star Renée Elise Goldsberry. Anglo-Welsh Cup: Northampton Saints v Harlequins BT Sport 1, 7.15pm Out-of-sorts Northampton, who’ve won just one of their last eight Premiership games, face Harlequins in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at Franklin’s Gardens. The last time these teams met, in December, Quins ran in seven tries, with Dave Ward, Danny Care and Tim Visser among the scorers, as Saints slumped to an embarrassing 50-21 defeat at Twickenham. Super League: St Helens v Castleford Tigers Sky Sports Main Event, 7.30pm The Totally Wicked Stadium host the action as St Helens and Castleford Tigers get their seasons under way. These sides last met in the semi-finals of last year’s competition in September, with the Tigers winning a dramatic match at the Mend-a-Hose Jungle 23-22 after extra-time, setting up a Grand Final meeting with Leeds Rhinos. Celebrity 5 Go Barging Channel 5, 8.00pm Last year, four celebrities gave us laughs as they took to the canals of England and Wales for the first run of this series. Now it returns with a new motley crew – Tom Conti, Diarmuid Gavin, Tessa Sanderson, Tony Christie and Penny Smith – and this time they are heading to France. So expect some crashes and fireworks. A Vicar’s Life BBC Two, 8.30pm; not Wales The likeable series about vicars in Herefordshire continues with assistant curate Father Matthew Cashmore joining a relief effort taking aid to refugees in Calais, while his boss, the Reverend Ruth Hulse comes up with a novel way of boosting church attendance. Nigel Slater’s Middle East BBC Two, 9.00pm; not Wales Nigel Slater is the sort of company you want on a food journey: enthusiastic, interesting and curious about the places he visits. This new series sees him heading throughout the Middle East, starting off in the food paradise of Beirut before moving on to the Beqaa Valley. Hits, Hype & Hustle: An Insider’s Guide to the Music Business BBC Four, 9.00pm The music industry guide concludes with a focus on reunions, presented by PR man Alan Edwards. “It was supposed to be edge of the seat stuff but, in reality, it was end of the pier,” he says, with a wicked grin, of the Sex Pistols reunion he engineered. Elsewhere, we’re treated to footage of Debbie Harry performing with a giant pair of horns on her head. SH Celebrity Big Brother: Live Final Channel 5, from 9.00pm This series of the reality show, which is celebrating the year of the woman, apparently, reaches its finale. Sadly, the all-female house was short lived and the series has been reduced to the usual mix of crude comments and bed-hopping. SH King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Guy Ritchie’s combat-heavy Camelot is a very silly place. It sets up Arthur (Charlie Hunnam) as a Moses figure who’s sent to Londinium when Vortigern (Jude Law) overthrows Camelot. What follows is a quick-witted caper, but the sword-pulling scene is sabotaged by a David Beckham cameo that saps the moment of its mythic excitement. Sorcerer (1977) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm Given the wild success that William Friedkin had achieved with The French Connection (1971) and The Exorcist (1973), the catastrophic failure of Sorcerer, a thrillingly downbeat action film about truck drivers, counted as the bitterest blow of his career: he’s always talked about it as his favourite film. Indeed, it’s far too technically accomplished and conceptually bold to have deserved such short shrift. This Is 40 (2012) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 12.10am Judd Apatow revisits two characters from his 2007 hit Knocked Up. Leslie Mann, Apatow’s wife, and Paul Rudd play a stressed-out Los Angeles couple whose 40th birthdays bookend the film. Apatow and Mann’s real-life daughters also play their children. It’s a perceptive comedy on middle-age and one that guarantees big laughs alongside some of Apatow’s most pertinent observations on love. Saturday 3 February Hard Sun: Agyness Deyn Hard Sun BBC One, 9.30pm Five weeks in, and the BBC’s relentlessly dark, eye-wateringly violent thriller is not making much more sense than it did at the outset. All we really know is that those unlikely cops Hicks (Jim Sturgess) and Renko (Agyness Deyn) are still racing around London trying to outsmart MI5, using their belief that the world will end in a little under five years to justify doing indescribably horrible things to some indescribably horrible people. The bloody opening to this episode (suffice to say it involves an ice axe) follows on from last week’s ending in which uber-spook Grace Morrigan (Nikki Amuka-Bird) helpfully gave Renko’s psychopath son Daniel (Jojo Macari) details of who it was that raped his mother at the age 14, with predictable consequences. And guess who’s given the job of investigating the case? That’s the sort of circular plotting that gives Neil Cross’s drama its pace, intensity and throbbing sense of paranoia. But the only thing that’s truly mysterious here is how Hicks and Renko, with the security forces still breathing down their necks in pursuit of the flashdrive containing “proof” of the impending apocalypse, have any time left for the day job. Gerard O’Donovan Hugh’s Wild West BBC Two, 6.00pm; NI, 6.30pm; Wales, 5.30pm Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall heads for the Somerset Levels to witness a spectacular “murmuration” of starlings. He also discovers how one native species of butterfly was rescued from the brink of extinction. The Voice UK ITV, 8.00pm The singing contest’s second series on ITV continues to plod along, with singer Olly Murs making no great impact on the show, as yet. The blind auditions enter their fifth week with more contestants hoping that their performances will be enough to make the coaches spin their chairs. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm Jeremy Hunt may not have predicted this year’s winter NHS crisis, but the writers of Casualty did. Here, the emergency department is in gridlock, with trolleys blocking corridors and ambulances queuing outside to admit patients. It’s just as well then that new junior doctor Bea Kinsella (Michelle Fox) is keen to get stuck in. Or is it? Grand Tours of Scotland’s Lochs BBC Two, 8.30pm In an unexpectedly explosive edition, Paul Murton visits Loch Shin, where a meteor hit the Highlands 1.2 billion years ago. Then, at Kylesku, he recalls how Britain’s “X Men” helped to destroy one of Germany’s greatest battleships during the Second World War. Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears Sky Arts, 9.00pm This documentary celebrates one of the Man in Black’s lesser-known works, his 1964 album Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian. It was a pioneering – and at the time controversial – album, which he used to draw attention to the long-running oppression of America’s native peoples. The film also covers the making of a commemorative tribute album by Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Kris Kristofferson and other country music stars. Spiral BBC Four, 9.00pm & 10.00pm The sixth series of this wonderfully gritty French policier, that’s been fraught even by its own standards, comes to a nail-biting climax. As gangster Drissa Camara (Narcisse Mame-Zollo) is betrayed over a gold deal, Captain Laure (Caroline Proust) and her detective team get the break they need in the Mercier case and lawyer Joséphine (Audrey Fleurot) realises that sticking to her story could place her in real jeopardy. Hamlet (1948, b/w) ★★★★★ London Live, 3.00pm This version of Shakespeare’s Hamlet was adapted and directed by Laurence Olivier, who also starred as the troubled Prince of Denmark. Despite winning the Academy Award for Best Picture, purists felt that Olivier had taken liberties with the text, condensing four hours into two and removing the characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. But the action remains tight and Olivier is magnificent. Suffragette (2015) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Never mind the respectable cast and period costumes – Sarah Gavron’s fiery film about the fight for women’s suffrage is far from genteel. Carey Mulligan is on form showing the transformation of Maud from bystander to activist with riveting emotional precision. As Abi Morgan’s script strips away the reasons for her to fall back into line, her nerve soars through the roof. The Talented Mr Ripley (1999) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.30pm Anthony Minghella’s glossy take on Patricia Highsmith’s novel is an engaging noir thriller with a pitch-perfect ending. New York wannabe Tom Ripley’s life changes when he begins lusting after the lifestyle of an errant playboy (Jude Law) in Italy. Matt Damon is suitably sinister in the lead role, with Philip Seymour Hoffman equally as magnificent as a bulldozer who ruptures Tom’s cosy idyll. Sunday 4 February Endeavour: Shaun Evans and Roger Allam Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Rugby Union - Autumn Internationals - Wales vs Georgia - Principality Stadium, Cardiff, Britain - November 18, 2017 Wales head coach Warren Gatland before the match REUTERS/Rebecca Naden
Autumn Internationals - Wales vs Georgia
Rugby Union - Autumn Internationals - Wales vs Georgia - Principality Stadium, Cardiff, Britain - November 18, 2017 Wales head coach Warren Gatland before the match REUTERS/Rebecca Naden
Friday 24 November Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Jamie Oliver and childhood mucker Jimmy Doherty return for another series of their hyperactive meld of cookery programme, food information and celebrity chat hosted at their Southend Pier caff. This series tends to stand or fall with the visiting celebrity but luckily this week it’s Simon Pegg, who gamely enters into the spirit of things by serving customers, cooking what looks like a pretty good tagine and admitting that he’s far more food conscious in these Mission: Impossible days (Tom Cruise is apparently the devil for pushing cakes on those trying to stay in shape). Friday Night Feast feels closer in tone to the early cookery shows that made Oliver’s name and Pegg enters into the cheeky-chappy spirit, mucking around with Doherty and dropping sardonic asides. “It’s fundamentally evil but at the same time beautiful,” he remarks of Oliver’s Provençal Bake, a calorific but clearly delicious mixture of pancakes, cheese, ham and tomatoes, which causes one customer to gush, “I never want it to end.” Elsewhere, Oliver and Doherty go on the road to uncover the joys of free-range duck, and Doherty builds a barbecue for the Stoke Mandeville wheelchair rugby team. Sarah Hughes Sounds Like Friday Night BBC One, 7.30pm BBC One’s live music show is a great idea but so far has been a bit hit and miss. Presenters Greg James and Dotty are enthusiastic but more risks are needed when booking the live acts. Craig David co-hosts this episode, and there are performances from The Killers and Anne-Marie. Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV, UTV or Wales Ray Mears’s laid-back excursion around Australia continues in South Australia’s Flinders mountain ranges, which provides a dramatic setting for three species of kangaroos and the country’s largest bird of prey. Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.00pm The personable Stephen Mangan takes the host’s chair for this episode of the satirical news-based panel game. He’s joined by business journalist Steph McGovern and comedian Jo Caulfield. Extreme Wives with Kate Humble BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Kate Humble heads to the remote town of Shillong in north-east India to meet with the matrilineal Khasi people in the fascinating final episode. The Khasi pass everything, including property, down the female line and hand power to the youngest daughter in each family. SH Rolling Stone: Stories from the Edge Sky Arts, 9.00pm Anyone who has read Sticky Fingers, the recent biography of Rolling Stone supremo Jann Wenner, will realise that this Alex Gibney series is something of a puff piece in comparison. That said, it’s still very enjoyable. The focus here is on the kidnap of Patty Hearst and the way in which the counterculture slowly became mainstream. Gregory Porter’s Popular Voices BBC Four, 10.00pm Jazz musician Gregory Porter’s outstanding series continues with a focus on crooners. All the usual suspects – Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, the unbeatable Nat King Cole – are present but what makes this series so exceptional is the knowledge Porter brings to his subject. This episode dissects why Sinatra was “a little too presumptuous for the croon” as well as looking at how everyone from Iggy Pop to David Bowie used the technique. The real pleasure, however, comes from the music. SH Collateral Beauty (2016) Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm ★★☆☆☆ The plot of David Frankel (The Devil Wears Prada) and Allan Loeb’s (Just Go with It) film is fantastically unhinged: Will Smith is an ad-exec who has lost his daughter to cancer, and in his grief is pestered on the streets of New York by the personifications of Love (Keira Knightley), Time (Jacob Latimore) and Death (Helen Mirren) – “the three abstractions”. Dark Shadows (2012) W, 9.00pm ★★☆☆☆ Tim Burton’s film is at its best in the opening scenes, when it can afford to be all show and no tell. It’s Johnny Depp, naturally, who plays Barnabas Collins, an 18th-century Byronic rascal who is transformed into a vampire by a jealous witch (Eva Green) and wakes up in Nixon-era small-town America. Depp and Burton’s eighth film together brought them level with De Niro and Scorsese, although in numerical terms only. Boyhood (2014) Channel 4, 12.05am ★★★★★ Richard Linklater’s real-time depiction of a boy growing up over 12 years received the biggest Oscar snub of recent years, winning only one award, for Patricia Arquette as for Best Supporting Actress. From 2002, Linklater spent a few days each year filming the same actors to chart Mason’s (Ellar Coltrane) ordinary life – in what is an extraordinary, beautiful and moving string of small, everyday moments. Saturday 25 November In his words: the life of the Sixties playwright Joe Orton Credit: Hulton Archive Joe Orton Laid Bare BBC Two, 9.00pm “I realise it’s unforgivable doing this but I’m just unrepentant.” So announces a young Joe Orton in this suitably anarchic take on the playwright’s life, works and early, brutal death. It’s a sentence that entirely sums up Orton’s acidic take on life; he was a man who loved (and arguably lived) to shock and who enjoyed making people uncomfortable – “I felt snakes were writhing round my feet,” wrote one theatre critic after watching the bawdy Entertaining Mr Sloane – yet who was also possessed of enough wit, charm and intelligence to win over even the most mortally offended. Making great use of Orton’s letters, diaries and plays – scenes from the latter acted by a cast that includes Antony Sher, Ben Miles and Jaime Winstone – the documentary does its best to pin its subject to the page with contributors including his sister Leonie, playwright Christopher Hampton and producer Michael Codron. There is (surprisingly) understanding too for the man who murdered Orton, his lover Kenneth Halliwell, who subsequently killed himself. Ultimately, however, what lingers is not the gory manner of Orton’s death but rather his wildly entertaining words. Sarah Hughes International Rugby Union: Scotland v Australia & England v Samoa BBC One, 2.00pm & Sky Sports Main Event, 2.45pm Having fallen agonisingly close to pulling off the greatest result in their history – they lost 22-17 to New Zealand – Scotland host Australia at Murrayfield with their tails up. Meanwhile, England – who beat the Wallabies 30-6 last weekend, with Danny Care putting a sublime performance after coming off the bench – face Samoa, hoping to take Eddie Jones’s record to 22 wins from 23 as their coach. Expect Jones to ring the changes, with Henry Slade likely to be handed another opportunity at No 12 and Mike Brown returning to the side as full-back. International Rugby Union: Wales v New Zealand BBC Two, 4.45pm An unsuccessful three-match series in New Zealand this summer saw Wales return home still looking for a victory over the All Blacks for the first time since 1953. They have now lost 29 consecutive fixtures, 10 of which have been presided over by New Zealand coach Warren Gatland during his tenure. Wales head into this match on the back of a far-from-convincing 13-6 victory against Georgia. Granted, Gatland did put out an experimental team. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Chelsea BT Sport 1, 5.00pm Two of last Saturday’s star performers meet at Anfield in what should be a pulsating encounter. Liverpool beat Southampton 3-0, with Mohamed Salah scoring twice, while Chelsea, inspired by Eden Hazard, ran out 4-0 winners at West Brom. When these sides met in January here, Georginio Wijnaldum cancelled out David Luiz’s goal in a 1-1 draw. Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.50pm With only three weeks left in the competition, the judges must try to separate the glitter from the paste. Alexandra Burke and Debbie McGee are expected to make the final but it’s wide open as to who else joins them. This week, the couples can earn extra points in the “pasodoblathon”. The X Factor: The Semi Finals ITV, 7.30pm From surprise double eliminations to the extra sing-offs, this year’s X Factor has been derided for being a mess. This week, it can redeem itself as the contestants sing for a place in next weekend’s Grand Final. Michael McIntyre’s Big Show BBC One, 8.10pm Michael McIntyre’s attempt to single-handedly revive the variety show continues. This week, he’s joined by guests Gary Barlow, Russell Kane, Clean Bandit and Danny Dyer, who hands over his mobile phone for the Celebrity Send to All slot. Dad’s Army BBC Two, 8.30pm; not NI or Scotland As Brexit edges nearer so Jimmy Perry and David Croft’s comedy about the Home Guard appears ever more relevant, not least because it pinpoints a certain kind of Englishness. This episode sees the bumbling Captain Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) pitch camp in the middle of an artillery exercise. SH Witnesses: A Frozen Death BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.55pm Another day, another atmospherically depressing European crime drama. But this French eight-part series, shown in double bills over the next four weeks, is really good. The Tunnel’s Marie Dompnier plays Lieutenant Sandra Winckler, who is assigned to a macabre case involving 15 frozen bodies on an abandoned bus. The dead men are all linked to one woman, Catherine Keemer (Audrey Fleurot), who disappeared three years earlier. White Princess Drama, 9.00pm It might be hokum but this adaptation of Philippa Gregory’s bestseller is enjoyable largely thanks to the complicated relationship at its heart. The marriage between Henry VII (Jacob Collins-Levy) and Elizabeth of York (Jodie Comer) is very much a dynastic contract between two people forced to find common cause. This episode sees them take steps towards that new understanding. SH Daddy Long Legs (1955) BBC Two, 2.10pm ★★★☆☆ Fred Astaire and Leslie Caron are paired for the first time in this Hollywood musical written by Phoebe and Henry Ephron (parents of Nora) and loosely based on a 1912 novel. They bring charm and warmth to a story about the complications of a love affair between a young woman and a man 30 years her senior. The dance sequences are particularly striking, containing a rarity in Astaire’s choreography: a kiss. Lone Survivor (2013) Channel 4, 11.05pm ★★★☆☆ In this film based on true events, Mark Wahlberg gives a strong performance as sniper Marcus Luttrell, who, in 2005, was the head of a four-man team of Navy Seals, tasked with killing Taliban leader Ahmed Shah. An encounter with some goatherds gives the team a major moral dilemma. The film, directed by Peter Berg, is hampered by a lack of character exploration but it’s certainly action-packed. Albert Nobbs (2011) BBC Two, 11.35pm ★★★☆☆ Glenn Close toiled for 30 years to make an Albert Nobbs film after playing the part in a 1982 off-Broadway play. Close inhabits the role, of a woman disguised as a man to work as a waiter in a 19th-century hotel, with uncanny accuracy (she was rewarded with an Oscar nomination). The film reaches for something to say about sexual identity, but neither Close nor director Rodrigo García seem to know what it is. Sunday 26 November Ring of fire: Xand van Tulleken Credit: BBC Expedition Volcano BBC Two, 9.00pm As is the wont of BBC documentaries about the natural world these days, the impact of humans can no longer be ignored – in fact, it’s central to the premise of this new two-parter in which geologist Chris Jackson and humanitarian doctor Xand van Tulleken journey to live volcanoes and the communities that live in their shadow. Nyiragongo, in the Congo, last erupted in 2002, causing a mass evacuation of the nearby city of Goma, terrible loss of life and wholesale destruction of property. The pair’s expedition examines ways to predict its behaviour, especially since another eruption is almost inevitable. Van Tulleken focuses on disease prevention and healthcare, looking at how to avoid the spread of cholera that proved so catastrophic 15 years ago, while Jackson drops into the crater (the staggering camerawork and pounding soundtrack leave you in no doubt as to the potential peril of the venture) to assess the latest techniques for detecting sulphur dioxide and geological vibrations. By the end, problems have been diagnosed and solutions prescribed – it’s an admirable project whose success can only be judged, grimly, in the event of another disaster. Next week, they head to nearby Nyamuragira. Gabriel Tate Formula 1: Abu Dhabi Grand Prix Channel 4, noon & Sky Sports F1, 12.30pm He may have already been crowned champion but that didn’t stop Lewis Hamilton putting in a fine display in Brazil, starting in the pit lane under flawless Brazilian skies and finishing a mere five seconds adrift of winner Sebastian Vettel. Let’s hope for a similarly exciting spectacle at the Yas Marina Circuit, as the curtain comes down on the 2017 season. Blue Planet II BBC One, 8.00pm Every episode of this mesmerising series brings with it new wonders. This week’s venture into underwater forests, meadows and mangroves sniffs out creatures with unlikely names (the Pyjama Shark, the Garibaldi Damselfish) and even more outlandish strategies for survival. Coastal Railways with Julie Walters Channel 4, 8.00pm It might be hard to see what Julie Walters can bring to this well-worn travelogue approach, despite all her charisma and appeal. But there is plenty to enjoy in her tour of the British Isles – tonight, she boards the “Harry Potter” train in the Highlands, guts herring and wrangles cattle. Howards End BBC One, 9.00pm Kenneth Lonergan’s restrained, affecting adaptation reachesa crunch point in relations between Margaret (Hayley Atwell) and Henry (Matthew Macfadyen), driving a wedge between their two families; with the Basts approaching penury, a showdown looms. Guy Martin vs the Robocar Channel 4, 9.00pm Always up for a challenge, Guy Martin builds his own robotic Ford Transit to take on a “Roboracer” around Silverstone. But first he picks up a few tips from a “Level Five” autonomous vehicle in Budapest and Tesla’s latest models in Massachusetts. GT Babylon Berlin Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm and 10.00pm With every one of the €40 million budget up on screen, this adaptation of Volker Kutscher’s Thirties-set policiers is one of the most handsome dramas of the year – and one of the most gripping. The first season reaches its climax with Lotte (Liv Lisa Fries) having a point to prove and Gereon (Volker Bruch) dealing both with ghosts from the past and chilling hints at what the future holds. Season two begins next week. Naples ’44: a Wartime Diary BBC Four, 11.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch narrates this gripping and cleverly structured Italian film, which blends archive footage, documentary and drama to tell the story of a city and its resilient citizens through the eyes of British officer Norman Lewis. Some of the imagery is powerful indeed (one sequence of cows being milked in the rubble of the city has a pungent surrealism) and the pacifist message is ultimately undeniable. GT Stalingrad (1994) History, 3.00pm ★★★☆☆ Joseph Vilsmaier’s film reconstructs the 1942 Siege of Stalingrad, in which Soviet forces successfully held back the German army. The battle proved to be a major turning point in the Second World War and claimed millions of lives – a point that the film rests on, showing the horrors of modern warfare in all its stomach-churning brutality. Dominique Horwitz and Thomas Kretschmann star as German soldiers. Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day (2014) BBC Two, 6.45pm ★★★☆☆ Steve Carell has become a dab hand at making public embarrassment ridiculous and borderline tragic, and saves the day in this slight but entertaining comedy. Alexander (Ed Oxenbould), blows out a candle for his 12th birthday and initiates this fateful curse so that his family understand how it feels to have a purely maddening 24 hours. Fury (2014) Channel 5, 9.00pm ★★★★☆ David Ayer’s study of the habits and habitats of the American killer male is an astonishing drama. It’s Germany 1945, and Sgt Don “Wardaddy” Collie (Brad Pitt) and his team are grinding towards Berlin in a battered tank. There is no rescue mission, just an agonising rumble from one brush with death to the next. The set pieces are gripping, and the terror of war is blasted home. Monday 27 November Right to work: Tourette’s sufferer Ryan Credit: BBC Employable Me BBC Two, 9.00pm This moving series, which follows jobseekers determined to show that their disabilities shouldn’t prevent them working, returns for a new four-part run. There’s a persuasive double purpose to the programme – to highlight the disabilities themselves and to explore how those living with them fight against prejudice every day. The opening episode showcases a wonderfully inspirational duo. We meet 52-year-old Andy, who was once the go-getting manager of a successful motorcycle business. Despite being left partially paralysed and struggling with speech after a life-threatening stroke, Andy wants to break into public speaking and motivate others with his story. Alongside him is turtle-mad Tourette’s sufferer Ryan, whose severe tics can leave him physically debilitated, but who nevertheless dreams of working with animals. The pair’s will to succeed is humbling as they tackle longed-for job opportunities and the significant hurdles this entails. Helping them on the way is psychologist Nancy Doyle, who runs a pioneering scheme aimed at getting our hopefuls to promote their talents and for recruiters to see their considerable worth. Toby Dantzic Chinese Burn BBC Three, from 10.00am This comedy pilot, executive-produced by Ash Atalla (People Just Do Nothing), about three girls from China trying to make new lives in London is worth watching. Flatmates Elizabeth (Shin-Fei Chen), who’s chasing her dream job as a sommelier, and fiery struggling actress Jackie (Yennis Cheung) get a surprise visit from Elizabeth’s ultra-rich friend FuFu (Yuyu Rau). She’s an unwelcome guest, however, as Elizabeth hasn’t been honest with her parents. Lost and Found Channel 4, 3.00pm Heartstrings are shamelessly tugged in this new series, which follows the sterling work of the Dogs Trust charity. The pooches featured in this episode include Ida, a Staffordshire Bull Terrier that needs regular hydrotherapy, and a Labrador that has been missing for four days. Paul Hollywood: A Baker’s Life Channel 4, 8.00pm Paul Hollywood fronts this new four-part series which combines personal anecdotes with his favourite recipes. The opening episode serves up footage of the gimlet-eyed bread expert’s original Great British Bake Off audition, along with a menu of his ultimate pizza and a Madeira celebration cake. Nigella: At My Table BBC Two, 8.30pm Here’s another eclectic selection of dishes from television’s glossiest gourmet. Her recipes include an intriguingly titled golden egg curry, and a feast of spiced lamb kofta followed by rose and pepper pavlova. Supershoppers Channel 4, 8.30pm The savvy consumer advice show returns with presenter Anna Richardson and newcomer Sabrina Grant investigating whether supermarkets’ standard own-label ranges are really any different to their cheaper value ranges. Beauty wipes and car insurance also get the once over. TD Last Men In Aleppo: Storyville BBC Four, 10.00pm This grim but absorbing documentary follows the work of the White Helmets, Syrian civilians who conduct search-and-rescue missions in the city of Aleppo. We follow a trio of volunteers that includes Khaled, who moves between scouring for missing people and searching out medicine for his malnourished daughter. The director Feras Fayyad’s stark camera style takes an unflinching approach to the horror. TD Die Another Day (2002) ITV4, 9.00pm ★★★☆☆ Pierce Brosnan’s last outing as James Bond is also his least satisfying (although even Sean Connery might have struggled to look cool driving an invisible car). Dastardly Gustav Graves (Toby Stephens) wants to provoke a war between the Koreas using a military satellite. Bond, aided by Halle Berry and Rosamund Pike, must stop him. It’s all let down by an over-reliance on CGI, but there are some great set pieces. Escobar: Paradise Lost (2014) Sky Cinema Premiere, 11.25pm ★★★☆☆ A thundering performance by Benicio del Toro almost redeems this misjudged biopic of the Colombian crime lord. Seizing on the role with understated relish, he teeters adroitly between generous family man and murdering manipulator. What a shame, then, that he’s used so sparingly – the film renders the tyrant nothing more than a supporting character. The Road (2009) ITV4, 11.45pm ★★★☆☆ John Hillcoat’s adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s exalted novel is as harrowing as its source material. Stunning landscape photography sets the melancholy mood as a man (Viggo Mortensen) and his son (the superb Kodi Smit-McPhee) wander the American wasteland after an ecological disaster. Meanwhile, Nick Cave’s wrenching score makes it a wholly chilling experience. Tuesday 28 November The rise of AI: robot Jess helps families with life’s challenges Credit: Channel 4 The Robot Will See You Now Channel 4, 10.00pm The Rise of the Robots season continues with this documentary exploring whether robots will ever be sophisticated enough to play the role of best friend and confidant, or even therapist, to humans. Some forms of artificial intelligence, such as Amazon’s Alexa, are becoming more commonly involved in our home lives; cars are almost at the point where they drive themselves; and trials are afoot to test whether software can be used to perform medical and legal functions. A companionship robot has also been developed to keep astronauts’ spirits up during lengthy periods on the International Space Station. That’s all a long way from being able to substitute the life experience, and emotional, ethical and psychological support, for which we turn to friends, family, religion and counsellors. But maybe not for long. This intriguing film focuses on a team from Manchester and Plymouth Universities racing to develop a humanoid robot called Jess, that uses AI-based analysis to offer counselling on problems to do with marriage, divorce, infidelity and other day-to-day traumas – with built-in sympathy and tissue dispenser, no doubt. Gerard O’Donovan Glitch Netflix, from today This Aussie drama about a lakeside town where the dead start coming back to life bore too great a resemblance to French chiller The Returned in its early stages, but it eventually took a different supernatural path with reasonable success. The second series kicks off with last season’s closing shock revelation still hanging in the air: Elisha (Genevieve O’Reilly), the medic who’s been helping the undead, has been one of them herself, all along. How to Spend It Well at Christmas with Phillip Schofield ITV, 8.00pm This festive consumer series sees Phillip Schofield inviting celebrity guests to test and taste the “must have” food, drink and gift items of the season. This week, they look at the hottest toys of 2017 and how Father Christmas can get hold of them. The A Word BBC One, 9.00pm Rebecca (Molly Wright) packs her parents off on a much-needed mini-break and drafts in Eddie (Greg McHugh) and Nicola (Vinette Robinson) to help care for seven-year-old Joe (Max Vento). Unsurprisingly, things don’t go entirely according to plan. MasterChef: The Professionals BBC Two, 9.00pm The standard has been unusually high this year and this week’s six nervous new candidates prove especially inventive in the signature round and a challenge to come up with a new take on flavoursome, filled pasta with an accompanying sauce. Grand Designs: House of the Year Channel 4, 9.00pm Which of the shortlisted super-dwellings will win the Riba prize for 2017’s House of the Year? Kevin McCloud can only announce the winner once the last two finalists have been chosen – from the predictably stunning nominees in the Minimalist and Modern category. GO Passions: Samuel Coleridge-Taylor by Chi-Chi Nwanoku Sky Arts, 9.00pm Bassist Chi-Chi Nwanoku is the founder of Europe’s first black and ethnic minority classical orchestra. So, unsurprisingly, it’s not the poet (that’s Samuel Taylor Coleridge, silly) she chooses as her hero but the similarly named mixed-race British composer born 100 years later, in a film praising black musicians who’ve overcome prejudice to succeed in the conservative world of classical music. GO Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (2016) Sky Cinema Superheroes, 5.50pm ★★★☆☆ Tim Burton’s Edwardian fairy tale, based on the first Miss Peregrine book by Ransom Riggs – feels oddly conventional. Adapted by Jane Goldman (Kick-Ass), it’s a tale of an insular Florida lad, Jake Portman (Asa Butterfield), who visits an orphanage that figured in tales spun by his grandfather (Terence Stamp). Mars Attacks! (1996) ITV4, 10.50pm ★★★★☆ It may not be director Tim Burton’s best film but this surreal sci-fi comedy is still fun. The glitzy cast, including Jack Nicholson, Pierce Brosnan, Glenn Close and Sarah Jessica Parker, put on their best camp performances to fight seemingly peaceful Martians, who in fact want to destroy Big Ben, the Eiffel Tower and the Taj Mahal all in the name of a good time. It’s a loving parody of Fifties’ science-fiction cinema. Runaway Train (1985) Movies4Men, 10.50pm ★★★☆☆ Jon Voight and Eric Roberts (both Oscar-nominated) star as a pair of convicts, whose dash for freedom from an Alaskan prison takes an unexpected turn when they find themselves on an out-of-control train. The officers on their heels are caught between stopping it and reclaiming the criminals. It’s all a bit ridiculous, but Voight brings an appealing manic energy to a fun premise. Rebecca De Mornay co-stars. Wednesday 29 November Ferrying around: those who work on the busy English Channel Credit: Channel 4 The Channel: The World’s Busiest Waterway Channel 4, 9.00pm Drunk passengers, frazzled families, fundraisers swimming in testing conditions, enormous ships trying to squeeze through a narrow body of water: it’s all in a day’s workfor those who police the waters of the English Channel, as this new documentary series makes clear. Filmed last summer and with a heavy focus on the many changes that Brexit may bring to the Channel crossing, this opening episode concentrates largely on life on the ferries. “We’re already down on passengers and spending from last year,” notes one employee, pointing out that the collapse of the pound against the euro means that holidaymakers are less inclined to splash their cash. It’s not all doom and gloom, however, as we also follow a determined single mother who plans to swim the Channel to raise money and awareness of sickle cell disease, which both her sons have. Elsewhere, there are interesting statistics about the sheer numbers making the crossing – up to 400 ships passing through the 21-mile-wide Dover Strait each day – and captain Mark Miller and his crew have to deal with both a paralytic passenger and the tour company who intend to leave him behind. Sarah Hughes The Marvellous Mrs Maisel Amazon Prime Video, from today Gilmore Girls creator Amy Sherman-Palladino returns with this effervescent tale set in Fifties New York. Our heroine is Miriam Maisel (Rachel Brosnahan). On the surface she’s the perfect Jewish American Princess but underneath beats the soul of an acid-tongued comedian. Sherman-Palladino is clearly playing homage to the trailblazing likes of Joan Rivers and Phyllis Diller but her story still feels fresh thanks to a sharp script and Brosnahan’s wonderful timing. Mary Berry’s Country House Secrets BBC One, 8.00pm Mary Berry continues her trawl through some of the UK’s grandest country houses. This week she’s in Scotland helping the inhabitants of Scone Palace, Lord and Lady Mansfield, prepare for dinner and a ceilidh while fitting in a bit of deer stalking and salmon fishing on the side. Peaky Blinders BBC Two, 9.00pm Steven Knight’s gangster drama is firing on all cylinders this series and never more so than in a tight, tense third episode which sees Polly (Helen McCrory) re-join the company and Arthur (the excellent Paul Anderson) wrestle with both his guilt and his God following John’s death. Digging for Britain BBC Four, 9.00pm “Archaeology is adding flesh to the bare bones of people” announces Professor Alice Roberts as the second part of this series digging deep into Britain’s past heads to Kent. There we spend time following the excavation of the wreck of East India Company ship, the Rooswijk, before uncovering early evidence of Julius Caesar’s invasion of Britain in the shape of an ancient fort. SH Wallis: The Queen That Never Was Channel 5, 9.00pm Georgina Rich is the latest actress to play Wallis Simpson in this meld of drama and documentary. It’s not a format that ever works particularly well but, beyond the enactments, a complex portrait of the Duchess of Windsor emerges and one which sheds fresh light on the true nature of her marriages. How to Build a Robot Channel 4, 10.35pm David Tennant narrates this entertaining documentary focusing on Canadian robot inventor and puppeteer David McGoran. McGoran’s aim is to invent a robot that can truly interact with humans. SH The Riot Club (2014) Film4, 9.00pm ★★★☆☆ Laura Wade’s 2010 play, Posh, dealt with a still-reported habit of trashing dining establishments by Oxford University’s notorious Bullingdon Club. It reaches the screen as The Riot Club, starring a braying gang of silverspoon-reared Brits. The pungency of the play has been diluted, along with its political bite, but Holliday Grainger, Max Irons and Sam Claflin are perfectly cast in the main roles. Bronson (2008) London Live, 10.00pm ★★★☆☆ A gripping character study of “Britain’s most notorious long-term prisoner”, Charles Bronson (who has recently wed), whose bloody bare-knuckle brawls have seen him moved from prison to prison 120 times. Tom Hardy (who now seems to specialise in complex, muscle-bound brawlers – Mad Max: Fury Road, Legend, Taboo) ramps it up with disturbing intensity to delve inside the mind of the tormented personality. Life As We Know It (2010) 5STAR, 11.00pm ★★★☆☆ Katherine Heigl and Josh Duhamel star in this shrill domestic nightmare in which they raise their orphaned godchild. Heigl once again plays a beautifully groomed control freak, while Duhamel’s Messer – a philandering man-child – repeatedly lives up to his name. When they get together, it feels like something to do with careers, contracts and romcom necessity; nothing to do with life. Thursday 30 November Pushing the boat out: Prunella Scales and Timothy West Credit: Channel 4 Great Canal Journeys Channel 4, 8.00pm When they embarked on the first series of Great Canal Journeys in 2014, it’s doubtful whether Timothy West or Prunella Scales could have foreseen its longevity, in part given the niche material and also because of Scales’s advancing Alzheimer’s disease. Yet here they are, heading through Portugal for the first instalment in this eighth series, never passing up the opportunity to draw comparisons between long marriages and vintage fortified wines. It is another hour of gentle insights and pure, unaffected charm. Their journey takes them from a river port 100 miles inland through to Porto along the Rio Douro, via several vineyards and, slightly less predictably, examples of ancient rock art and Europe’s deepest lock. Throughout is evidence of why Portugal remains England’s oldest ally (Brits are heavily involved in the contemporary port industry) and, more significantly, of a relationship of a strength and mutual affection to which we can all aspire. Scales credits her husband with “opening up the world”. For West’s part, he reckons that “she likes being with me and I like being with her. That’s the best we can hope for, and very nice too.” Gabriel Tate PGA Tour Golf: The Hero World Challenge Sky Sports Main Event, 6.30pm It’s the opening day at the Albany Resort in the Bahamas, where Japan’s Hideki Matsuyama is the reigning champion. Discovering: Richard Widmark Sky Arts, 8.00pm Always more than a mere journeyman but never quite leading man material either, Richard Widmark was one of Hollywood’s most consistent talents, his work spanning classic noirs (Panic in the Streets), westerns (Two Rode Together) and thrillers (Coma). Journalists and critics assemble to pay tribute in another breezy, concise profile. The Farthest: Voyager’s Interstellar Journey: Storyville BBC Four, 8.55pm The space programme perhaps best represents the dazzling possibilities of the human brain and our capacity to imagine. This characteristically excellent and absorbing Storyville celebrates the scientific achievements of the Voyager probes through those that planned, made and continue to monitor them as they leave our solar system for interstellar space. Their enthusiasm is undiminished and infectious. GT Blitz: the Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm This affecting series investigates the repercussions of a German bomb that destroyed two houses in Hull. The personal traumas were of course profound, but a series of essays written by the city’s children in 1941 also unwittingly encouraged Britain’s controversial urban bombing strategies later in the war. Trump: an American Dream Channel 4, 9.00pm This enthralling series concludes with the future President rediscovering his mojo thanks to the influence of a new wife and advisors, before a combination of reality television and social media open an unlikely route to the White House. Live at the Apollo BBC Two, 10.00pm A fine line-up launch a new run for the hardy stand-up perennial from Hammersmith, with quickfire Gary Delaney and rising Scottish comic Larry Dean on the agenda, introduced by Sara Pascoe. The Sex Robots Are Coming Channel 4, 10.00pm Nick Sweeney’s unsettling documentary follows the creation of Harmony, a prototype sexbot, and James, a potential purchaser. What do these technological advances mean for human relationships and the ever-present issue of objectification? GT Airplane II: The Sequel (1982) Film4, 7.15pm ★★★☆☆ The furiously funny, and startling originality of disaster parody Airplane! makes this sequel, which is set in the future and takes place on a lunar shuttle, stick out like a sore thumb, especially since the original team had no involvement. There are some amusing spoofs of Rocky and E.T., but the jokes tread familiar ground. Cameos come from Raymond Burr and William Shatner. Cliffhanger (1993) Universal Channel, 9.00pm ★★★☆☆ Living up to its title, Cliffhanger is a rollicking rollercoaster of a film. It stars Sylvester Stallone as a hotshot mountain climber, who becomes embroiled in a heist, along with Janine Turner. Set in the Rocky Mountains and featuring some stupendous stunts, it may be big-budget nonsense – but it’s entertaining big-budget nonsense with zesty lines and exhilarating cinematography. Get Him to the Greek (2010) Comedy Central, 10.00pm ★★★☆☆ Russell Brand plays himself (very well), thinly disguised as washed-up British rocker Aldous Snow who, desperate for a career revival, is called upon for a one-night show at LA venue The Greek. Despite trying too hard to shock, Brand’s famously crude humour lends this potentially humdrum American bromance some eccentricity and makes it, at times, a raucous comedy. Friday 1 December Life Thru a Lens: Robbie Williams is one of Norton’s guests Credit: Getty The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm Graham Norton remains the best chat show host on British television, even if one or two of his line-ups this season have failed to generate much in the way of sparks. (The recent edition featuring only the cast of Ken Branagh’s new Agatha Christie movie Murder on the Orient Express could have been bottled and sold as a soporific, despite all of the star names on display.) Happily that’s unlikely to be a problem here as most of his guests are blessed with some of the biggest and most-often utilised mouths in showbiz. Elton John is on hand to promote his latest greatest hits collection, and will perhaps have plenty to say about ITV’s recent poll of the British public’s 20 favourite songs from his rather extensive back catalogue. Stephen Fry will doubtless be as mesmerising as ever as he discusses his new book on Greek mythology; and Robbie Williams might make some noise about his new album, Under the Radar Volume 2, and upcoming Heavy Entertainment tour. All in all, you have to wonder how demure actress Carey Mulligan will manage to get a word in edgeways on the subject of her terrific new Netflix film Mudbound, although we’re confident she will. Gerard O’Donovan Dark Netflix, from today “The question is not where, or who, or how…but when?” This creepy time-bending thriller, about the disappearance of two German boys over a 30-year interval, plays with the idea of how fractured relationships repeat time and again. Voyeur Netflix, from today This controversial documentary explores one of veteran US writer Gay Talese’s most sensational pieces of “literary journalism”, The Voyeur’s Motel. It told the story of how, in the Eighties, Gerald Foos opened a motel supposedly for the sole purpose of peeping on guests. But how much of the tale was made up? Sounds Like Friday Night BBC One, 7.30pm Singer Rita Ora joins regular presenters Greg James and Dotty as guest host at the BBC’s White City studios to introduce, among others, Brighton rock duo Royal Blood. Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV, UTV or Wales In the series’ finale Mears ends his epic journey in the ancient Walpole Forest, a vast swathe of primordial wilderness in Western Australia. He’s in search of the forest’s famed giant tingle and karri trees but the smaller denizens – such as the elusive quokka – are just as amazing. Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Jamie Oliver and Jimmy Doherty’s pier-end café goes fully vegetarian in honour of guest Joanna Lumley, who revives the tastes of her childhood by cooking the King of Malaysia’s favourite dish. Meanwhile, the childhood friends go on the road to champion British fava beans, and Doherty designs a vertical vegetable patch – perfect for the high-rise balcony. Britain’s Greatest Bridges Channel 5, 8.00pm The series concludes with the story of the feat of engineering that is the mile-long Severn Bridge and how its designer Bill Brown revolutionised modern bridge design with its aerodynamic box girder deck. GO Truth Tellers at the BBC BBC Four, 11.00pm Friday night is music night on BBC Four, and this new archive series adds depth to its line-up by showcasing clips of the most lyrically gifted songwriters to have performed on the BBC. These include Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell and Patti Smith. GO The King’s Speech (2010) More4, 9.00pm ★★★★☆ Tom Hooper’s film about the future George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer in the nation’s hour of need won multiple Oscars, including a deserved Best Actor gong for Colin Firth. But it’s his double-act with Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist Lionel Logue that gives the film its heart, and the double-handers between them are fraught and fascinating. Helena Bonham Carter is perhaps underused as the Duchess of York. Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (2008) ITV4, 11.40pm ★★★☆☆ This is Tim Burton’s adaptation of Stephen Sondheim’s 1979 musical about the demon barber of Fleet Street. Johnny Depp plays Benjamin Barker, a revenge artist who wields his razors with merry abandon in 19th-century London with the help of the deliciously sinister Mrs Lovett (Helena Bonham Carter). Alan Rickman plays the deplorable Judge Turpin. Wild (2014) Channel 4, 12.10am ★★★★☆ The Pacific Crest Trail, which runs up the entire western spine of the United States, is a challenge of fabled arduousness and rugged beauty. In 1995, aged 26, Cheryl Strayed (played by a superb Reese Witherspoon) walked it, to get clearance in her head after a decade of loss and personal meltdown. Wild powerfully reveals Strayed’s terrors and pleasures as she forges ahead on the journey. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Jamie and Jimmy's Friday Night Feast and Sounds Like Friday Night
Friday 24 November Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Jamie Oliver and childhood mucker Jimmy Doherty return for another series of their hyperactive meld of cookery programme, food information and celebrity chat hosted at their Southend Pier caff. This series tends to stand or fall with the visiting celebrity but luckily this week it’s Simon Pegg, who gamely enters into the spirit of things by serving customers, cooking what looks like a pretty good tagine and admitting that he’s far more food conscious in these Mission: Impossible days (Tom Cruise is apparently the devil for pushing cakes on those trying to stay in shape). Friday Night Feast feels closer in tone to the early cookery shows that made Oliver’s name and Pegg enters into the cheeky-chappy spirit, mucking around with Doherty and dropping sardonic asides. “It’s fundamentally evil but at the same time beautiful,” he remarks of Oliver’s Provençal Bake, a calorific but clearly delicious mixture of pancakes, cheese, ham and tomatoes, which causes one customer to gush, “I never want it to end.” Elsewhere, Oliver and Doherty go on the road to uncover the joys of free-range duck, and Doherty builds a barbecue for the Stoke Mandeville wheelchair rugby team. Sarah Hughes Sounds Like Friday Night BBC One, 7.30pm BBC One’s live music show is a great idea but so far has been a bit hit and miss. Presenters Greg James and Dotty are enthusiastic but more risks are needed when booking the live acts. Craig David co-hosts this episode, and there are performances from The Killers and Anne-Marie. Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV, UTV or Wales Ray Mears’s laid-back excursion around Australia continues in South Australia’s Flinders mountain ranges, which provides a dramatic setting for three species of kangaroos and the country’s largest bird of prey. Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.00pm The personable Stephen Mangan takes the host’s chair for this episode of the satirical news-based panel game. He’s joined by business journalist Steph McGovern and comedian Jo Caulfield. Extreme Wives with Kate Humble BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Kate Humble heads to the remote town of Shillong in north-east India to meet with the matrilineal Khasi people in the fascinating final episode. The Khasi pass everything, including property, down the female line and hand power to the youngest daughter in each family. SH Rolling Stone: Stories from the Edge Sky Arts, 9.00pm Anyone who has read Sticky Fingers, the recent biography of Rolling Stone supremo Jann Wenner, will realise that this Alex Gibney series is something of a puff piece in comparison. That said, it’s still very enjoyable. The focus here is on the kidnap of Patty Hearst and the way in which the counterculture slowly became mainstream. Gregory Porter’s Popular Voices BBC Four, 10.00pm Jazz musician Gregory Porter’s outstanding series continues with a focus on crooners. All the usual suspects – Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, the unbeatable Nat King Cole – are present but what makes this series so exceptional is the knowledge Porter brings to his subject. This episode dissects why Sinatra was “a little too presumptuous for the croon” as well as looking at how everyone from Iggy Pop to David Bowie used the technique. The real pleasure, however, comes from the music. SH Collateral Beauty (2016) Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm ★★☆☆☆ The plot of David Frankel (The Devil Wears Prada) and Allan Loeb’s (Just Go with It) film is fantastically unhinged: Will Smith is an ad-exec who has lost his daughter to cancer, and in his grief is pestered on the streets of New York by the personifications of Love (Keira Knightley), Time (Jacob Latimore) and Death (Helen Mirren) – “the three abstractions”. Dark Shadows (2012) W, 9.00pm ★★☆☆☆ Tim Burton’s film is at its best in the opening scenes, when it can afford to be all show and no tell. It’s Johnny Depp, naturally, who plays Barnabas Collins, an 18th-century Byronic rascal who is transformed into a vampire by a jealous witch (Eva Green) and wakes up in Nixon-era small-town America. Depp and Burton’s eighth film together brought them level with De Niro and Scorsese, although in numerical terms only. Boyhood (2014) Channel 4, 12.05am ★★★★★ Richard Linklater’s real-time depiction of a boy growing up over 12 years received the biggest Oscar snub of recent years, winning only one award, for Patricia Arquette as for Best Supporting Actress. From 2002, Linklater spent a few days each year filming the same actors to chart Mason’s (Ellar Coltrane) ordinary life – in what is an extraordinary, beautiful and moving string of small, everyday moments. Saturday 25 November In his words: the life of the Sixties playwright Joe Orton Credit: Hulton Archive Joe Orton Laid Bare BBC Two, 9.00pm “I realise it’s unforgivable doing this but I’m just unrepentant.” So announces a young Joe Orton in this suitably anarchic take on the playwright’s life, works and early, brutal death. It’s a sentence that entirely sums up Orton’s acidic take on life; he was a man who loved (and arguably lived) to shock and who enjoyed making people uncomfortable – “I felt snakes were writhing round my feet,” wrote one theatre critic after watching the bawdy Entertaining Mr Sloane – yet who was also possessed of enough wit, charm and intelligence to win over even the most mortally offended. Making great use of Orton’s letters, diaries and plays – scenes from the latter acted by a cast that includes Antony Sher, Ben Miles and Jaime Winstone – the documentary does its best to pin its subject to the page with contributors including his sister Leonie, playwright Christopher Hampton and producer Michael Codron. There is (surprisingly) understanding too for the man who murdered Orton, his lover Kenneth Halliwell, who subsequently killed himself. Ultimately, however, what lingers is not the gory manner of Orton’s death but rather his wildly entertaining words. Sarah Hughes International Rugby Union: Scotland v Australia & England v Samoa BBC One, 2.00pm & Sky Sports Main Event, 2.45pm Having fallen agonisingly close to pulling off the greatest result in their history – they lost 22-17 to New Zealand – Scotland host Australia at Murrayfield with their tails up. Meanwhile, England – who beat the Wallabies 30-6 last weekend, with Danny Care putting a sublime performance after coming off the bench – face Samoa, hoping to take Eddie Jones’s record to 22 wins from 23 as their coach. Expect Jones to ring the changes, with Henry Slade likely to be handed another opportunity at No 12 and Mike Brown returning to the side as full-back. International Rugby Union: Wales v New Zealand BBC Two, 4.45pm An unsuccessful three-match series in New Zealand this summer saw Wales return home still looking for a victory over the All Blacks for the first time since 1953. They have now lost 29 consecutive fixtures, 10 of which have been presided over by New Zealand coach Warren Gatland during his tenure. Wales head into this match on the back of a far-from-convincing 13-6 victory against Georgia. Granted, Gatland did put out an experimental team. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Chelsea BT Sport 1, 5.00pm Two of last Saturday’s star performers meet at Anfield in what should be a pulsating encounter. Liverpool beat Southampton 3-0, with Mohamed Salah scoring twice, while Chelsea, inspired by Eden Hazard, ran out 4-0 winners at West Brom. When these sides met in January here, Georginio Wijnaldum cancelled out David Luiz’s goal in a 1-1 draw. Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.50pm With only three weeks left in the competition, the judges must try to separate the glitter from the paste. Alexandra Burke and Debbie McGee are expected to make the final but it’s wide open as to who else joins them. This week, the couples can earn extra points in the “pasodoblathon”. The X Factor: The Semi Finals ITV, 7.30pm From surprise double eliminations to the extra sing-offs, this year’s X Factor has been derided for being a mess. This week, it can redeem itself as the contestants sing for a place in next weekend’s Grand Final. Michael McIntyre’s Big Show BBC One, 8.10pm Michael McIntyre’s attempt to single-handedly revive the variety show continues. This week, he’s joined by guests Gary Barlow, Russell Kane, Clean Bandit and Danny Dyer, who hands over his mobile phone for the Celebrity Send to All slot. Dad’s Army BBC Two, 8.30pm; not NI or Scotland As Brexit edges nearer so Jimmy Perry and David Croft’s comedy about the Home Guard appears ever more relevant, not least because it pinpoints a certain kind of Englishness. This episode sees the bumbling Captain Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) pitch camp in the middle of an artillery exercise. SH Witnesses: A Frozen Death BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.55pm Another day, another atmospherically depressing European crime drama. But this French eight-part series, shown in double bills over the next four weeks, is really good. The Tunnel’s Marie Dompnier plays Lieutenant Sandra Winckler, who is assigned to a macabre case involving 15 frozen bodies on an abandoned bus. The dead men are all linked to one woman, Catherine Keemer (Audrey Fleurot), who disappeared three years earlier. White Princess Drama, 9.00pm It might be hokum but this adaptation of Philippa Gregory’s bestseller is enjoyable largely thanks to the complicated relationship at its heart. The marriage between Henry VII (Jacob Collins-Levy) and Elizabeth of York (Jodie Comer) is very much a dynastic contract between two people forced to find common cause. This episode sees them take steps towards that new understanding. SH Daddy Long Legs (1955) BBC Two, 2.10pm ★★★☆☆ Fred Astaire and Leslie Caron are paired for the first time in this Hollywood musical written by Phoebe and Henry Ephron (parents of Nora) and loosely based on a 1912 novel. They bring charm and warmth to a story about the complications of a love affair between a young woman and a man 30 years her senior. The dance sequences are particularly striking, containing a rarity in Astaire’s choreography: a kiss. Lone Survivor (2013) Channel 4, 11.05pm ★★★☆☆ In this film based on true events, Mark Wahlberg gives a strong performance as sniper Marcus Luttrell, who, in 2005, was the head of a four-man team of Navy Seals, tasked with killing Taliban leader Ahmed Shah. An encounter with some goatherds gives the team a major moral dilemma. The film, directed by Peter Berg, is hampered by a lack of character exploration but it’s certainly action-packed. Albert Nobbs (2011) BBC Two, 11.35pm ★★★☆☆ Glenn Close toiled for 30 years to make an Albert Nobbs film after playing the part in a 1982 off-Broadway play. Close inhabits the role, of a woman disguised as a man to work as a waiter in a 19th-century hotel, with uncanny accuracy (she was rewarded with an Oscar nomination). The film reaches for something to say about sexual identity, but neither Close nor director Rodrigo García seem to know what it is. Sunday 26 November Ring of fire: Xand van Tulleken Credit: BBC Expedition Volcano BBC Two, 9.00pm As is the wont of BBC documentaries about the natural world these days, the impact of humans can no longer be ignored – in fact, it’s central to the premise of this new two-parter in which geologist Chris Jackson and humanitarian doctor Xand van Tulleken journey to live volcanoes and the communities that live in their shadow. Nyiragongo, in the Congo, last erupted in 2002, causing a mass evacuation of the nearby city of Goma, terrible loss of life and wholesale destruction of property. The pair’s expedition examines ways to predict its behaviour, especially since another eruption is almost inevitable. Van Tulleken focuses on disease prevention and healthcare, looking at how to avoid the spread of cholera that proved so catastrophic 15 years ago, while Jackson drops into the crater (the staggering camerawork and pounding soundtrack leave you in no doubt as to the potential peril of the venture) to assess the latest techniques for detecting sulphur dioxide and geological vibrations. By the end, problems have been diagnosed and solutions prescribed – it’s an admirable project whose success can only be judged, grimly, in the event of another disaster. Next week, they head to nearby Nyamuragira. Gabriel Tate Formula 1: Abu Dhabi Grand Prix Channel 4, noon & Sky Sports F1, 12.30pm He may have already been crowned champion but that didn’t stop Lewis Hamilton putting in a fine display in Brazil, starting in the pit lane under flawless Brazilian skies and finishing a mere five seconds adrift of winner Sebastian Vettel. Let’s hope for a similarly exciting spectacle at the Yas Marina Circuit, as the curtain comes down on the 2017 season. Blue Planet II BBC One, 8.00pm Every episode of this mesmerising series brings with it new wonders. This week’s venture into underwater forests, meadows and mangroves sniffs out creatures with unlikely names (the Pyjama Shark, the Garibaldi Damselfish) and even more outlandish strategies for survival. Coastal Railways with Julie Walters Channel 4, 8.00pm It might be hard to see what Julie Walters can bring to this well-worn travelogue approach, despite all her charisma and appeal. But there is plenty to enjoy in her tour of the British Isles – tonight, she boards the “Harry Potter” train in the Highlands, guts herring and wrangles cattle. Howards End BBC One, 9.00pm Kenneth Lonergan’s restrained, affecting adaptation reachesa crunch point in relations between Margaret (Hayley Atwell) and Henry (Matthew Macfadyen), driving a wedge between their two families; with the Basts approaching penury, a showdown looms. Guy Martin vs the Robocar Channel 4, 9.00pm Always up for a challenge, Guy Martin builds his own robotic Ford Transit to take on a “Roboracer” around Silverstone. But first he picks up a few tips from a “Level Five” autonomous vehicle in Budapest and Tesla’s latest models in Massachusetts. GT Babylon Berlin Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm and 10.00pm With every one of the €40 million budget up on screen, this adaptation of Volker Kutscher’s Thirties-set policiers is one of the most handsome dramas of the year – and one of the most gripping. The first season reaches its climax with Lotte (Liv Lisa Fries) having a point to prove and Gereon (Volker Bruch) dealing both with ghosts from the past and chilling hints at what the future holds. Season two begins next week. Naples ’44: a Wartime Diary BBC Four, 11.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch narrates this gripping and cleverly structured Italian film, which blends archive footage, documentary and drama to tell the story of a city and its resilient citizens through the eyes of British officer Norman Lewis. Some of the imagery is powerful indeed (one sequence of cows being milked in the rubble of the city has a pungent surrealism) and the pacifist message is ultimately undeniable. GT Stalingrad (1994) History, 3.00pm ★★★☆☆ Joseph Vilsmaier’s film reconstructs the 1942 Siege of Stalingrad, in which Soviet forces successfully held back the German army. The battle proved to be a major turning point in the Second World War and claimed millions of lives – a point that the film rests on, showing the horrors of modern warfare in all its stomach-churning brutality. Dominique Horwitz and Thomas Kretschmann star as German soldiers. Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day (2014) BBC Two, 6.45pm ★★★☆☆ Steve Carell has become a dab hand at making public embarrassment ridiculous and borderline tragic, and saves the day in this slight but entertaining comedy. Alexander (Ed Oxenbould), blows out a candle for his 12th birthday and initiates this fateful curse so that his family understand how it feels to have a purely maddening 24 hours. Fury (2014) Channel 5, 9.00pm ★★★★☆ David Ayer’s study of the habits and habitats of the American killer male is an astonishing drama. It’s Germany 1945, and Sgt Don “Wardaddy” Collie (Brad Pitt) and his team are grinding towards Berlin in a battered tank. There is no rescue mission, just an agonising rumble from one brush with death to the next. The set pieces are gripping, and the terror of war is blasted home. Monday 27 November Right to work: Tourette’s sufferer Ryan Credit: BBC Employable Me BBC Two, 9.00pm This moving series, which follows jobseekers determined to show that their disabilities shouldn’t prevent them working, returns for a new four-part run. There’s a persuasive double purpose to the programme – to highlight the disabilities themselves and to explore how those living with them fight against prejudice every day. The opening episode showcases a wonderfully inspirational duo. We meet 52-year-old Andy, who was once the go-getting manager of a successful motorcycle business. Despite being left partially paralysed and struggling with speech after a life-threatening stroke, Andy wants to break into public speaking and motivate others with his story. Alongside him is turtle-mad Tourette’s sufferer Ryan, whose severe tics can leave him physically debilitated, but who nevertheless dreams of working with animals. The pair’s will to succeed is humbling as they tackle longed-for job opportunities and the significant hurdles this entails. Helping them on the way is psychologist Nancy Doyle, who runs a pioneering scheme aimed at getting our hopefuls to promote their talents and for recruiters to see their considerable worth. Toby Dantzic Chinese Burn BBC Three, from 10.00am This comedy pilot, executive-produced by Ash Atalla (People Just Do Nothing), about three girls from China trying to make new lives in London is worth watching. Flatmates Elizabeth (Shin-Fei Chen), who’s chasing her dream job as a sommelier, and fiery struggling actress Jackie (Yennis Cheung) get a surprise visit from Elizabeth’s ultra-rich friend FuFu (Yuyu Rau). She’s an unwelcome guest, however, as Elizabeth hasn’t been honest with her parents. Lost and Found Channel 4, 3.00pm Heartstrings are shamelessly tugged in this new series, which follows the sterling work of the Dogs Trust charity. The pooches featured in this episode include Ida, a Staffordshire Bull Terrier that needs regular hydrotherapy, and a Labrador that has been missing for four days. Paul Hollywood: A Baker’s Life Channel 4, 8.00pm Paul Hollywood fronts this new four-part series which combines personal anecdotes with his favourite recipes. The opening episode serves up footage of the gimlet-eyed bread expert’s original Great British Bake Off audition, along with a menu of his ultimate pizza and a Madeira celebration cake. Nigella: At My Table BBC Two, 8.30pm Here’s another eclectic selection of dishes from television’s glossiest gourmet. Her recipes include an intriguingly titled golden egg curry, and a feast of spiced lamb kofta followed by rose and pepper pavlova. Supershoppers Channel 4, 8.30pm The savvy consumer advice show returns with presenter Anna Richardson and newcomer Sabrina Grant investigating whether supermarkets’ standard own-label ranges are really any different to their cheaper value ranges. Beauty wipes and car insurance also get the once over. TD Last Men In Aleppo: Storyville BBC Four, 10.00pm This grim but absorbing documentary follows the work of the White Helmets, Syrian civilians who conduct search-and-rescue missions in the city of Aleppo. We follow a trio of volunteers that includes Khaled, who moves between scouring for missing people and searching out medicine for his malnourished daughter. The director Feras Fayyad’s stark camera style takes an unflinching approach to the horror. TD Die Another Day (2002) ITV4, 9.00pm ★★★☆☆ Pierce Brosnan’s last outing as James Bond is also his least satisfying (although even Sean Connery might have struggled to look cool driving an invisible car). Dastardly Gustav Graves (Toby Stephens) wants to provoke a war between the Koreas using a military satellite. Bond, aided by Halle Berry and Rosamund Pike, must stop him. It’s all let down by an over-reliance on CGI, but there are some great set pieces. Escobar: Paradise Lost (2014) Sky Cinema Premiere, 11.25pm ★★★☆☆ A thundering performance by Benicio del Toro almost redeems this misjudged biopic of the Colombian crime lord. Seizing on the role with understated relish, he teeters adroitly between generous family man and murdering manipulator. What a shame, then, that he’s used so sparingly – the film renders the tyrant nothing more than a supporting character. The Road (2009) ITV4, 11.45pm ★★★☆☆ John Hillcoat’s adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s exalted novel is as harrowing as its source material. Stunning landscape photography sets the melancholy mood as a man (Viggo Mortensen) and his son (the superb Kodi Smit-McPhee) wander the American wasteland after an ecological disaster. Meanwhile, Nick Cave’s wrenching score makes it a wholly chilling experience. Tuesday 28 November The rise of AI: robot Jess helps families with life’s challenges Credit: Channel 4 The Robot Will See You Now Channel 4, 10.00pm The Rise of the Robots season continues with this documentary exploring whether robots will ever be sophisticated enough to play the role of best friend and confidant, or even therapist, to humans. Some forms of artificial intelligence, such as Amazon’s Alexa, are becoming more commonly involved in our home lives; cars are almost at the point where they drive themselves; and trials are afoot to test whether software can be used to perform medical and legal functions. A companionship robot has also been developed to keep astronauts’ spirits up during lengthy periods on the International Space Station. That’s all a long way from being able to substitute the life experience, and emotional, ethical and psychological support, for which we turn to friends, family, religion and counsellors. But maybe not for long. This intriguing film focuses on a team from Manchester and Plymouth Universities racing to develop a humanoid robot called Jess, that uses AI-based analysis to offer counselling on problems to do with marriage, divorce, infidelity and other day-to-day traumas – with built-in sympathy and tissue dispenser, no doubt. Gerard O’Donovan Glitch Netflix, from today This Aussie drama about a lakeside town where the dead start coming back to life bore too great a resemblance to French chiller The Returned in its early stages, but it eventually took a different supernatural path with reasonable success. The second series kicks off with last season’s closing shock revelation still hanging in the air: Elisha (Genevieve O’Reilly), the medic who’s been helping the undead, has been one of them herself, all along. How to Spend It Well at Christmas with Phillip Schofield ITV, 8.00pm This festive consumer series sees Phillip Schofield inviting celebrity guests to test and taste the “must have” food, drink and gift items of the season. This week, they look at the hottest toys of 2017 and how Father Christmas can get hold of them. The A Word BBC One, 9.00pm Rebecca (Molly Wright) packs her parents off on a much-needed mini-break and drafts in Eddie (Greg McHugh) and Nicola (Vinette Robinson) to help care for seven-year-old Joe (Max Vento). Unsurprisingly, things don’t go entirely according to plan. MasterChef: The Professionals BBC Two, 9.00pm The standard has been unusually high this year and this week’s six nervous new candidates prove especially inventive in the signature round and a challenge to come up with a new take on flavoursome, filled pasta with an accompanying sauce. Grand Designs: House of the Year Channel 4, 9.00pm Which of the shortlisted super-dwellings will win the Riba prize for 2017’s House of the Year? Kevin McCloud can only announce the winner once the last two finalists have been chosen – from the predictably stunning nominees in the Minimalist and Modern category. GO Passions: Samuel Coleridge-Taylor by Chi-Chi Nwanoku Sky Arts, 9.00pm Bassist Chi-Chi Nwanoku is the founder of Europe’s first black and ethnic minority classical orchestra. So, unsurprisingly, it’s not the poet (that’s Samuel Taylor Coleridge, silly) she chooses as her hero but the similarly named mixed-race British composer born 100 years later, in a film praising black musicians who’ve overcome prejudice to succeed in the conservative world of classical music. GO Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (2016) Sky Cinema Superheroes, 5.50pm ★★★☆☆ Tim Burton’s Edwardian fairy tale, based on the first Miss Peregrine book by Ransom Riggs – feels oddly conventional. Adapted by Jane Goldman (Kick-Ass), it’s a tale of an insular Florida lad, Jake Portman (Asa Butterfield), who visits an orphanage that figured in tales spun by his grandfather (Terence Stamp). Mars Attacks! (1996) ITV4, 10.50pm ★★★★☆ It may not be director Tim Burton’s best film but this surreal sci-fi comedy is still fun. The glitzy cast, including Jack Nicholson, Pierce Brosnan, Glenn Close and Sarah Jessica Parker, put on their best camp performances to fight seemingly peaceful Martians, who in fact want to destroy Big Ben, the Eiffel Tower and the Taj Mahal all in the name of a good time. It’s a loving parody of Fifties’ science-fiction cinema. Runaway Train (1985) Movies4Men, 10.50pm ★★★☆☆ Jon Voight and Eric Roberts (both Oscar-nominated) star as a pair of convicts, whose dash for freedom from an Alaskan prison takes an unexpected turn when they find themselves on an out-of-control train. The officers on their heels are caught between stopping it and reclaiming the criminals. It’s all a bit ridiculous, but Voight brings an appealing manic energy to a fun premise. Rebecca De Mornay co-stars. Wednesday 29 November Ferrying around: those who work on the busy English Channel Credit: Channel 4 The Channel: The World’s Busiest Waterway Channel 4, 9.00pm Drunk passengers, frazzled families, fundraisers swimming in testing conditions, enormous ships trying to squeeze through a narrow body of water: it’s all in a day’s workfor those who police the waters of the English Channel, as this new documentary series makes clear. Filmed last summer and with a heavy focus on the many changes that Brexit may bring to the Channel crossing, this opening episode concentrates largely on life on the ferries. “We’re already down on passengers and spending from last year,” notes one employee, pointing out that the collapse of the pound against the euro means that holidaymakers are less inclined to splash their cash. It’s not all doom and gloom, however, as we also follow a determined single mother who plans to swim the Channel to raise money and awareness of sickle cell disease, which both her sons have. Elsewhere, there are interesting statistics about the sheer numbers making the crossing – up to 400 ships passing through the 21-mile-wide Dover Strait each day – and captain Mark Miller and his crew have to deal with both a paralytic passenger and the tour company who intend to leave him behind. Sarah Hughes The Marvellous Mrs Maisel Amazon Prime Video, from today Gilmore Girls creator Amy Sherman-Palladino returns with this effervescent tale set in Fifties New York. Our heroine is Miriam Maisel (Rachel Brosnahan). On the surface she’s the perfect Jewish American Princess but underneath beats the soul of an acid-tongued comedian. Sherman-Palladino is clearly playing homage to the trailblazing likes of Joan Rivers and Phyllis Diller but her story still feels fresh thanks to a sharp script and Brosnahan’s wonderful timing. Mary Berry’s Country House Secrets BBC One, 8.00pm Mary Berry continues her trawl through some of the UK’s grandest country houses. This week she’s in Scotland helping the inhabitants of Scone Palace, Lord and Lady Mansfield, prepare for dinner and a ceilidh while fitting in a bit of deer stalking and salmon fishing on the side. Peaky Blinders BBC Two, 9.00pm Steven Knight’s gangster drama is firing on all cylinders this series and never more so than in a tight, tense third episode which sees Polly (Helen McCrory) re-join the company and Arthur (the excellent Paul Anderson) wrestle with both his guilt and his God following John’s death. Digging for Britain BBC Four, 9.00pm “Archaeology is adding flesh to the bare bones of people” announces Professor Alice Roberts as the second part of this series digging deep into Britain’s past heads to Kent. There we spend time following the excavation of the wreck of East India Company ship, the Rooswijk, before uncovering early evidence of Julius Caesar’s invasion of Britain in the shape of an ancient fort. SH Wallis: The Queen That Never Was Channel 5, 9.00pm Georgina Rich is the latest actress to play Wallis Simpson in this meld of drama and documentary. It’s not a format that ever works particularly well but, beyond the enactments, a complex portrait of the Duchess of Windsor emerges and one which sheds fresh light on the true nature of her marriages. How to Build a Robot Channel 4, 10.35pm David Tennant narrates this entertaining documentary focusing on Canadian robot inventor and puppeteer David McGoran. McGoran’s aim is to invent a robot that can truly interact with humans. SH The Riot Club (2014) Film4, 9.00pm ★★★☆☆ Laura Wade’s 2010 play, Posh, dealt with a still-reported habit of trashing dining establishments by Oxford University’s notorious Bullingdon Club. It reaches the screen as The Riot Club, starring a braying gang of silverspoon-reared Brits. The pungency of the play has been diluted, along with its political bite, but Holliday Grainger, Max Irons and Sam Claflin are perfectly cast in the main roles. Bronson (2008) London Live, 10.00pm ★★★☆☆ A gripping character study of “Britain’s most notorious long-term prisoner”, Charles Bronson (who has recently wed), whose bloody bare-knuckle brawls have seen him moved from prison to prison 120 times. Tom Hardy (who now seems to specialise in complex, muscle-bound brawlers – Mad Max: Fury Road, Legend, Taboo) ramps it up with disturbing intensity to delve inside the mind of the tormented personality. Life As We Know It (2010) 5STAR, 11.00pm ★★★☆☆ Katherine Heigl and Josh Duhamel star in this shrill domestic nightmare in which they raise their orphaned godchild. Heigl once again plays a beautifully groomed control freak, while Duhamel’s Messer – a philandering man-child – repeatedly lives up to his name. When they get together, it feels like something to do with careers, contracts and romcom necessity; nothing to do with life. Thursday 30 November Pushing the boat out: Prunella Scales and Timothy West Credit: Channel 4 Great Canal Journeys Channel 4, 8.00pm When they embarked on the first series of Great Canal Journeys in 2014, it’s doubtful whether Timothy West or Prunella Scales could have foreseen its longevity, in part given the niche material and also because of Scales’s advancing Alzheimer’s disease. Yet here they are, heading through Portugal for the first instalment in this eighth series, never passing up the opportunity to draw comparisons between long marriages and vintage fortified wines. It is another hour of gentle insights and pure, unaffected charm. Their journey takes them from a river port 100 miles inland through to Porto along the Rio Douro, via several vineyards and, slightly less predictably, examples of ancient rock art and Europe’s deepest lock. Throughout is evidence of why Portugal remains England’s oldest ally (Brits are heavily involved in the contemporary port industry) and, more significantly, of a relationship of a strength and mutual affection to which we can all aspire. Scales credits her husband with “opening up the world”. For West’s part, he reckons that “she likes being with me and I like being with her. That’s the best we can hope for, and very nice too.” Gabriel Tate PGA Tour Golf: The Hero World Challenge Sky Sports Main Event, 6.30pm It’s the opening day at the Albany Resort in the Bahamas, where Japan’s Hideki Matsuyama is the reigning champion. Discovering: Richard Widmark Sky Arts, 8.00pm Always more than a mere journeyman but never quite leading man material either, Richard Widmark was one of Hollywood’s most consistent talents, his work spanning classic noirs (Panic in the Streets), westerns (Two Rode Together) and thrillers (Coma). Journalists and critics assemble to pay tribute in another breezy, concise profile. The Farthest: Voyager’s Interstellar Journey: Storyville BBC Four, 8.55pm The space programme perhaps best represents the dazzling possibilities of the human brain and our capacity to imagine. This characteristically excellent and absorbing Storyville celebrates the scientific achievements of the Voyager probes through those that planned, made and continue to monitor them as they leave our solar system for interstellar space. Their enthusiasm is undiminished and infectious. GT Blitz: the Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm This affecting series investigates the repercussions of a German bomb that destroyed two houses in Hull. The personal traumas were of course profound, but a series of essays written by the city’s children in 1941 also unwittingly encouraged Britain’s controversial urban bombing strategies later in the war. Trump: an American Dream Channel 4, 9.00pm This enthralling series concludes with the future President rediscovering his mojo thanks to the influence of a new wife and advisors, before a combination of reality television and social media open an unlikely route to the White House. Live at the Apollo BBC Two, 10.00pm A fine line-up launch a new run for the hardy stand-up perennial from Hammersmith, with quickfire Gary Delaney and rising Scottish comic Larry Dean on the agenda, introduced by Sara Pascoe. The Sex Robots Are Coming Channel 4, 10.00pm Nick Sweeney’s unsettling documentary follows the creation of Harmony, a prototype sexbot, and James, a potential purchaser. What do these technological advances mean for human relationships and the ever-present issue of objectification? GT Airplane II: The Sequel (1982) Film4, 7.15pm ★★★☆☆ The furiously funny, and startling originality of disaster parody Airplane! makes this sequel, which is set in the future and takes place on a lunar shuttle, stick out like a sore thumb, especially since the original team had no involvement. There are some amusing spoofs of Rocky and E.T., but the jokes tread familiar ground. Cameos come from Raymond Burr and William Shatner. Cliffhanger (1993) Universal Channel, 9.00pm ★★★☆☆ Living up to its title, Cliffhanger is a rollicking rollercoaster of a film. It stars Sylvester Stallone as a hotshot mountain climber, who becomes embroiled in a heist, along with Janine Turner. Set in the Rocky Mountains and featuring some stupendous stunts, it may be big-budget nonsense – but it’s entertaining big-budget nonsense with zesty lines and exhilarating cinematography. Get Him to the Greek (2010) Comedy Central, 10.00pm ★★★☆☆ Russell Brand plays himself (very well), thinly disguised as washed-up British rocker Aldous Snow who, desperate for a career revival, is called upon for a one-night show at LA venue The Greek. Despite trying too hard to shock, Brand’s famously crude humour lends this potentially humdrum American bromance some eccentricity and makes it, at times, a raucous comedy. Friday 1 December Life Thru a Lens: Robbie Williams is one of Norton’s guests Credit: Getty The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm Graham Norton remains the best chat show host on British television, even if one or two of his line-ups this season have failed to generate much in the way of sparks. (The recent edition featuring only the cast of Ken Branagh’s new Agatha Christie movie Murder on the Orient Express could have been bottled and sold as a soporific, despite all of the star names on display.) Happily that’s unlikely to be a problem here as most of his guests are blessed with some of the biggest and most-often utilised mouths in showbiz. Elton John is on hand to promote his latest greatest hits collection, and will perhaps have plenty to say about ITV’s recent poll of the British public’s 20 favourite songs from his rather extensive back catalogue. Stephen Fry will doubtless be as mesmerising as ever as he discusses his new book on Greek mythology; and Robbie Williams might make some noise about his new album, Under the Radar Volume 2, and upcoming Heavy Entertainment tour. All in all, you have to wonder how demure actress Carey Mulligan will manage to get a word in edgeways on the subject of her terrific new Netflix film Mudbound, although we’re confident she will. Gerard O’Donovan Dark Netflix, from today “The question is not where, or who, or how…but when?” This creepy time-bending thriller, about the disappearance of two German boys over a 30-year interval, plays with the idea of how fractured relationships repeat time and again. Voyeur Netflix, from today This controversial documentary explores one of veteran US writer Gay Talese’s most sensational pieces of “literary journalism”, The Voyeur’s Motel. It told the story of how, in the Eighties, Gerald Foos opened a motel supposedly for the sole purpose of peeping on guests. But how much of the tale was made up? Sounds Like Friday Night BBC One, 7.30pm Singer Rita Ora joins regular presenters Greg James and Dotty as guest host at the BBC’s White City studios to introduce, among others, Brighton rock duo Royal Blood. Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV, UTV or Wales In the series’ finale Mears ends his epic journey in the ancient Walpole Forest, a vast swathe of primordial wilderness in Western Australia. He’s in search of the forest’s famed giant tingle and karri trees but the smaller denizens – such as the elusive quokka – are just as amazing. Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Jamie Oliver and Jimmy Doherty’s pier-end café goes fully vegetarian in honour of guest Joanna Lumley, who revives the tastes of her childhood by cooking the King of Malaysia’s favourite dish. Meanwhile, the childhood friends go on the road to champion British fava beans, and Doherty designs a vertical vegetable patch – perfect for the high-rise balcony. Britain’s Greatest Bridges Channel 5, 8.00pm The series concludes with the story of the feat of engineering that is the mile-long Severn Bridge and how its designer Bill Brown revolutionised modern bridge design with its aerodynamic box girder deck. GO Truth Tellers at the BBC BBC Four, 11.00pm Friday night is music night on BBC Four, and this new archive series adds depth to its line-up by showcasing clips of the most lyrically gifted songwriters to have performed on the BBC. These include Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell and Patti Smith. GO The King’s Speech (2010) More4, 9.00pm ★★★★☆ Tom Hooper’s film about the future George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer in the nation’s hour of need won multiple Oscars, including a deserved Best Actor gong for Colin Firth. But it’s his double-act with Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist Lionel Logue that gives the film its heart, and the double-handers between them are fraught and fascinating. Helena Bonham Carter is perhaps underused as the Duchess of York. Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (2008) ITV4, 11.40pm ★★★☆☆ This is Tim Burton’s adaptation of Stephen Sondheim’s 1979 musical about the demon barber of Fleet Street. Johnny Depp plays Benjamin Barker, a revenge artist who wields his razors with merry abandon in 19th-century London with the help of the deliciously sinister Mrs Lovett (Helena Bonham Carter). Alan Rickman plays the deplorable Judge Turpin. Wild (2014) Channel 4, 12.10am ★★★★☆ The Pacific Crest Trail, which runs up the entire western spine of the United States, is a challenge of fabled arduousness and rugged beauty. In 1995, aged 26, Cheryl Strayed (played by a superb Reese Witherspoon) walked it, to get clearance in her head after a decade of loss and personal meltdown. Wild powerfully reveals Strayed’s terrors and pleasures as she forges ahead on the journey. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Friday 24 November Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Jamie Oliver and childhood mucker Jimmy Doherty return for another series of their hyperactive meld of cookery programme, food information and celebrity chat hosted at their Southend Pier caff. This series tends to stand or fall with the visiting celebrity but luckily this week it’s Simon Pegg, who gamely enters into the spirit of things by serving customers, cooking what looks like a pretty good tagine and admitting that he’s far more food conscious in these Mission: Impossible days (Tom Cruise is apparently the devil for pushing cakes on those trying to stay in shape). Friday Night Feast feels closer in tone to the early cookery shows that made Oliver’s name and Pegg enters into the cheeky-chappy spirit, mucking around with Doherty and dropping sardonic asides. “It’s fundamentally evil but at the same time beautiful,” he remarks of Oliver’s Provençal Bake, a calorific but clearly delicious mixture of pancakes, cheese, ham and tomatoes, which causes one customer to gush, “I never want it to end.” Elsewhere, Oliver and Doherty go on the road to uncover the joys of free-range duck, and Doherty builds a barbecue for the Stoke Mandeville wheelchair rugby team. Sarah Hughes Sounds Like Friday Night BBC One, 7.30pm BBC One’s live music show is a great idea but so far has been a bit hit and miss. Presenters Greg James and Dotty are enthusiastic but more risks are needed when booking the live acts. Craig David co-hosts this episode, and there are performances from The Killers and Anne-Marie. Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV, UTV or Wales Ray Mears’s laid-back excursion around Australia continues in South Australia’s Flinders mountain ranges, which provides a dramatic setting for three species of kangaroos and the country’s largest bird of prey. Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.00pm The personable Stephen Mangan takes the host’s chair for this episode of the satirical news-based panel game. He’s joined by business journalist Steph McGovern and comedian Jo Caulfield. Extreme Wives with Kate Humble BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Kate Humble heads to the remote town of Shillong in north-east India to meet with the matrilineal Khasi people in the fascinating final episode. The Khasi pass everything, including property, down the female line and hand power to the youngest daughter in each family. SH Rolling Stone: Stories from the Edge Sky Arts, 9.00pm Anyone who has read Sticky Fingers, the recent biography of Rolling Stone supremo Jann Wenner, will realise that this Alex Gibney series is something of a puff piece in comparison. That said, it’s still very enjoyable. The focus here is on the kidnap of Patty Hearst and the way in which the counterculture slowly became mainstream. Gregory Porter’s Popular Voices BBC Four, 10.00pm Jazz musician Gregory Porter’s outstanding series continues with a focus on crooners. All the usual suspects – Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, the unbeatable Nat King Cole – are present but what makes this series so exceptional is the knowledge Porter brings to his subject. This episode dissects why Sinatra was “a little too presumptuous for the croon” as well as looking at how everyone from Iggy Pop to David Bowie used the technique. The real pleasure, however, comes from the music. SH Collateral Beauty (2016) Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm ★★☆☆☆ The plot of David Frankel (The Devil Wears Prada) and Allan Loeb’s (Just Go with It) film is fantastically unhinged: Will Smith is an ad-exec who has lost his daughter to cancer, and in his grief is pestered on the streets of New York by the personifications of Love (Keira Knightley), Time (Jacob Latimore) and Death (Helen Mirren) – “the three abstractions”. Dark Shadows (2012) W, 9.00pm ★★☆☆☆ Tim Burton’s film is at its best in the opening scenes, when it can afford to be all show and no tell. It’s Johnny Depp, naturally, who plays Barnabas Collins, an 18th-century Byronic rascal who is transformed into a vampire by a jealous witch (Eva Green) and wakes up in Nixon-era small-town America. Depp and Burton’s eighth film together brought them level with De Niro and Scorsese, although in numerical terms only. Boyhood (2014) Channel 4, 12.05am ★★★★★ Richard Linklater’s real-time depiction of a boy growing up over 12 years received the biggest Oscar snub of recent years, winning only one award, for Patricia Arquette as for Best Supporting Actress. From 2002, Linklater spent a few days each year filming the same actors to chart Mason’s (Ellar Coltrane) ordinary life – in what is an extraordinary, beautiful and moving string of small, everyday moments. Saturday 25 November In his words: the life of the Sixties playwright Joe Orton Credit: Hulton Archive Joe Orton Laid Bare BBC Two, 9.00pm “I realise it’s unforgivable doing this but I’m just unrepentant.” So announces a young Joe Orton in this suitably anarchic take on the playwright’s life, works and early, brutal death. It’s a sentence that entirely sums up Orton’s acidic take on life; he was a man who loved (and arguably lived) to shock and who enjoyed making people uncomfortable – “I felt snakes were writhing round my feet,” wrote one theatre critic after watching the bawdy Entertaining Mr Sloane – yet who was also possessed of enough wit, charm and intelligence to win over even the most mortally offended. Making great use of Orton’s letters, diaries and plays – scenes from the latter acted by a cast that includes Antony Sher, Ben Miles and Jaime Winstone – the documentary does its best to pin its subject to the page with contributors including his sister Leonie, playwright Christopher Hampton and producer Michael Codron. There is (surprisingly) understanding too for the man who murdered Orton, his lover Kenneth Halliwell, who subsequently killed himself. Ultimately, however, what lingers is not the gory manner of Orton’s death but rather his wildly entertaining words. Sarah Hughes International Rugby Union: Scotland v Australia & England v Samoa BBC One, 2.00pm & Sky Sports Main Event, 2.45pm Having fallen agonisingly close to pulling off the greatest result in their history – they lost 22-17 to New Zealand – Scotland host Australia at Murrayfield with their tails up. Meanwhile, England – who beat the Wallabies 30-6 last weekend, with Danny Care putting a sublime performance after coming off the bench – face Samoa, hoping to take Eddie Jones’s record to 22 wins from 23 as their coach. Expect Jones to ring the changes, with Henry Slade likely to be handed another opportunity at No 12 and Mike Brown returning to the side as full-back. International Rugby Union: Wales v New Zealand BBC Two, 4.45pm An unsuccessful three-match series in New Zealand this summer saw Wales return home still looking for a victory over the All Blacks for the first time since 1953. They have now lost 29 consecutive fixtures, 10 of which have been presided over by New Zealand coach Warren Gatland during his tenure. Wales head into this match on the back of a far-from-convincing 13-6 victory against Georgia. Granted, Gatland did put out an experimental team. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Chelsea BT Sport 1, 5.00pm Two of last Saturday’s star performers meet at Anfield in what should be a pulsating encounter. Liverpool beat Southampton 3-0, with Mohamed Salah scoring twice, while Chelsea, inspired by Eden Hazard, ran out 4-0 winners at West Brom. When these sides met in January here, Georginio Wijnaldum cancelled out David Luiz’s goal in a 1-1 draw. Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.50pm With only three weeks left in the competition, the judges must try to separate the glitter from the paste. Alexandra Burke and Debbie McGee are expected to make the final but it’s wide open as to who else joins them. This week, the couples can earn extra points in the “pasodoblathon”. The X Factor: The Semi Finals ITV, 7.30pm From surprise double eliminations to the extra sing-offs, this year’s X Factor has been derided for being a mess. This week, it can redeem itself as the contestants sing for a place in next weekend’s Grand Final. Michael McIntyre’s Big Show BBC One, 8.10pm Michael McIntyre’s attempt to single-handedly revive the variety show continues. This week, he’s joined by guests Gary Barlow, Russell Kane, Clean Bandit and Danny Dyer, who hands over his mobile phone for the Celebrity Send to All slot. Dad’s Army BBC Two, 8.30pm; not NI or Scotland As Brexit edges nearer so Jimmy Perry and David Croft’s comedy about the Home Guard appears ever more relevant, not least because it pinpoints a certain kind of Englishness. This episode sees the bumbling Captain Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) pitch camp in the middle of an artillery exercise. SH Witnesses: A Frozen Death BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.55pm Another day, another atmospherically depressing European crime drama. But this French eight-part series, shown in double bills over the next four weeks, is really good. The Tunnel’s Marie Dompnier plays Lieutenant Sandra Winckler, who is assigned to a macabre case involving 15 frozen bodies on an abandoned bus. The dead men are all linked to one woman, Catherine Keemer (Audrey Fleurot), who disappeared three years earlier. White Princess Drama, 9.00pm It might be hokum but this adaptation of Philippa Gregory’s bestseller is enjoyable largely thanks to the complicated relationship at its heart. The marriage between Henry VII (Jacob Collins-Levy) and Elizabeth of York (Jodie Comer) is very much a dynastic contract between two people forced to find common cause. This episode sees them take steps towards that new understanding. SH Daddy Long Legs (1955) BBC Two, 2.10pm ★★★☆☆ Fred Astaire and Leslie Caron are paired for the first time in this Hollywood musical written by Phoebe and Henry Ephron (parents of Nora) and loosely based on a 1912 novel. They bring charm and warmth to a story about the complications of a love affair between a young woman and a man 30 years her senior. The dance sequences are particularly striking, containing a rarity in Astaire’s choreography: a kiss. Lone Survivor (2013) Channel 4, 11.05pm ★★★☆☆ In this film based on true events, Mark Wahlberg gives a strong performance as sniper Marcus Luttrell, who, in 2005, was the head of a four-man team of Navy Seals, tasked with killing Taliban leader Ahmed Shah. An encounter with some goatherds gives the team a major moral dilemma. The film, directed by Peter Berg, is hampered by a lack of character exploration but it’s certainly action-packed. Albert Nobbs (2011) BBC Two, 11.35pm ★★★☆☆ Glenn Close toiled for 30 years to make an Albert Nobbs film after playing the part in a 1982 off-Broadway play. Close inhabits the role, of a woman disguised as a man to work as a waiter in a 19th-century hotel, with uncanny accuracy (she was rewarded with an Oscar nomination). The film reaches for something to say about sexual identity, but neither Close nor director Rodrigo García seem to know what it is. Sunday 26 November Ring of fire: Xand van Tulleken Credit: BBC Expedition Volcano BBC Two, 9.00pm As is the wont of BBC documentaries about the natural world these days, the impact of humans can no longer be ignored – in fact, it’s central to the premise of this new two-parter in which geologist Chris Jackson and humanitarian doctor Xand van Tulleken journey to live volcanoes and the communities that live in their shadow. Nyiragongo, in the Congo, last erupted in 2002, causing a mass evacuation of the nearby city of Goma, terrible loss of life and wholesale destruction of property. The pair’s expedition examines ways to predict its behaviour, especially since another eruption is almost inevitable. Van Tulleken focuses on disease prevention and healthcare, looking at how to avoid the spread of cholera that proved so catastrophic 15 years ago, while Jackson drops into the crater (the staggering camerawork and pounding soundtrack leave you in no doubt as to the potential peril of the venture) to assess the latest techniques for detecting sulphur dioxide and geological vibrations. By the end, problems have been diagnosed and solutions prescribed – it’s an admirable project whose success can only be judged, grimly, in the event of another disaster. Next week, they head to nearby Nyamuragira. Gabriel Tate Formula 1: Abu Dhabi Grand Prix Channel 4, noon & Sky Sports F1, 12.30pm He may have already been crowned champion but that didn’t stop Lewis Hamilton putting in a fine display in Brazil, starting in the pit lane under flawless Brazilian skies and finishing a mere five seconds adrift of winner Sebastian Vettel. Let’s hope for a similarly exciting spectacle at the Yas Marina Circuit, as the curtain comes down on the 2017 season. Blue Planet II BBC One, 8.00pm Every episode of this mesmerising series brings with it new wonders. This week’s venture into underwater forests, meadows and mangroves sniffs out creatures with unlikely names (the Pyjama Shark, the Garibaldi Damselfish) and even more outlandish strategies for survival. Coastal Railways with Julie Walters Channel 4, 8.00pm It might be hard to see what Julie Walters can bring to this well-worn travelogue approach, despite all her charisma and appeal. But there is plenty to enjoy in her tour of the British Isles – tonight, she boards the “Harry Potter” train in the Highlands, guts herring and wrangles cattle. Howards End BBC One, 9.00pm Kenneth Lonergan’s restrained, affecting adaptation reachesa crunch point in relations between Margaret (Hayley Atwell) and Henry (Matthew Macfadyen), driving a wedge between their two families; with the Basts approaching penury, a showdown looms. Guy Martin vs the Robocar Channel 4, 9.00pm Always up for a challenge, Guy Martin builds his own robotic Ford Transit to take on a “Roboracer” around Silverstone. But first he picks up a few tips from a “Level Five” autonomous vehicle in Budapest and Tesla’s latest models in Massachusetts. GT Babylon Berlin Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm and 10.00pm With every one of the €40 million budget up on screen, this adaptation of Volker Kutscher’s Thirties-set policiers is one of the most handsome dramas of the year – and one of the most gripping. The first season reaches its climax with Lotte (Liv Lisa Fries) having a point to prove and Gereon (Volker Bruch) dealing both with ghosts from the past and chilling hints at what the future holds. Season two begins next week. Naples ’44: a Wartime Diary BBC Four, 11.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch narrates this gripping and cleverly structured Italian film, which blends archive footage, documentary and drama to tell the story of a city and its resilient citizens through the eyes of British officer Norman Lewis. Some of the imagery is powerful indeed (one sequence of cows being milked in the rubble of the city has a pungent surrealism) and the pacifist message is ultimately undeniable. GT Stalingrad (1994) History, 3.00pm ★★★☆☆ Joseph Vilsmaier’s film reconstructs the 1942 Siege of Stalingrad, in which Soviet forces successfully held back the German army. The battle proved to be a major turning point in the Second World War and claimed millions of lives – a point that the film rests on, showing the horrors of modern warfare in all its stomach-churning brutality. Dominique Horwitz and Thomas Kretschmann star as German soldiers. Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day (2014) BBC Two, 6.45pm ★★★☆☆ Steve Carell has become a dab hand at making public embarrassment ridiculous and borderline tragic, and saves the day in this slight but entertaining comedy. Alexander (Ed Oxenbould), blows out a candle for his 12th birthday and initiates this fateful curse so that his family understand how it feels to have a purely maddening 24 hours. Fury (2014) Channel 5, 9.00pm ★★★★☆ David Ayer’s study of the habits and habitats of the American killer male is an astonishing drama. It’s Germany 1945, and Sgt Don “Wardaddy” Collie (Brad Pitt) and his team are grinding towards Berlin in a battered tank. There is no rescue mission, just an agonising rumble from one brush with death to the next. The set pieces are gripping, and the terror of war is blasted home. Monday 27 November Right to work: Tourette’s sufferer Ryan Credit: BBC Employable Me BBC Two, 9.00pm This moving series, which follows jobseekers determined to show that their disabilities shouldn’t prevent them working, returns for a new four-part run. There’s a persuasive double purpose to the programme – to highlight the disabilities themselves and to explore how those living with them fight against prejudice every day. The opening episode showcases a wonderfully inspirational duo. We meet 52-year-old Andy, who was once the go-getting manager of a successful motorcycle business. Despite being left partially paralysed and struggling with speech after a life-threatening stroke, Andy wants to break into public speaking and motivate others with his story. Alongside him is turtle-mad Tourette’s sufferer Ryan, whose severe tics can leave him physically debilitated, but who nevertheless dreams of working with animals. The pair’s will to succeed is humbling as they tackle longed-for job opportunities and the significant hurdles this entails. Helping them on the way is psychologist Nancy Doyle, who runs a pioneering scheme aimed at getting our hopefuls to promote their talents and for recruiters to see their considerable worth. Toby Dantzic Chinese Burn BBC Three, from 10.00am This comedy pilot, executive-produced by Ash Atalla (People Just Do Nothing), about three girls from China trying to make new lives in London is worth watching. Flatmates Elizabeth (Shin-Fei Chen), who’s chasing her dream job as a sommelier, and fiery struggling actress Jackie (Yennis Cheung) get a surprise visit from Elizabeth’s ultra-rich friend FuFu (Yuyu Rau). She’s an unwelcome guest, however, as Elizabeth hasn’t been honest with her parents. Lost and Found Channel 4, 3.00pm Heartstrings are shamelessly tugged in this new series, which follows the sterling work of the Dogs Trust charity. The pooches featured in this episode include Ida, a Staffordshire Bull Terrier that needs regular hydrotherapy, and a Labrador that has been missing for four days. Paul Hollywood: A Baker’s Life Channel 4, 8.00pm Paul Hollywood fronts this new four-part series which combines personal anecdotes with his favourite recipes. The opening episode serves up footage of the gimlet-eyed bread expert’s original Great British Bake Off audition, along with a menu of his ultimate pizza and a Madeira celebration cake. Nigella: At My Table BBC Two, 8.30pm Here’s another eclectic selection of dishes from television’s glossiest gourmet. Her recipes include an intriguingly titled golden egg curry, and a feast of spiced lamb kofta followed by rose and pepper pavlova. Supershoppers Channel 4, 8.30pm The savvy consumer advice show returns with presenter Anna Richardson and newcomer Sabrina Grant investigating whether supermarkets’ standard own-label ranges are really any different to their cheaper value ranges. Beauty wipes and car insurance also get the once over. TD Last Men In Aleppo: Storyville BBC Four, 10.00pm This grim but absorbing documentary follows the work of the White Helmets, Syrian civilians who conduct search-and-rescue missions in the city of Aleppo. We follow a trio of volunteers that includes Khaled, who moves between scouring for missing people and searching out medicine for his malnourished daughter. The director Feras Fayyad’s stark camera style takes an unflinching approach to the horror. TD Die Another Day (2002) ITV4, 9.00pm ★★★☆☆ Pierce Brosnan’s last outing as James Bond is also his least satisfying (although even Sean Connery might have struggled to look cool driving an invisible car). Dastardly Gustav Graves (Toby Stephens) wants to provoke a war between the Koreas using a military satellite. Bond, aided by Halle Berry and Rosamund Pike, must stop him. It’s all let down by an over-reliance on CGI, but there are some great set pieces. Escobar: Paradise Lost (2014) Sky Cinema Premiere, 11.25pm ★★★☆☆ A thundering performance by Benicio del Toro almost redeems this misjudged biopic of the Colombian crime lord. Seizing on the role with understated relish, he teeters adroitly between generous family man and murdering manipulator. What a shame, then, that he’s used so sparingly – the film renders the tyrant nothing more than a supporting character. The Road (2009) ITV4, 11.45pm ★★★☆☆ John Hillcoat’s adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s exalted novel is as harrowing as its source material. Stunning landscape photography sets the melancholy mood as a man (Viggo Mortensen) and his son (the superb Kodi Smit-McPhee) wander the American wasteland after an ecological disaster. Meanwhile, Nick Cave’s wrenching score makes it a wholly chilling experience. Tuesday 28 November The rise of AI: robot Jess helps families with life’s challenges Credit: Channel 4 The Robot Will See You Now Channel 4, 10.00pm The Rise of the Robots season continues with this documentary exploring whether robots will ever be sophisticated enough to play the role of best friend and confidant, or even therapist, to humans. Some forms of artificial intelligence, such as Amazon’s Alexa, are becoming more commonly involved in our home lives; cars are almost at the point where they drive themselves; and trials are afoot to test whether software can be used to perform medical and legal functions. A companionship robot has also been developed to keep astronauts’ spirits up during lengthy periods on the International Space Station. That’s all a long way from being able to substitute the life experience, and emotional, ethical and psychological support, for which we turn to friends, family, religion and counsellors. But maybe not for long. This intriguing film focuses on a team from Manchester and Plymouth Universities racing to develop a humanoid robot called Jess, that uses AI-based analysis to offer counselling on problems to do with marriage, divorce, infidelity and other day-to-day traumas – with built-in sympathy and tissue dispenser, no doubt. Gerard O’Donovan Glitch Netflix, from today This Aussie drama about a lakeside town where the dead start coming back to life bore too great a resemblance to French chiller The Returned in its early stages, but it eventually took a different supernatural path with reasonable success. The second series kicks off with last season’s closing shock revelation still hanging in the air: Elisha (Genevieve O’Reilly), the medic who’s been helping the undead, has been one of them herself, all along. How to Spend It Well at Christmas with Phillip Schofield ITV, 8.00pm This festive consumer series sees Phillip Schofield inviting celebrity guests to test and taste the “must have” food, drink and gift items of the season. This week, they look at the hottest toys of 2017 and how Father Christmas can get hold of them. The A Word BBC One, 9.00pm Rebecca (Molly Wright) packs her parents off on a much-needed mini-break and drafts in Eddie (Greg McHugh) and Nicola (Vinette Robinson) to help care for seven-year-old Joe (Max Vento). Unsurprisingly, things don’t go entirely according to plan. MasterChef: The Professionals BBC Two, 9.00pm The standard has been unusually high this year and this week’s six nervous new candidates prove especially inventive in the signature round and a challenge to come up with a new take on flavoursome, filled pasta with an accompanying sauce. Grand Designs: House of the Year Channel 4, 9.00pm Which of the shortlisted super-dwellings will win the Riba prize for 2017’s House of the Year? Kevin McCloud can only announce the winner once the last two finalists have been chosen – from the predictably stunning nominees in the Minimalist and Modern category. GO Passions: Samuel Coleridge-Taylor by Chi-Chi Nwanoku Sky Arts, 9.00pm Bassist Chi-Chi Nwanoku is the founder of Europe’s first black and ethnic minority classical orchestra. So, unsurprisingly, it’s not the poet (that’s Samuel Taylor Coleridge, silly) she chooses as her hero but the similarly named mixed-race British composer born 100 years later, in a film praising black musicians who’ve overcome prejudice to succeed in the conservative world of classical music. GO Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (2016) Sky Cinema Superheroes, 5.50pm ★★★☆☆ Tim Burton’s Edwardian fairy tale, based on the first Miss Peregrine book by Ransom Riggs – feels oddly conventional. Adapted by Jane Goldman (Kick-Ass), it’s a tale of an insular Florida lad, Jake Portman (Asa Butterfield), who visits an orphanage that figured in tales spun by his grandfather (Terence Stamp). Mars Attacks! (1996) ITV4, 10.50pm ★★★★☆ It may not be director Tim Burton’s best film but this surreal sci-fi comedy is still fun. The glitzy cast, including Jack Nicholson, Pierce Brosnan, Glenn Close and Sarah Jessica Parker, put on their best camp performances to fight seemingly peaceful Martians, who in fact want to destroy Big Ben, the Eiffel Tower and the Taj Mahal all in the name of a good time. It’s a loving parody of Fifties’ science-fiction cinema. Runaway Train (1985) Movies4Men, 10.50pm ★★★☆☆ Jon Voight and Eric Roberts (both Oscar-nominated) star as a pair of convicts, whose dash for freedom from an Alaskan prison takes an unexpected turn when they find themselves on an out-of-control train. The officers on their heels are caught between stopping it and reclaiming the criminals. It’s all a bit ridiculous, but Voight brings an appealing manic energy to a fun premise. Rebecca De Mornay co-stars. Wednesday 29 November Ferrying around: those who work on the busy English Channel Credit: Channel 4 The Channel: The World’s Busiest Waterway Channel 4, 9.00pm Drunk passengers, frazzled families, fundraisers swimming in testing conditions, enormous ships trying to squeeze through a narrow body of water: it’s all in a day’s workfor those who police the waters of the English Channel, as this new documentary series makes clear. Filmed last summer and with a heavy focus on the many changes that Brexit may bring to the Channel crossing, this opening episode concentrates largely on life on the ferries. “We’re already down on passengers and spending from last year,” notes one employee, pointing out that the collapse of the pound against the euro means that holidaymakers are less inclined to splash their cash. It’s not all doom and gloom, however, as we also follow a determined single mother who plans to swim the Channel to raise money and awareness of sickle cell disease, which both her sons have. Elsewhere, there are interesting statistics about the sheer numbers making the crossing – up to 400 ships passing through the 21-mile-wide Dover Strait each day – and captain Mark Miller and his crew have to deal with both a paralytic passenger and the tour company who intend to leave him behind. Sarah Hughes The Marvellous Mrs Maisel Amazon Prime Video, from today Gilmore Girls creator Amy Sherman-Palladino returns with this effervescent tale set in Fifties New York. Our heroine is Miriam Maisel (Rachel Brosnahan). On the surface she’s the perfect Jewish American Princess but underneath beats the soul of an acid-tongued comedian. Sherman-Palladino is clearly playing homage to the trailblazing likes of Joan Rivers and Phyllis Diller but her story still feels fresh thanks to a sharp script and Brosnahan’s wonderful timing. Mary Berry’s Country House Secrets BBC One, 8.00pm Mary Berry continues her trawl through some of the UK’s grandest country houses. This week she’s in Scotland helping the inhabitants of Scone Palace, Lord and Lady Mansfield, prepare for dinner and a ceilidh while fitting in a bit of deer stalking and salmon fishing on the side. Peaky Blinders BBC Two, 9.00pm Steven Knight’s gangster drama is firing on all cylinders this series and never more so than in a tight, tense third episode which sees Polly (Helen McCrory) re-join the company and Arthur (the excellent Paul Anderson) wrestle with both his guilt and his God following John’s death. Digging for Britain BBC Four, 9.00pm “Archaeology is adding flesh to the bare bones of people” announces Professor Alice Roberts as the second part of this series digging deep into Britain’s past heads to Kent. There we spend time following the excavation of the wreck of East India Company ship, the Rooswijk, before uncovering early evidence of Julius Caesar’s invasion of Britain in the shape of an ancient fort. SH Wallis: The Queen That Never Was Channel 5, 9.00pm Georgina Rich is the latest actress to play Wallis Simpson in this meld of drama and documentary. It’s not a format that ever works particularly well but, beyond the enactments, a complex portrait of the Duchess of Windsor emerges and one which sheds fresh light on the true nature of her marriages. How to Build a Robot Channel 4, 10.35pm David Tennant narrates this entertaining documentary focusing on Canadian robot inventor and puppeteer David McGoran. McGoran’s aim is to invent a robot that can truly interact with humans. SH The Riot Club (2014) Film4, 9.00pm ★★★☆☆ Laura Wade’s 2010 play, Posh, dealt with a still-reported habit of trashing dining establishments by Oxford University’s notorious Bullingdon Club. It reaches the screen as The Riot Club, starring a braying gang of silverspoon-reared Brits. The pungency of the play has been diluted, along with its political bite, but Holliday Grainger, Max Irons and Sam Claflin are perfectly cast in the main roles. Bronson (2008) London Live, 10.00pm ★★★☆☆ A gripping character study of “Britain’s most notorious long-term prisoner”, Charles Bronson (who has recently wed), whose bloody bare-knuckle brawls have seen him moved from prison to prison 120 times. Tom Hardy (who now seems to specialise in complex, muscle-bound brawlers – Mad Max: Fury Road, Legend, Taboo) ramps it up with disturbing intensity to delve inside the mind of the tormented personality. Life As We Know It (2010) 5STAR, 11.00pm ★★★☆☆ Katherine Heigl and Josh Duhamel star in this shrill domestic nightmare in which they raise their orphaned godchild. Heigl once again plays a beautifully groomed control freak, while Duhamel’s Messer – a philandering man-child – repeatedly lives up to his name. When they get together, it feels like something to do with careers, contracts and romcom necessity; nothing to do with life. Thursday 30 November Pushing the boat out: Prunella Scales and Timothy West Credit: Channel 4 Great Canal Journeys Channel 4, 8.00pm When they embarked on the first series of Great Canal Journeys in 2014, it’s doubtful whether Timothy West or Prunella Scales could have foreseen its longevity, in part given the niche material and also because of Scales’s advancing Alzheimer’s disease. Yet here they are, heading through Portugal for the first instalment in this eighth series, never passing up the opportunity to draw comparisons between long marriages and vintage fortified wines. It is another hour of gentle insights and pure, unaffected charm. Their journey takes them from a river port 100 miles inland through to Porto along the Rio Douro, via several vineyards and, slightly less predictably, examples of ancient rock art and Europe’s deepest lock. Throughout is evidence of why Portugal remains England’s oldest ally (Brits are heavily involved in the contemporary port industry) and, more significantly, of a relationship of a strength and mutual affection to which we can all aspire. Scales credits her husband with “opening up the world”. For West’s part, he reckons that “she likes being with me and I like being with her. That’s the best we can hope for, and very nice too.” Gabriel Tate PGA Tour Golf: The Hero World Challenge Sky Sports Main Event, 6.30pm It’s the opening day at the Albany Resort in the Bahamas, where Japan’s Hideki Matsuyama is the reigning champion. Discovering: Richard Widmark Sky Arts, 8.00pm Always more than a mere journeyman but never quite leading man material either, Richard Widmark was one of Hollywood’s most consistent talents, his work spanning classic noirs (Panic in the Streets), westerns (Two Rode Together) and thrillers (Coma). Journalists and critics assemble to pay tribute in another breezy, concise profile. The Farthest: Voyager’s Interstellar Journey: Storyville BBC Four, 8.55pm The space programme perhaps best represents the dazzling possibilities of the human brain and our capacity to imagine. This characteristically excellent and absorbing Storyville celebrates the scientific achievements of the Voyager probes through those that planned, made and continue to monitor them as they leave our solar system for interstellar space. Their enthusiasm is undiminished and infectious. GT Blitz: the Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm This affecting series investigates the repercussions of a German bomb that destroyed two houses in Hull. The personal traumas were of course profound, but a series of essays written by the city’s children in 1941 also unwittingly encouraged Britain’s controversial urban bombing strategies later in the war. Trump: an American Dream Channel 4, 9.00pm This enthralling series concludes with the future President rediscovering his mojo thanks to the influence of a new wife and advisors, before a combination of reality television and social media open an unlikely route to the White House. Live at the Apollo BBC Two, 10.00pm A fine line-up launch a new run for the hardy stand-up perennial from Hammersmith, with quickfire Gary Delaney and rising Scottish comic Larry Dean on the agenda, introduced by Sara Pascoe. The Sex Robots Are Coming Channel 4, 10.00pm Nick Sweeney’s unsettling documentary follows the creation of Harmony, a prototype sexbot, and James, a potential purchaser. What do these technological advances mean for human relationships and the ever-present issue of objectification? GT Airplane II: The Sequel (1982) Film4, 7.15pm ★★★☆☆ The furiously funny, and startling originality of disaster parody Airplane! makes this sequel, which is set in the future and takes place on a lunar shuttle, stick out like a sore thumb, especially since the original team had no involvement. There are some amusing spoofs of Rocky and E.T., but the jokes tread familiar ground. Cameos come from Raymond Burr and William Shatner. Cliffhanger (1993) Universal Channel, 9.00pm ★★★☆☆ Living up to its title, Cliffhanger is a rollicking rollercoaster of a film. It stars Sylvester Stallone as a hotshot mountain climber, who becomes embroiled in a heist, along with Janine Turner. Set in the Rocky Mountains and featuring some stupendous stunts, it may be big-budget nonsense – but it’s entertaining big-budget nonsense with zesty lines and exhilarating cinematography. Get Him to the Greek (2010) Comedy Central, 10.00pm ★★★☆☆ Russell Brand plays himself (very well), thinly disguised as washed-up British rocker Aldous Snow who, desperate for a career revival, is called upon for a one-night show at LA venue The Greek. Despite trying too hard to shock, Brand’s famously crude humour lends this potentially humdrum American bromance some eccentricity and makes it, at times, a raucous comedy. Friday 1 December Life Thru a Lens: Robbie Williams is one of Norton’s guests Credit: Getty The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm Graham Norton remains the best chat show host on British television, even if one or two of his line-ups this season have failed to generate much in the way of sparks. (The recent edition featuring only the cast of Ken Branagh’s new Agatha Christie movie Murder on the Orient Express could have been bottled and sold as a soporific, despite all of the star names on display.) Happily that’s unlikely to be a problem here as most of his guests are blessed with some of the biggest and most-often utilised mouths in showbiz. Elton John is on hand to promote his latest greatest hits collection, and will perhaps have plenty to say about ITV’s recent poll of the British public’s 20 favourite songs from his rather extensive back catalogue. Stephen Fry will doubtless be as mesmerising as ever as he discusses his new book on Greek mythology; and Robbie Williams might make some noise about his new album, Under the Radar Volume 2, and upcoming Heavy Entertainment tour. All in all, you have to wonder how demure actress Carey Mulligan will manage to get a word in edgeways on the subject of her terrific new Netflix film Mudbound, although we’re confident she will. Gerard O’Donovan Dark Netflix, from today “The question is not where, or who, or how…but when?” This creepy time-bending thriller, about the disappearance of two German boys over a 30-year interval, plays with the idea of how fractured relationships repeat time and again. Voyeur Netflix, from today This controversial documentary explores one of veteran US writer Gay Talese’s most sensational pieces of “literary journalism”, The Voyeur’s Motel. It told the story of how, in the Eighties, Gerald Foos opened a motel supposedly for the sole purpose of peeping on guests. But how much of the tale was made up? Sounds Like Friday Night BBC One, 7.30pm Singer Rita Ora joins regular presenters Greg James and Dotty as guest host at the BBC’s White City studios to introduce, among others, Brighton rock duo Royal Blood. Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV, UTV or Wales In the series’ finale Mears ends his epic journey in the ancient Walpole Forest, a vast swathe of primordial wilderness in Western Australia. He’s in search of the forest’s famed giant tingle and karri trees but the smaller denizens – such as the elusive quokka – are just as amazing. Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Jamie Oliver and Jimmy Doherty’s pier-end café goes fully vegetarian in honour of guest Joanna Lumley, who revives the tastes of her childhood by cooking the King of Malaysia’s favourite dish. Meanwhile, the childhood friends go on the road to champion British fava beans, and Doherty designs a vertical vegetable patch – perfect for the high-rise balcony. Britain’s Greatest Bridges Channel 5, 8.00pm The series concludes with the story of the feat of engineering that is the mile-long Severn Bridge and how its designer Bill Brown revolutionised modern bridge design with its aerodynamic box girder deck. GO Truth Tellers at the BBC BBC Four, 11.00pm Friday night is music night on BBC Four, and this new archive series adds depth to its line-up by showcasing clips of the most lyrically gifted songwriters to have performed on the BBC. These include Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell and Patti Smith. GO The King’s Speech (2010) More4, 9.00pm ★★★★☆ Tom Hooper’s film about the future George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer in the nation’s hour of need won multiple Oscars, including a deserved Best Actor gong for Colin Firth. But it’s his double-act with Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist Lionel Logue that gives the film its heart, and the double-handers between them are fraught and fascinating. Helena Bonham Carter is perhaps underused as the Duchess of York. Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (2008) ITV4, 11.40pm ★★★☆☆ This is Tim Burton’s adaptation of Stephen Sondheim’s 1979 musical about the demon barber of Fleet Street. Johnny Depp plays Benjamin Barker, a revenge artist who wields his razors with merry abandon in 19th-century London with the help of the deliciously sinister Mrs Lovett (Helena Bonham Carter). Alan Rickman plays the deplorable Judge Turpin. Wild (2014) Channel 4, 12.10am ★★★★☆ The Pacific Crest Trail, which runs up the entire western spine of the United States, is a challenge of fabled arduousness and rugged beauty. In 1995, aged 26, Cheryl Strayed (played by a superb Reese Witherspoon) walked it, to get clearance in her head after a decade of loss and personal meltdown. Wild powerfully reveals Strayed’s terrors and pleasures as she forges ahead on the journey. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Jamie and Jimmy's Friday Night Feast and Sounds Like Friday Night
Friday 24 November Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Jamie Oliver and childhood mucker Jimmy Doherty return for another series of their hyperactive meld of cookery programme, food information and celebrity chat hosted at their Southend Pier caff. This series tends to stand or fall with the visiting celebrity but luckily this week it’s Simon Pegg, who gamely enters into the spirit of things by serving customers, cooking what looks like a pretty good tagine and admitting that he’s far more food conscious in these Mission: Impossible days (Tom Cruise is apparently the devil for pushing cakes on those trying to stay in shape). Friday Night Feast feels closer in tone to the early cookery shows that made Oliver’s name and Pegg enters into the cheeky-chappy spirit, mucking around with Doherty and dropping sardonic asides. “It’s fundamentally evil but at the same time beautiful,” he remarks of Oliver’s Provençal Bake, a calorific but clearly delicious mixture of pancakes, cheese, ham and tomatoes, which causes one customer to gush, “I never want it to end.” Elsewhere, Oliver and Doherty go on the road to uncover the joys of free-range duck, and Doherty builds a barbecue for the Stoke Mandeville wheelchair rugby team. Sarah Hughes Sounds Like Friday Night BBC One, 7.30pm BBC One’s live music show is a great idea but so far has been a bit hit and miss. Presenters Greg James and Dotty are enthusiastic but more risks are needed when booking the live acts. Craig David co-hosts this episode, and there are performances from The Killers and Anne-Marie. Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV, UTV or Wales Ray Mears’s laid-back excursion around Australia continues in South Australia’s Flinders mountain ranges, which provides a dramatic setting for three species of kangaroos and the country’s largest bird of prey. Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.00pm The personable Stephen Mangan takes the host’s chair for this episode of the satirical news-based panel game. He’s joined by business journalist Steph McGovern and comedian Jo Caulfield. Extreme Wives with Kate Humble BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Kate Humble heads to the remote town of Shillong in north-east India to meet with the matrilineal Khasi people in the fascinating final episode. The Khasi pass everything, including property, down the female line and hand power to the youngest daughter in each family. SH Rolling Stone: Stories from the Edge Sky Arts, 9.00pm Anyone who has read Sticky Fingers, the recent biography of Rolling Stone supremo Jann Wenner, will realise that this Alex Gibney series is something of a puff piece in comparison. That said, it’s still very enjoyable. The focus here is on the kidnap of Patty Hearst and the way in which the counterculture slowly became mainstream. Gregory Porter’s Popular Voices BBC Four, 10.00pm Jazz musician Gregory Porter’s outstanding series continues with a focus on crooners. All the usual suspects – Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, the unbeatable Nat King Cole – are present but what makes this series so exceptional is the knowledge Porter brings to his subject. This episode dissects why Sinatra was “a little too presumptuous for the croon” as well as looking at how everyone from Iggy Pop to David Bowie used the technique. The real pleasure, however, comes from the music. SH Collateral Beauty (2016) Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm ★★☆☆☆ The plot of David Frankel (The Devil Wears Prada) and Allan Loeb’s (Just Go with It) film is fantastically unhinged: Will Smith is an ad-exec who has lost his daughter to cancer, and in his grief is pestered on the streets of New York by the personifications of Love (Keira Knightley), Time (Jacob Latimore) and Death (Helen Mirren) – “the three abstractions”. Dark Shadows (2012) W, 9.00pm ★★☆☆☆ Tim Burton’s film is at its best in the opening scenes, when it can afford to be all show and no tell. It’s Johnny Depp, naturally, who plays Barnabas Collins, an 18th-century Byronic rascal who is transformed into a vampire by a jealous witch (Eva Green) and wakes up in Nixon-era small-town America. Depp and Burton’s eighth film together brought them level with De Niro and Scorsese, although in numerical terms only. Boyhood (2014) Channel 4, 12.05am ★★★★★ Richard Linklater’s real-time depiction of a boy growing up over 12 years received the biggest Oscar snub of recent years, winning only one award, for Patricia Arquette as for Best Supporting Actress. From 2002, Linklater spent a few days each year filming the same actors to chart Mason’s (Ellar Coltrane) ordinary life – in what is an extraordinary, beautiful and moving string of small, everyday moments. Saturday 25 November In his words: the life of the Sixties playwright Joe Orton Credit: Hulton Archive Joe Orton Laid Bare BBC Two, 9.00pm “I realise it’s unforgivable doing this but I’m just unrepentant.” So announces a young Joe Orton in this suitably anarchic take on the playwright’s life, works and early, brutal death. It’s a sentence that entirely sums up Orton’s acidic take on life; he was a man who loved (and arguably lived) to shock and who enjoyed making people uncomfortable – “I felt snakes were writhing round my feet,” wrote one theatre critic after watching the bawdy Entertaining Mr Sloane – yet who was also possessed of enough wit, charm and intelligence to win over even the most mortally offended. Making great use of Orton’s letters, diaries and plays – scenes from the latter acted by a cast that includes Antony Sher, Ben Miles and Jaime Winstone – the documentary does its best to pin its subject to the page with contributors including his sister Leonie, playwright Christopher Hampton and producer Michael Codron. There is (surprisingly) understanding too for the man who murdered Orton, his lover Kenneth Halliwell, who subsequently killed himself. Ultimately, however, what lingers is not the gory manner of Orton’s death but rather his wildly entertaining words. Sarah Hughes International Rugby Union: Scotland v Australia & England v Samoa BBC One, 2.00pm & Sky Sports Main Event, 2.45pm Having fallen agonisingly close to pulling off the greatest result in their history – they lost 22-17 to New Zealand – Scotland host Australia at Murrayfield with their tails up. Meanwhile, England – who beat the Wallabies 30-6 last weekend, with Danny Care putting a sublime performance after coming off the bench – face Samoa, hoping to take Eddie Jones’s record to 22 wins from 23 as their coach. Expect Jones to ring the changes, with Henry Slade likely to be handed another opportunity at No 12 and Mike Brown returning to the side as full-back. International Rugby Union: Wales v New Zealand BBC Two, 4.45pm An unsuccessful three-match series in New Zealand this summer saw Wales return home still looking for a victory over the All Blacks for the first time since 1953. They have now lost 29 consecutive fixtures, 10 of which have been presided over by New Zealand coach Warren Gatland during his tenure. Wales head into this match on the back of a far-from-convincing 13-6 victory against Georgia. Granted, Gatland did put out an experimental team. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Chelsea BT Sport 1, 5.00pm Two of last Saturday’s star performers meet at Anfield in what should be a pulsating encounter. Liverpool beat Southampton 3-0, with Mohamed Salah scoring twice, while Chelsea, inspired by Eden Hazard, ran out 4-0 winners at West Brom. When these sides met in January here, Georginio Wijnaldum cancelled out David Luiz’s goal in a 1-1 draw. Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.50pm With only three weeks left in the competition, the judges must try to separate the glitter from the paste. Alexandra Burke and Debbie McGee are expected to make the final but it’s wide open as to who else joins them. This week, the couples can earn extra points in the “pasodoblathon”. The X Factor: The Semi Finals ITV, 7.30pm From surprise double eliminations to the extra sing-offs, this year’s X Factor has been derided for being a mess. This week, it can redeem itself as the contestants sing for a place in next weekend’s Grand Final. Michael McIntyre’s Big Show BBC One, 8.10pm Michael McIntyre’s attempt to single-handedly revive the variety show continues. This week, he’s joined by guests Gary Barlow, Russell Kane, Clean Bandit and Danny Dyer, who hands over his mobile phone for the Celebrity Send to All slot. Dad’s Army BBC Two, 8.30pm; not NI or Scotland As Brexit edges nearer so Jimmy Perry and David Croft’s comedy about the Home Guard appears ever more relevant, not least because it pinpoints a certain kind of Englishness. This episode sees the bumbling Captain Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) pitch camp in the middle of an artillery exercise. SH Witnesses: A Frozen Death BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.55pm Another day, another atmospherically depressing European crime drama. But this French eight-part series, shown in double bills over the next four weeks, is really good. The Tunnel’s Marie Dompnier plays Lieutenant Sandra Winckler, who is assigned to a macabre case involving 15 frozen bodies on an abandoned bus. The dead men are all linked to one woman, Catherine Keemer (Audrey Fleurot), who disappeared three years earlier. White Princess Drama, 9.00pm It might be hokum but this adaptation of Philippa Gregory’s bestseller is enjoyable largely thanks to the complicated relationship at its heart. The marriage between Henry VII (Jacob Collins-Levy) and Elizabeth of York (Jodie Comer) is very much a dynastic contract between two people forced to find common cause. This episode sees them take steps towards that new understanding. SH Daddy Long Legs (1955) BBC Two, 2.10pm ★★★☆☆ Fred Astaire and Leslie Caron are paired for the first time in this Hollywood musical written by Phoebe and Henry Ephron (parents of Nora) and loosely based on a 1912 novel. They bring charm and warmth to a story about the complications of a love affair between a young woman and a man 30 years her senior. The dance sequences are particularly striking, containing a rarity in Astaire’s choreography: a kiss. Lone Survivor (2013) Channel 4, 11.05pm ★★★☆☆ In this film based on true events, Mark Wahlberg gives a strong performance as sniper Marcus Luttrell, who, in 2005, was the head of a four-man team of Navy Seals, tasked with killing Taliban leader Ahmed Shah. An encounter with some goatherds gives the team a major moral dilemma. The film, directed by Peter Berg, is hampered by a lack of character exploration but it’s certainly action-packed. Albert Nobbs (2011) BBC Two, 11.35pm ★★★☆☆ Glenn Close toiled for 30 years to make an Albert Nobbs film after playing the part in a 1982 off-Broadway play. Close inhabits the role, of a woman disguised as a man to work as a waiter in a 19th-century hotel, with uncanny accuracy (she was rewarded with an Oscar nomination). The film reaches for something to say about sexual identity, but neither Close nor director Rodrigo García seem to know what it is. Sunday 26 November Ring of fire: Xand van Tulleken Credit: BBC Expedition Volcano BBC Two, 9.00pm As is the wont of BBC documentaries about the natural world these days, the impact of humans can no longer be ignored – in fact, it’s central to the premise of this new two-parter in which geologist Chris Jackson and humanitarian doctor Xand van Tulleken journey to live volcanoes and the communities that live in their shadow. Nyiragongo, in the Congo, last erupted in 2002, causing a mass evacuation of the nearby city of Goma, terrible loss of life and wholesale destruction of property. The pair’s expedition examines ways to predict its behaviour, especially since another eruption is almost inevitable. Van Tulleken focuses on disease prevention and healthcare, looking at how to avoid the spread of cholera that proved so catastrophic 15 years ago, while Jackson drops into the crater (the staggering camerawork and pounding soundtrack leave you in no doubt as to the potential peril of the venture) to assess the latest techniques for detecting sulphur dioxide and geological vibrations. By the end, problems have been diagnosed and solutions prescribed – it’s an admirable project whose success can only be judged, grimly, in the event of another disaster. Next week, they head to nearby Nyamuragira. Gabriel Tate Formula 1: Abu Dhabi Grand Prix Channel 4, noon & Sky Sports F1, 12.30pm He may have already been crowned champion but that didn’t stop Lewis Hamilton putting in a fine display in Brazil, starting in the pit lane under flawless Brazilian skies and finishing a mere five seconds adrift of winner Sebastian Vettel. Let’s hope for a similarly exciting spectacle at the Yas Marina Circuit, as the curtain comes down on the 2017 season. Blue Planet II BBC One, 8.00pm Every episode of this mesmerising series brings with it new wonders. This week’s venture into underwater forests, meadows and mangroves sniffs out creatures with unlikely names (the Pyjama Shark, the Garibaldi Damselfish) and even more outlandish strategies for survival. Coastal Railways with Julie Walters Channel 4, 8.00pm It might be hard to see what Julie Walters can bring to this well-worn travelogue approach, despite all her charisma and appeal. But there is plenty to enjoy in her tour of the British Isles – tonight, she boards the “Harry Potter” train in the Highlands, guts herring and wrangles cattle. Howards End BBC One, 9.00pm Kenneth Lonergan’s restrained, affecting adaptation reachesa crunch point in relations between Margaret (Hayley Atwell) and Henry (Matthew Macfadyen), driving a wedge between their two families; with the Basts approaching penury, a showdown looms. Guy Martin vs the Robocar Channel 4, 9.00pm Always up for a challenge, Guy Martin builds his own robotic Ford Transit to take on a “Roboracer” around Silverstone. But first he picks up a few tips from a “Level Five” autonomous vehicle in Budapest and Tesla’s latest models in Massachusetts. GT Babylon Berlin Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm and 10.00pm With every one of the €40 million budget up on screen, this adaptation of Volker Kutscher’s Thirties-set policiers is one of the most handsome dramas of the year – and one of the most gripping. The first season reaches its climax with Lotte (Liv Lisa Fries) having a point to prove and Gereon (Volker Bruch) dealing both with ghosts from the past and chilling hints at what the future holds. Season two begins next week. Naples ’44: a Wartime Diary BBC Four, 11.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch narrates this gripping and cleverly structured Italian film, which blends archive footage, documentary and drama to tell the story of a city and its resilient citizens through the eyes of British officer Norman Lewis. Some of the imagery is powerful indeed (one sequence of cows being milked in the rubble of the city has a pungent surrealism) and the pacifist message is ultimately undeniable. GT Stalingrad (1994) History, 3.00pm ★★★☆☆ Joseph Vilsmaier’s film reconstructs the 1942 Siege of Stalingrad, in which Soviet forces successfully held back the German army. The battle proved to be a major turning point in the Second World War and claimed millions of lives – a point that the film rests on, showing the horrors of modern warfare in all its stomach-churning brutality. Dominique Horwitz and Thomas Kretschmann star as German soldiers. Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day (2014) BBC Two, 6.45pm ★★★☆☆ Steve Carell has become a dab hand at making public embarrassment ridiculous and borderline tragic, and saves the day in this slight but entertaining comedy. Alexander (Ed Oxenbould), blows out a candle for his 12th birthday and initiates this fateful curse so that his family understand how it feels to have a purely maddening 24 hours. Fury (2014) Channel 5, 9.00pm ★★★★☆ David Ayer’s study of the habits and habitats of the American killer male is an astonishing drama. It’s Germany 1945, and Sgt Don “Wardaddy” Collie (Brad Pitt) and his team are grinding towards Berlin in a battered tank. There is no rescue mission, just an agonising rumble from one brush with death to the next. The set pieces are gripping, and the terror of war is blasted home. Monday 27 November Right to work: Tourette’s sufferer Ryan Credit: BBC Employable Me BBC Two, 9.00pm This moving series, which follows jobseekers determined to show that their disabilities shouldn’t prevent them working, returns for a new four-part run. There’s a persuasive double purpose to the programme – to highlight the disabilities themselves and to explore how those living with them fight against prejudice every day. The opening episode showcases a wonderfully inspirational duo. We meet 52-year-old Andy, who was once the go-getting manager of a successful motorcycle business. Despite being left partially paralysed and struggling with speech after a life-threatening stroke, Andy wants to break into public speaking and motivate others with his story. Alongside him is turtle-mad Tourette’s sufferer Ryan, whose severe tics can leave him physically debilitated, but who nevertheless dreams of working with animals. The pair’s will to succeed is humbling as they tackle longed-for job opportunities and the significant hurdles this entails. Helping them on the way is psychologist Nancy Doyle, who runs a pioneering scheme aimed at getting our hopefuls to promote their talents and for recruiters to see their considerable worth. Toby Dantzic Chinese Burn BBC Three, from 10.00am This comedy pilot, executive-produced by Ash Atalla (People Just Do Nothing), about three girls from China trying to make new lives in London is worth watching. Flatmates Elizabeth (Shin-Fei Chen), who’s chasing her dream job as a sommelier, and fiery struggling actress Jackie (Yennis Cheung) get a surprise visit from Elizabeth’s ultra-rich friend FuFu (Yuyu Rau). She’s an unwelcome guest, however, as Elizabeth hasn’t been honest with her parents. Lost and Found Channel 4, 3.00pm Heartstrings are shamelessly tugged in this new series, which follows the sterling work of the Dogs Trust charity. The pooches featured in this episode include Ida, a Staffordshire Bull Terrier that needs regular hydrotherapy, and a Labrador that has been missing for four days. Paul Hollywood: A Baker’s Life Channel 4, 8.00pm Paul Hollywood fronts this new four-part series which combines personal anecdotes with his favourite recipes. The opening episode serves up footage of the gimlet-eyed bread expert’s original Great British Bake Off audition, along with a menu of his ultimate pizza and a Madeira celebration cake. Nigella: At My Table BBC Two, 8.30pm Here’s another eclectic selection of dishes from television’s glossiest gourmet. Her recipes include an intriguingly titled golden egg curry, and a feast of spiced lamb kofta followed by rose and pepper pavlova. Supershoppers Channel 4, 8.30pm The savvy consumer advice show returns with presenter Anna Richardson and newcomer Sabrina Grant investigating whether supermarkets’ standard own-label ranges are really any different to their cheaper value ranges. Beauty wipes and car insurance also get the once over. TD Last Men In Aleppo: Storyville BBC Four, 10.00pm This grim but absorbing documentary follows the work of the White Helmets, Syrian civilians who conduct search-and-rescue missions in the city of Aleppo. We follow a trio of volunteers that includes Khaled, who moves between scouring for missing people and searching out medicine for his malnourished daughter. The director Feras Fayyad’s stark camera style takes an unflinching approach to the horror. TD Die Another Day (2002) ITV4, 9.00pm ★★★☆☆ Pierce Brosnan’s last outing as James Bond is also his least satisfying (although even Sean Connery might have struggled to look cool driving an invisible car). Dastardly Gustav Graves (Toby Stephens) wants to provoke a war between the Koreas using a military satellite. Bond, aided by Halle Berry and Rosamund Pike, must stop him. It’s all let down by an over-reliance on CGI, but there are some great set pieces. Escobar: Paradise Lost (2014) Sky Cinema Premiere, 11.25pm ★★★☆☆ A thundering performance by Benicio del Toro almost redeems this misjudged biopic of the Colombian crime lord. Seizing on the role with understated relish, he teeters adroitly between generous family man and murdering manipulator. What a shame, then, that he’s used so sparingly – the film renders the tyrant nothing more than a supporting character. The Road (2009) ITV4, 11.45pm ★★★☆☆ John Hillcoat’s adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s exalted novel is as harrowing as its source material. Stunning landscape photography sets the melancholy mood as a man (Viggo Mortensen) and his son (the superb Kodi Smit-McPhee) wander the American wasteland after an ecological disaster. Meanwhile, Nick Cave’s wrenching score makes it a wholly chilling experience. Tuesday 28 November The rise of AI: robot Jess helps families with life’s challenges Credit: Channel 4 The Robot Will See You Now Channel 4, 10.00pm The Rise of the Robots season continues with this documentary exploring whether robots will ever be sophisticated enough to play the role of best friend and confidant, or even therapist, to humans. Some forms of artificial intelligence, such as Amazon’s Alexa, are becoming more commonly involved in our home lives; cars are almost at the point where they drive themselves; and trials are afoot to test whether software can be used to perform medical and legal functions. A companionship robot has also been developed to keep astronauts’ spirits up during lengthy periods on the International Space Station. That’s all a long way from being able to substitute the life experience, and emotional, ethical and psychological support, for which we turn to friends, family, religion and counsellors. But maybe not for long. This intriguing film focuses on a team from Manchester and Plymouth Universities racing to develop a humanoid robot called Jess, that uses AI-based analysis to offer counselling on problems to do with marriage, divorce, infidelity and other day-to-day traumas – with built-in sympathy and tissue dispenser, no doubt. Gerard O’Donovan Glitch Netflix, from today This Aussie drama about a lakeside town where the dead start coming back to life bore too great a resemblance to French chiller The Returned in its early stages, but it eventually took a different supernatural path with reasonable success. The second series kicks off with last season’s closing shock revelation still hanging in the air: Elisha (Genevieve O’Reilly), the medic who’s been helping the undead, has been one of them herself, all along. How to Spend It Well at Christmas with Phillip Schofield ITV, 8.00pm This festive consumer series sees Phillip Schofield inviting celebrity guests to test and taste the “must have” food, drink and gift items of the season. This week, they look at the hottest toys of 2017 and how Father Christmas can get hold of them. The A Word BBC One, 9.00pm Rebecca (Molly Wright) packs her parents off on a much-needed mini-break and drafts in Eddie (Greg McHugh) and Nicola (Vinette Robinson) to help care for seven-year-old Joe (Max Vento). Unsurprisingly, things don’t go entirely according to plan. MasterChef: The Professionals BBC Two, 9.00pm The standard has been unusually high this year and this week’s six nervous new candidates prove especially inventive in the signature round and a challenge to come up with a new take on flavoursome, filled pasta with an accompanying sauce. Grand Designs: House of the Year Channel 4, 9.00pm Which of the shortlisted super-dwellings will win the Riba prize for 2017’s House of the Year? Kevin McCloud can only announce the winner once the last two finalists have been chosen – from the predictably stunning nominees in the Minimalist and Modern category. GO Passions: Samuel Coleridge-Taylor by Chi-Chi Nwanoku Sky Arts, 9.00pm Bassist Chi-Chi Nwanoku is the founder of Europe’s first black and ethnic minority classical orchestra. So, unsurprisingly, it’s not the poet (that’s Samuel Taylor Coleridge, silly) she chooses as her hero but the similarly named mixed-race British composer born 100 years later, in a film praising black musicians who’ve overcome prejudice to succeed in the conservative world of classical music. GO Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (2016) Sky Cinema Superheroes, 5.50pm ★★★☆☆ Tim Burton’s Edwardian fairy tale, based on the first Miss Peregrine book by Ransom Riggs – feels oddly conventional. Adapted by Jane Goldman (Kick-Ass), it’s a tale of an insular Florida lad, Jake Portman (Asa Butterfield), who visits an orphanage that figured in tales spun by his grandfather (Terence Stamp). Mars Attacks! (1996) ITV4, 10.50pm ★★★★☆ It may not be director Tim Burton’s best film but this surreal sci-fi comedy is still fun. The glitzy cast, including Jack Nicholson, Pierce Brosnan, Glenn Close and Sarah Jessica Parker, put on their best camp performances to fight seemingly peaceful Martians, who in fact want to destroy Big Ben, the Eiffel Tower and the Taj Mahal all in the name of a good time. It’s a loving parody of Fifties’ science-fiction cinema. Runaway Train (1985) Movies4Men, 10.50pm ★★★☆☆ Jon Voight and Eric Roberts (both Oscar-nominated) star as a pair of convicts, whose dash for freedom from an Alaskan prison takes an unexpected turn when they find themselves on an out-of-control train. The officers on their heels are caught between stopping it and reclaiming the criminals. It’s all a bit ridiculous, but Voight brings an appealing manic energy to a fun premise. Rebecca De Mornay co-stars. Wednesday 29 November Ferrying around: those who work on the busy English Channel Credit: Channel 4 The Channel: The World’s Busiest Waterway Channel 4, 9.00pm Drunk passengers, frazzled families, fundraisers swimming in testing conditions, enormous ships trying to squeeze through a narrow body of water: it’s all in a day’s workfor those who police the waters of the English Channel, as this new documentary series makes clear. Filmed last summer and with a heavy focus on the many changes that Brexit may bring to the Channel crossing, this opening episode concentrates largely on life on the ferries. “We’re already down on passengers and spending from last year,” notes one employee, pointing out that the collapse of the pound against the euro means that holidaymakers are less inclined to splash their cash. It’s not all doom and gloom, however, as we also follow a determined single mother who plans to swim the Channel to raise money and awareness of sickle cell disease, which both her sons have. Elsewhere, there are interesting statistics about the sheer numbers making the crossing – up to 400 ships passing through the 21-mile-wide Dover Strait each day – and captain Mark Miller and his crew have to deal with both a paralytic passenger and the tour company who intend to leave him behind. Sarah Hughes The Marvellous Mrs Maisel Amazon Prime Video, from today Gilmore Girls creator Amy Sherman-Palladino returns with this effervescent tale set in Fifties New York. Our heroine is Miriam Maisel (Rachel Brosnahan). On the surface she’s the perfect Jewish American Princess but underneath beats the soul of an acid-tongued comedian. Sherman-Palladino is clearly playing homage to the trailblazing likes of Joan Rivers and Phyllis Diller but her story still feels fresh thanks to a sharp script and Brosnahan’s wonderful timing. Mary Berry’s Country House Secrets BBC One, 8.00pm Mary Berry continues her trawl through some of the UK’s grandest country houses. This week she’s in Scotland helping the inhabitants of Scone Palace, Lord and Lady Mansfield, prepare for dinner and a ceilidh while fitting in a bit of deer stalking and salmon fishing on the side. Peaky Blinders BBC Two, 9.00pm Steven Knight’s gangster drama is firing on all cylinders this series and never more so than in a tight, tense third episode which sees Polly (Helen McCrory) re-join the company and Arthur (the excellent Paul Anderson) wrestle with both his guilt and his God following John’s death. Digging for Britain BBC Four, 9.00pm “Archaeology is adding flesh to the bare bones of people” announces Professor Alice Roberts as the second part of this series digging deep into Britain’s past heads to Kent. There we spend time following the excavation of the wreck of East India Company ship, the Rooswijk, before uncovering early evidence of Julius Caesar’s invasion of Britain in the shape of an ancient fort. SH Wallis: The Queen That Never Was Channel 5, 9.00pm Georgina Rich is the latest actress to play Wallis Simpson in this meld of drama and documentary. It’s not a format that ever works particularly well but, beyond the enactments, a complex portrait of the Duchess of Windsor emerges and one which sheds fresh light on the true nature of her marriages. How to Build a Robot Channel 4, 10.35pm David Tennant narrates this entertaining documentary focusing on Canadian robot inventor and puppeteer David McGoran. McGoran’s aim is to invent a robot that can truly interact with humans. SH The Riot Club (2014) Film4, 9.00pm ★★★☆☆ Laura Wade’s 2010 play, Posh, dealt with a still-reported habit of trashing dining establishments by Oxford University’s notorious Bullingdon Club. It reaches the screen as The Riot Club, starring a braying gang of silverspoon-reared Brits. The pungency of the play has been diluted, along with its political bite, but Holliday Grainger, Max Irons and Sam Claflin are perfectly cast in the main roles. Bronson (2008) London Live, 10.00pm ★★★☆☆ A gripping character study of “Britain’s most notorious long-term prisoner”, Charles Bronson (who has recently wed), whose bloody bare-knuckle brawls have seen him moved from prison to prison 120 times. Tom Hardy (who now seems to specialise in complex, muscle-bound brawlers – Mad Max: Fury Road, Legend, Taboo) ramps it up with disturbing intensity to delve inside the mind of the tormented personality. Life As We Know It (2010) 5STAR, 11.00pm ★★★☆☆ Katherine Heigl and Josh Duhamel star in this shrill domestic nightmare in which they raise their orphaned godchild. Heigl once again plays a beautifully groomed control freak, while Duhamel’s Messer – a philandering man-child – repeatedly lives up to his name. When they get together, it feels like something to do with careers, contracts and romcom necessity; nothing to do with life. Thursday 30 November Pushing the boat out: Prunella Scales and Timothy West Credit: Channel 4 Great Canal Journeys Channel 4, 8.00pm When they embarked on the first series of Great Canal Journeys in 2014, it’s doubtful whether Timothy West or Prunella Scales could have foreseen its longevity, in part given the niche material and also because of Scales’s advancing Alzheimer’s disease. Yet here they are, heading through Portugal for the first instalment in this eighth series, never passing up the opportunity to draw comparisons between long marriages and vintage fortified wines. It is another hour of gentle insights and pure, unaffected charm. Their journey takes them from a river port 100 miles inland through to Porto along the Rio Douro, via several vineyards and, slightly less predictably, examples of ancient rock art and Europe’s deepest lock. Throughout is evidence of why Portugal remains England’s oldest ally (Brits are heavily involved in the contemporary port industry) and, more significantly, of a relationship of a strength and mutual affection to which we can all aspire. Scales credits her husband with “opening up the world”. For West’s part, he reckons that “she likes being with me and I like being with her. That’s the best we can hope for, and very nice too.” Gabriel Tate PGA Tour Golf: The Hero World Challenge Sky Sports Main Event, 6.30pm It’s the opening day at the Albany Resort in the Bahamas, where Japan’s Hideki Matsuyama is the reigning champion. Discovering: Richard Widmark Sky Arts, 8.00pm Always more than a mere journeyman but never quite leading man material either, Richard Widmark was one of Hollywood’s most consistent talents, his work spanning classic noirs (Panic in the Streets), westerns (Two Rode Together) and thrillers (Coma). Journalists and critics assemble to pay tribute in another breezy, concise profile. The Farthest: Voyager’s Interstellar Journey: Storyville BBC Four, 8.55pm The space programme perhaps best represents the dazzling possibilities of the human brain and our capacity to imagine. This characteristically excellent and absorbing Storyville celebrates the scientific achievements of the Voyager probes through those that planned, made and continue to monitor them as they leave our solar system for interstellar space. Their enthusiasm is undiminished and infectious. GT Blitz: the Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm This affecting series investigates the repercussions of a German bomb that destroyed two houses in Hull. The personal traumas were of course profound, but a series of essays written by the city’s children in 1941 also unwittingly encouraged Britain’s controversial urban bombing strategies later in the war. Trump: an American Dream Channel 4, 9.00pm This enthralling series concludes with the future President rediscovering his mojo thanks to the influence of a new wife and advisors, before a combination of reality television and social media open an unlikely route to the White House. Live at the Apollo BBC Two, 10.00pm A fine line-up launch a new run for the hardy stand-up perennial from Hammersmith, with quickfire Gary Delaney and rising Scottish comic Larry Dean on the agenda, introduced by Sara Pascoe. The Sex Robots Are Coming Channel 4, 10.00pm Nick Sweeney’s unsettling documentary follows the creation of Harmony, a prototype sexbot, and James, a potential purchaser. What do these technological advances mean for human relationships and the ever-present issue of objectification? GT Airplane II: The Sequel (1982) Film4, 7.15pm ★★★☆☆ The furiously funny, and startling originality of disaster parody Airplane! makes this sequel, which is set in the future and takes place on a lunar shuttle, stick out like a sore thumb, especially since the original team had no involvement. There are some amusing spoofs of Rocky and E.T., but the jokes tread familiar ground. Cameos come from Raymond Burr and William Shatner. Cliffhanger (1993) Universal Channel, 9.00pm ★★★☆☆ Living up to its title, Cliffhanger is a rollicking rollercoaster of a film. It stars Sylvester Stallone as a hotshot mountain climber, who becomes embroiled in a heist, along with Janine Turner. Set in the Rocky Mountains and featuring some stupendous stunts, it may be big-budget nonsense – but it’s entertaining big-budget nonsense with zesty lines and exhilarating cinematography. Get Him to the Greek (2010) Comedy Central, 10.00pm ★★★☆☆ Russell Brand plays himself (very well), thinly disguised as washed-up British rocker Aldous Snow who, desperate for a career revival, is called upon for a one-night show at LA venue The Greek. Despite trying too hard to shock, Brand’s famously crude humour lends this potentially humdrum American bromance some eccentricity and makes it, at times, a raucous comedy. Friday 1 December Life Thru a Lens: Robbie Williams is one of Norton’s guests Credit: Getty The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm Graham Norton remains the best chat show host on British television, even if one or two of his line-ups this season have failed to generate much in the way of sparks. (The recent edition featuring only the cast of Ken Branagh’s new Agatha Christie movie Murder on the Orient Express could have been bottled and sold as a soporific, despite all of the star names on display.) Happily that’s unlikely to be a problem here as most of his guests are blessed with some of the biggest and most-often utilised mouths in showbiz. Elton John is on hand to promote his latest greatest hits collection, and will perhaps have plenty to say about ITV’s recent poll of the British public’s 20 favourite songs from his rather extensive back catalogue. Stephen Fry will doubtless be as mesmerising as ever as he discusses his new book on Greek mythology; and Robbie Williams might make some noise about his new album, Under the Radar Volume 2, and upcoming Heavy Entertainment tour. All in all, you have to wonder how demure actress Carey Mulligan will manage to get a word in edgeways on the subject of her terrific new Netflix film Mudbound, although we’re confident she will. Gerard O’Donovan Dark Netflix, from today “The question is not where, or who, or how…but when?” This creepy time-bending thriller, about the disappearance of two German boys over a 30-year interval, plays with the idea of how fractured relationships repeat time and again. Voyeur Netflix, from today This controversial documentary explores one of veteran US writer Gay Talese’s most sensational pieces of “literary journalism”, The Voyeur’s Motel. It told the story of how, in the Eighties, Gerald Foos opened a motel supposedly for the sole purpose of peeping on guests. But how much of the tale was made up? Sounds Like Friday Night BBC One, 7.30pm Singer Rita Ora joins regular presenters Greg James and Dotty as guest host at the BBC’s White City studios to introduce, among others, Brighton rock duo Royal Blood. Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV, UTV or Wales In the series’ finale Mears ends his epic journey in the ancient Walpole Forest, a vast swathe of primordial wilderness in Western Australia. He’s in search of the forest’s famed giant tingle and karri trees but the smaller denizens – such as the elusive quokka – are just as amazing. Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Jamie Oliver and Jimmy Doherty’s pier-end café goes fully vegetarian in honour of guest Joanna Lumley, who revives the tastes of her childhood by cooking the King of Malaysia’s favourite dish. Meanwhile, the childhood friends go on the road to champion British fava beans, and Doherty designs a vertical vegetable patch – perfect for the high-rise balcony. Britain’s Greatest Bridges Channel 5, 8.00pm The series concludes with the story of the feat of engineering that is the mile-long Severn Bridge and how its designer Bill Brown revolutionised modern bridge design with its aerodynamic box girder deck. GO Truth Tellers at the BBC BBC Four, 11.00pm Friday night is music night on BBC Four, and this new archive series adds depth to its line-up by showcasing clips of the most lyrically gifted songwriters to have performed on the BBC. These include Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell and Patti Smith. GO The King’s Speech (2010) More4, 9.00pm ★★★★☆ Tom Hooper’s film about the future George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer in the nation’s hour of need won multiple Oscars, including a deserved Best Actor gong for Colin Firth. But it’s his double-act with Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist Lionel Logue that gives the film its heart, and the double-handers between them are fraught and fascinating. Helena Bonham Carter is perhaps underused as the Duchess of York. Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (2008) ITV4, 11.40pm ★★★☆☆ This is Tim Burton’s adaptation of Stephen Sondheim’s 1979 musical about the demon barber of Fleet Street. Johnny Depp plays Benjamin Barker, a revenge artist who wields his razors with merry abandon in 19th-century London with the help of the deliciously sinister Mrs Lovett (Helena Bonham Carter). Alan Rickman plays the deplorable Judge Turpin. Wild (2014) Channel 4, 12.10am ★★★★☆ The Pacific Crest Trail, which runs up the entire western spine of the United States, is a challenge of fabled arduousness and rugged beauty. In 1995, aged 26, Cheryl Strayed (played by a superb Reese Witherspoon) walked it, to get clearance in her head after a decade of loss and personal meltdown. Wild powerfully reveals Strayed’s terrors and pleasures as she forges ahead on the journey. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Friday 24 November Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Jamie Oliver and childhood mucker Jimmy Doherty return for another series of their hyperactive meld of cookery programme, food information and celebrity chat hosted at their Southend Pier caff. This series tends to stand or fall with the visiting celebrity but luckily this week it’s Simon Pegg, who gamely enters into the spirit of things by serving customers, cooking what looks like a pretty good tagine and admitting that he’s far more food conscious in these Mission: Impossible days (Tom Cruise is apparently the devil for pushing cakes on those trying to stay in shape). Friday Night Feast feels closer in tone to the early cookery shows that made Oliver’s name and Pegg enters into the cheeky-chappy spirit, mucking around with Doherty and dropping sardonic asides. “It’s fundamentally evil but at the same time beautiful,” he remarks of Oliver’s Provençal Bake, a calorific but clearly delicious mixture of pancakes, cheese, ham and tomatoes, which causes one customer to gush, “I never want it to end.” Elsewhere, Oliver and Doherty go on the road to uncover the joys of free-range duck, and Doherty builds a barbecue for the Stoke Mandeville wheelchair rugby team. Sarah Hughes Sounds Like Friday Night BBC One, 7.30pm BBC One’s live music show is a great idea but so far has been a bit hit and miss. Presenters Greg James and Dotty are enthusiastic but more risks are needed when booking the live acts. Craig David co-hosts this episode, and there are performances from The Killers and Anne-Marie. Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV, UTV or Wales Ray Mears’s laid-back excursion around Australia continues in South Australia’s Flinders mountain ranges, which provides a dramatic setting for three species of kangaroos and the country’s largest bird of prey. Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.00pm The personable Stephen Mangan takes the host’s chair for this episode of the satirical news-based panel game. He’s joined by business journalist Steph McGovern and comedian Jo Caulfield. Extreme Wives with Kate Humble BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Kate Humble heads to the remote town of Shillong in north-east India to meet with the matrilineal Khasi people in the fascinating final episode. The Khasi pass everything, including property, down the female line and hand power to the youngest daughter in each family. SH Rolling Stone: Stories from the Edge Sky Arts, 9.00pm Anyone who has read Sticky Fingers, the recent biography of Rolling Stone supremo Jann Wenner, will realise that this Alex Gibney series is something of a puff piece in comparison. That said, it’s still very enjoyable. The focus here is on the kidnap of Patty Hearst and the way in which the counterculture slowly became mainstream. Gregory Porter’s Popular Voices BBC Four, 10.00pm Jazz musician Gregory Porter’s outstanding series continues with a focus on crooners. All the usual suspects – Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, the unbeatable Nat King Cole – are present but what makes this series so exceptional is the knowledge Porter brings to his subject. This episode dissects why Sinatra was “a little too presumptuous for the croon” as well as looking at how everyone from Iggy Pop to David Bowie used the technique. The real pleasure, however, comes from the music. SH Collateral Beauty (2016) Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm ★★☆☆☆ The plot of David Frankel (The Devil Wears Prada) and Allan Loeb’s (Just Go with It) film is fantastically unhinged: Will Smith is an ad-exec who has lost his daughter to cancer, and in his grief is pestered on the streets of New York by the personifications of Love (Keira Knightley), Time (Jacob Latimore) and Death (Helen Mirren) – “the three abstractions”. Dark Shadows (2012) W, 9.00pm ★★☆☆☆ Tim Burton’s film is at its best in the opening scenes, when it can afford to be all show and no tell. It’s Johnny Depp, naturally, who plays Barnabas Collins, an 18th-century Byronic rascal who is transformed into a vampire by a jealous witch (Eva Green) and wakes up in Nixon-era small-town America. Depp and Burton’s eighth film together brought them level with De Niro and Scorsese, although in numerical terms only. Boyhood (2014) Channel 4, 12.05am ★★★★★ Richard Linklater’s real-time depiction of a boy growing up over 12 years received the biggest Oscar snub of recent years, winning only one award, for Patricia Arquette as for Best Supporting Actress. From 2002, Linklater spent a few days each year filming the same actors to chart Mason’s (Ellar Coltrane) ordinary life – in what is an extraordinary, beautiful and moving string of small, everyday moments. Saturday 25 November In his words: the life of the Sixties playwright Joe Orton Credit: Hulton Archive Joe Orton Laid Bare BBC Two, 9.00pm “I realise it’s unforgivable doing this but I’m just unrepentant.” So announces a young Joe Orton in this suitably anarchic take on the playwright’s life, works and early, brutal death. It’s a sentence that entirely sums up Orton’s acidic take on life; he was a man who loved (and arguably lived) to shock and who enjoyed making people uncomfortable – “I felt snakes were writhing round my feet,” wrote one theatre critic after watching the bawdy Entertaining Mr Sloane – yet who was also possessed of enough wit, charm and intelligence to win over even the most mortally offended. Making great use of Orton’s letters, diaries and plays – scenes from the latter acted by a cast that includes Antony Sher, Ben Miles and Jaime Winstone – the documentary does its best to pin its subject to the page with contributors including his sister Leonie, playwright Christopher Hampton and producer Michael Codron. There is (surprisingly) understanding too for the man who murdered Orton, his lover Kenneth Halliwell, who subsequently killed himself. Ultimately, however, what lingers is not the gory manner of Orton’s death but rather his wildly entertaining words. Sarah Hughes International Rugby Union: Scotland v Australia & England v Samoa BBC One, 2.00pm & Sky Sports Main Event, 2.45pm Having fallen agonisingly close to pulling off the greatest result in their history – they lost 22-17 to New Zealand – Scotland host Australia at Murrayfield with their tails up. Meanwhile, England – who beat the Wallabies 30-6 last weekend, with Danny Care putting a sublime performance after coming off the bench – face Samoa, hoping to take Eddie Jones’s record to 22 wins from 23 as their coach. Expect Jones to ring the changes, with Henry Slade likely to be handed another opportunity at No 12 and Mike Brown returning to the side as full-back. International Rugby Union: Wales v New Zealand BBC Two, 4.45pm An unsuccessful three-match series in New Zealand this summer saw Wales return home still looking for a victory over the All Blacks for the first time since 1953. They have now lost 29 consecutive fixtures, 10 of which have been presided over by New Zealand coach Warren Gatland during his tenure. Wales head into this match on the back of a far-from-convincing 13-6 victory against Georgia. Granted, Gatland did put out an experimental team. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Chelsea BT Sport 1, 5.00pm Two of last Saturday’s star performers meet at Anfield in what should be a pulsating encounter. Liverpool beat Southampton 3-0, with Mohamed Salah scoring twice, while Chelsea, inspired by Eden Hazard, ran out 4-0 winners at West Brom. When these sides met in January here, Georginio Wijnaldum cancelled out David Luiz’s goal in a 1-1 draw. Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.50pm With only three weeks left in the competition, the judges must try to separate the glitter from the paste. Alexandra Burke and Debbie McGee are expected to make the final but it’s wide open as to who else joins them. This week, the couples can earn extra points in the “pasodoblathon”. The X Factor: The Semi Finals ITV, 7.30pm From surprise double eliminations to the extra sing-offs, this year’s X Factor has been derided for being a mess. This week, it can redeem itself as the contestants sing for a place in next weekend’s Grand Final. Michael McIntyre’s Big Show BBC One, 8.10pm Michael McIntyre’s attempt to single-handedly revive the variety show continues. This week, he’s joined by guests Gary Barlow, Russell Kane, Clean Bandit and Danny Dyer, who hands over his mobile phone for the Celebrity Send to All slot. Dad’s Army BBC Two, 8.30pm; not NI or Scotland As Brexit edges nearer so Jimmy Perry and David Croft’s comedy about the Home Guard appears ever more relevant, not least because it pinpoints a certain kind of Englishness. This episode sees the bumbling Captain Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) pitch camp in the middle of an artillery exercise. SH Witnesses: A Frozen Death BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.55pm Another day, another atmospherically depressing European crime drama. But this French eight-part series, shown in double bills over the next four weeks, is really good. The Tunnel’s Marie Dompnier plays Lieutenant Sandra Winckler, who is assigned to a macabre case involving 15 frozen bodies on an abandoned bus. The dead men are all linked to one woman, Catherine Keemer (Audrey Fleurot), who disappeared three years earlier. White Princess Drama, 9.00pm It might be hokum but this adaptation of Philippa Gregory’s bestseller is enjoyable largely thanks to the complicated relationship at its heart. The marriage between Henry VII (Jacob Collins-Levy) and Elizabeth of York (Jodie Comer) is very much a dynastic contract between two people forced to find common cause. This episode sees them take steps towards that new understanding. SH Daddy Long Legs (1955) BBC Two, 2.10pm ★★★☆☆ Fred Astaire and Leslie Caron are paired for the first time in this Hollywood musical written by Phoebe and Henry Ephron (parents of Nora) and loosely based on a 1912 novel. They bring charm and warmth to a story about the complications of a love affair between a young woman and a man 30 years her senior. The dance sequences are particularly striking, containing a rarity in Astaire’s choreography: a kiss. Lone Survivor (2013) Channel 4, 11.05pm ★★★☆☆ In this film based on true events, Mark Wahlberg gives a strong performance as sniper Marcus Luttrell, who, in 2005, was the head of a four-man team of Navy Seals, tasked with killing Taliban leader Ahmed Shah. An encounter with some goatherds gives the team a major moral dilemma. The film, directed by Peter Berg, is hampered by a lack of character exploration but it’s certainly action-packed. Albert Nobbs (2011) BBC Two, 11.35pm ★★★☆☆ Glenn Close toiled for 30 years to make an Albert Nobbs film after playing the part in a 1982 off-Broadway play. Close inhabits the role, of a woman disguised as a man to work as a waiter in a 19th-century hotel, with uncanny accuracy (she was rewarded with an Oscar nomination). The film reaches for something to say about sexual identity, but neither Close nor director Rodrigo García seem to know what it is. Sunday 26 November Ring of fire: Xand van Tulleken Credit: BBC Expedition Volcano BBC Two, 9.00pm As is the wont of BBC documentaries about the natural world these days, the impact of humans can no longer be ignored – in fact, it’s central to the premise of this new two-parter in which geologist Chris Jackson and humanitarian doctor Xand van Tulleken journey to live volcanoes and the communities that live in their shadow. Nyiragongo, in the Congo, last erupted in 2002, causing a mass evacuation of the nearby city of Goma, terrible loss of life and wholesale destruction of property. The pair’s expedition examines ways to predict its behaviour, especially since another eruption is almost inevitable. Van Tulleken focuses on disease prevention and healthcare, looking at how to avoid the spread of cholera that proved so catastrophic 15 years ago, while Jackson drops into the crater (the staggering camerawork and pounding soundtrack leave you in no doubt as to the potential peril of the venture) to assess the latest techniques for detecting sulphur dioxide and geological vibrations. By the end, problems have been diagnosed and solutions prescribed – it’s an admirable project whose success can only be judged, grimly, in the event of another disaster. Next week, they head to nearby Nyamuragira. Gabriel Tate Formula 1: Abu Dhabi Grand Prix Channel 4, noon & Sky Sports F1, 12.30pm He may have already been crowned champion but that didn’t stop Lewis Hamilton putting in a fine display in Brazil, starting in the pit lane under flawless Brazilian skies and finishing a mere five seconds adrift of winner Sebastian Vettel. Let’s hope for a similarly exciting spectacle at the Yas Marina Circuit, as the curtain comes down on the 2017 season. Blue Planet II BBC One, 8.00pm Every episode of this mesmerising series brings with it new wonders. This week’s venture into underwater forests, meadows and mangroves sniffs out creatures with unlikely names (the Pyjama Shark, the Garibaldi Damselfish) and even more outlandish strategies for survival. Coastal Railways with Julie Walters Channel 4, 8.00pm It might be hard to see what Julie Walters can bring to this well-worn travelogue approach, despite all her charisma and appeal. But there is plenty to enjoy in her tour of the British Isles – tonight, she boards the “Harry Potter” train in the Highlands, guts herring and wrangles cattle. Howards End BBC One, 9.00pm Kenneth Lonergan’s restrained, affecting adaptation reachesa crunch point in relations between Margaret (Hayley Atwell) and Henry (Matthew Macfadyen), driving a wedge between their two families; with the Basts approaching penury, a showdown looms. Guy Martin vs the Robocar Channel 4, 9.00pm Always up for a challenge, Guy Martin builds his own robotic Ford Transit to take on a “Roboracer” around Silverstone. But first he picks up a few tips from a “Level Five” autonomous vehicle in Budapest and Tesla’s latest models in Massachusetts. GT Babylon Berlin Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm and 10.00pm With every one of the €40 million budget up on screen, this adaptation of Volker Kutscher’s Thirties-set policiers is one of the most handsome dramas of the year – and one of the most gripping. The first season reaches its climax with Lotte (Liv Lisa Fries) having a point to prove and Gereon (Volker Bruch) dealing both with ghosts from the past and chilling hints at what the future holds. Season two begins next week. Naples ’44: a Wartime Diary BBC Four, 11.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch narrates this gripping and cleverly structured Italian film, which blends archive footage, documentary and drama to tell the story of a city and its resilient citizens through the eyes of British officer Norman Lewis. Some of the imagery is powerful indeed (one sequence of cows being milked in the rubble of the city has a pungent surrealism) and the pacifist message is ultimately undeniable. GT Stalingrad (1994) History, 3.00pm ★★★☆☆ Joseph Vilsmaier’s film reconstructs the 1942 Siege of Stalingrad, in which Soviet forces successfully held back the German army. The battle proved to be a major turning point in the Second World War and claimed millions of lives – a point that the film rests on, showing the horrors of modern warfare in all its stomach-churning brutality. Dominique Horwitz and Thomas Kretschmann star as German soldiers. Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day (2014) BBC Two, 6.45pm ★★★☆☆ Steve Carell has become a dab hand at making public embarrassment ridiculous and borderline tragic, and saves the day in this slight but entertaining comedy. Alexander (Ed Oxenbould), blows out a candle for his 12th birthday and initiates this fateful curse so that his family understand how it feels to have a purely maddening 24 hours. Fury (2014) Channel 5, 9.00pm ★★★★☆ David Ayer’s study of the habits and habitats of the American killer male is an astonishing drama. It’s Germany 1945, and Sgt Don “Wardaddy” Collie (Brad Pitt) and his team are grinding towards Berlin in a battered tank. There is no rescue mission, just an agonising rumble from one brush with death to the next. The set pieces are gripping, and the terror of war is blasted home. Monday 27 November Right to work: Tourette’s sufferer Ryan Credit: BBC Employable Me BBC Two, 9.00pm This moving series, which follows jobseekers determined to show that their disabilities shouldn’t prevent them working, returns for a new four-part run. There’s a persuasive double purpose to the programme – to highlight the disabilities themselves and to explore how those living with them fight against prejudice every day. The opening episode showcases a wonderfully inspirational duo. We meet 52-year-old Andy, who was once the go-getting manager of a successful motorcycle business. Despite being left partially paralysed and struggling with speech after a life-threatening stroke, Andy wants to break into public speaking and motivate others with his story. Alongside him is turtle-mad Tourette’s sufferer Ryan, whose severe tics can leave him physically debilitated, but who nevertheless dreams of working with animals. The pair’s will to succeed is humbling as they tackle longed-for job opportunities and the significant hurdles this entails. Helping them on the way is psychologist Nancy Doyle, who runs a pioneering scheme aimed at getting our hopefuls to promote their talents and for recruiters to see their considerable worth. Toby Dantzic Chinese Burn BBC Three, from 10.00am This comedy pilot, executive-produced by Ash Atalla (People Just Do Nothing), about three girls from China trying to make new lives in London is worth watching. Flatmates Elizabeth (Shin-Fei Chen), who’s chasing her dream job as a sommelier, and fiery struggling actress Jackie (Yennis Cheung) get a surprise visit from Elizabeth’s ultra-rich friend FuFu (Yuyu Rau). She’s an unwelcome guest, however, as Elizabeth hasn’t been honest with her parents. Lost and Found Channel 4, 3.00pm Heartstrings are shamelessly tugged in this new series, which follows the sterling work of the Dogs Trust charity. The pooches featured in this episode include Ida, a Staffordshire Bull Terrier that needs regular hydrotherapy, and a Labrador that has been missing for four days. Paul Hollywood: A Baker’s Life Channel 4, 8.00pm Paul Hollywood fronts this new four-part series which combines personal anecdotes with his favourite recipes. The opening episode serves up footage of the gimlet-eyed bread expert’s original Great British Bake Off audition, along with a menu of his ultimate pizza and a Madeira celebration cake. Nigella: At My Table BBC Two, 8.30pm Here’s another eclectic selection of dishes from television’s glossiest gourmet. Her recipes include an intriguingly titled golden egg curry, and a feast of spiced lamb kofta followed by rose and pepper pavlova. Supershoppers Channel 4, 8.30pm The savvy consumer advice show returns with presenter Anna Richardson and newcomer Sabrina Grant investigating whether supermarkets’ standard own-label ranges are really any different to their cheaper value ranges. Beauty wipes and car insurance also get the once over. TD Last Men In Aleppo: Storyville BBC Four, 10.00pm This grim but absorbing documentary follows the work of the White Helmets, Syrian civilians who conduct search-and-rescue missions in the city of Aleppo. We follow a trio of volunteers that includes Khaled, who moves between scouring for missing people and searching out medicine for his malnourished daughter. The director Feras Fayyad’s stark camera style takes an unflinching approach to the horror. TD Die Another Day (2002) ITV4, 9.00pm ★★★☆☆ Pierce Brosnan’s last outing as James Bond is also his least satisfying (although even Sean Connery might have struggled to look cool driving an invisible car). Dastardly Gustav Graves (Toby Stephens) wants to provoke a war between the Koreas using a military satellite. Bond, aided by Halle Berry and Rosamund Pike, must stop him. It’s all let down by an over-reliance on CGI, but there are some great set pieces. Escobar: Paradise Lost (2014) Sky Cinema Premiere, 11.25pm ★★★☆☆ A thundering performance by Benicio del Toro almost redeems this misjudged biopic of the Colombian crime lord. Seizing on the role with understated relish, he teeters adroitly between generous family man and murdering manipulator. What a shame, then, that he’s used so sparingly – the film renders the tyrant nothing more than a supporting character. The Road (2009) ITV4, 11.45pm ★★★☆☆ John Hillcoat’s adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s exalted novel is as harrowing as its source material. Stunning landscape photography sets the melancholy mood as a man (Viggo Mortensen) and his son (the superb Kodi Smit-McPhee) wander the American wasteland after an ecological disaster. Meanwhile, Nick Cave’s wrenching score makes it a wholly chilling experience. Tuesday 28 November The rise of AI: robot Jess helps families with life’s challenges Credit: Channel 4 The Robot Will See You Now Channel 4, 10.00pm The Rise of the Robots season continues with this documentary exploring whether robots will ever be sophisticated enough to play the role of best friend and confidant, or even therapist, to humans. Some forms of artificial intelligence, such as Amazon’s Alexa, are becoming more commonly involved in our home lives; cars are almost at the point where they drive themselves; and trials are afoot to test whether software can be used to perform medical and legal functions. A companionship robot has also been developed to keep astronauts’ spirits up during lengthy periods on the International Space Station. That’s all a long way from being able to substitute the life experience, and emotional, ethical and psychological support, for which we turn to friends, family, religion and counsellors. But maybe not for long. This intriguing film focuses on a team from Manchester and Plymouth Universities racing to develop a humanoid robot called Jess, that uses AI-based analysis to offer counselling on problems to do with marriage, divorce, infidelity and other day-to-day traumas – with built-in sympathy and tissue dispenser, no doubt. Gerard O’Donovan Glitch Netflix, from today This Aussie drama about a lakeside town where the dead start coming back to life bore too great a resemblance to French chiller The Returned in its early stages, but it eventually took a different supernatural path with reasonable success. The second series kicks off with last season’s closing shock revelation still hanging in the air: Elisha (Genevieve O’Reilly), the medic who’s been helping the undead, has been one of them herself, all along. How to Spend It Well at Christmas with Phillip Schofield ITV, 8.00pm This festive consumer series sees Phillip Schofield inviting celebrity guests to test and taste the “must have” food, drink and gift items of the season. This week, they look at the hottest toys of 2017 and how Father Christmas can get hold of them. The A Word BBC One, 9.00pm Rebecca (Molly Wright) packs her parents off on a much-needed mini-break and drafts in Eddie (Greg McHugh) and Nicola (Vinette Robinson) to help care for seven-year-old Joe (Max Vento). Unsurprisingly, things don’t go entirely according to plan. MasterChef: The Professionals BBC Two, 9.00pm The standard has been unusually high this year and this week’s six nervous new candidates prove especially inventive in the signature round and a challenge to come up with a new take on flavoursome, filled pasta with an accompanying sauce. Grand Designs: House of the Year Channel 4, 9.00pm Which of the shortlisted super-dwellings will win the Riba prize for 2017’s House of the Year? Kevin McCloud can only announce the winner once the last two finalists have been chosen – from the predictably stunning nominees in the Minimalist and Modern category. GO Passions: Samuel Coleridge-Taylor by Chi-Chi Nwanoku Sky Arts, 9.00pm Bassist Chi-Chi Nwanoku is the founder of Europe’s first black and ethnic minority classical orchestra. So, unsurprisingly, it’s not the poet (that’s Samuel Taylor Coleridge, silly) she chooses as her hero but the similarly named mixed-race British composer born 100 years later, in a film praising black musicians who’ve overcome prejudice to succeed in the conservative world of classical music. GO Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (2016) Sky Cinema Superheroes, 5.50pm ★★★☆☆ Tim Burton’s Edwardian fairy tale, based on the first Miss Peregrine book by Ransom Riggs – feels oddly conventional. Adapted by Jane Goldman (Kick-Ass), it’s a tale of an insular Florida lad, Jake Portman (Asa Butterfield), who visits an orphanage that figured in tales spun by his grandfather (Terence Stamp). Mars Attacks! (1996) ITV4, 10.50pm ★★★★☆ It may not be director Tim Burton’s best film but this surreal sci-fi comedy is still fun. The glitzy cast, including Jack Nicholson, Pierce Brosnan, Glenn Close and Sarah Jessica Parker, put on their best camp performances to fight seemingly peaceful Martians, who in fact want to destroy Big Ben, the Eiffel Tower and the Taj Mahal all in the name of a good time. It’s a loving parody of Fifties’ science-fiction cinema. Runaway Train (1985) Movies4Men, 10.50pm ★★★☆☆ Jon Voight and Eric Roberts (both Oscar-nominated) star as a pair of convicts, whose dash for freedom from an Alaskan prison takes an unexpected turn when they find themselves on an out-of-control train. The officers on their heels are caught between stopping it and reclaiming the criminals. It’s all a bit ridiculous, but Voight brings an appealing manic energy to a fun premise. Rebecca De Mornay co-stars. Wednesday 29 November Ferrying around: those who work on the busy English Channel Credit: Channel 4 The Channel: The World’s Busiest Waterway Channel 4, 9.00pm Drunk passengers, frazzled families, fundraisers swimming in testing conditions, enormous ships trying to squeeze through a narrow body of water: it’s all in a day’s workfor those who police the waters of the English Channel, as this new documentary series makes clear. Filmed last summer and with a heavy focus on the many changes that Brexit may bring to the Channel crossing, this opening episode concentrates largely on life on the ferries. “We’re already down on passengers and spending from last year,” notes one employee, pointing out that the collapse of the pound against the euro means that holidaymakers are less inclined to splash their cash. It’s not all doom and gloom, however, as we also follow a determined single mother who plans to swim the Channel to raise money and awareness of sickle cell disease, which both her sons have. Elsewhere, there are interesting statistics about the sheer numbers making the crossing – up to 400 ships passing through the 21-mile-wide Dover Strait each day – and captain Mark Miller and his crew have to deal with both a paralytic passenger and the tour company who intend to leave him behind. Sarah Hughes The Marvellous Mrs Maisel Amazon Prime Video, from today Gilmore Girls creator Amy Sherman-Palladino returns with this effervescent tale set in Fifties New York. Our heroine is Miriam Maisel (Rachel Brosnahan). On the surface she’s the perfect Jewish American Princess but underneath beats the soul of an acid-tongued comedian. Sherman-Palladino is clearly playing homage to the trailblazing likes of Joan Rivers and Phyllis Diller but her story still feels fresh thanks to a sharp script and Brosnahan’s wonderful timing. Mary Berry’s Country House Secrets BBC One, 8.00pm Mary Berry continues her trawl through some of the UK’s grandest country houses. This week she’s in Scotland helping the inhabitants of Scone Palace, Lord and Lady Mansfield, prepare for dinner and a ceilidh while fitting in a bit of deer stalking and salmon fishing on the side. Peaky Blinders BBC Two, 9.00pm Steven Knight’s gangster drama is firing on all cylinders this series and never more so than in a tight, tense third episode which sees Polly (Helen McCrory) re-join the company and Arthur (the excellent Paul Anderson) wrestle with both his guilt and his God following John’s death. Digging for Britain BBC Four, 9.00pm “Archaeology is adding flesh to the bare bones of people” announces Professor Alice Roberts as the second part of this series digging deep into Britain’s past heads to Kent. There we spend time following the excavation of the wreck of East India Company ship, the Rooswijk, before uncovering early evidence of Julius Caesar’s invasion of Britain in the shape of an ancient fort. SH Wallis: The Queen That Never Was Channel 5, 9.00pm Georgina Rich is the latest actress to play Wallis Simpson in this meld of drama and documentary. It’s not a format that ever works particularly well but, beyond the enactments, a complex portrait of the Duchess of Windsor emerges and one which sheds fresh light on the true nature of her marriages. How to Build a Robot Channel 4, 10.35pm David Tennant narrates this entertaining documentary focusing on Canadian robot inventor and puppeteer David McGoran. McGoran’s aim is to invent a robot that can truly interact with humans. SH The Riot Club (2014) Film4, 9.00pm ★★★☆☆ Laura Wade’s 2010 play, Posh, dealt with a still-reported habit of trashing dining establishments by Oxford University’s notorious Bullingdon Club. It reaches the screen as The Riot Club, starring a braying gang of silverspoon-reared Brits. The pungency of the play has been diluted, along with its political bite, but Holliday Grainger, Max Irons and Sam Claflin are perfectly cast in the main roles. Bronson (2008) London Live, 10.00pm ★★★☆☆ A gripping character study of “Britain’s most notorious long-term prisoner”, Charles Bronson (who has recently wed), whose bloody bare-knuckle brawls have seen him moved from prison to prison 120 times. Tom Hardy (who now seems to specialise in complex, muscle-bound brawlers – Mad Max: Fury Road, Legend, Taboo) ramps it up with disturbing intensity to delve inside the mind of the tormented personality. Life As We Know It (2010) 5STAR, 11.00pm ★★★☆☆ Katherine Heigl and Josh Duhamel star in this shrill domestic nightmare in which they raise their orphaned godchild. Heigl once again plays a beautifully groomed control freak, while Duhamel’s Messer – a philandering man-child – repeatedly lives up to his name. When they get together, it feels like something to do with careers, contracts and romcom necessity; nothing to do with life. Thursday 30 November Pushing the boat out: Prunella Scales and Timothy West Credit: Channel 4 Great Canal Journeys Channel 4, 8.00pm When they embarked on the first series of Great Canal Journeys in 2014, it’s doubtful whether Timothy West or Prunella Scales could have foreseen its longevity, in part given the niche material and also because of Scales’s advancing Alzheimer’s disease. Yet here they are, heading through Portugal for the first instalment in this eighth series, never passing up the opportunity to draw comparisons between long marriages and vintage fortified wines. It is another hour of gentle insights and pure, unaffected charm. Their journey takes them from a river port 100 miles inland through to Porto along the Rio Douro, via several vineyards and, slightly less predictably, examples of ancient rock art and Europe’s deepest lock. Throughout is evidence of why Portugal remains England’s oldest ally (Brits are heavily involved in the contemporary port industry) and, more significantly, of a relationship of a strength and mutual affection to which we can all aspire. Scales credits her husband with “opening up the world”. For West’s part, he reckons that “she likes being with me and I like being with her. That’s the best we can hope for, and very nice too.” Gabriel Tate PGA Tour Golf: The Hero World Challenge Sky Sports Main Event, 6.30pm It’s the opening day at the Albany Resort in the Bahamas, where Japan’s Hideki Matsuyama is the reigning champion. Discovering: Richard Widmark Sky Arts, 8.00pm Always more than a mere journeyman but never quite leading man material either, Richard Widmark was one of Hollywood’s most consistent talents, his work spanning classic noirs (Panic in the Streets), westerns (Two Rode Together) and thrillers (Coma). Journalists and critics assemble to pay tribute in another breezy, concise profile. The Farthest: Voyager’s Interstellar Journey: Storyville BBC Four, 8.55pm The space programme perhaps best represents the dazzling possibilities of the human brain and our capacity to imagine. This characteristically excellent and absorbing Storyville celebrates the scientific achievements of the Voyager probes through those that planned, made and continue to monitor them as they leave our solar system for interstellar space. Their enthusiasm is undiminished and infectious. GT Blitz: the Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm This affecting series investigates the repercussions of a German bomb that destroyed two houses in Hull. The personal traumas were of course profound, but a series of essays written by the city’s children in 1941 also unwittingly encouraged Britain’s controversial urban bombing strategies later in the war. Trump: an American Dream Channel 4, 9.00pm This enthralling series concludes with the future President rediscovering his mojo thanks to the influence of a new wife and advisors, before a combination of reality television and social media open an unlikely route to the White House. Live at the Apollo BBC Two, 10.00pm A fine line-up launch a new run for the hardy stand-up perennial from Hammersmith, with quickfire Gary Delaney and rising Scottish comic Larry Dean on the agenda, introduced by Sara Pascoe. The Sex Robots Are Coming Channel 4, 10.00pm Nick Sweeney’s unsettling documentary follows the creation of Harmony, a prototype sexbot, and James, a potential purchaser. What do these technological advances mean for human relationships and the ever-present issue of objectification? GT Airplane II: The Sequel (1982) Film4, 7.15pm ★★★☆☆ The furiously funny, and startling originality of disaster parody Airplane! makes this sequel, which is set in the future and takes place on a lunar shuttle, stick out like a sore thumb, especially since the original team had no involvement. There are some amusing spoofs of Rocky and E.T., but the jokes tread familiar ground. Cameos come from Raymond Burr and William Shatner. Cliffhanger (1993) Universal Channel, 9.00pm ★★★☆☆ Living up to its title, Cliffhanger is a rollicking rollercoaster of a film. It stars Sylvester Stallone as a hotshot mountain climber, who becomes embroiled in a heist, along with Janine Turner. Set in the Rocky Mountains and featuring some stupendous stunts, it may be big-budget nonsense – but it’s entertaining big-budget nonsense with zesty lines and exhilarating cinematography. Get Him to the Greek (2010) Comedy Central, 10.00pm ★★★☆☆ Russell Brand plays himself (very well), thinly disguised as washed-up British rocker Aldous Snow who, desperate for a career revival, is called upon for a one-night show at LA venue The Greek. Despite trying too hard to shock, Brand’s famously crude humour lends this potentially humdrum American bromance some eccentricity and makes it, at times, a raucous comedy. Friday 1 December Life Thru a Lens: Robbie Williams is one of Norton’s guests Credit: Getty The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm Graham Norton remains the best chat show host on British television, even if one or two of his line-ups this season have failed to generate much in the way of sparks. (The recent edition featuring only the cast of Ken Branagh’s new Agatha Christie movie Murder on the Orient Express could have been bottled and sold as a soporific, despite all of the star names on display.) Happily that’s unlikely to be a problem here as most of his guests are blessed with some of the biggest and most-often utilised mouths in showbiz. Elton John is on hand to promote his latest greatest hits collection, and will perhaps have plenty to say about ITV’s recent poll of the British public’s 20 favourite songs from his rather extensive back catalogue. Stephen Fry will doubtless be as mesmerising as ever as he discusses his new book on Greek mythology; and Robbie Williams might make some noise about his new album, Under the Radar Volume 2, and upcoming Heavy Entertainment tour. All in all, you have to wonder how demure actress Carey Mulligan will manage to get a word in edgeways on the subject of her terrific new Netflix film Mudbound, although we’re confident she will. Gerard O’Donovan Dark Netflix, from today “The question is not where, or who, or how…but when?” This creepy time-bending thriller, about the disappearance of two German boys over a 30-year interval, plays with the idea of how fractured relationships repeat time and again. Voyeur Netflix, from today This controversial documentary explores one of veteran US writer Gay Talese’s most sensational pieces of “literary journalism”, The Voyeur’s Motel. It told the story of how, in the Eighties, Gerald Foos opened a motel supposedly for the sole purpose of peeping on guests. But how much of the tale was made up? Sounds Like Friday Night BBC One, 7.30pm Singer Rita Ora joins regular presenters Greg James and Dotty as guest host at the BBC’s White City studios to introduce, among others, Brighton rock duo Royal Blood. Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV, UTV or Wales In the series’ finale Mears ends his epic journey in the ancient Walpole Forest, a vast swathe of primordial wilderness in Western Australia. He’s in search of the forest’s famed giant tingle and karri trees but the smaller denizens – such as the elusive quokka – are just as amazing. Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Jamie Oliver and Jimmy Doherty’s pier-end café goes fully vegetarian in honour of guest Joanna Lumley, who revives the tastes of her childhood by cooking the King of Malaysia’s favourite dish. Meanwhile, the childhood friends go on the road to champion British fava beans, and Doherty designs a vertical vegetable patch – perfect for the high-rise balcony. Britain’s Greatest Bridges Channel 5, 8.00pm The series concludes with the story of the feat of engineering that is the mile-long Severn Bridge and how its designer Bill Brown revolutionised modern bridge design with its aerodynamic box girder deck. GO Truth Tellers at the BBC BBC Four, 11.00pm Friday night is music night on BBC Four, and this new archive series adds depth to its line-up by showcasing clips of the most lyrically gifted songwriters to have performed on the BBC. These include Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell and Patti Smith. GO The King’s Speech (2010) More4, 9.00pm ★★★★☆ Tom Hooper’s film about the future George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer in the nation’s hour of need won multiple Oscars, including a deserved Best Actor gong for Colin Firth. But it’s his double-act with Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist Lionel Logue that gives the film its heart, and the double-handers between them are fraught and fascinating. Helena Bonham Carter is perhaps underused as the Duchess of York. Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (2008) ITV4, 11.40pm ★★★☆☆ This is Tim Burton’s adaptation of Stephen Sondheim’s 1979 musical about the demon barber of Fleet Street. Johnny Depp plays Benjamin Barker, a revenge artist who wields his razors with merry abandon in 19th-century London with the help of the deliciously sinister Mrs Lovett (Helena Bonham Carter). Alan Rickman plays the deplorable Judge Turpin. Wild (2014) Channel 4, 12.10am ★★★★☆ The Pacific Crest Trail, which runs up the entire western spine of the United States, is a challenge of fabled arduousness and rugged beauty. In 1995, aged 26, Cheryl Strayed (played by a superb Reese Witherspoon) walked it, to get clearance in her head after a decade of loss and personal meltdown. Wild powerfully reveals Strayed’s terrors and pleasures as she forges ahead on the journey. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Jamie and Jimmy's Friday Night Feast and Sounds Like Friday Night
Friday 24 November Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Jamie Oliver and childhood mucker Jimmy Doherty return for another series of their hyperactive meld of cookery programme, food information and celebrity chat hosted at their Southend Pier caff. This series tends to stand or fall with the visiting celebrity but luckily this week it’s Simon Pegg, who gamely enters into the spirit of things by serving customers, cooking what looks like a pretty good tagine and admitting that he’s far more food conscious in these Mission: Impossible days (Tom Cruise is apparently the devil for pushing cakes on those trying to stay in shape). Friday Night Feast feels closer in tone to the early cookery shows that made Oliver’s name and Pegg enters into the cheeky-chappy spirit, mucking around with Doherty and dropping sardonic asides. “It’s fundamentally evil but at the same time beautiful,” he remarks of Oliver’s Provençal Bake, a calorific but clearly delicious mixture of pancakes, cheese, ham and tomatoes, which causes one customer to gush, “I never want it to end.” Elsewhere, Oliver and Doherty go on the road to uncover the joys of free-range duck, and Doherty builds a barbecue for the Stoke Mandeville wheelchair rugby team. Sarah Hughes Sounds Like Friday Night BBC One, 7.30pm BBC One’s live music show is a great idea but so far has been a bit hit and miss. Presenters Greg James and Dotty are enthusiastic but more risks are needed when booking the live acts. Craig David co-hosts this episode, and there are performances from The Killers and Anne-Marie. Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV, UTV or Wales Ray Mears’s laid-back excursion around Australia continues in South Australia’s Flinders mountain ranges, which provides a dramatic setting for three species of kangaroos and the country’s largest bird of prey. Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.00pm The personable Stephen Mangan takes the host’s chair for this episode of the satirical news-based panel game. He’s joined by business journalist Steph McGovern and comedian Jo Caulfield. Extreme Wives with Kate Humble BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Kate Humble heads to the remote town of Shillong in north-east India to meet with the matrilineal Khasi people in the fascinating final episode. The Khasi pass everything, including property, down the female line and hand power to the youngest daughter in each family. SH Rolling Stone: Stories from the Edge Sky Arts, 9.00pm Anyone who has read Sticky Fingers, the recent biography of Rolling Stone supremo Jann Wenner, will realise that this Alex Gibney series is something of a puff piece in comparison. That said, it’s still very enjoyable. The focus here is on the kidnap of Patty Hearst and the way in which the counterculture slowly became mainstream. Gregory Porter’s Popular Voices BBC Four, 10.00pm Jazz musician Gregory Porter’s outstanding series continues with a focus on crooners. All the usual suspects – Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, the unbeatable Nat King Cole – are present but what makes this series so exceptional is the knowledge Porter brings to his subject. This episode dissects why Sinatra was “a little too presumptuous for the croon” as well as looking at how everyone from Iggy Pop to David Bowie used the technique. The real pleasure, however, comes from the music. SH Collateral Beauty (2016) Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm ★★☆☆☆ The plot of David Frankel (The Devil Wears Prada) and Allan Loeb’s (Just Go with It) film is fantastically unhinged: Will Smith is an ad-exec who has lost his daughter to cancer, and in his grief is pestered on the streets of New York by the personifications of Love (Keira Knightley), Time (Jacob Latimore) and Death (Helen Mirren) – “the three abstractions”. Dark Shadows (2012) W, 9.00pm ★★☆☆☆ Tim Burton’s film is at its best in the opening scenes, when it can afford to be all show and no tell. It’s Johnny Depp, naturally, who plays Barnabas Collins, an 18th-century Byronic rascal who is transformed into a vampire by a jealous witch (Eva Green) and wakes up in Nixon-era small-town America. Depp and Burton’s eighth film together brought them level with De Niro and Scorsese, although in numerical terms only. Boyhood (2014) Channel 4, 12.05am ★★★★★ Richard Linklater’s real-time depiction of a boy growing up over 12 years received the biggest Oscar snub of recent years, winning only one award, for Patricia Arquette as for Best Supporting Actress. From 2002, Linklater spent a few days each year filming the same actors to chart Mason’s (Ellar Coltrane) ordinary life – in what is an extraordinary, beautiful and moving string of small, everyday moments. Saturday 25 November In his words: the life of the Sixties playwright Joe Orton Credit: Hulton Archive Joe Orton Laid Bare BBC Two, 9.00pm “I realise it’s unforgivable doing this but I’m just unrepentant.” So announces a young Joe Orton in this suitably anarchic take on the playwright’s life, works and early, brutal death. It’s a sentence that entirely sums up Orton’s acidic take on life; he was a man who loved (and arguably lived) to shock and who enjoyed making people uncomfortable – “I felt snakes were writhing round my feet,” wrote one theatre critic after watching the bawdy Entertaining Mr Sloane – yet who was also possessed of enough wit, charm and intelligence to win over even the most mortally offended. Making great use of Orton’s letters, diaries and plays – scenes from the latter acted by a cast that includes Antony Sher, Ben Miles and Jaime Winstone – the documentary does its best to pin its subject to the page with contributors including his sister Leonie, playwright Christopher Hampton and producer Michael Codron. There is (surprisingly) understanding too for the man who murdered Orton, his lover Kenneth Halliwell, who subsequently killed himself. Ultimately, however, what lingers is not the gory manner of Orton’s death but rather his wildly entertaining words. Sarah Hughes International Rugby Union: Scotland v Australia & England v Samoa BBC One, 2.00pm & Sky Sports Main Event, 2.45pm Having fallen agonisingly close to pulling off the greatest result in their history – they lost 22-17 to New Zealand – Scotland host Australia at Murrayfield with their tails up. Meanwhile, England – who beat the Wallabies 30-6 last weekend, with Danny Care putting a sublime performance after coming off the bench – face Samoa, hoping to take Eddie Jones’s record to 22 wins from 23 as their coach. Expect Jones to ring the changes, with Henry Slade likely to be handed another opportunity at No 12 and Mike Brown returning to the side as full-back. International Rugby Union: Wales v New Zealand BBC Two, 4.45pm An unsuccessful three-match series in New Zealand this summer saw Wales return home still looking for a victory over the All Blacks for the first time since 1953. They have now lost 29 consecutive fixtures, 10 of which have been presided over by New Zealand coach Warren Gatland during his tenure. Wales head into this match on the back of a far-from-convincing 13-6 victory against Georgia. Granted, Gatland did put out an experimental team. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Chelsea BT Sport 1, 5.00pm Two of last Saturday’s star performers meet at Anfield in what should be a pulsating encounter. Liverpool beat Southampton 3-0, with Mohamed Salah scoring twice, while Chelsea, inspired by Eden Hazard, ran out 4-0 winners at West Brom. When these sides met in January here, Georginio Wijnaldum cancelled out David Luiz’s goal in a 1-1 draw. Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.50pm With only three weeks left in the competition, the judges must try to separate the glitter from the paste. Alexandra Burke and Debbie McGee are expected to make the final but it’s wide open as to who else joins them. This week, the couples can earn extra points in the “pasodoblathon”. The X Factor: The Semi Finals ITV, 7.30pm From surprise double eliminations to the extra sing-offs, this year’s X Factor has been derided for being a mess. This week, it can redeem itself as the contestants sing for a place in next weekend’s Grand Final. Michael McIntyre’s Big Show BBC One, 8.10pm Michael McIntyre’s attempt to single-handedly revive the variety show continues. This week, he’s joined by guests Gary Barlow, Russell Kane, Clean Bandit and Danny Dyer, who hands over his mobile phone for the Celebrity Send to All slot. Dad’s Army BBC Two, 8.30pm; not NI or Scotland As Brexit edges nearer so Jimmy Perry and David Croft’s comedy about the Home Guard appears ever more relevant, not least because it pinpoints a certain kind of Englishness. This episode sees the bumbling Captain Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) pitch camp in the middle of an artillery exercise. SH Witnesses: A Frozen Death BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.55pm Another day, another atmospherically depressing European crime drama. But this French eight-part series, shown in double bills over the next four weeks, is really good. The Tunnel’s Marie Dompnier plays Lieutenant Sandra Winckler, who is assigned to a macabre case involving 15 frozen bodies on an abandoned bus. The dead men are all linked to one woman, Catherine Keemer (Audrey Fleurot), who disappeared three years earlier. White Princess Drama, 9.00pm It might be hokum but this adaptation of Philippa Gregory’s bestseller is enjoyable largely thanks to the complicated relationship at its heart. The marriage between Henry VII (Jacob Collins-Levy) and Elizabeth of York (Jodie Comer) is very much a dynastic contract between two people forced to find common cause. This episode sees them take steps towards that new understanding. SH Daddy Long Legs (1955) BBC Two, 2.10pm ★★★☆☆ Fred Astaire and Leslie Caron are paired for the first time in this Hollywood musical written by Phoebe and Henry Ephron (parents of Nora) and loosely based on a 1912 novel. They bring charm and warmth to a story about the complications of a love affair between a young woman and a man 30 years her senior. The dance sequences are particularly striking, containing a rarity in Astaire’s choreography: a kiss. Lone Survivor (2013) Channel 4, 11.05pm ★★★☆☆ In this film based on true events, Mark Wahlberg gives a strong performance as sniper Marcus Luttrell, who, in 2005, was the head of a four-man team of Navy Seals, tasked with killing Taliban leader Ahmed Shah. An encounter with some goatherds gives the team a major moral dilemma. The film, directed by Peter Berg, is hampered by a lack of character exploration but it’s certainly action-packed. Albert Nobbs (2011) BBC Two, 11.35pm ★★★☆☆ Glenn Close toiled for 30 years to make an Albert Nobbs film after playing the part in a 1982 off-Broadway play. Close inhabits the role, of a woman disguised as a man to work as a waiter in a 19th-century hotel, with uncanny accuracy (she was rewarded with an Oscar nomination). The film reaches for something to say about sexual identity, but neither Close nor director Rodrigo García seem to know what it is. Sunday 26 November Ring of fire: Xand van Tulleken Credit: BBC Expedition Volcano BBC Two, 9.00pm As is the wont of BBC documentaries about the natural world these days, the impact of humans can no longer be ignored – in fact, it’s central to the premise of this new two-parter in which geologist Chris Jackson and humanitarian doctor Xand van Tulleken journey to live volcanoes and the communities that live in their shadow. Nyiragongo, in the Congo, last erupted in 2002, causing a mass evacuation of the nearby city of Goma, terrible loss of life and wholesale destruction of property. The pair’s expedition examines ways to predict its behaviour, especially since another eruption is almost inevitable. Van Tulleken focuses on disease prevention and healthcare, looking at how to avoid the spread of cholera that proved so catastrophic 15 years ago, while Jackson drops into the crater (the staggering camerawork and pounding soundtrack leave you in no doubt as to the potential peril of the venture) to assess the latest techniques for detecting sulphur dioxide and geological vibrations. By the end, problems have been diagnosed and solutions prescribed – it’s an admirable project whose success can only be judged, grimly, in the event of another disaster. Next week, they head to nearby Nyamuragira. Gabriel Tate Formula 1: Abu Dhabi Grand Prix Channel 4, noon & Sky Sports F1, 12.30pm He may have already been crowned champion but that didn’t stop Lewis Hamilton putting in a fine display in Brazil, starting in the pit lane under flawless Brazilian skies and finishing a mere five seconds adrift of winner Sebastian Vettel. Let’s hope for a similarly exciting spectacle at the Yas Marina Circuit, as the curtain comes down on the 2017 season. Blue Planet II BBC One, 8.00pm Every episode of this mesmerising series brings with it new wonders. This week’s venture into underwater forests, meadows and mangroves sniffs out creatures with unlikely names (the Pyjama Shark, the Garibaldi Damselfish) and even more outlandish strategies for survival. Coastal Railways with Julie Walters Channel 4, 8.00pm It might be hard to see what Julie Walters can bring to this well-worn travelogue approach, despite all her charisma and appeal. But there is plenty to enjoy in her tour of the British Isles – tonight, she boards the “Harry Potter” train in the Highlands, guts herring and wrangles cattle. Howards End BBC One, 9.00pm Kenneth Lonergan’s restrained, affecting adaptation reachesa crunch point in relations between Margaret (Hayley Atwell) and Henry (Matthew Macfadyen), driving a wedge between their two families; with the Basts approaching penury, a showdown looms. Guy Martin vs the Robocar Channel 4, 9.00pm Always up for a challenge, Guy Martin builds his own robotic Ford Transit to take on a “Roboracer” around Silverstone. But first he picks up a few tips from a “Level Five” autonomous vehicle in Budapest and Tesla’s latest models in Massachusetts. GT Babylon Berlin Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm and 10.00pm With every one of the €40 million budget up on screen, this adaptation of Volker Kutscher’s Thirties-set policiers is one of the most handsome dramas of the year – and one of the most gripping. The first season reaches its climax with Lotte (Liv Lisa Fries) having a point to prove and Gereon (Volker Bruch) dealing both with ghosts from the past and chilling hints at what the future holds. Season two begins next week. Naples ’44: a Wartime Diary BBC Four, 11.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch narrates this gripping and cleverly structured Italian film, which blends archive footage, documentary and drama to tell the story of a city and its resilient citizens through the eyes of British officer Norman Lewis. Some of the imagery is powerful indeed (one sequence of cows being milked in the rubble of the city has a pungent surrealism) and the pacifist message is ultimately undeniable. GT Stalingrad (1994) History, 3.00pm ★★★☆☆ Joseph Vilsmaier’s film reconstructs the 1942 Siege of Stalingrad, in which Soviet forces successfully held back the German army. The battle proved to be a major turning point in the Second World War and claimed millions of lives – a point that the film rests on, showing the horrors of modern warfare in all its stomach-churning brutality. Dominique Horwitz and Thomas Kretschmann star as German soldiers. Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day (2014) BBC Two, 6.45pm ★★★☆☆ Steve Carell has become a dab hand at making public embarrassment ridiculous and borderline tragic, and saves the day in this slight but entertaining comedy. Alexander (Ed Oxenbould), blows out a candle for his 12th birthday and initiates this fateful curse so that his family understand how it feels to have a purely maddening 24 hours. Fury (2014) Channel 5, 9.00pm ★★★★☆ David Ayer’s study of the habits and habitats of the American killer male is an astonishing drama. It’s Germany 1945, and Sgt Don “Wardaddy” Collie (Brad Pitt) and his team are grinding towards Berlin in a battered tank. There is no rescue mission, just an agonising rumble from one brush with death to the next. The set pieces are gripping, and the terror of war is blasted home. Monday 27 November Right to work: Tourette’s sufferer Ryan Credit: BBC Employable Me BBC Two, 9.00pm This moving series, which follows jobseekers determined to show that their disabilities shouldn’t prevent them working, returns for a new four-part run. There’s a persuasive double purpose to the programme – to highlight the disabilities themselves and to explore how those living with them fight against prejudice every day. The opening episode showcases a wonderfully inspirational duo. We meet 52-year-old Andy, who was once the go-getting manager of a successful motorcycle business. Despite being left partially paralysed and struggling with speech after a life-threatening stroke, Andy wants to break into public speaking and motivate others with his story. Alongside him is turtle-mad Tourette’s sufferer Ryan, whose severe tics can leave him physically debilitated, but who nevertheless dreams of working with animals. The pair’s will to succeed is humbling as they tackle longed-for job opportunities and the significant hurdles this entails. Helping them on the way is psychologist Nancy Doyle, who runs a pioneering scheme aimed at getting our hopefuls to promote their talents and for recruiters to see their considerable worth. Toby Dantzic Chinese Burn BBC Three, from 10.00am This comedy pilot, executive-produced by Ash Atalla (People Just Do Nothing), about three girls from China trying to make new lives in London is worth watching. Flatmates Elizabeth (Shin-Fei Chen), who’s chasing her dream job as a sommelier, and fiery struggling actress Jackie (Yennis Cheung) get a surprise visit from Elizabeth’s ultra-rich friend FuFu (Yuyu Rau). She’s an unwelcome guest, however, as Elizabeth hasn’t been honest with her parents. Lost and Found Channel 4, 3.00pm Heartstrings are shamelessly tugged in this new series, which follows the sterling work of the Dogs Trust charity. The pooches featured in this episode include Ida, a Staffordshire Bull Terrier that needs regular hydrotherapy, and a Labrador that has been missing for four days. Paul Hollywood: A Baker’s Life Channel 4, 8.00pm Paul Hollywood fronts this new four-part series which combines personal anecdotes with his favourite recipes. The opening episode serves up footage of the gimlet-eyed bread expert’s original Great British Bake Off audition, along with a menu of his ultimate pizza and a Madeira celebration cake. Nigella: At My Table BBC Two, 8.30pm Here’s another eclectic selection of dishes from television’s glossiest gourmet. Her recipes include an intriguingly titled golden egg curry, and a feast of spiced lamb kofta followed by rose and pepper pavlova. Supershoppers Channel 4, 8.30pm The savvy consumer advice show returns with presenter Anna Richardson and newcomer Sabrina Grant investigating whether supermarkets’ standard own-label ranges are really any different to their cheaper value ranges. Beauty wipes and car insurance also get the once over. TD Last Men In Aleppo: Storyville BBC Four, 10.00pm This grim but absorbing documentary follows the work of the White Helmets, Syrian civilians who conduct search-and-rescue missions in the city of Aleppo. We follow a trio of volunteers that includes Khaled, who moves between scouring for missing people and searching out medicine for his malnourished daughter. The director Feras Fayyad’s stark camera style takes an unflinching approach to the horror. TD Die Another Day (2002) ITV4, 9.00pm ★★★☆☆ Pierce Brosnan’s last outing as James Bond is also his least satisfying (although even Sean Connery might have struggled to look cool driving an invisible car). Dastardly Gustav Graves (Toby Stephens) wants to provoke a war between the Koreas using a military satellite. Bond, aided by Halle Berry and Rosamund Pike, must stop him. It’s all let down by an over-reliance on CGI, but there are some great set pieces. Escobar: Paradise Lost (2014) Sky Cinema Premiere, 11.25pm ★★★☆☆ A thundering performance by Benicio del Toro almost redeems this misjudged biopic of the Colombian crime lord. Seizing on the role with understated relish, he teeters adroitly between generous family man and murdering manipulator. What a shame, then, that he’s used so sparingly – the film renders the tyrant nothing more than a supporting character. The Road (2009) ITV4, 11.45pm ★★★☆☆ John Hillcoat’s adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s exalted novel is as harrowing as its source material. Stunning landscape photography sets the melancholy mood as a man (Viggo Mortensen) and his son (the superb Kodi Smit-McPhee) wander the American wasteland after an ecological disaster. Meanwhile, Nick Cave’s wrenching score makes it a wholly chilling experience. Tuesday 28 November The rise of AI: robot Jess helps families with life’s challenges Credit: Channel 4 The Robot Will See You Now Channel 4, 10.00pm The Rise of the Robots season continues with this documentary exploring whether robots will ever be sophisticated enough to play the role of best friend and confidant, or even therapist, to humans. Some forms of artificial intelligence, such as Amazon’s Alexa, are becoming more commonly involved in our home lives; cars are almost at the point where they drive themselves; and trials are afoot to test whether software can be used to perform medical and legal functions. A companionship robot has also been developed to keep astronauts’ spirits up during lengthy periods on the International Space Station. That’s all a long way from being able to substitute the life experience, and emotional, ethical and psychological support, for which we turn to friends, family, religion and counsellors. But maybe not for long. This intriguing film focuses on a team from Manchester and Plymouth Universities racing to develop a humanoid robot called Jess, that uses AI-based analysis to offer counselling on problems to do with marriage, divorce, infidelity and other day-to-day traumas – with built-in sympathy and tissue dispenser, no doubt. Gerard O’Donovan Glitch Netflix, from today This Aussie drama about a lakeside town where the dead start coming back to life bore too great a resemblance to French chiller The Returned in its early stages, but it eventually took a different supernatural path with reasonable success. The second series kicks off with last season’s closing shock revelation still hanging in the air: Elisha (Genevieve O’Reilly), the medic who’s been helping the undead, has been one of them herself, all along. How to Spend It Well at Christmas with Phillip Schofield ITV, 8.00pm This festive consumer series sees Phillip Schofield inviting celebrity guests to test and taste the “must have” food, drink and gift items of the season. This week, they look at the hottest toys of 2017 and how Father Christmas can get hold of them. The A Word BBC One, 9.00pm Rebecca (Molly Wright) packs her parents off on a much-needed mini-break and drafts in Eddie (Greg McHugh) and Nicola (Vinette Robinson) to help care for seven-year-old Joe (Max Vento). Unsurprisingly, things don’t go entirely according to plan. MasterChef: The Professionals BBC Two, 9.00pm The standard has been unusually high this year and this week’s six nervous new candidates prove especially inventive in the signature round and a challenge to come up with a new take on flavoursome, filled pasta with an accompanying sauce. Grand Designs: House of the Year Channel 4, 9.00pm Which of the shortlisted super-dwellings will win the Riba prize for 2017’s House of the Year? Kevin McCloud can only announce the winner once the last two finalists have been chosen – from the predictably stunning nominees in the Minimalist and Modern category. GO Passions: Samuel Coleridge-Taylor by Chi-Chi Nwanoku Sky Arts, 9.00pm Bassist Chi-Chi Nwanoku is the founder of Europe’s first black and ethnic minority classical orchestra. So, unsurprisingly, it’s not the poet (that’s Samuel Taylor Coleridge, silly) she chooses as her hero but the similarly named mixed-race British composer born 100 years later, in a film praising black musicians who’ve overcome prejudice to succeed in the conservative world of classical music. GO Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (2016) Sky Cinema Superheroes, 5.50pm ★★★☆☆ Tim Burton’s Edwardian fairy tale, based on the first Miss Peregrine book by Ransom Riggs – feels oddly conventional. Adapted by Jane Goldman (Kick-Ass), it’s a tale of an insular Florida lad, Jake Portman (Asa Butterfield), who visits an orphanage that figured in tales spun by his grandfather (Terence Stamp). Mars Attacks! (1996) ITV4, 10.50pm ★★★★☆ It may not be director Tim Burton’s best film but this surreal sci-fi comedy is still fun. The glitzy cast, including Jack Nicholson, Pierce Brosnan, Glenn Close and Sarah Jessica Parker, put on their best camp performances to fight seemingly peaceful Martians, who in fact want to destroy Big Ben, the Eiffel Tower and the Taj Mahal all in the name of a good time. It’s a loving parody of Fifties’ science-fiction cinema. Runaway Train (1985) Movies4Men, 10.50pm ★★★☆☆ Jon Voight and Eric Roberts (both Oscar-nominated) star as a pair of convicts, whose dash for freedom from an Alaskan prison takes an unexpected turn when they find themselves on an out-of-control train. The officers on their heels are caught between stopping it and reclaiming the criminals. It’s all a bit ridiculous, but Voight brings an appealing manic energy to a fun premise. Rebecca De Mornay co-stars. Wednesday 29 November Ferrying around: those who work on the busy English Channel Credit: Channel 4 The Channel: The World’s Busiest Waterway Channel 4, 9.00pm Drunk passengers, frazzled families, fundraisers swimming in testing conditions, enormous ships trying to squeeze through a narrow body of water: it’s all in a day’s workfor those who police the waters of the English Channel, as this new documentary series makes clear. Filmed last summer and with a heavy focus on the many changes that Brexit may bring to the Channel crossing, this opening episode concentrates largely on life on the ferries. “We’re already down on passengers and spending from last year,” notes one employee, pointing out that the collapse of the pound against the euro means that holidaymakers are less inclined to splash their cash. It’s not all doom and gloom, however, as we also follow a determined single mother who plans to swim the Channel to raise money and awareness of sickle cell disease, which both her sons have. Elsewhere, there are interesting statistics about the sheer numbers making the crossing – up to 400 ships passing through the 21-mile-wide Dover Strait each day – and captain Mark Miller and his crew have to deal with both a paralytic passenger and the tour company who intend to leave him behind. Sarah Hughes The Marvellous Mrs Maisel Amazon Prime Video, from today Gilmore Girls creator Amy Sherman-Palladino returns with this effervescent tale set in Fifties New York. Our heroine is Miriam Maisel (Rachel Brosnahan). On the surface she’s the perfect Jewish American Princess but underneath beats the soul of an acid-tongued comedian. Sherman-Palladino is clearly playing homage to the trailblazing likes of Joan Rivers and Phyllis Diller but her story still feels fresh thanks to a sharp script and Brosnahan’s wonderful timing. Mary Berry’s Country House Secrets BBC One, 8.00pm Mary Berry continues her trawl through some of the UK’s grandest country houses. This week she’s in Scotland helping the inhabitants of Scone Palace, Lord and Lady Mansfield, prepare for dinner and a ceilidh while fitting in a bit of deer stalking and salmon fishing on the side. Peaky Blinders BBC Two, 9.00pm Steven Knight’s gangster drama is firing on all cylinders this series and never more so than in a tight, tense third episode which sees Polly (Helen McCrory) re-join the company and Arthur (the excellent Paul Anderson) wrestle with both his guilt and his God following John’s death. Digging for Britain BBC Four, 9.00pm “Archaeology is adding flesh to the bare bones of people” announces Professor Alice Roberts as the second part of this series digging deep into Britain’s past heads to Kent. There we spend time following the excavation of the wreck of East India Company ship, the Rooswijk, before uncovering early evidence of Julius Caesar’s invasion of Britain in the shape of an ancient fort. SH Wallis: The Queen That Never Was Channel 5, 9.00pm Georgina Rich is the latest actress to play Wallis Simpson in this meld of drama and documentary. It’s not a format that ever works particularly well but, beyond the enactments, a complex portrait of the Duchess of Windsor emerges and one which sheds fresh light on the true nature of her marriages. How to Build a Robot Channel 4, 10.35pm David Tennant narrates this entertaining documentary focusing on Canadian robot inventor and puppeteer David McGoran. McGoran’s aim is to invent a robot that can truly interact with humans. SH The Riot Club (2014) Film4, 9.00pm ★★★☆☆ Laura Wade’s 2010 play, Posh, dealt with a still-reported habit of trashing dining establishments by Oxford University’s notorious Bullingdon Club. It reaches the screen as The Riot Club, starring a braying gang of silverspoon-reared Brits. The pungency of the play has been diluted, along with its political bite, but Holliday Grainger, Max Irons and Sam Claflin are perfectly cast in the main roles. Bronson (2008) London Live, 10.00pm ★★★☆☆ A gripping character study of “Britain’s most notorious long-term prisoner”, Charles Bronson (who has recently wed), whose bloody bare-knuckle brawls have seen him moved from prison to prison 120 times. Tom Hardy (who now seems to specialise in complex, muscle-bound brawlers – Mad Max: Fury Road, Legend, Taboo) ramps it up with disturbing intensity to delve inside the mind of the tormented personality. Life As We Know It (2010) 5STAR, 11.00pm ★★★☆☆ Katherine Heigl and Josh Duhamel star in this shrill domestic nightmare in which they raise their orphaned godchild. Heigl once again plays a beautifully groomed control freak, while Duhamel’s Messer – a philandering man-child – repeatedly lives up to his name. When they get together, it feels like something to do with careers, contracts and romcom necessity; nothing to do with life. Thursday 30 November Pushing the boat out: Prunella Scales and Timothy West Credit: Channel 4 Great Canal Journeys Channel 4, 8.00pm When they embarked on the first series of Great Canal Journeys in 2014, it’s doubtful whether Timothy West or Prunella Scales could have foreseen its longevity, in part given the niche material and also because of Scales’s advancing Alzheimer’s disease. Yet here they are, heading through Portugal for the first instalment in this eighth series, never passing up the opportunity to draw comparisons between long marriages and vintage fortified wines. It is another hour of gentle insights and pure, unaffected charm. Their journey takes them from a river port 100 miles inland through to Porto along the Rio Douro, via several vineyards and, slightly less predictably, examples of ancient rock art and Europe’s deepest lock. Throughout is evidence of why Portugal remains England’s oldest ally (Brits are heavily involved in the contemporary port industry) and, more significantly, of a relationship of a strength and mutual affection to which we can all aspire. Scales credits her husband with “opening up the world”. For West’s part, he reckons that “she likes being with me and I like being with her. That’s the best we can hope for, and very nice too.” Gabriel Tate PGA Tour Golf: The Hero World Challenge Sky Sports Main Event, 6.30pm It’s the opening day at the Albany Resort in the Bahamas, where Japan’s Hideki Matsuyama is the reigning champion. Discovering: Richard Widmark Sky Arts, 8.00pm Always more than a mere journeyman but never quite leading man material either, Richard Widmark was one of Hollywood’s most consistent talents, his work spanning classic noirs (Panic in the Streets), westerns (Two Rode Together) and thrillers (Coma). Journalists and critics assemble to pay tribute in another breezy, concise profile. The Farthest: Voyager’s Interstellar Journey: Storyville BBC Four, 8.55pm The space programme perhaps best represents the dazzling possibilities of the human brain and our capacity to imagine. This characteristically excellent and absorbing Storyville celebrates the scientific achievements of the Voyager probes through those that planned, made and continue to monitor them as they leave our solar system for interstellar space. Their enthusiasm is undiminished and infectious. GT Blitz: the Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm This affecting series investigates the repercussions of a German bomb that destroyed two houses in Hull. The personal traumas were of course profound, but a series of essays written by the city’s children in 1941 also unwittingly encouraged Britain’s controversial urban bombing strategies later in the war. Trump: an American Dream Channel 4, 9.00pm This enthralling series concludes with the future President rediscovering his mojo thanks to the influence of a new wife and advisors, before a combination of reality television and social media open an unlikely route to the White House. Live at the Apollo BBC Two, 10.00pm A fine line-up launch a new run for the hardy stand-up perennial from Hammersmith, with quickfire Gary Delaney and rising Scottish comic Larry Dean on the agenda, introduced by Sara Pascoe. The Sex Robots Are Coming Channel 4, 10.00pm Nick Sweeney’s unsettling documentary follows the creation of Harmony, a prototype sexbot, and James, a potential purchaser. What do these technological advances mean for human relationships and the ever-present issue of objectification? GT Airplane II: The Sequel (1982) Film4, 7.15pm ★★★☆☆ The furiously funny, and startling originality of disaster parody Airplane! makes this sequel, which is set in the future and takes place on a lunar shuttle, stick out like a sore thumb, especially since the original team had no involvement. There are some amusing spoofs of Rocky and E.T., but the jokes tread familiar ground. Cameos come from Raymond Burr and William Shatner. Cliffhanger (1993) Universal Channel, 9.00pm ★★★☆☆ Living up to its title, Cliffhanger is a rollicking rollercoaster of a film. It stars Sylvester Stallone as a hotshot mountain climber, who becomes embroiled in a heist, along with Janine Turner. Set in the Rocky Mountains and featuring some stupendous stunts, it may be big-budget nonsense – but it’s entertaining big-budget nonsense with zesty lines and exhilarating cinematography. Get Him to the Greek (2010) Comedy Central, 10.00pm ★★★☆☆ Russell Brand plays himself (very well), thinly disguised as washed-up British rocker Aldous Snow who, desperate for a career revival, is called upon for a one-night show at LA venue The Greek. Despite trying too hard to shock, Brand’s famously crude humour lends this potentially humdrum American bromance some eccentricity and makes it, at times, a raucous comedy. Friday 1 December Life Thru a Lens: Robbie Williams is one of Norton’s guests Credit: Getty The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm Graham Norton remains the best chat show host on British television, even if one or two of his line-ups this season have failed to generate much in the way of sparks. (The recent edition featuring only the cast of Ken Branagh’s new Agatha Christie movie Murder on the Orient Express could have been bottled and sold as a soporific, despite all of the star names on display.) Happily that’s unlikely to be a problem here as most of his guests are blessed with some of the biggest and most-often utilised mouths in showbiz. Elton John is on hand to promote his latest greatest hits collection, and will perhaps have plenty to say about ITV’s recent poll of the British public’s 20 favourite songs from his rather extensive back catalogue. Stephen Fry will doubtless be as mesmerising as ever as he discusses his new book on Greek mythology; and Robbie Williams might make some noise about his new album, Under the Radar Volume 2, and upcoming Heavy Entertainment tour. All in all, you have to wonder how demure actress Carey Mulligan will manage to get a word in edgeways on the subject of her terrific new Netflix film Mudbound, although we’re confident she will. Gerard O’Donovan Dark Netflix, from today “The question is not where, or who, or how…but when?” This creepy time-bending thriller, about the disappearance of two German boys over a 30-year interval, plays with the idea of how fractured relationships repeat time and again. Voyeur Netflix, from today This controversial documentary explores one of veteran US writer Gay Talese’s most sensational pieces of “literary journalism”, The Voyeur’s Motel. It told the story of how, in the Eighties, Gerald Foos opened a motel supposedly for the sole purpose of peeping on guests. But how much of the tale was made up? Sounds Like Friday Night BBC One, 7.30pm Singer Rita Ora joins regular presenters Greg James and Dotty as guest host at the BBC’s White City studios to introduce, among others, Brighton rock duo Royal Blood. Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV, UTV or Wales In the series’ finale Mears ends his epic journey in the ancient Walpole Forest, a vast swathe of primordial wilderness in Western Australia. He’s in search of the forest’s famed giant tingle and karri trees but the smaller denizens – such as the elusive quokka – are just as amazing. Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Jamie Oliver and Jimmy Doherty’s pier-end café goes fully vegetarian in honour of guest Joanna Lumley, who revives the tastes of her childhood by cooking the King of Malaysia’s favourite dish. Meanwhile, the childhood friends go on the road to champion British fava beans, and Doherty designs a vertical vegetable patch – perfect for the high-rise balcony. Britain’s Greatest Bridges Channel 5, 8.00pm The series concludes with the story of the feat of engineering that is the mile-long Severn Bridge and how its designer Bill Brown revolutionised modern bridge design with its aerodynamic box girder deck. GO Truth Tellers at the BBC BBC Four, 11.00pm Friday night is music night on BBC Four, and this new archive series adds depth to its line-up by showcasing clips of the most lyrically gifted songwriters to have performed on the BBC. These include Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell and Patti Smith. GO The King’s Speech (2010) More4, 9.00pm ★★★★☆ Tom Hooper’s film about the future George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer in the nation’s hour of need won multiple Oscars, including a deserved Best Actor gong for Colin Firth. But it’s his double-act with Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist Lionel Logue that gives the film its heart, and the double-handers between them are fraught and fascinating. Helena Bonham Carter is perhaps underused as the Duchess of York. Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (2008) ITV4, 11.40pm ★★★☆☆ This is Tim Burton’s adaptation of Stephen Sondheim’s 1979 musical about the demon barber of Fleet Street. Johnny Depp plays Benjamin Barker, a revenge artist who wields his razors with merry abandon in 19th-century London with the help of the deliciously sinister Mrs Lovett (Helena Bonham Carter). Alan Rickman plays the deplorable Judge Turpin. Wild (2014) Channel 4, 12.10am ★★★★☆ The Pacific Crest Trail, which runs up the entire western spine of the United States, is a challenge of fabled arduousness and rugged beauty. In 1995, aged 26, Cheryl Strayed (played by a superb Reese Witherspoon) walked it, to get clearance in her head after a decade of loss and personal meltdown. Wild powerfully reveals Strayed’s terrors and pleasures as she forges ahead on the journey. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Wales' head coach Warren Gatland watches his players during a warm-up ahead of their rugby union Test match against Georgia, at Principality stadium in Cardiff, on November 18, 2017
Wales' head coach Warren Gatland watches his players during a warm-up ahead of their rugby union Test match against Georgia, at Principality stadium in Cardiff, on November 18, 2017
Wales' head coach Warren Gatland watches his players during a warm-up ahead of their rugby union Test match against Georgia, at Principality stadium in Cardiff, on November 18, 2017
Wales' head coach Warren Gatland watches his players during a warm-up ahead of their rugby union Test match against Georgia, at Principality stadium in Cardiff, on November 18, 2017
Wales' head coach Warren Gatland watches his players during a warm-up ahead of their rugby union Test match against Georgia, at Principality stadium in Cardiff, on November 18, 2017
Wales' head coach Warren Gatland watches his players during a warm-up ahead of their rugby union Test match against Georgia, at Principality stadium in Cardiff, on November 18, 2017
Wales' head coach Warren Gatland watches his players during a warm-up ahead of their rugby union Test match against Georgia, at Principality stadium in Cardiff, on November 18, 2017 (AFP Photo/Geoff CADDICK)
Wales' head coach Warren Gatland watches his players during a warm-up ahead of their rugby union Test match against Georgia, at Principality stadium in Cardiff, on November 18, 2017
Wales' head coach Warren Gatland watches his players during a warm-up ahead of their rugby union Test match against Georgia, at Principality stadium in Cardiff, on November 18, 2017 (AFP Photo/Geoff CADDICK)
Wales' head coach Warren Gatland looks on before the international rugby union test match against Georgia at Principality stadium in Cardiff November 18, 2017 (AFP Photo/Geoff CADDICK)
Wales' head coach Warren Gatland looks on before the international rugby union test match against Georgia at Principality stadium in Cardiff November 18, 2017
Wales' head coach Warren Gatland looks on before the international rugby union test match against Georgia at Principality stadium in Cardiff November 18, 2017 (AFP Photo/Geoff CADDICK)
Wales' head coach Warren Gatland looks on before the international rugby union test match against Georgia at Principality stadium in Cardiff November 18, 2017