Georgia RU

Georgia slideshow

Saturday 9 June Germaine Bloody Greer BBC Two, 9.00pm The personal views of Germaine Greer once had a universality and pungency about them that the world so desperately needed. But her recent comments about rape, violence on TV and transpeople, by contrast, resemble self-important trolling: wilfully controversial, dreadfully retrograde and a blight on a considerable legacy. This thrilling profile is a reminder of why she still matters, albeit perhaps more for what she was than what she has become. Novelist Zoë Heller and journalist Rosie Boycott are among those singing her praises, while Greer herself proves as unable as ever to avoid calling out a daft question or savaging a sacred cow. The footage is exciting and superbly mounted by director Clare Beavan. Whether it’s Greer’s early films, her steadfastness in the face of the abuse sent her way after The Female Eunuch was published, and her evisceration of Norman Mailer during a famous 1971 set-to in New York, Greer remains a most rugged individual. “I don’t think Germaine and the word ‘sisterhood’ are natural bedfellows,” reckons Boycott. What about that legacy? “I don’t do regret and I don’t do things that I regret,” Greer concludes. By any standards, a remarkable life. Gabriel Tate Trooping the Colour BBC One, 10.30am Marking the official birthday of the Queen, the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards will conduct their annual pageant on Horse Guards Parade, introduced by Huw Edwards and with J J Chalmers offering behind-the-scenes insights. There are highlights at 7.30pm on BBC Two. French Open Tennis: The women’s final ITV, 1.30pm Action on the 14th day at Roland Garros features the women’s singles final in the second Grand Slam tournament of the year. Jelena Ostapenko met Simona Halep in last year’s showpiece match, where the Latvian defeated the number three seed 4-6, 6-4, 6-3 to become the first person from her country to win a Grand Slam tournament and the first unseeded player to win the French Open since 1933. The men’s final, which was won for a record 10th time by Spaniard Rafael Nadal last year, takes place on Sunday at 1.30pm on ITV. Women’s International One-Day Cricket: England Women v South Africa Women Sky Sports Main Event, 1.30pm It’s the opening one-day international of the three-match series, which takes place at New Road in Worcester. Katherine Brunt, Georgia Elwiss, Laura Marsh, Sarah Taylor and Lauren Winfield all return to the England squad after missing out on the Indian tour. World Cup-winning duo Fran Wilson and Alex Hartley miss out, however. International Rugby Union: South Africa v England Sky Sports Main Event, 3.00pm This afternoon England will be looking to dispatch the Springboks at a venue Eddie Jones has described as the “spiritual home of rugby”. They’ve not won at Ellis Park in Johannesburg since 1972 – their only triumph at the venue – and their last appearance here was a 36-27 defeat under Stuart Lancaster in 2012. Ellis Park was the setting for the Springboks’ World Cup final victory over New Zealand in 1995 and one of the sport’s finest moments – Nelson Mandela handing Francois Pienaar the Webb Ellis Cup. “It will be hostile but it’s fantastic and I am so excited about it,” says Jones. “In world rugby who do you want to beat? The Springboks at Ellis Park.” Owen Farrell will captain England, while the hugely talented New Zealand-born flanker Brad Shields is expected to play a part for the visitors. The River Wye with Will Millard BBC Two, 5.30pm; Scotland, 2.45pm After deconstructing the exploration documentary in the fascinating and alarming My Year with the Tribe, explorer Will Millard is on slightly surer ground with this new series in which he journeys down the River Wye. He begins his journey with a search for the river’s source on the slopes of Plynlimon, before he has an encounter with an entrepreneurial local sheep farmer. Take Me Out: Over 50s Special ITV, 8.00pm Three “older gentlemen” (I’m sure host Paddy McGuinness will make plenty of gags here) face 30 single “Golden Girls”, including a former nun and an ex-partner of action hero Jason Statham, in this one-off special of the ever-popular dating show. Hidden BBC Four, 9.00pm After Hinterland and Keeping Faith comes the BBC’s latest Welsh language crime thriller. Hidden has a familiar set-up – the discovery of a young girl’s body in a disused quarry tears a small community apart – but Sian Reese-Williams and Sion Alun Davies as DIs Cadi John and Owen Vaughan area leading pair to reckon with, and the atmosphere of unease benefits hugely from the mountainous surroundings. Come Together: the Rise of the Festival Sky Arts, 9.00pm The line-up for this documentary would grace any festival, with Pete Townshend and Noel Gallagher among the interviewees explaining the evolution of the modern music festival from its earliest jazz and blues incarnations in Newport, through the hippy beanfeasts of Monterey and Woodstock to Glastonbury and Coachella. There are also contributions from those who promote and document festivals, including Michael Eavis and D A Pennebaker. GT A Girl’s Guide to TV BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI Comedian Rachel Parris of The Mash Report presents her typically tongue-in-cheek advice for women looking to get ahead in television. GT Maleficent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 6.05pm Angelina Jolie stars as the titular Maleficent in Disney’s live-action reimagining of Sleeping Beauty, which follows her from a carefree fairy to Mistress of All Evil, muddling the distinction between hero and villain. Maleficent is happy in a kingdom of peculiar CGI beasts until her heart is broken by Stefan (Sharlto Copley), who inherits the throne. Seeking vengeance, she curses his baby, Princess Aurora (Elle Fanning). Thor: The Dark World (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 10.35pm This is a follow-up to the popular Norse god/superhero blockbuster. The rather flabby plot is alleviated by Chris Hemsworth’s hearty charisma, which provides frequent relief from Natalie Portman’s bland damsel-in-distress (attempts to beef up her character by making her an astrophysicist are undermined by her constant fainting). Highlights include Thor sliding down The Gherkin skyscraper. Made in Dagenham (2010) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.45pm Industrial action in pursuit of equal pay for women doesn’t sound too thrilling a subject, but Nigel Cole’s (Calendar Girls) film, based around the real-life strike from 1968, turns out to be a rousing crowd-pleaser. Sally Hawkins plays the reluctant ringleader of the workers who sew car seats at Ford’s Dagenham plant; Bob Hoskins is a union rep; Miranda Richardson is wonderful as Labour MP Barbara Castle. Sunday 10 June Smoldering: Aidan Turner returns as the eponymous hero Credit: BBC Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Not since Daniel Craig emerged from the waves in Casino Royale has there been so much fuss over a pair of wet pecs. Yes, Poldark is back for a fourth series and star Aidan Turner bares his chest for the fans in an opening scene that, if nothing else, suggests that he’s spent a lot of time exercising since the end of series three. This opener finds our swashbuckling hero Ross Poldark (Turner) back in full-on Cornish crusader mode when, following a disturbance in Truro, he locks horns with old enemy George Warleggan (Jack Farthing) over the fate of three good pals accused of riot and murder. Meanwhile, his flame-haired wife Demelza (Eleanor Tomlinson) can’t fend off her intimate longings following that illicit clinch in the dunes with poetry-penning aristo Hugh Armitage (Josh Whitehouse) – who, with the announcement of a general election, looks set to be diverted into a career at Westminster. But as Dr Dwight (Luke Norris) is at pains to point out, Armitage has a delicate constitution that might not suit the rough and tumble of parliamentary politics. Could Ross be persuaded to think again about throwing his hat in the ring? Gerard O’Donovan One-Day International Cricket: Scotland v England Sky Sports Main Event, 10.30am Having responded brilliantly to tie the Test series with Pakistan 1-1, England now turn their attention to Scotland, with this ODI at the Grange in Edinburgh. Songs of Praise BBC One, 1.25pm A year on from the Grenfell Tower disaster, Aled Jones presents a commemorative special edition exploring how the local community in North Kensington is coping and recovering. Britain Celebrates Live: 100 Years of Women’s Votes BBC One, 2.00pm Live coverage of today’s public processions through Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh and London to celebrate the centenary of women winning the right to vote. Tonight’s Antiques Roadshow, at 8pm, also takes up the theme, devoting its time to items with links to remarkable women. Formula 1: Canadian Grand Prix Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm After a Monaco Grand Prix that left championship leader Lewis Hamilton, in his words, “cold”, all eyes are on the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal, where Daniel Riccardio will be aiming to win back-to-back races. Soccer Aid for Unicef 2018 ITV, 6.30pm Live from Old Trafford, it’s the annual England v World XI charity football match between teams mixing celebrities and professional athletes. This year Robbie Williams’s England is taking on a team of international stars led by Usain Bolt. Other players include Mo Farah, Gordon Ramsay, Olly Murs, and Eric Cantona, and there’s live music from Jessie Ware. Countryfile BBC One, 7.00pm The last of three specials heads for Sandringham in Norfolk, the most private of the Royal retreats. Matt Baker discovers one of the Queen’s less-known interests – racing pigeons – while Ellie Harrison learns more about her love of horses. GO Patrick Melrose Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch’s brilliantly judged bravura performance has been one of the television highlights of 2018. Tonight, he brings the series to an entertaining and emotionally charged close as Patrick, separated and back in London in 2006, hopes to put the past to rest following his mother’s funeral. Cosby: The Women Speak Sony Crime Channel, 9.00pm Following Bill Cosby’s conviction on three counts of aggravated indecent assault, here’s another opportunity to see the A&E network’s 2015 one-hour special in which the extent of the allegations against the former TV icon for predatory sexual behaviour came to light. Over a dozen of the 50-plus women who accused him of rape and sexual assault going back decades talk of their experiences on screen for the first time, and how statute of limitation laws threatened to deprive them of justice. GO Despicable Me 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 5.10pm Despicable Me, 2010’s animated supervillain comedy, had a neat enough premise. It’s gone in this sequel, though, as Steve Carell’s bald antihero, Gru, is now a reformed soul, occupied with childcare rather than dastardly plots to steal the moon. Gru’s Minions – those knee-high yellow Tic-Tacs – provide the film’s one inspired idea as they’re injected with mutating serum by the film’s mystery baddy. Hulk (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.15pm Ang Lee’s dark and stylised version (a split screen mimics the panels of a comic book page) of the Incredible Hulk’s adventures is one of the best and underrated Marvel adaptations, even if it’s too complex at times. Eric Bana stars as Bruce, a scientist who’s exposed to gamma radiation and becomes a not-so-jolly green giant. This is a rampaging tale with bold special effects. Jennifer Connolly co-stars as his love interest. It (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Stephen King’s evil clown tale is no laughing matter. First a Warners miniseries in 1990, starring an unforgettable Tim Curry, and now a two-part film version. Here we continue the terrifying tale of Pennywise (Bill Skarsgård), but jump forward three decades to the summer of 1988, buying into the current vogue for Eighties teen-flick nostalgia. The scary stuff is petrifying when it peaks. Monday 11 June Community spirit: those affected by the fire tell their stories Credit: BBC Grenfell BBC One, 8.30pm Bafta-winning director Ben Anthony’s unmissable documentary about last year’s Grenfell Tower tragedy opens with a sea of faces, all of which gain poignant individual focus as the film progresses. The blaze at the 24-storey block of public housing in the London borough of Kensington, which resulted in 72 deaths, left a lasting impression in those featured here as each person tells their unique story about the horrific events and their impact. Survivors who lost their homes, the bereaved, bystanders and police all share their stories, although it’s a surprising omission that the firefighters who witnessed the horrors first hand don’t offer their account. Split screens give multiple perspectives on the same moment, and what starts out as a patchwork of personal experience knits together into a mighty whole, the collective voice of a community broken but defiant. In fact, much of the film focuses on the efforts of those affected to unite in the face of seeming indifference from the local council, who also have their say. As the ongoing inquiry continues, this devastating account offers a damning testament of its own, rife with accusations of injustice and neglect, underpinned by blistering rage and grief. Toby Dantzic Fight Like a Girl BBC One, 7.30pm The ferocious sport of female wrestling comes under the spotlight with this lively film following Scottish fighter Kimberly Benson. She combines a gruelling training regime with her daytime job, as she aims for her first world title in Japan. Long Lost Family: What Happened Next ITV, 9.00pm Nicky Campbell and Davina McCall catch up with families they’ve reunited. Cathie Cutler Evans, who met her half-sister in 2016, has found joy in her extended clan. But for Maureen Charlton, separated from her brother Michael for 40 years, progress been painstaking. Dan Snow’s Norman Walks PBS America, 9.00pm Dan Snow sorts fact from fiction as he investigates the history of Norman Britain in this new series. He starts off on the Sussex coast, where aided by evidence from the Bayeux Tapestry, he pieces together William the Conqueror’s 11th-century coastal invasion. Flowers Channel 4, 10.00pm Will Sharpe’s gloriously dark comedy about a dysfunctional family returns with a double bill, then continues each night this week. A seemingly chipper Maurice (Julian Bennett) and Deborah (Olivia Colman) are on a caravanning holiday, while daughter Amy (Sophia di Martino) has a brash new girlfriend. Storyville: City Of Ghosts BBC Four, 10.30pm There are images of death in Matthew Heineman’s film so harrowing that it’s hard to keep watching, but these are the sights that Heineman’s subject, rebel group Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered, face daily. The renegade collective have made it their task to secretly film the atrocities committed by Isil in the Syrian city of Raqqa, and show the rest of the world the reality of the regime. It’s an astonishing act of citizen-led journalism, and the participants’ fear and grief, as well as their sense of purpose, are starkly captured in Heineman’s blunt and brutal chronicle of a city in turmoil. TD Prisons Uncovered: Out Of Control? ITV, 10.45pm; Scotland, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.15pm; not UTV In 2016, HMP Birmingham saw the worst prison riot for 25 years, in which 600 inmates were freed from their cells. This sobering documentary looks at the factors behind the incident and reflects on the prison system. TD Our Kind of Traitor (2016) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor stars in this so-so John le Carré adaptation as poetry lecturer Perry Makepeace, who becomes embroiled in negotiations to bring Dima (Stellan Skarsgård), a well-connected Russian oligarch, into the fold of British intelligence. Skarsgård is the standout here, charging into his role with pungency, playing Dima as a bedraggled beast of Moscow’s criminal underworld. The Shining (1980) ★★★★★ TCM, 9.00pm Set in a deserted hotel that’s in the care of writer Jack (Jack Nicholson) and his family for the winter, Stanley Kubrick’s brilliant psycho-horror, based on the novel by Stephen King, is subtly unsettling. But it’s stuffed, too, with unforgettable nerve-jangling shocks, including the moment when the crazed Jack smashes his way through a door with an axe as his wife (Shelley Duvall) cowers in the corner. Teen Wolf (1985) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 12.10am Critics howled at this preposterous teenage comedy but audiences loved it, perhaps because it came out shortly after its star Michael J Fox’s finest hour: Back to the Future. The plot – in which Fox’s likeable nerd morphs into a basketball-playing werewolf – is almost as unlikely as the fact that he still looked fresh out of the 11th grade at the ripe old age of 25. An unparalleled analysis of puberty and adolescence. Tuesday 12 June Hitting the books: Tanisha is a pupil at Townley Grammar Credit: BBC Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland & Wales, 11.15pm Jamie Pickup’s series has walked a tightrope with considerable skill, highlighting the inarguable inequities of our educational system that favours a selective approach, while also acknowledging its considerable benefits and observing the situation from the points of view of both pupils and teachers. It concludes with mock GCSE exams approaching and students at Erith School, a secondary modern, and neighbouring institution Townley Grammar, having to assess their suitability for further education. Some, it’s fair to say, are taking it more seriously than others. Townley pupil Tanisha is underperforming and low on confidence, yet keen to raise her game and nurtured by staff aware of her limitations and capabilities. At Erith, meanwhile, Denisa is angling for a place in Townley Sixth Form and seems more than capable of attaining it, but staffing shortages are crippling science classes amid an endless round of supply teachers and stand-ins. “It keeps me awake at night,” says the admirable faculty head Mr Appiah-Gates. It’s a desperately difficult situation and one that reaches an unexpected conclusion, as common ground is found between two unlikely bedfellows. Gabriel Tate The Champions Netflix, from today Created by Mindy Kaling, this new NBC sitcom plays a bachelor gym owner (Anders Holm) off against his gay, estranged son-cum-new flatmate (the brilliant J J Totah). Smartly written and nimbly performed, it’s a solid mainstream hit. Ackley Bridge Channel 4, 8.00pm Matt Evans and Penny Woolcock continue to keep an implausible number of plates spinning as the fizzy pre-watershed drama continues to conduct its handbrake narrative turns. Both Jordan (Samuel Bottomley) and Missy (Poppy Lee Friar) handle cash shortages in an equally desperate manner, and the arrival of Steve’s ex Claire (Kimberly Walsh) puts head teacher Mandy’s (Jo Joyner) nose out of joint. Our Girl BBC One, 9.00pm Georgie (Michelle Keegan) learns an astonishing secret about the local crime boss, before a major rescue operation begins as the flawed but well-meaning military drama continues. Flights from Hell: Caught on Camera ITV, 9.00pm ITV lays down its prime-time weapons as the World Cup looms, as demonstrated by this daft three-part series of incidents filmed at 30,000 feet. These include what an engine explosion feels like to those on board the plane to the impact of volcanic ash and an extraordinarily dramatic landing. Seeing Daylight: the Photography of Dorothy Bohm Sky Arts, 9.00pm Arriving in England in 1939 to escape the Nazis, Dorothy Bohm became a pioneer of street photography and portraiture of deep humanity. This profile examines her life and work. Elvis: the Searcher Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on Peter Guralnick’s epochal two-part biography, Thom Zimny’s HBO epic is a treat, focusing as much on Presley the man as Elvis the icon, Part one follows him out of Tupelo, into Sun Records and on to the US army, with part two’s fall, rise and fall again airing Wednesday at 10.00pm. GT Ugly Me: My Life with Body Dysmorphia BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm First shown on BBC Three, this harrowing film follows 29-year-old Liane, seeking treatment for the titular condition which has left her self-worth in tatters. GT Field of Dreams (1989) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.50pm Kevin Costner clearly likes a baseball movie – he’s made five of them. In this one he’s an Iowa farmer instructed by a mysterious voice to build a baseball pitch in the middle of a cornfield, which is soon occupied by a gang of ghostly players from the past. Enjoyably dotty, and responsible for the misquote, “If you build it, they will come” – it’s actually “he will come” – the fantasy is elevated by brilliant performances all around. A Good Day to Die Hard (2013) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The fifth film in the Die Hard franchise takes place in Russia, where our hero, Bruce Willis’s now grizzled John McClane, arrives in Moscow to hunt for his estranged son Jack (Jai Courtney). McClane suspects that he may have become a drug dealer, but it transpires he is in fact working undercover for the CIA, and Dad blunders in on him mid-mission. An enjoyable but clunky thriller. The Departed (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Nothing beats watching a great director in his comfort zone. Martin Scorsese’s gangland thriller – the film that finally won him an Oscar – is riveting. The plot revolves around the local police force’s efforts to stamp out Boston crime lord Frank Costello (a magnificently malevolent Jack Nicholson). There are powerhouse performances, too, from Leonardo Di Caprio, Matt Damon and Mark Wahlberg. Wednesday 13 June From Russia with love: David Dimbleby Credit: BBC Putin’s Russia with David Dimbleby BBC One, 9.00pm, Wales, 11.05pm “In a democracy if you fail to deliver on economic promises, if you surround yourself with cronies and use the law to suppress opposition, you would rightly be thrown out on your ear. But this is Russia, they do things differently here…” So begins David Dimbleby’s thoughtful film in which – as the eyes of the world turn towards Moscow for the 2018 World Cup football tournament – he takes the opportunity to cast an eye over Vladimir Putin’s 18 years as leader and assess the state of Russia today, especially in regard to the West. What he finds is a country in deep economic crisis yet with a people that seem to happily hero-worship Putin and mostly accept a state machine that controls almost every aspect of their lives with the willing assistance of security services, media, military and church. Dimbleby meets ordinary contented Russians as well as protesters, human rights lawyers, journalists and official spokespeople, coming away with a sense, ultimately, that Putin’s popularity is rooted in his strongman image and media-backed levels of suspicion and hostility towards the West unseen since the end of the Cold War. Gerard O’Donovan The Fight for Women’s Bodies BBC Three, from 10.00am Following the landmark vote to legalise abortion in the Republic of Ireland, Ellie Flynn looks back at the issues through the eyes of campaigners on both sides. Great Rail Restorations with Peter Snow Channel 4, 8.00pm Here is a visit to the Isle of Wight, where Peter Snow and his team set out to restore an 1864 wooden train carriage that has served as a holiday chalet since it was decommissioned in the Twenties. Before Grenfell: A Hidden History BBC Two, 9.00pm A year since the Grenfell Tower fire, residents of Kensington relate how the London borough has become the most unequal place in Britain, with the gap between rich and poor once again as extreme as in the 1860s when developers first built housing for the rich in Notting Hill next to the worst slum in London. Can Science Make Me Perfect? With Alice Roberts BBC Four, 9.00pm Millions of years have gone into the human body: lots of great evolutionary adaptations but lots of imperfections, too. In a film that’s as entertaining as it is instructive, anatomist Alice Roberts takes on a challenge to design a better body than the one we get at birth. The Fast Fix: Diabetes ITV, 9.00pm Anita Rani presents a new two-part series exploring whether it is possible for people suffering from type 2 diabetes to reverse the condition by adhering to a radical diet. By consuming just 800 calories a day, can they “fast themselves better”? Concludes tomorrow Big Beasts: Last of the Giants Sky One, 9.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee explores why size matters in the natural world. Beginning in the Americas, he checks out the planet’s largest predator, the sperm whale; comes face to face with a grizzly bear and gets rather too close to an anaconda that’s as long as a bus. GO How to Start an Airline Channel 4, 10.30pm This documentary follows Bangladeshi-British entrepreneur Kazi Shafiqur Rahman as he attempts to break into the fiercely competitive airline industry while also fulfilling the demands of his faith by insisting that the airline must comply with the teachings of Islam. GO Regarding Henry (1991) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 6.50pm Telling the story of a hotshot lawyer (Harrison Ford) who learns to question his values after a head injury, this film formed a companion piece to Wolf (1994), with Jack Nicholson as a publisher who is bitten by a wolf and turns into a boardroom predator. Directed by Mike Nichols, whose Oscar-winning movie The Graduate was a cinematic landmark of the 1960s, it’s a bit of an embarrassment, but interesting nevertheless. Source Code (2011) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal repeatedly finds himself reliving the last eight minutes in the life of a man on board a train which is about to be destroyed by a bomb as part of an experiment. Meanwhile, scientists Vera Farmiga and Jeffrey Wright are monitoring Gyllenhaal’s exploits. Duncan Jones confirmed the promise of his directing debut Moon with this thrilling whodunit, which also serves as a moving meditation on life. Beetlejuice (1988) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm Michael Keaton is an actor of rare versatility (as his triumphant role in Birdman proved). In this cult, Oscar-winning film by Tim Burton, Keaton shines as a con artist ghost called Beetlejuice, who aims to help two other ghosts (Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis) to scare the obnoxious new residents out of their old house. But he then falls for lovely goth Lydia (Winona Ryder), the family’s daughter. Thursday 14 June It’s kicking off: Mark Pugatch (centre) leads ITV’s presenting team Credit: ITV FIFA World Cup 2018: Opening Ceremony ITV, 2.30pm Regardless of how you think Russia got to be awarded the 21st staging of football’s biggest tournament (by corrupt means or otherwise), it’s time to cast those aspersions aside because the Russia 2018 championship is here. But, two hours before a ball is kicked, the opening ceremony marks the official start of the highest prize in football. And as we all know, entertaining opening ceremonies can be a great curtain-raiser for sport events, if they are done well – think the London 2012 Olympics. This one takes place at the 80,000-seat Luzhniki Stadium, which is the jewel in Russia’s crown of stadiums and will also host the final on July 15. Mark Pougatch presents the live coverage of the ceremony, which is headlined by actor and rapper Will Smith and Nicky Jam, who will perform Live It Up, the official World Cup song, which has received mixed reviews. As well as that, the ceremony will include local performers showing off different aspects of Russian culture, with gymnasts and trampolinists in among the fireworks and performances on display. The matches get under way following the ceremony with the host nation against Saudi Arabia. Clive Morgan Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm While the BBC’s post-Bake Off cookery contest may not have set the world alight, it’s given the judges plenty to get their teeth into. This week, it’s the final, and three challenges stand between the contestants and the title: a summer favourite, their best main course and a pudding. Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm After three weeks of cute animals, Springwatch comes to an end with Chris Packham, Michaela Strachan and co reliving this year’s best moments at Sherborne Park Estate. The Trouble with Women with Anne Robinson BBC One, 9.00pm As a journalist and TV presenter, Anne Robinson shattered the glass ceiling as she built her career. She imagined that now, 50 years later, we’d be much closer to achieving equality than we are. With the ongoing discussions about gender pay, Robinson asks women around the UK what’s preventing parity? Inside HM Prison Wormwood Scrubs Channel 5, 9.00pm Wormwood Scrubs has had some infamous inmates: from serial killers Ian Brady and Peter Sutcliffe to rockers Pete Docherty and Keith Richards. This documentary exploring the prison’s history tells the stories of a Soviet spy who escaped from the jail and its best-known inmate, Charles Bronson. CM Missions BBC Four, 10.00pm and 10.20pm The absorbing French sci-fi drama about the first manned mission to Mars concludes with its final double header. This week, psychiatrist Jeanne (Hélène Viviès) discovers the reason behind cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov’s (Arben Bajraktaraj) mission. I Am Evidence Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Even though Mariska Hargitay spent almost 20 years as crime fighter Olivia Benson in Law & Order: SVU, nothing prepared her for what she was to learn in real life. In this shocking documentary, Hargitay investigates the flaws in the US justice system that have allowed tens of thousands of rape kits to go untested for years. It’s a tough film to watch at times, especially as it highlights the issue through deeply personal and harrowing, first-person accounts from four women whose attacks are still fresh in their minds decades after the assaults due to a lack of closure. “I felt like my body was a crime scene,” one of the women recalls. CM Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby (2006) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm Will Ferrell fans will need little encouragement to lap up this affectionate send-up of Nascar racing, redneck culture and male bonding. Ferrell pays a Nascar speed-demon who is challenged by a gay, French Formula One driver (Sacha Baron Cohen), to see who is the ultimate racer. It’s a full throttle comedy that plays to Ferrell’s strengths. The Hills Have Eyes (2006) ★★★☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm French director Alexandre Aja makes his Hollywood debut with this grim but gripping remake of Wes Craven’s semi-cult horror film about a family battling a brood of mutants in the New Mexico desert. Aja ups the visceral violence, and the characters – including Ted Levine and Kathleen Quinlan as the parents – are sufficiently well-drawn to make the outcome shocking. The Ghost (2010) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor plays a talented ghost writer, who lands a lucrative contract to edit the memoirs of Adam Lang (Pierce Brosnan), the former UK Prime Minister, in this Roman Polanski adaptation of the Robert Harris novel. Soon after, Lang is accused of committing a war crime and the Ghost finds himself drawn into a world of dangerous secrets that put his life at risk. This is a deeply unsettling thriller. Friday 15 June One connected flow: Dan Jones on the Grand Union Canal Building Britain’s Canals Channel 5, 8.00pm His tattoos may have a nerdish medieval theme, but historian Dan Jones still seems too hip to be fronting a stuffy-sounding series about Britain’s iconic canals. Jones’s lively style and eye for interesting detail, however, keeps this subject surprisingly fresh, as he begins this three-part run with a look at the Grand Union Canal, the longest stretch of man-made waterway in Britain. It’s a story that reaches back 200 years, when the demands of the Industrial Revolution called for a speedy way to move goods between Birmingham and London, and the country’s engineering super-brains found ingenious means to link seven separate channels into one connected flow. As Jones explains, while the financial benefits were big, construction of the Grand Union was time consuming and dangerous. The 12-year stop-start struggle to complete the technically complex Blisworth Hill tunnel, for example, saw the deaths of up to 60 workers. Unable to compete with the advent of the speedy steam train, the Grand Union itself soon declined too. The canal is now a source of summertime pleasure, so this is a welcome reminder of its once vital purpose. Toby Dantzic Queer Eye Netflix, from today The success of this heart-warming makeover series, which returned to much acclaim earlier this year, was something of a surprise. Netflix then have been quick to capitalise, snappily rolling out another run barely four months later, with the likeable quintet all returning for more lifestyle revamping. Details are so far scant, but the show’s culture guru Karamo Brown has hinted that women and the trans community could be featured. World Cup 2018: Portugal v Spain BBC One, 6.20pm The pick of this week’s World Cup matches happens on day two at the Fisht Stadium in Sochi and comes from Group B. Expect a tense affair as Spain, who suffered the ignominy of failing to make it to the knockout rounds four years ago, take on their bitter rivals Portugal. The Crystal Maze: Celebrity Special Channel 4, 9.00pm Former footballer Dennis Wise heads the team of celebrity hopefuls, joined by Katie Price, Roman Kemp, Bez and Binky Felstead.Wise struggles with a fiendish skill game, while a number-based challenge sets Felstead’s head spinning. Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm Jane McDonald wraps up her Antipodean adventure in New Zealand’s North Island. She rubs noses with a Maori tribe in Napier, explores Rotorua’s dramatic geothermal landscapes and views Auckland’s skyline from a helicopter. Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.40pm This is a final bout of topical treats from veteran impressionist Tracey Ullman. Favourites Angela Merkel and Rupert Murdoch get a look in, alongside more takes on Jeremy Corbyn, Michael Gove and Nanny, the dedicated carer of Jacob Rees-Mogg. Africa: A Journey Into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm Apart from the occasional act on Later… with Jools Holland, world music doesn’t get much airtime on our TVs, so this beguiling series helmed by DJ Rita Ray offers a welcome insight into its traditions. For her final foray, Ray heads to Mali, home to more Grammy award-winning artists than any other African country. From her attempts at a sinuous wedding dance to meeting renowned harp player Toumani Diabaté, Ray’s journey is full of stirring encounters. TD Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 10.00pm A fitting reminder of Dale Winton’s easy-going charm, this swansong travelogue series resumes after a hiatus with our host in ocean-front Miami. Highlights include a trip to Little Havana, the city’s Cuban quarter, and a look at fashion designer Versace’s opulent former home. TD Blade Runner 2049 (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm In a similar but distinct way to Ridley Scott’s masterful original, Blade Runner 2049 mulls one of the meatiest questions around: is surface all that there is, or do life’s currents run deeper than the things we can see, hear and touch? Denis Villeneuve’s film toys with both options, making neither a comfort – and in the process, maps out a provocative blockbuster. Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford star. Red (2010) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. The Wolf of Wall Street (2013) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 11.40pm Soaked in sex, drugs and scandal, Martin Scorsese’s epic is based on the memoir of stockbroker Jordan Belfort, who spent the Nineties illegally amassing a vast personal fortune. With a fantastic performance from Leonardo DiCaprio, this morally bankrupt romp was lauded by audiences and critics alike. Jonah Hill and Margot Robbie co-star. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: Germaine Bloody Greer, Take Me Out: Over 50s Special and more
Saturday 9 June Germaine Bloody Greer BBC Two, 9.00pm The personal views of Germaine Greer once had a universality and pungency about them that the world so desperately needed. But her recent comments about rape, violence on TV and transpeople, by contrast, resemble self-important trolling: wilfully controversial, dreadfully retrograde and a blight on a considerable legacy. This thrilling profile is a reminder of why she still matters, albeit perhaps more for what she was than what she has become. Novelist Zoë Heller and journalist Rosie Boycott are among those singing her praises, while Greer herself proves as unable as ever to avoid calling out a daft question or savaging a sacred cow. The footage is exciting and superbly mounted by director Clare Beavan. Whether it’s Greer’s early films, her steadfastness in the face of the abuse sent her way after The Female Eunuch was published, and her evisceration of Norman Mailer during a famous 1971 set-to in New York, Greer remains a most rugged individual. “I don’t think Germaine and the word ‘sisterhood’ are natural bedfellows,” reckons Boycott. What about that legacy? “I don’t do regret and I don’t do things that I regret,” Greer concludes. By any standards, a remarkable life. Gabriel Tate Trooping the Colour BBC One, 10.30am Marking the official birthday of the Queen, the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards will conduct their annual pageant on Horse Guards Parade, introduced by Huw Edwards and with J J Chalmers offering behind-the-scenes insights. There are highlights at 7.30pm on BBC Two. French Open Tennis: The women’s final ITV, 1.30pm Action on the 14th day at Roland Garros features the women’s singles final in the second Grand Slam tournament of the year. Jelena Ostapenko met Simona Halep in last year’s showpiece match, where the Latvian defeated the number three seed 4-6, 6-4, 6-3 to become the first person from her country to win a Grand Slam tournament and the first unseeded player to win the French Open since 1933. The men’s final, which was won for a record 10th time by Spaniard Rafael Nadal last year, takes place on Sunday at 1.30pm on ITV. Women’s International One-Day Cricket: England Women v South Africa Women Sky Sports Main Event, 1.30pm It’s the opening one-day international of the three-match series, which takes place at New Road in Worcester. Katherine Brunt, Georgia Elwiss, Laura Marsh, Sarah Taylor and Lauren Winfield all return to the England squad after missing out on the Indian tour. World Cup-winning duo Fran Wilson and Alex Hartley miss out, however. International Rugby Union: South Africa v England Sky Sports Main Event, 3.00pm This afternoon England will be looking to dispatch the Springboks at a venue Eddie Jones has described as the “spiritual home of rugby”. They’ve not won at Ellis Park in Johannesburg since 1972 – their only triumph at the venue – and their last appearance here was a 36-27 defeat under Stuart Lancaster in 2012. Ellis Park was the setting for the Springboks’ World Cup final victory over New Zealand in 1995 and one of the sport’s finest moments – Nelson Mandela handing Francois Pienaar the Webb Ellis Cup. “It will be hostile but it’s fantastic and I am so excited about it,” says Jones. “In world rugby who do you want to beat? The Springboks at Ellis Park.” Owen Farrell will captain England, while the hugely talented New Zealand-born flanker Brad Shields is expected to play a part for the visitors. The River Wye with Will Millard BBC Two, 5.30pm; Scotland, 2.45pm After deconstructing the exploration documentary in the fascinating and alarming My Year with the Tribe, explorer Will Millard is on slightly surer ground with this new series in which he journeys down the River Wye. He begins his journey with a search for the river’s source on the slopes of Plynlimon, before he has an encounter with an entrepreneurial local sheep farmer. Take Me Out: Over 50s Special ITV, 8.00pm Three “older gentlemen” (I’m sure host Paddy McGuinness will make plenty of gags here) face 30 single “Golden Girls”, including a former nun and an ex-partner of action hero Jason Statham, in this one-off special of the ever-popular dating show. Hidden BBC Four, 9.00pm After Hinterland and Keeping Faith comes the BBC’s latest Welsh language crime thriller. Hidden has a familiar set-up – the discovery of a young girl’s body in a disused quarry tears a small community apart – but Sian Reese-Williams and Sion Alun Davies as DIs Cadi John and Owen Vaughan area leading pair to reckon with, and the atmosphere of unease benefits hugely from the mountainous surroundings. Come Together: the Rise of the Festival Sky Arts, 9.00pm The line-up for this documentary would grace any festival, with Pete Townshend and Noel Gallagher among the interviewees explaining the evolution of the modern music festival from its earliest jazz and blues incarnations in Newport, through the hippy beanfeasts of Monterey and Woodstock to Glastonbury and Coachella. There are also contributions from those who promote and document festivals, including Michael Eavis and D A Pennebaker. GT A Girl’s Guide to TV BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI Comedian Rachel Parris of The Mash Report presents her typically tongue-in-cheek advice for women looking to get ahead in television. GT Maleficent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 6.05pm Angelina Jolie stars as the titular Maleficent in Disney’s live-action reimagining of Sleeping Beauty, which follows her from a carefree fairy to Mistress of All Evil, muddling the distinction between hero and villain. Maleficent is happy in a kingdom of peculiar CGI beasts until her heart is broken by Stefan (Sharlto Copley), who inherits the throne. Seeking vengeance, she curses his baby, Princess Aurora (Elle Fanning). Thor: The Dark World (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 10.35pm This is a follow-up to the popular Norse god/superhero blockbuster. The rather flabby plot is alleviated by Chris Hemsworth’s hearty charisma, which provides frequent relief from Natalie Portman’s bland damsel-in-distress (attempts to beef up her character by making her an astrophysicist are undermined by her constant fainting). Highlights include Thor sliding down The Gherkin skyscraper. Made in Dagenham (2010) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.45pm Industrial action in pursuit of equal pay for women doesn’t sound too thrilling a subject, but Nigel Cole’s (Calendar Girls) film, based around the real-life strike from 1968, turns out to be a rousing crowd-pleaser. Sally Hawkins plays the reluctant ringleader of the workers who sew car seats at Ford’s Dagenham plant; Bob Hoskins is a union rep; Miranda Richardson is wonderful as Labour MP Barbara Castle. Sunday 10 June Smoldering: Aidan Turner returns as the eponymous hero Credit: BBC Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Not since Daniel Craig emerged from the waves in Casino Royale has there been so much fuss over a pair of wet pecs. Yes, Poldark is back for a fourth series and star Aidan Turner bares his chest for the fans in an opening scene that, if nothing else, suggests that he’s spent a lot of time exercising since the end of series three. This opener finds our swashbuckling hero Ross Poldark (Turner) back in full-on Cornish crusader mode when, following a disturbance in Truro, he locks horns with old enemy George Warleggan (Jack Farthing) over the fate of three good pals accused of riot and murder. Meanwhile, his flame-haired wife Demelza (Eleanor Tomlinson) can’t fend off her intimate longings following that illicit clinch in the dunes with poetry-penning aristo Hugh Armitage (Josh Whitehouse) – who, with the announcement of a general election, looks set to be diverted into a career at Westminster. But as Dr Dwight (Luke Norris) is at pains to point out, Armitage has a delicate constitution that might not suit the rough and tumble of parliamentary politics. Could Ross be persuaded to think again about throwing his hat in the ring? Gerard O’Donovan One-Day International Cricket: Scotland v England Sky Sports Main Event, 10.30am Having responded brilliantly to tie the Test series with Pakistan 1-1, England now turn their attention to Scotland, with this ODI at the Grange in Edinburgh. Songs of Praise BBC One, 1.25pm A year on from the Grenfell Tower disaster, Aled Jones presents a commemorative special edition exploring how the local community in North Kensington is coping and recovering. Britain Celebrates Live: 100 Years of Women’s Votes BBC One, 2.00pm Live coverage of today’s public processions through Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh and London to celebrate the centenary of women winning the right to vote. Tonight’s Antiques Roadshow, at 8pm, also takes up the theme, devoting its time to items with links to remarkable women. Formula 1: Canadian Grand Prix Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm After a Monaco Grand Prix that left championship leader Lewis Hamilton, in his words, “cold”, all eyes are on the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal, where Daniel Riccardio will be aiming to win back-to-back races. Soccer Aid for Unicef 2018 ITV, 6.30pm Live from Old Trafford, it’s the annual England v World XI charity football match between teams mixing celebrities and professional athletes. This year Robbie Williams’s England is taking on a team of international stars led by Usain Bolt. Other players include Mo Farah, Gordon Ramsay, Olly Murs, and Eric Cantona, and there’s live music from Jessie Ware. Countryfile BBC One, 7.00pm The last of three specials heads for Sandringham in Norfolk, the most private of the Royal retreats. Matt Baker discovers one of the Queen’s less-known interests – racing pigeons – while Ellie Harrison learns more about her love of horses. GO Patrick Melrose Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch’s brilliantly judged bravura performance has been one of the television highlights of 2018. Tonight, he brings the series to an entertaining and emotionally charged close as Patrick, separated and back in London in 2006, hopes to put the past to rest following his mother’s funeral. Cosby: The Women Speak Sony Crime Channel, 9.00pm Following Bill Cosby’s conviction on three counts of aggravated indecent assault, here’s another opportunity to see the A&E network’s 2015 one-hour special in which the extent of the allegations against the former TV icon for predatory sexual behaviour came to light. Over a dozen of the 50-plus women who accused him of rape and sexual assault going back decades talk of their experiences on screen for the first time, and how statute of limitation laws threatened to deprive them of justice. GO Despicable Me 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 5.10pm Despicable Me, 2010’s animated supervillain comedy, had a neat enough premise. It’s gone in this sequel, though, as Steve Carell’s bald antihero, Gru, is now a reformed soul, occupied with childcare rather than dastardly plots to steal the moon. Gru’s Minions – those knee-high yellow Tic-Tacs – provide the film’s one inspired idea as they’re injected with mutating serum by the film’s mystery baddy. Hulk (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.15pm Ang Lee’s dark and stylised version (a split screen mimics the panels of a comic book page) of the Incredible Hulk’s adventures is one of the best and underrated Marvel adaptations, even if it’s too complex at times. Eric Bana stars as Bruce, a scientist who’s exposed to gamma radiation and becomes a not-so-jolly green giant. This is a rampaging tale with bold special effects. Jennifer Connolly co-stars as his love interest. It (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Stephen King’s evil clown tale is no laughing matter. First a Warners miniseries in 1990, starring an unforgettable Tim Curry, and now a two-part film version. Here we continue the terrifying tale of Pennywise (Bill Skarsgård), but jump forward three decades to the summer of 1988, buying into the current vogue for Eighties teen-flick nostalgia. The scary stuff is petrifying when it peaks. Monday 11 June Community spirit: those affected by the fire tell their stories Credit: BBC Grenfell BBC One, 8.30pm Bafta-winning director Ben Anthony’s unmissable documentary about last year’s Grenfell Tower tragedy opens with a sea of faces, all of which gain poignant individual focus as the film progresses. The blaze at the 24-storey block of public housing in the London borough of Kensington, which resulted in 72 deaths, left a lasting impression in those featured here as each person tells their unique story about the horrific events and their impact. Survivors who lost their homes, the bereaved, bystanders and police all share their stories, although it’s a surprising omission that the firefighters who witnessed the horrors first hand don’t offer their account. Split screens give multiple perspectives on the same moment, and what starts out as a patchwork of personal experience knits together into a mighty whole, the collective voice of a community broken but defiant. In fact, much of the film focuses on the efforts of those affected to unite in the face of seeming indifference from the local council, who also have their say. As the ongoing inquiry continues, this devastating account offers a damning testament of its own, rife with accusations of injustice and neglect, underpinned by blistering rage and grief. Toby Dantzic Fight Like a Girl BBC One, 7.30pm The ferocious sport of female wrestling comes under the spotlight with this lively film following Scottish fighter Kimberly Benson. She combines a gruelling training regime with her daytime job, as she aims for her first world title in Japan. Long Lost Family: What Happened Next ITV, 9.00pm Nicky Campbell and Davina McCall catch up with families they’ve reunited. Cathie Cutler Evans, who met her half-sister in 2016, has found joy in her extended clan. But for Maureen Charlton, separated from her brother Michael for 40 years, progress been painstaking. Dan Snow’s Norman Walks PBS America, 9.00pm Dan Snow sorts fact from fiction as he investigates the history of Norman Britain in this new series. He starts off on the Sussex coast, where aided by evidence from the Bayeux Tapestry, he pieces together William the Conqueror’s 11th-century coastal invasion. Flowers Channel 4, 10.00pm Will Sharpe’s gloriously dark comedy about a dysfunctional family returns with a double bill, then continues each night this week. A seemingly chipper Maurice (Julian Bennett) and Deborah (Olivia Colman) are on a caravanning holiday, while daughter Amy (Sophia di Martino) has a brash new girlfriend. Storyville: City Of Ghosts BBC Four, 10.30pm There are images of death in Matthew Heineman’s film so harrowing that it’s hard to keep watching, but these are the sights that Heineman’s subject, rebel group Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered, face daily. The renegade collective have made it their task to secretly film the atrocities committed by Isil in the Syrian city of Raqqa, and show the rest of the world the reality of the regime. It’s an astonishing act of citizen-led journalism, and the participants’ fear and grief, as well as their sense of purpose, are starkly captured in Heineman’s blunt and brutal chronicle of a city in turmoil. TD Prisons Uncovered: Out Of Control? ITV, 10.45pm; Scotland, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.15pm; not UTV In 2016, HMP Birmingham saw the worst prison riot for 25 years, in which 600 inmates were freed from their cells. This sobering documentary looks at the factors behind the incident and reflects on the prison system. TD Our Kind of Traitor (2016) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor stars in this so-so John le Carré adaptation as poetry lecturer Perry Makepeace, who becomes embroiled in negotiations to bring Dima (Stellan Skarsgård), a well-connected Russian oligarch, into the fold of British intelligence. Skarsgård is the standout here, charging into his role with pungency, playing Dima as a bedraggled beast of Moscow’s criminal underworld. The Shining (1980) ★★★★★ TCM, 9.00pm Set in a deserted hotel that’s in the care of writer Jack (Jack Nicholson) and his family for the winter, Stanley Kubrick’s brilliant psycho-horror, based on the novel by Stephen King, is subtly unsettling. But it’s stuffed, too, with unforgettable nerve-jangling shocks, including the moment when the crazed Jack smashes his way through a door with an axe as his wife (Shelley Duvall) cowers in the corner. Teen Wolf (1985) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 12.10am Critics howled at this preposterous teenage comedy but audiences loved it, perhaps because it came out shortly after its star Michael J Fox’s finest hour: Back to the Future. The plot – in which Fox’s likeable nerd morphs into a basketball-playing werewolf – is almost as unlikely as the fact that he still looked fresh out of the 11th grade at the ripe old age of 25. An unparalleled analysis of puberty and adolescence. Tuesday 12 June Hitting the books: Tanisha is a pupil at Townley Grammar Credit: BBC Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland & Wales, 11.15pm Jamie Pickup’s series has walked a tightrope with considerable skill, highlighting the inarguable inequities of our educational system that favours a selective approach, while also acknowledging its considerable benefits and observing the situation from the points of view of both pupils and teachers. It concludes with mock GCSE exams approaching and students at Erith School, a secondary modern, and neighbouring institution Townley Grammar, having to assess their suitability for further education. Some, it’s fair to say, are taking it more seriously than others. Townley pupil Tanisha is underperforming and low on confidence, yet keen to raise her game and nurtured by staff aware of her limitations and capabilities. At Erith, meanwhile, Denisa is angling for a place in Townley Sixth Form and seems more than capable of attaining it, but staffing shortages are crippling science classes amid an endless round of supply teachers and stand-ins. “It keeps me awake at night,” says the admirable faculty head Mr Appiah-Gates. It’s a desperately difficult situation and one that reaches an unexpected conclusion, as common ground is found between two unlikely bedfellows. Gabriel Tate The Champions Netflix, from today Created by Mindy Kaling, this new NBC sitcom plays a bachelor gym owner (Anders Holm) off against his gay, estranged son-cum-new flatmate (the brilliant J J Totah). Smartly written and nimbly performed, it’s a solid mainstream hit. Ackley Bridge Channel 4, 8.00pm Matt Evans and Penny Woolcock continue to keep an implausible number of plates spinning as the fizzy pre-watershed drama continues to conduct its handbrake narrative turns. Both Jordan (Samuel Bottomley) and Missy (Poppy Lee Friar) handle cash shortages in an equally desperate manner, and the arrival of Steve’s ex Claire (Kimberly Walsh) puts head teacher Mandy’s (Jo Joyner) nose out of joint. Our Girl BBC One, 9.00pm Georgie (Michelle Keegan) learns an astonishing secret about the local crime boss, before a major rescue operation begins as the flawed but well-meaning military drama continues. Flights from Hell: Caught on Camera ITV, 9.00pm ITV lays down its prime-time weapons as the World Cup looms, as demonstrated by this daft three-part series of incidents filmed at 30,000 feet. These include what an engine explosion feels like to those on board the plane to the impact of volcanic ash and an extraordinarily dramatic landing. Seeing Daylight: the Photography of Dorothy Bohm Sky Arts, 9.00pm Arriving in England in 1939 to escape the Nazis, Dorothy Bohm became a pioneer of street photography and portraiture of deep humanity. This profile examines her life and work. Elvis: the Searcher Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on Peter Guralnick’s epochal two-part biography, Thom Zimny’s HBO epic is a treat, focusing as much on Presley the man as Elvis the icon, Part one follows him out of Tupelo, into Sun Records and on to the US army, with part two’s fall, rise and fall again airing Wednesday at 10.00pm. GT Ugly Me: My Life with Body Dysmorphia BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm First shown on BBC Three, this harrowing film follows 29-year-old Liane, seeking treatment for the titular condition which has left her self-worth in tatters. GT Field of Dreams (1989) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.50pm Kevin Costner clearly likes a baseball movie – he’s made five of them. In this one he’s an Iowa farmer instructed by a mysterious voice to build a baseball pitch in the middle of a cornfield, which is soon occupied by a gang of ghostly players from the past. Enjoyably dotty, and responsible for the misquote, “If you build it, they will come” – it’s actually “he will come” – the fantasy is elevated by brilliant performances all around. A Good Day to Die Hard (2013) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The fifth film in the Die Hard franchise takes place in Russia, where our hero, Bruce Willis’s now grizzled John McClane, arrives in Moscow to hunt for his estranged son Jack (Jai Courtney). McClane suspects that he may have become a drug dealer, but it transpires he is in fact working undercover for the CIA, and Dad blunders in on him mid-mission. An enjoyable but clunky thriller. The Departed (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Nothing beats watching a great director in his comfort zone. Martin Scorsese’s gangland thriller – the film that finally won him an Oscar – is riveting. The plot revolves around the local police force’s efforts to stamp out Boston crime lord Frank Costello (a magnificently malevolent Jack Nicholson). There are powerhouse performances, too, from Leonardo Di Caprio, Matt Damon and Mark Wahlberg. Wednesday 13 June From Russia with love: David Dimbleby Credit: BBC Putin’s Russia with David Dimbleby BBC One, 9.00pm, Wales, 11.05pm “In a democracy if you fail to deliver on economic promises, if you surround yourself with cronies and use the law to suppress opposition, you would rightly be thrown out on your ear. But this is Russia, they do things differently here…” So begins David Dimbleby’s thoughtful film in which – as the eyes of the world turn towards Moscow for the 2018 World Cup football tournament – he takes the opportunity to cast an eye over Vladimir Putin’s 18 years as leader and assess the state of Russia today, especially in regard to the West. What he finds is a country in deep economic crisis yet with a people that seem to happily hero-worship Putin and mostly accept a state machine that controls almost every aspect of their lives with the willing assistance of security services, media, military and church. Dimbleby meets ordinary contented Russians as well as protesters, human rights lawyers, journalists and official spokespeople, coming away with a sense, ultimately, that Putin’s popularity is rooted in his strongman image and media-backed levels of suspicion and hostility towards the West unseen since the end of the Cold War. Gerard O’Donovan The Fight for Women’s Bodies BBC Three, from 10.00am Following the landmark vote to legalise abortion in the Republic of Ireland, Ellie Flynn looks back at the issues through the eyes of campaigners on both sides. Great Rail Restorations with Peter Snow Channel 4, 8.00pm Here is a visit to the Isle of Wight, where Peter Snow and his team set out to restore an 1864 wooden train carriage that has served as a holiday chalet since it was decommissioned in the Twenties. Before Grenfell: A Hidden History BBC Two, 9.00pm A year since the Grenfell Tower fire, residents of Kensington relate how the London borough has become the most unequal place in Britain, with the gap between rich and poor once again as extreme as in the 1860s when developers first built housing for the rich in Notting Hill next to the worst slum in London. Can Science Make Me Perfect? With Alice Roberts BBC Four, 9.00pm Millions of years have gone into the human body: lots of great evolutionary adaptations but lots of imperfections, too. In a film that’s as entertaining as it is instructive, anatomist Alice Roberts takes on a challenge to design a better body than the one we get at birth. The Fast Fix: Diabetes ITV, 9.00pm Anita Rani presents a new two-part series exploring whether it is possible for people suffering from type 2 diabetes to reverse the condition by adhering to a radical diet. By consuming just 800 calories a day, can they “fast themselves better”? Concludes tomorrow Big Beasts: Last of the Giants Sky One, 9.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee explores why size matters in the natural world. Beginning in the Americas, he checks out the planet’s largest predator, the sperm whale; comes face to face with a grizzly bear and gets rather too close to an anaconda that’s as long as a bus. GO How to Start an Airline Channel 4, 10.30pm This documentary follows Bangladeshi-British entrepreneur Kazi Shafiqur Rahman as he attempts to break into the fiercely competitive airline industry while also fulfilling the demands of his faith by insisting that the airline must comply with the teachings of Islam. GO Regarding Henry (1991) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 6.50pm Telling the story of a hotshot lawyer (Harrison Ford) who learns to question his values after a head injury, this film formed a companion piece to Wolf (1994), with Jack Nicholson as a publisher who is bitten by a wolf and turns into a boardroom predator. Directed by Mike Nichols, whose Oscar-winning movie The Graduate was a cinematic landmark of the 1960s, it’s a bit of an embarrassment, but interesting nevertheless. Source Code (2011) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal repeatedly finds himself reliving the last eight minutes in the life of a man on board a train which is about to be destroyed by a bomb as part of an experiment. Meanwhile, scientists Vera Farmiga and Jeffrey Wright are monitoring Gyllenhaal’s exploits. Duncan Jones confirmed the promise of his directing debut Moon with this thrilling whodunit, which also serves as a moving meditation on life. Beetlejuice (1988) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm Michael Keaton is an actor of rare versatility (as his triumphant role in Birdman proved). In this cult, Oscar-winning film by Tim Burton, Keaton shines as a con artist ghost called Beetlejuice, who aims to help two other ghosts (Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis) to scare the obnoxious new residents out of their old house. But he then falls for lovely goth Lydia (Winona Ryder), the family’s daughter. Thursday 14 June It’s kicking off: Mark Pugatch (centre) leads ITV’s presenting team Credit: ITV FIFA World Cup 2018: Opening Ceremony ITV, 2.30pm Regardless of how you think Russia got to be awarded the 21st staging of football’s biggest tournament (by corrupt means or otherwise), it’s time to cast those aspersions aside because the Russia 2018 championship is here. But, two hours before a ball is kicked, the opening ceremony marks the official start of the highest prize in football. And as we all know, entertaining opening ceremonies can be a great curtain-raiser for sport events, if they are done well – think the London 2012 Olympics. This one takes place at the 80,000-seat Luzhniki Stadium, which is the jewel in Russia’s crown of stadiums and will also host the final on July 15. Mark Pougatch presents the live coverage of the ceremony, which is headlined by actor and rapper Will Smith and Nicky Jam, who will perform Live It Up, the official World Cup song, which has received mixed reviews. As well as that, the ceremony will include local performers showing off different aspects of Russian culture, with gymnasts and trampolinists in among the fireworks and performances on display. The matches get under way following the ceremony with the host nation against Saudi Arabia. Clive Morgan Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm While the BBC’s post-Bake Off cookery contest may not have set the world alight, it’s given the judges plenty to get their teeth into. This week, it’s the final, and three challenges stand between the contestants and the title: a summer favourite, their best main course and a pudding. Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm After three weeks of cute animals, Springwatch comes to an end with Chris Packham, Michaela Strachan and co reliving this year’s best moments at Sherborne Park Estate. The Trouble with Women with Anne Robinson BBC One, 9.00pm As a journalist and TV presenter, Anne Robinson shattered the glass ceiling as she built her career. She imagined that now, 50 years later, we’d be much closer to achieving equality than we are. With the ongoing discussions about gender pay, Robinson asks women around the UK what’s preventing parity? Inside HM Prison Wormwood Scrubs Channel 5, 9.00pm Wormwood Scrubs has had some infamous inmates: from serial killers Ian Brady and Peter Sutcliffe to rockers Pete Docherty and Keith Richards. This documentary exploring the prison’s history tells the stories of a Soviet spy who escaped from the jail and its best-known inmate, Charles Bronson. CM Missions BBC Four, 10.00pm and 10.20pm The absorbing French sci-fi drama about the first manned mission to Mars concludes with its final double header. This week, psychiatrist Jeanne (Hélène Viviès) discovers the reason behind cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov’s (Arben Bajraktaraj) mission. I Am Evidence Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Even though Mariska Hargitay spent almost 20 years as crime fighter Olivia Benson in Law & Order: SVU, nothing prepared her for what she was to learn in real life. In this shocking documentary, Hargitay investigates the flaws in the US justice system that have allowed tens of thousands of rape kits to go untested for years. It’s a tough film to watch at times, especially as it highlights the issue through deeply personal and harrowing, first-person accounts from four women whose attacks are still fresh in their minds decades after the assaults due to a lack of closure. “I felt like my body was a crime scene,” one of the women recalls. CM Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby (2006) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm Will Ferrell fans will need little encouragement to lap up this affectionate send-up of Nascar racing, redneck culture and male bonding. Ferrell pays a Nascar speed-demon who is challenged by a gay, French Formula One driver (Sacha Baron Cohen), to see who is the ultimate racer. It’s a full throttle comedy that plays to Ferrell’s strengths. The Hills Have Eyes (2006) ★★★☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm French director Alexandre Aja makes his Hollywood debut with this grim but gripping remake of Wes Craven’s semi-cult horror film about a family battling a brood of mutants in the New Mexico desert. Aja ups the visceral violence, and the characters – including Ted Levine and Kathleen Quinlan as the parents – are sufficiently well-drawn to make the outcome shocking. The Ghost (2010) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor plays a talented ghost writer, who lands a lucrative contract to edit the memoirs of Adam Lang (Pierce Brosnan), the former UK Prime Minister, in this Roman Polanski adaptation of the Robert Harris novel. Soon after, Lang is accused of committing a war crime and the Ghost finds himself drawn into a world of dangerous secrets that put his life at risk. This is a deeply unsettling thriller. Friday 15 June One connected flow: Dan Jones on the Grand Union Canal Building Britain’s Canals Channel 5, 8.00pm His tattoos may have a nerdish medieval theme, but historian Dan Jones still seems too hip to be fronting a stuffy-sounding series about Britain’s iconic canals. Jones’s lively style and eye for interesting detail, however, keeps this subject surprisingly fresh, as he begins this three-part run with a look at the Grand Union Canal, the longest stretch of man-made waterway in Britain. It’s a story that reaches back 200 years, when the demands of the Industrial Revolution called for a speedy way to move goods between Birmingham and London, and the country’s engineering super-brains found ingenious means to link seven separate channels into one connected flow. As Jones explains, while the financial benefits were big, construction of the Grand Union was time consuming and dangerous. The 12-year stop-start struggle to complete the technically complex Blisworth Hill tunnel, for example, saw the deaths of up to 60 workers. Unable to compete with the advent of the speedy steam train, the Grand Union itself soon declined too. The canal is now a source of summertime pleasure, so this is a welcome reminder of its once vital purpose. Toby Dantzic Queer Eye Netflix, from today The success of this heart-warming makeover series, which returned to much acclaim earlier this year, was something of a surprise. Netflix then have been quick to capitalise, snappily rolling out another run barely four months later, with the likeable quintet all returning for more lifestyle revamping. Details are so far scant, but the show’s culture guru Karamo Brown has hinted that women and the trans community could be featured. World Cup 2018: Portugal v Spain BBC One, 6.20pm The pick of this week’s World Cup matches happens on day two at the Fisht Stadium in Sochi and comes from Group B. Expect a tense affair as Spain, who suffered the ignominy of failing to make it to the knockout rounds four years ago, take on their bitter rivals Portugal. The Crystal Maze: Celebrity Special Channel 4, 9.00pm Former footballer Dennis Wise heads the team of celebrity hopefuls, joined by Katie Price, Roman Kemp, Bez and Binky Felstead.Wise struggles with a fiendish skill game, while a number-based challenge sets Felstead’s head spinning. Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm Jane McDonald wraps up her Antipodean adventure in New Zealand’s North Island. She rubs noses with a Maori tribe in Napier, explores Rotorua’s dramatic geothermal landscapes and views Auckland’s skyline from a helicopter. Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.40pm This is a final bout of topical treats from veteran impressionist Tracey Ullman. Favourites Angela Merkel and Rupert Murdoch get a look in, alongside more takes on Jeremy Corbyn, Michael Gove and Nanny, the dedicated carer of Jacob Rees-Mogg. Africa: A Journey Into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm Apart from the occasional act on Later… with Jools Holland, world music doesn’t get much airtime on our TVs, so this beguiling series helmed by DJ Rita Ray offers a welcome insight into its traditions. For her final foray, Ray heads to Mali, home to more Grammy award-winning artists than any other African country. From her attempts at a sinuous wedding dance to meeting renowned harp player Toumani Diabaté, Ray’s journey is full of stirring encounters. TD Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 10.00pm A fitting reminder of Dale Winton’s easy-going charm, this swansong travelogue series resumes after a hiatus with our host in ocean-front Miami. Highlights include a trip to Little Havana, the city’s Cuban quarter, and a look at fashion designer Versace’s opulent former home. TD Blade Runner 2049 (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm In a similar but distinct way to Ridley Scott’s masterful original, Blade Runner 2049 mulls one of the meatiest questions around: is surface all that there is, or do life’s currents run deeper than the things we can see, hear and touch? Denis Villeneuve’s film toys with both options, making neither a comfort – and in the process, maps out a provocative blockbuster. Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford star. Red (2010) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. The Wolf of Wall Street (2013) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 11.40pm Soaked in sex, drugs and scandal, Martin Scorsese’s epic is based on the memoir of stockbroker Jordan Belfort, who spent the Nineties illegally amassing a vast personal fortune. With a fantastic performance from Leonardo DiCaprio, this morally bankrupt romp was lauded by audiences and critics alike. Jonah Hill and Margot Robbie co-star. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Saturday 9 June Germaine Bloody Greer BBC Two, 9.00pm The personal views of Germaine Greer once had a universality and pungency about them that the world so desperately needed. But her recent comments about rape, violence on TV and transpeople, by contrast, resemble self-important trolling: wilfully controversial, dreadfully retrograde and a blight on a considerable legacy. This thrilling profile is a reminder of why she still matters, albeit perhaps more for what she was than what she has become. Novelist Zoë Heller and journalist Rosie Boycott are among those singing her praises, while Greer herself proves as unable as ever to avoid calling out a daft question or savaging a sacred cow. The footage is exciting and superbly mounted by director Clare Beavan. Whether it’s Greer’s early films, her steadfastness in the face of the abuse sent her way after The Female Eunuch was published, and her evisceration of Norman Mailer during a famous 1971 set-to in New York, Greer remains a most rugged individual. “I don’t think Germaine and the word ‘sisterhood’ are natural bedfellows,” reckons Boycott. What about that legacy? “I don’t do regret and I don’t do things that I regret,” Greer concludes. By any standards, a remarkable life. Gabriel Tate Trooping the Colour BBC One, 10.30am Marking the official birthday of the Queen, the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards will conduct their annual pageant on Horse Guards Parade, introduced by Huw Edwards and with J J Chalmers offering behind-the-scenes insights. There are highlights at 7.30pm on BBC Two. French Open Tennis: The women’s final ITV, 1.30pm Action on the 14th day at Roland Garros features the women’s singles final in the second Grand Slam tournament of the year. Jelena Ostapenko met Simona Halep in last year’s showpiece match, where the Latvian defeated the number three seed 4-6, 6-4, 6-3 to become the first person from her country to win a Grand Slam tournament and the first unseeded player to win the French Open since 1933. The men’s final, which was won for a record 10th time by Spaniard Rafael Nadal last year, takes place on Sunday at 1.30pm on ITV. Women’s International One-Day Cricket: England Women v South Africa Women Sky Sports Main Event, 1.30pm It’s the opening one-day international of the three-match series, which takes place at New Road in Worcester. Katherine Brunt, Georgia Elwiss, Laura Marsh, Sarah Taylor and Lauren Winfield all return to the England squad after missing out on the Indian tour. World Cup-winning duo Fran Wilson and Alex Hartley miss out, however. International Rugby Union: South Africa v England Sky Sports Main Event, 3.00pm This afternoon England will be looking to dispatch the Springboks at a venue Eddie Jones has described as the “spiritual home of rugby”. They’ve not won at Ellis Park in Johannesburg since 1972 – their only triumph at the venue – and their last appearance here was a 36-27 defeat under Stuart Lancaster in 2012. Ellis Park was the setting for the Springboks’ World Cup final victory over New Zealand in 1995 and one of the sport’s finest moments – Nelson Mandela handing Francois Pienaar the Webb Ellis Cup. “It will be hostile but it’s fantastic and I am so excited about it,” says Jones. “In world rugby who do you want to beat? The Springboks at Ellis Park.” Owen Farrell will captain England, while the hugely talented New Zealand-born flanker Brad Shields is expected to play a part for the visitors. The River Wye with Will Millard BBC Two, 5.30pm; Scotland, 2.45pm After deconstructing the exploration documentary in the fascinating and alarming My Year with the Tribe, explorer Will Millard is on slightly surer ground with this new series in which he journeys down the River Wye. He begins his journey with a search for the river’s source on the slopes of Plynlimon, before he has an encounter with an entrepreneurial local sheep farmer. Take Me Out: Over 50s Special ITV, 8.00pm Three “older gentlemen” (I’m sure host Paddy McGuinness will make plenty of gags here) face 30 single “Golden Girls”, including a former nun and an ex-partner of action hero Jason Statham, in this one-off special of the ever-popular dating show. Hidden BBC Four, 9.00pm After Hinterland and Keeping Faith comes the BBC’s latest Welsh language crime thriller. Hidden has a familiar set-up – the discovery of a young girl’s body in a disused quarry tears a small community apart – but Sian Reese-Williams and Sion Alun Davies as DIs Cadi John and Owen Vaughan area leading pair to reckon with, and the atmosphere of unease benefits hugely from the mountainous surroundings. Come Together: the Rise of the Festival Sky Arts, 9.00pm The line-up for this documentary would grace any festival, with Pete Townshend and Noel Gallagher among the interviewees explaining the evolution of the modern music festival from its earliest jazz and blues incarnations in Newport, through the hippy beanfeasts of Monterey and Woodstock to Glastonbury and Coachella. There are also contributions from those who promote and document festivals, including Michael Eavis and D A Pennebaker. GT A Girl’s Guide to TV BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI Comedian Rachel Parris of The Mash Report presents her typically tongue-in-cheek advice for women looking to get ahead in television. GT Maleficent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 6.05pm Angelina Jolie stars as the titular Maleficent in Disney’s live-action reimagining of Sleeping Beauty, which follows her from a carefree fairy to Mistress of All Evil, muddling the distinction between hero and villain. Maleficent is happy in a kingdom of peculiar CGI beasts until her heart is broken by Stefan (Sharlto Copley), who inherits the throne. Seeking vengeance, she curses his baby, Princess Aurora (Elle Fanning). Thor: The Dark World (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 10.35pm This is a follow-up to the popular Norse god/superhero blockbuster. The rather flabby plot is alleviated by Chris Hemsworth’s hearty charisma, which provides frequent relief from Natalie Portman’s bland damsel-in-distress (attempts to beef up her character by making her an astrophysicist are undermined by her constant fainting). Highlights include Thor sliding down The Gherkin skyscraper. Made in Dagenham (2010) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.45pm Industrial action in pursuit of equal pay for women doesn’t sound too thrilling a subject, but Nigel Cole’s (Calendar Girls) film, based around the real-life strike from 1968, turns out to be a rousing crowd-pleaser. Sally Hawkins plays the reluctant ringleader of the workers who sew car seats at Ford’s Dagenham plant; Bob Hoskins is a union rep; Miranda Richardson is wonderful as Labour MP Barbara Castle. Sunday 10 June Smoldering: Aidan Turner returns as the eponymous hero Credit: BBC Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Not since Daniel Craig emerged from the waves in Casino Royale has there been so much fuss over a pair of wet pecs. Yes, Poldark is back for a fourth series and star Aidan Turner bares his chest for the fans in an opening scene that, if nothing else, suggests that he’s spent a lot of time exercising since the end of series three. This opener finds our swashbuckling hero Ross Poldark (Turner) back in full-on Cornish crusader mode when, following a disturbance in Truro, he locks horns with old enemy George Warleggan (Jack Farthing) over the fate of three good pals accused of riot and murder. Meanwhile, his flame-haired wife Demelza (Eleanor Tomlinson) can’t fend off her intimate longings following that illicit clinch in the dunes with poetry-penning aristo Hugh Armitage (Josh Whitehouse) – who, with the announcement of a general election, looks set to be diverted into a career at Westminster. But as Dr Dwight (Luke Norris) is at pains to point out, Armitage has a delicate constitution that might not suit the rough and tumble of parliamentary politics. Could Ross be persuaded to think again about throwing his hat in the ring? Gerard O’Donovan One-Day International Cricket: Scotland v England Sky Sports Main Event, 10.30am Having responded brilliantly to tie the Test series with Pakistan 1-1, England now turn their attention to Scotland, with this ODI at the Grange in Edinburgh. Songs of Praise BBC One, 1.25pm A year on from the Grenfell Tower disaster, Aled Jones presents a commemorative special edition exploring how the local community in North Kensington is coping and recovering. Britain Celebrates Live: 100 Years of Women’s Votes BBC One, 2.00pm Live coverage of today’s public processions through Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh and London to celebrate the centenary of women winning the right to vote. Tonight’s Antiques Roadshow, at 8pm, also takes up the theme, devoting its time to items with links to remarkable women. Formula 1: Canadian Grand Prix Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm After a Monaco Grand Prix that left championship leader Lewis Hamilton, in his words, “cold”, all eyes are on the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal, where Daniel Riccardio will be aiming to win back-to-back races. Soccer Aid for Unicef 2018 ITV, 6.30pm Live from Old Trafford, it’s the annual England v World XI charity football match between teams mixing celebrities and professional athletes. This year Robbie Williams’s England is taking on a team of international stars led by Usain Bolt. Other players include Mo Farah, Gordon Ramsay, Olly Murs, and Eric Cantona, and there’s live music from Jessie Ware. Countryfile BBC One, 7.00pm The last of three specials heads for Sandringham in Norfolk, the most private of the Royal retreats. Matt Baker discovers one of the Queen’s less-known interests – racing pigeons – while Ellie Harrison learns more about her love of horses. GO Patrick Melrose Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch’s brilliantly judged bravura performance has been one of the television highlights of 2018. Tonight, he brings the series to an entertaining and emotionally charged close as Patrick, separated and back in London in 2006, hopes to put the past to rest following his mother’s funeral. Cosby: The Women Speak Sony Crime Channel, 9.00pm Following Bill Cosby’s conviction on three counts of aggravated indecent assault, here’s another opportunity to see the A&E network’s 2015 one-hour special in which the extent of the allegations against the former TV icon for predatory sexual behaviour came to light. Over a dozen of the 50-plus women who accused him of rape and sexual assault going back decades talk of their experiences on screen for the first time, and how statute of limitation laws threatened to deprive them of justice. GO Despicable Me 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 5.10pm Despicable Me, 2010’s animated supervillain comedy, had a neat enough premise. It’s gone in this sequel, though, as Steve Carell’s bald antihero, Gru, is now a reformed soul, occupied with childcare rather than dastardly plots to steal the moon. Gru’s Minions – those knee-high yellow Tic-Tacs – provide the film’s one inspired idea as they’re injected with mutating serum by the film’s mystery baddy. Hulk (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.15pm Ang Lee’s dark and stylised version (a split screen mimics the panels of a comic book page) of the Incredible Hulk’s adventures is one of the best and underrated Marvel adaptations, even if it’s too complex at times. Eric Bana stars as Bruce, a scientist who’s exposed to gamma radiation and becomes a not-so-jolly green giant. This is a rampaging tale with bold special effects. Jennifer Connolly co-stars as his love interest. It (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Stephen King’s evil clown tale is no laughing matter. First a Warners miniseries in 1990, starring an unforgettable Tim Curry, and now a two-part film version. Here we continue the terrifying tale of Pennywise (Bill Skarsgård), but jump forward three decades to the summer of 1988, buying into the current vogue for Eighties teen-flick nostalgia. The scary stuff is petrifying when it peaks. Monday 11 June Community spirit: those affected by the fire tell their stories Credit: BBC Grenfell BBC One, 8.30pm Bafta-winning director Ben Anthony’s unmissable documentary about last year’s Grenfell Tower tragedy opens with a sea of faces, all of which gain poignant individual focus as the film progresses. The blaze at the 24-storey block of public housing in the London borough of Kensington, which resulted in 72 deaths, left a lasting impression in those featured here as each person tells their unique story about the horrific events and their impact. Survivors who lost their homes, the bereaved, bystanders and police all share their stories, although it’s a surprising omission that the firefighters who witnessed the horrors first hand don’t offer their account. Split screens give multiple perspectives on the same moment, and what starts out as a patchwork of personal experience knits together into a mighty whole, the collective voice of a community broken but defiant. In fact, much of the film focuses on the efforts of those affected to unite in the face of seeming indifference from the local council, who also have their say. As the ongoing inquiry continues, this devastating account offers a damning testament of its own, rife with accusations of injustice and neglect, underpinned by blistering rage and grief. Toby Dantzic Fight Like a Girl BBC One, 7.30pm The ferocious sport of female wrestling comes under the spotlight with this lively film following Scottish fighter Kimberly Benson. She combines a gruelling training regime with her daytime job, as she aims for her first world title in Japan. Long Lost Family: What Happened Next ITV, 9.00pm Nicky Campbell and Davina McCall catch up with families they’ve reunited. Cathie Cutler Evans, who met her half-sister in 2016, has found joy in her extended clan. But for Maureen Charlton, separated from her brother Michael for 40 years, progress been painstaking. Dan Snow’s Norman Walks PBS America, 9.00pm Dan Snow sorts fact from fiction as he investigates the history of Norman Britain in this new series. He starts off on the Sussex coast, where aided by evidence from the Bayeux Tapestry, he pieces together William the Conqueror’s 11th-century coastal invasion. Flowers Channel 4, 10.00pm Will Sharpe’s gloriously dark comedy about a dysfunctional family returns with a double bill, then continues each night this week. A seemingly chipper Maurice (Julian Bennett) and Deborah (Olivia Colman) are on a caravanning holiday, while daughter Amy (Sophia di Martino) has a brash new girlfriend. Storyville: City Of Ghosts BBC Four, 10.30pm There are images of death in Matthew Heineman’s film so harrowing that it’s hard to keep watching, but these are the sights that Heineman’s subject, rebel group Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered, face daily. The renegade collective have made it their task to secretly film the atrocities committed by Isil in the Syrian city of Raqqa, and show the rest of the world the reality of the regime. It’s an astonishing act of citizen-led journalism, and the participants’ fear and grief, as well as their sense of purpose, are starkly captured in Heineman’s blunt and brutal chronicle of a city in turmoil. TD Prisons Uncovered: Out Of Control? ITV, 10.45pm; Scotland, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.15pm; not UTV In 2016, HMP Birmingham saw the worst prison riot for 25 years, in which 600 inmates were freed from their cells. This sobering documentary looks at the factors behind the incident and reflects on the prison system. TD Our Kind of Traitor (2016) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor stars in this so-so John le Carré adaptation as poetry lecturer Perry Makepeace, who becomes embroiled in negotiations to bring Dima (Stellan Skarsgård), a well-connected Russian oligarch, into the fold of British intelligence. Skarsgård is the standout here, charging into his role with pungency, playing Dima as a bedraggled beast of Moscow’s criminal underworld. The Shining (1980) ★★★★★ TCM, 9.00pm Set in a deserted hotel that’s in the care of writer Jack (Jack Nicholson) and his family for the winter, Stanley Kubrick’s brilliant psycho-horror, based on the novel by Stephen King, is subtly unsettling. But it’s stuffed, too, with unforgettable nerve-jangling shocks, including the moment when the crazed Jack smashes his way through a door with an axe as his wife (Shelley Duvall) cowers in the corner. Teen Wolf (1985) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 12.10am Critics howled at this preposterous teenage comedy but audiences loved it, perhaps because it came out shortly after its star Michael J Fox’s finest hour: Back to the Future. The plot – in which Fox’s likeable nerd morphs into a basketball-playing werewolf – is almost as unlikely as the fact that he still looked fresh out of the 11th grade at the ripe old age of 25. An unparalleled analysis of puberty and adolescence. Tuesday 12 June Hitting the books: Tanisha is a pupil at Townley Grammar Credit: BBC Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland & Wales, 11.15pm Jamie Pickup’s series has walked a tightrope with considerable skill, highlighting the inarguable inequities of our educational system that favours a selective approach, while also acknowledging its considerable benefits and observing the situation from the points of view of both pupils and teachers. It concludes with mock GCSE exams approaching and students at Erith School, a secondary modern, and neighbouring institution Townley Grammar, having to assess their suitability for further education. Some, it’s fair to say, are taking it more seriously than others. Townley pupil Tanisha is underperforming and low on confidence, yet keen to raise her game and nurtured by staff aware of her limitations and capabilities. At Erith, meanwhile, Denisa is angling for a place in Townley Sixth Form and seems more than capable of attaining it, but staffing shortages are crippling science classes amid an endless round of supply teachers and stand-ins. “It keeps me awake at night,” says the admirable faculty head Mr Appiah-Gates. It’s a desperately difficult situation and one that reaches an unexpected conclusion, as common ground is found between two unlikely bedfellows. Gabriel Tate The Champions Netflix, from today Created by Mindy Kaling, this new NBC sitcom plays a bachelor gym owner (Anders Holm) off against his gay, estranged son-cum-new flatmate (the brilliant J J Totah). Smartly written and nimbly performed, it’s a solid mainstream hit. Ackley Bridge Channel 4, 8.00pm Matt Evans and Penny Woolcock continue to keep an implausible number of plates spinning as the fizzy pre-watershed drama continues to conduct its handbrake narrative turns. Both Jordan (Samuel Bottomley) and Missy (Poppy Lee Friar) handle cash shortages in an equally desperate manner, and the arrival of Steve’s ex Claire (Kimberly Walsh) puts head teacher Mandy’s (Jo Joyner) nose out of joint. Our Girl BBC One, 9.00pm Georgie (Michelle Keegan) learns an astonishing secret about the local crime boss, before a major rescue operation begins as the flawed but well-meaning military drama continues. Flights from Hell: Caught on Camera ITV, 9.00pm ITV lays down its prime-time weapons as the World Cup looms, as demonstrated by this daft three-part series of incidents filmed at 30,000 feet. These include what an engine explosion feels like to those on board the plane to the impact of volcanic ash and an extraordinarily dramatic landing. Seeing Daylight: the Photography of Dorothy Bohm Sky Arts, 9.00pm Arriving in England in 1939 to escape the Nazis, Dorothy Bohm became a pioneer of street photography and portraiture of deep humanity. This profile examines her life and work. Elvis: the Searcher Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on Peter Guralnick’s epochal two-part biography, Thom Zimny’s HBO epic is a treat, focusing as much on Presley the man as Elvis the icon, Part one follows him out of Tupelo, into Sun Records and on to the US army, with part two’s fall, rise and fall again airing Wednesday at 10.00pm. GT Ugly Me: My Life with Body Dysmorphia BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm First shown on BBC Three, this harrowing film follows 29-year-old Liane, seeking treatment for the titular condition which has left her self-worth in tatters. GT Field of Dreams (1989) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.50pm Kevin Costner clearly likes a baseball movie – he’s made five of them. In this one he’s an Iowa farmer instructed by a mysterious voice to build a baseball pitch in the middle of a cornfield, which is soon occupied by a gang of ghostly players from the past. Enjoyably dotty, and responsible for the misquote, “If you build it, they will come” – it’s actually “he will come” – the fantasy is elevated by brilliant performances all around. A Good Day to Die Hard (2013) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The fifth film in the Die Hard franchise takes place in Russia, where our hero, Bruce Willis’s now grizzled John McClane, arrives in Moscow to hunt for his estranged son Jack (Jai Courtney). McClane suspects that he may have become a drug dealer, but it transpires he is in fact working undercover for the CIA, and Dad blunders in on him mid-mission. An enjoyable but clunky thriller. The Departed (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Nothing beats watching a great director in his comfort zone. Martin Scorsese’s gangland thriller – the film that finally won him an Oscar – is riveting. The plot revolves around the local police force’s efforts to stamp out Boston crime lord Frank Costello (a magnificently malevolent Jack Nicholson). There are powerhouse performances, too, from Leonardo Di Caprio, Matt Damon and Mark Wahlberg. Wednesday 13 June From Russia with love: David Dimbleby Credit: BBC Putin’s Russia with David Dimbleby BBC One, 9.00pm, Wales, 11.05pm “In a democracy if you fail to deliver on economic promises, if you surround yourself with cronies and use the law to suppress opposition, you would rightly be thrown out on your ear. But this is Russia, they do things differently here…” So begins David Dimbleby’s thoughtful film in which – as the eyes of the world turn towards Moscow for the 2018 World Cup football tournament – he takes the opportunity to cast an eye over Vladimir Putin’s 18 years as leader and assess the state of Russia today, especially in regard to the West. What he finds is a country in deep economic crisis yet with a people that seem to happily hero-worship Putin and mostly accept a state machine that controls almost every aspect of their lives with the willing assistance of security services, media, military and church. Dimbleby meets ordinary contented Russians as well as protesters, human rights lawyers, journalists and official spokespeople, coming away with a sense, ultimately, that Putin’s popularity is rooted in his strongman image and media-backed levels of suspicion and hostility towards the West unseen since the end of the Cold War. Gerard O’Donovan The Fight for Women’s Bodies BBC Three, from 10.00am Following the landmark vote to legalise abortion in the Republic of Ireland, Ellie Flynn looks back at the issues through the eyes of campaigners on both sides. Great Rail Restorations with Peter Snow Channel 4, 8.00pm Here is a visit to the Isle of Wight, where Peter Snow and his team set out to restore an 1864 wooden train carriage that has served as a holiday chalet since it was decommissioned in the Twenties. Before Grenfell: A Hidden History BBC Two, 9.00pm A year since the Grenfell Tower fire, residents of Kensington relate how the London borough has become the most unequal place in Britain, with the gap between rich and poor once again as extreme as in the 1860s when developers first built housing for the rich in Notting Hill next to the worst slum in London. Can Science Make Me Perfect? With Alice Roberts BBC Four, 9.00pm Millions of years have gone into the human body: lots of great evolutionary adaptations but lots of imperfections, too. In a film that’s as entertaining as it is instructive, anatomist Alice Roberts takes on a challenge to design a better body than the one we get at birth. The Fast Fix: Diabetes ITV, 9.00pm Anita Rani presents a new two-part series exploring whether it is possible for people suffering from type 2 diabetes to reverse the condition by adhering to a radical diet. By consuming just 800 calories a day, can they “fast themselves better”? Concludes tomorrow Big Beasts: Last of the Giants Sky One, 9.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee explores why size matters in the natural world. Beginning in the Americas, he checks out the planet’s largest predator, the sperm whale; comes face to face with a grizzly bear and gets rather too close to an anaconda that’s as long as a bus. GO How to Start an Airline Channel 4, 10.30pm This documentary follows Bangladeshi-British entrepreneur Kazi Shafiqur Rahman as he attempts to break into the fiercely competitive airline industry while also fulfilling the demands of his faith by insisting that the airline must comply with the teachings of Islam. GO Regarding Henry (1991) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 6.50pm Telling the story of a hotshot lawyer (Harrison Ford) who learns to question his values after a head injury, this film formed a companion piece to Wolf (1994), with Jack Nicholson as a publisher who is bitten by a wolf and turns into a boardroom predator. Directed by Mike Nichols, whose Oscar-winning movie The Graduate was a cinematic landmark of the 1960s, it’s a bit of an embarrassment, but interesting nevertheless. Source Code (2011) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal repeatedly finds himself reliving the last eight minutes in the life of a man on board a train which is about to be destroyed by a bomb as part of an experiment. Meanwhile, scientists Vera Farmiga and Jeffrey Wright are monitoring Gyllenhaal’s exploits. Duncan Jones confirmed the promise of his directing debut Moon with this thrilling whodunit, which also serves as a moving meditation on life. Beetlejuice (1988) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm Michael Keaton is an actor of rare versatility (as his triumphant role in Birdman proved). In this cult, Oscar-winning film by Tim Burton, Keaton shines as a con artist ghost called Beetlejuice, who aims to help two other ghosts (Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis) to scare the obnoxious new residents out of their old house. But he then falls for lovely goth Lydia (Winona Ryder), the family’s daughter. Thursday 14 June It’s kicking off: Mark Pugatch (centre) leads ITV’s presenting team Credit: ITV FIFA World Cup 2018: Opening Ceremony ITV, 2.30pm Regardless of how you think Russia got to be awarded the 21st staging of football’s biggest tournament (by corrupt means or otherwise), it’s time to cast those aspersions aside because the Russia 2018 championship is here. But, two hours before a ball is kicked, the opening ceremony marks the official start of the highest prize in football. And as we all know, entertaining opening ceremonies can be a great curtain-raiser for sport events, if they are done well – think the London 2012 Olympics. This one takes place at the 80,000-seat Luzhniki Stadium, which is the jewel in Russia’s crown of stadiums and will also host the final on July 15. Mark Pougatch presents the live coverage of the ceremony, which is headlined by actor and rapper Will Smith and Nicky Jam, who will perform Live It Up, the official World Cup song, which has received mixed reviews. As well as that, the ceremony will include local performers showing off different aspects of Russian culture, with gymnasts and trampolinists in among the fireworks and performances on display. The matches get under way following the ceremony with the host nation against Saudi Arabia. Clive Morgan Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm While the BBC’s post-Bake Off cookery contest may not have set the world alight, it’s given the judges plenty to get their teeth into. This week, it’s the final, and three challenges stand between the contestants and the title: a summer favourite, their best main course and a pudding. Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm After three weeks of cute animals, Springwatch comes to an end with Chris Packham, Michaela Strachan and co reliving this year’s best moments at Sherborne Park Estate. The Trouble with Women with Anne Robinson BBC One, 9.00pm As a journalist and TV presenter, Anne Robinson shattered the glass ceiling as she built her career. She imagined that now, 50 years later, we’d be much closer to achieving equality than we are. With the ongoing discussions about gender pay, Robinson asks women around the UK what’s preventing parity? Inside HM Prison Wormwood Scrubs Channel 5, 9.00pm Wormwood Scrubs has had some infamous inmates: from serial killers Ian Brady and Peter Sutcliffe to rockers Pete Docherty and Keith Richards. This documentary exploring the prison’s history tells the stories of a Soviet spy who escaped from the jail and its best-known inmate, Charles Bronson. CM Missions BBC Four, 10.00pm and 10.20pm The absorbing French sci-fi drama about the first manned mission to Mars concludes with its final double header. This week, psychiatrist Jeanne (Hélène Viviès) discovers the reason behind cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov’s (Arben Bajraktaraj) mission. I Am Evidence Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Even though Mariska Hargitay spent almost 20 years as crime fighter Olivia Benson in Law & Order: SVU, nothing prepared her for what she was to learn in real life. In this shocking documentary, Hargitay investigates the flaws in the US justice system that have allowed tens of thousands of rape kits to go untested for years. It’s a tough film to watch at times, especially as it highlights the issue through deeply personal and harrowing, first-person accounts from four women whose attacks are still fresh in their minds decades after the assaults due to a lack of closure. “I felt like my body was a crime scene,” one of the women recalls. CM Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby (2006) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm Will Ferrell fans will need little encouragement to lap up this affectionate send-up of Nascar racing, redneck culture and male bonding. Ferrell pays a Nascar speed-demon who is challenged by a gay, French Formula One driver (Sacha Baron Cohen), to see who is the ultimate racer. It’s a full throttle comedy that plays to Ferrell’s strengths. The Hills Have Eyes (2006) ★★★☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm French director Alexandre Aja makes his Hollywood debut with this grim but gripping remake of Wes Craven’s semi-cult horror film about a family battling a brood of mutants in the New Mexico desert. Aja ups the visceral violence, and the characters – including Ted Levine and Kathleen Quinlan as the parents – are sufficiently well-drawn to make the outcome shocking. The Ghost (2010) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor plays a talented ghost writer, who lands a lucrative contract to edit the memoirs of Adam Lang (Pierce Brosnan), the former UK Prime Minister, in this Roman Polanski adaptation of the Robert Harris novel. Soon after, Lang is accused of committing a war crime and the Ghost finds himself drawn into a world of dangerous secrets that put his life at risk. This is a deeply unsettling thriller. Friday 15 June One connected flow: Dan Jones on the Grand Union Canal Building Britain’s Canals Channel 5, 8.00pm His tattoos may have a nerdish medieval theme, but historian Dan Jones still seems too hip to be fronting a stuffy-sounding series about Britain’s iconic canals. Jones’s lively style and eye for interesting detail, however, keeps this subject surprisingly fresh, as he begins this three-part run with a look at the Grand Union Canal, the longest stretch of man-made waterway in Britain. It’s a story that reaches back 200 years, when the demands of the Industrial Revolution called for a speedy way to move goods between Birmingham and London, and the country’s engineering super-brains found ingenious means to link seven separate channels into one connected flow. As Jones explains, while the financial benefits were big, construction of the Grand Union was time consuming and dangerous. The 12-year stop-start struggle to complete the technically complex Blisworth Hill tunnel, for example, saw the deaths of up to 60 workers. Unable to compete with the advent of the speedy steam train, the Grand Union itself soon declined too. The canal is now a source of summertime pleasure, so this is a welcome reminder of its once vital purpose. Toby Dantzic Queer Eye Netflix, from today The success of this heart-warming makeover series, which returned to much acclaim earlier this year, was something of a surprise. Netflix then have been quick to capitalise, snappily rolling out another run barely four months later, with the likeable quintet all returning for more lifestyle revamping. Details are so far scant, but the show’s culture guru Karamo Brown has hinted that women and the trans community could be featured. World Cup 2018: Portugal v Spain BBC One, 6.20pm The pick of this week’s World Cup matches happens on day two at the Fisht Stadium in Sochi and comes from Group B. Expect a tense affair as Spain, who suffered the ignominy of failing to make it to the knockout rounds four years ago, take on their bitter rivals Portugal. The Crystal Maze: Celebrity Special Channel 4, 9.00pm Former footballer Dennis Wise heads the team of celebrity hopefuls, joined by Katie Price, Roman Kemp, Bez and Binky Felstead.Wise struggles with a fiendish skill game, while a number-based challenge sets Felstead’s head spinning. Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm Jane McDonald wraps up her Antipodean adventure in New Zealand’s North Island. She rubs noses with a Maori tribe in Napier, explores Rotorua’s dramatic geothermal landscapes and views Auckland’s skyline from a helicopter. Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.40pm This is a final bout of topical treats from veteran impressionist Tracey Ullman. Favourites Angela Merkel and Rupert Murdoch get a look in, alongside more takes on Jeremy Corbyn, Michael Gove and Nanny, the dedicated carer of Jacob Rees-Mogg. Africa: A Journey Into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm Apart from the occasional act on Later… with Jools Holland, world music doesn’t get much airtime on our TVs, so this beguiling series helmed by DJ Rita Ray offers a welcome insight into its traditions. For her final foray, Ray heads to Mali, home to more Grammy award-winning artists than any other African country. From her attempts at a sinuous wedding dance to meeting renowned harp player Toumani Diabaté, Ray’s journey is full of stirring encounters. TD Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 10.00pm A fitting reminder of Dale Winton’s easy-going charm, this swansong travelogue series resumes after a hiatus with our host in ocean-front Miami. Highlights include a trip to Little Havana, the city’s Cuban quarter, and a look at fashion designer Versace’s opulent former home. TD Blade Runner 2049 (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm In a similar but distinct way to Ridley Scott’s masterful original, Blade Runner 2049 mulls one of the meatiest questions around: is surface all that there is, or do life’s currents run deeper than the things we can see, hear and touch? Denis Villeneuve’s film toys with both options, making neither a comfort – and in the process, maps out a provocative blockbuster. Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford star. Red (2010) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. The Wolf of Wall Street (2013) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 11.40pm Soaked in sex, drugs and scandal, Martin Scorsese’s epic is based on the memoir of stockbroker Jordan Belfort, who spent the Nineties illegally amassing a vast personal fortune. With a fantastic performance from Leonardo DiCaprio, this morally bankrupt romp was lauded by audiences and critics alike. Jonah Hill and Margot Robbie co-star. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: Germaine Bloody Greer, Take Me Out: Over 50s Special and more
Saturday 9 June Germaine Bloody Greer BBC Two, 9.00pm The personal views of Germaine Greer once had a universality and pungency about them that the world so desperately needed. But her recent comments about rape, violence on TV and transpeople, by contrast, resemble self-important trolling: wilfully controversial, dreadfully retrograde and a blight on a considerable legacy. This thrilling profile is a reminder of why she still matters, albeit perhaps more for what she was than what she has become. Novelist Zoë Heller and journalist Rosie Boycott are among those singing her praises, while Greer herself proves as unable as ever to avoid calling out a daft question or savaging a sacred cow. The footage is exciting and superbly mounted by director Clare Beavan. Whether it’s Greer’s early films, her steadfastness in the face of the abuse sent her way after The Female Eunuch was published, and her evisceration of Norman Mailer during a famous 1971 set-to in New York, Greer remains a most rugged individual. “I don’t think Germaine and the word ‘sisterhood’ are natural bedfellows,” reckons Boycott. What about that legacy? “I don’t do regret and I don’t do things that I regret,” Greer concludes. By any standards, a remarkable life. Gabriel Tate Trooping the Colour BBC One, 10.30am Marking the official birthday of the Queen, the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards will conduct their annual pageant on Horse Guards Parade, introduced by Huw Edwards and with J J Chalmers offering behind-the-scenes insights. There are highlights at 7.30pm on BBC Two. French Open Tennis: The women’s final ITV, 1.30pm Action on the 14th day at Roland Garros features the women’s singles final in the second Grand Slam tournament of the year. Jelena Ostapenko met Simona Halep in last year’s showpiece match, where the Latvian defeated the number three seed 4-6, 6-4, 6-3 to become the first person from her country to win a Grand Slam tournament and the first unseeded player to win the French Open since 1933. The men’s final, which was won for a record 10th time by Spaniard Rafael Nadal last year, takes place on Sunday at 1.30pm on ITV. Women’s International One-Day Cricket: England Women v South Africa Women Sky Sports Main Event, 1.30pm It’s the opening one-day international of the three-match series, which takes place at New Road in Worcester. Katherine Brunt, Georgia Elwiss, Laura Marsh, Sarah Taylor and Lauren Winfield all return to the England squad after missing out on the Indian tour. World Cup-winning duo Fran Wilson and Alex Hartley miss out, however. International Rugby Union: South Africa v England Sky Sports Main Event, 3.00pm This afternoon England will be looking to dispatch the Springboks at a venue Eddie Jones has described as the “spiritual home of rugby”. They’ve not won at Ellis Park in Johannesburg since 1972 – their only triumph at the venue – and their last appearance here was a 36-27 defeat under Stuart Lancaster in 2012. Ellis Park was the setting for the Springboks’ World Cup final victory over New Zealand in 1995 and one of the sport’s finest moments – Nelson Mandela handing Francois Pienaar the Webb Ellis Cup. “It will be hostile but it’s fantastic and I am so excited about it,” says Jones. “In world rugby who do you want to beat? The Springboks at Ellis Park.” Owen Farrell will captain England, while the hugely talented New Zealand-born flanker Brad Shields is expected to play a part for the visitors. The River Wye with Will Millard BBC Two, 5.30pm; Scotland, 2.45pm After deconstructing the exploration documentary in the fascinating and alarming My Year with the Tribe, explorer Will Millard is on slightly surer ground with this new series in which he journeys down the River Wye. He begins his journey with a search for the river’s source on the slopes of Plynlimon, before he has an encounter with an entrepreneurial local sheep farmer. Take Me Out: Over 50s Special ITV, 8.00pm Three “older gentlemen” (I’m sure host Paddy McGuinness will make plenty of gags here) face 30 single “Golden Girls”, including a former nun and an ex-partner of action hero Jason Statham, in this one-off special of the ever-popular dating show. Hidden BBC Four, 9.00pm After Hinterland and Keeping Faith comes the BBC’s latest Welsh language crime thriller. Hidden has a familiar set-up – the discovery of a young girl’s body in a disused quarry tears a small community apart – but Sian Reese-Williams and Sion Alun Davies as DIs Cadi John and Owen Vaughan area leading pair to reckon with, and the atmosphere of unease benefits hugely from the mountainous surroundings. Come Together: the Rise of the Festival Sky Arts, 9.00pm The line-up for this documentary would grace any festival, with Pete Townshend and Noel Gallagher among the interviewees explaining the evolution of the modern music festival from its earliest jazz and blues incarnations in Newport, through the hippy beanfeasts of Monterey and Woodstock to Glastonbury and Coachella. There are also contributions from those who promote and document festivals, including Michael Eavis and D A Pennebaker. GT A Girl’s Guide to TV BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI Comedian Rachel Parris of The Mash Report presents her typically tongue-in-cheek advice for women looking to get ahead in television. GT Maleficent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 6.05pm Angelina Jolie stars as the titular Maleficent in Disney’s live-action reimagining of Sleeping Beauty, which follows her from a carefree fairy to Mistress of All Evil, muddling the distinction between hero and villain. Maleficent is happy in a kingdom of peculiar CGI beasts until her heart is broken by Stefan (Sharlto Copley), who inherits the throne. Seeking vengeance, she curses his baby, Princess Aurora (Elle Fanning). Thor: The Dark World (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 10.35pm This is a follow-up to the popular Norse god/superhero blockbuster. The rather flabby plot is alleviated by Chris Hemsworth’s hearty charisma, which provides frequent relief from Natalie Portman’s bland damsel-in-distress (attempts to beef up her character by making her an astrophysicist are undermined by her constant fainting). Highlights include Thor sliding down The Gherkin skyscraper. Made in Dagenham (2010) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.45pm Industrial action in pursuit of equal pay for women doesn’t sound too thrilling a subject, but Nigel Cole’s (Calendar Girls) film, based around the real-life strike from 1968, turns out to be a rousing crowd-pleaser. Sally Hawkins plays the reluctant ringleader of the workers who sew car seats at Ford’s Dagenham plant; Bob Hoskins is a union rep; Miranda Richardson is wonderful as Labour MP Barbara Castle. Sunday 10 June Smoldering: Aidan Turner returns as the eponymous hero Credit: BBC Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Not since Daniel Craig emerged from the waves in Casino Royale has there been so much fuss over a pair of wet pecs. Yes, Poldark is back for a fourth series and star Aidan Turner bares his chest for the fans in an opening scene that, if nothing else, suggests that he’s spent a lot of time exercising since the end of series three. This opener finds our swashbuckling hero Ross Poldark (Turner) back in full-on Cornish crusader mode when, following a disturbance in Truro, he locks horns with old enemy George Warleggan (Jack Farthing) over the fate of three good pals accused of riot and murder. Meanwhile, his flame-haired wife Demelza (Eleanor Tomlinson) can’t fend off her intimate longings following that illicit clinch in the dunes with poetry-penning aristo Hugh Armitage (Josh Whitehouse) – who, with the announcement of a general election, looks set to be diverted into a career at Westminster. But as Dr Dwight (Luke Norris) is at pains to point out, Armitage has a delicate constitution that might not suit the rough and tumble of parliamentary politics. Could Ross be persuaded to think again about throwing his hat in the ring? Gerard O’Donovan One-Day International Cricket: Scotland v England Sky Sports Main Event, 10.30am Having responded brilliantly to tie the Test series with Pakistan 1-1, England now turn their attention to Scotland, with this ODI at the Grange in Edinburgh. Songs of Praise BBC One, 1.25pm A year on from the Grenfell Tower disaster, Aled Jones presents a commemorative special edition exploring how the local community in North Kensington is coping and recovering. Britain Celebrates Live: 100 Years of Women’s Votes BBC One, 2.00pm Live coverage of today’s public processions through Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh and London to celebrate the centenary of women winning the right to vote. Tonight’s Antiques Roadshow, at 8pm, also takes up the theme, devoting its time to items with links to remarkable women. Formula 1: Canadian Grand Prix Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm After a Monaco Grand Prix that left championship leader Lewis Hamilton, in his words, “cold”, all eyes are on the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal, where Daniel Riccardio will be aiming to win back-to-back races. Soccer Aid for Unicef 2018 ITV, 6.30pm Live from Old Trafford, it’s the annual England v World XI charity football match between teams mixing celebrities and professional athletes. This year Robbie Williams’s England is taking on a team of international stars led by Usain Bolt. Other players include Mo Farah, Gordon Ramsay, Olly Murs, and Eric Cantona, and there’s live music from Jessie Ware. Countryfile BBC One, 7.00pm The last of three specials heads for Sandringham in Norfolk, the most private of the Royal retreats. Matt Baker discovers one of the Queen’s less-known interests – racing pigeons – while Ellie Harrison learns more about her love of horses. GO Patrick Melrose Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch’s brilliantly judged bravura performance has been one of the television highlights of 2018. Tonight, he brings the series to an entertaining and emotionally charged close as Patrick, separated and back in London in 2006, hopes to put the past to rest following his mother’s funeral. Cosby: The Women Speak Sony Crime Channel, 9.00pm Following Bill Cosby’s conviction on three counts of aggravated indecent assault, here’s another opportunity to see the A&E network’s 2015 one-hour special in which the extent of the allegations against the former TV icon for predatory sexual behaviour came to light. Over a dozen of the 50-plus women who accused him of rape and sexual assault going back decades talk of their experiences on screen for the first time, and how statute of limitation laws threatened to deprive them of justice. GO Despicable Me 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 5.10pm Despicable Me, 2010’s animated supervillain comedy, had a neat enough premise. It’s gone in this sequel, though, as Steve Carell’s bald antihero, Gru, is now a reformed soul, occupied with childcare rather than dastardly plots to steal the moon. Gru’s Minions – those knee-high yellow Tic-Tacs – provide the film’s one inspired idea as they’re injected with mutating serum by the film’s mystery baddy. Hulk (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.15pm Ang Lee’s dark and stylised version (a split screen mimics the panels of a comic book page) of the Incredible Hulk’s adventures is one of the best and underrated Marvel adaptations, even if it’s too complex at times. Eric Bana stars as Bruce, a scientist who’s exposed to gamma radiation and becomes a not-so-jolly green giant. This is a rampaging tale with bold special effects. Jennifer Connolly co-stars as his love interest. It (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Stephen King’s evil clown tale is no laughing matter. First a Warners miniseries in 1990, starring an unforgettable Tim Curry, and now a two-part film version. Here we continue the terrifying tale of Pennywise (Bill Skarsgård), but jump forward three decades to the summer of 1988, buying into the current vogue for Eighties teen-flick nostalgia. The scary stuff is petrifying when it peaks. Monday 11 June Community spirit: those affected by the fire tell their stories Credit: BBC Grenfell BBC One, 8.30pm Bafta-winning director Ben Anthony’s unmissable documentary about last year’s Grenfell Tower tragedy opens with a sea of faces, all of which gain poignant individual focus as the film progresses. The blaze at the 24-storey block of public housing in the London borough of Kensington, which resulted in 72 deaths, left a lasting impression in those featured here as each person tells their unique story about the horrific events and their impact. Survivors who lost their homes, the bereaved, bystanders and police all share their stories, although it’s a surprising omission that the firefighters who witnessed the horrors first hand don’t offer their account. Split screens give multiple perspectives on the same moment, and what starts out as a patchwork of personal experience knits together into a mighty whole, the collective voice of a community broken but defiant. In fact, much of the film focuses on the efforts of those affected to unite in the face of seeming indifference from the local council, who also have their say. As the ongoing inquiry continues, this devastating account offers a damning testament of its own, rife with accusations of injustice and neglect, underpinned by blistering rage and grief. Toby Dantzic Fight Like a Girl BBC One, 7.30pm The ferocious sport of female wrestling comes under the spotlight with this lively film following Scottish fighter Kimberly Benson. She combines a gruelling training regime with her daytime job, as she aims for her first world title in Japan. Long Lost Family: What Happened Next ITV, 9.00pm Nicky Campbell and Davina McCall catch up with families they’ve reunited. Cathie Cutler Evans, who met her half-sister in 2016, has found joy in her extended clan. But for Maureen Charlton, separated from her brother Michael for 40 years, progress been painstaking. Dan Snow’s Norman Walks PBS America, 9.00pm Dan Snow sorts fact from fiction as he investigates the history of Norman Britain in this new series. He starts off on the Sussex coast, where aided by evidence from the Bayeux Tapestry, he pieces together William the Conqueror’s 11th-century coastal invasion. Flowers Channel 4, 10.00pm Will Sharpe’s gloriously dark comedy about a dysfunctional family returns with a double bill, then continues each night this week. A seemingly chipper Maurice (Julian Bennett) and Deborah (Olivia Colman) are on a caravanning holiday, while daughter Amy (Sophia di Martino) has a brash new girlfriend. Storyville: City Of Ghosts BBC Four, 10.30pm There are images of death in Matthew Heineman’s film so harrowing that it’s hard to keep watching, but these are the sights that Heineman’s subject, rebel group Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered, face daily. The renegade collective have made it their task to secretly film the atrocities committed by Isil in the Syrian city of Raqqa, and show the rest of the world the reality of the regime. It’s an astonishing act of citizen-led journalism, and the participants’ fear and grief, as well as their sense of purpose, are starkly captured in Heineman’s blunt and brutal chronicle of a city in turmoil. TD Prisons Uncovered: Out Of Control? ITV, 10.45pm; Scotland, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.15pm; not UTV In 2016, HMP Birmingham saw the worst prison riot for 25 years, in which 600 inmates were freed from their cells. This sobering documentary looks at the factors behind the incident and reflects on the prison system. TD Our Kind of Traitor (2016) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor stars in this so-so John le Carré adaptation as poetry lecturer Perry Makepeace, who becomes embroiled in negotiations to bring Dima (Stellan Skarsgård), a well-connected Russian oligarch, into the fold of British intelligence. Skarsgård is the standout here, charging into his role with pungency, playing Dima as a bedraggled beast of Moscow’s criminal underworld. The Shining (1980) ★★★★★ TCM, 9.00pm Set in a deserted hotel that’s in the care of writer Jack (Jack Nicholson) and his family for the winter, Stanley Kubrick’s brilliant psycho-horror, based on the novel by Stephen King, is subtly unsettling. But it’s stuffed, too, with unforgettable nerve-jangling shocks, including the moment when the crazed Jack smashes his way through a door with an axe as his wife (Shelley Duvall) cowers in the corner. Teen Wolf (1985) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 12.10am Critics howled at this preposterous teenage comedy but audiences loved it, perhaps because it came out shortly after its star Michael J Fox’s finest hour: Back to the Future. The plot – in which Fox’s likeable nerd morphs into a basketball-playing werewolf – is almost as unlikely as the fact that he still looked fresh out of the 11th grade at the ripe old age of 25. An unparalleled analysis of puberty and adolescence. Tuesday 12 June Hitting the books: Tanisha is a pupil at Townley Grammar Credit: BBC Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland & Wales, 11.15pm Jamie Pickup’s series has walked a tightrope with considerable skill, highlighting the inarguable inequities of our educational system that favours a selective approach, while also acknowledging its considerable benefits and observing the situation from the points of view of both pupils and teachers. It concludes with mock GCSE exams approaching and students at Erith School, a secondary modern, and neighbouring institution Townley Grammar, having to assess their suitability for further education. Some, it’s fair to say, are taking it more seriously than others. Townley pupil Tanisha is underperforming and low on confidence, yet keen to raise her game and nurtured by staff aware of her limitations and capabilities. At Erith, meanwhile, Denisa is angling for a place in Townley Sixth Form and seems more than capable of attaining it, but staffing shortages are crippling science classes amid an endless round of supply teachers and stand-ins. “It keeps me awake at night,” says the admirable faculty head Mr Appiah-Gates. It’s a desperately difficult situation and one that reaches an unexpected conclusion, as common ground is found between two unlikely bedfellows. Gabriel Tate The Champions Netflix, from today Created by Mindy Kaling, this new NBC sitcom plays a bachelor gym owner (Anders Holm) off against his gay, estranged son-cum-new flatmate (the brilliant J J Totah). Smartly written and nimbly performed, it’s a solid mainstream hit. Ackley Bridge Channel 4, 8.00pm Matt Evans and Penny Woolcock continue to keep an implausible number of plates spinning as the fizzy pre-watershed drama continues to conduct its handbrake narrative turns. Both Jordan (Samuel Bottomley) and Missy (Poppy Lee Friar) handle cash shortages in an equally desperate manner, and the arrival of Steve’s ex Claire (Kimberly Walsh) puts head teacher Mandy’s (Jo Joyner) nose out of joint. Our Girl BBC One, 9.00pm Georgie (Michelle Keegan) learns an astonishing secret about the local crime boss, before a major rescue operation begins as the flawed but well-meaning military drama continues. Flights from Hell: Caught on Camera ITV, 9.00pm ITV lays down its prime-time weapons as the World Cup looms, as demonstrated by this daft three-part series of incidents filmed at 30,000 feet. These include what an engine explosion feels like to those on board the plane to the impact of volcanic ash and an extraordinarily dramatic landing. Seeing Daylight: the Photography of Dorothy Bohm Sky Arts, 9.00pm Arriving in England in 1939 to escape the Nazis, Dorothy Bohm became a pioneer of street photography and portraiture of deep humanity. This profile examines her life and work. Elvis: the Searcher Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on Peter Guralnick’s epochal two-part biography, Thom Zimny’s HBO epic is a treat, focusing as much on Presley the man as Elvis the icon, Part one follows him out of Tupelo, into Sun Records and on to the US army, with part two’s fall, rise and fall again airing Wednesday at 10.00pm. GT Ugly Me: My Life with Body Dysmorphia BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm First shown on BBC Three, this harrowing film follows 29-year-old Liane, seeking treatment for the titular condition which has left her self-worth in tatters. GT Field of Dreams (1989) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.50pm Kevin Costner clearly likes a baseball movie – he’s made five of them. In this one he’s an Iowa farmer instructed by a mysterious voice to build a baseball pitch in the middle of a cornfield, which is soon occupied by a gang of ghostly players from the past. Enjoyably dotty, and responsible for the misquote, “If you build it, they will come” – it’s actually “he will come” – the fantasy is elevated by brilliant performances all around. A Good Day to Die Hard (2013) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The fifth film in the Die Hard franchise takes place in Russia, where our hero, Bruce Willis’s now grizzled John McClane, arrives in Moscow to hunt for his estranged son Jack (Jai Courtney). McClane suspects that he may have become a drug dealer, but it transpires he is in fact working undercover for the CIA, and Dad blunders in on him mid-mission. An enjoyable but clunky thriller. The Departed (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Nothing beats watching a great director in his comfort zone. Martin Scorsese’s gangland thriller – the film that finally won him an Oscar – is riveting. The plot revolves around the local police force’s efforts to stamp out Boston crime lord Frank Costello (a magnificently malevolent Jack Nicholson). There are powerhouse performances, too, from Leonardo Di Caprio, Matt Damon and Mark Wahlberg. Wednesday 13 June From Russia with love: David Dimbleby Credit: BBC Putin’s Russia with David Dimbleby BBC One, 9.00pm, Wales, 11.05pm “In a democracy if you fail to deliver on economic promises, if you surround yourself with cronies and use the law to suppress opposition, you would rightly be thrown out on your ear. But this is Russia, they do things differently here…” So begins David Dimbleby’s thoughtful film in which – as the eyes of the world turn towards Moscow for the 2018 World Cup football tournament – he takes the opportunity to cast an eye over Vladimir Putin’s 18 years as leader and assess the state of Russia today, especially in regard to the West. What he finds is a country in deep economic crisis yet with a people that seem to happily hero-worship Putin and mostly accept a state machine that controls almost every aspect of their lives with the willing assistance of security services, media, military and church. Dimbleby meets ordinary contented Russians as well as protesters, human rights lawyers, journalists and official spokespeople, coming away with a sense, ultimately, that Putin’s popularity is rooted in his strongman image and media-backed levels of suspicion and hostility towards the West unseen since the end of the Cold War. Gerard O’Donovan The Fight for Women’s Bodies BBC Three, from 10.00am Following the landmark vote to legalise abortion in the Republic of Ireland, Ellie Flynn looks back at the issues through the eyes of campaigners on both sides. Great Rail Restorations with Peter Snow Channel 4, 8.00pm Here is a visit to the Isle of Wight, where Peter Snow and his team set out to restore an 1864 wooden train carriage that has served as a holiday chalet since it was decommissioned in the Twenties. Before Grenfell: A Hidden History BBC Two, 9.00pm A year since the Grenfell Tower fire, residents of Kensington relate how the London borough has become the most unequal place in Britain, with the gap between rich and poor once again as extreme as in the 1860s when developers first built housing for the rich in Notting Hill next to the worst slum in London. Can Science Make Me Perfect? With Alice Roberts BBC Four, 9.00pm Millions of years have gone into the human body: lots of great evolutionary adaptations but lots of imperfections, too. In a film that’s as entertaining as it is instructive, anatomist Alice Roberts takes on a challenge to design a better body than the one we get at birth. The Fast Fix: Diabetes ITV, 9.00pm Anita Rani presents a new two-part series exploring whether it is possible for people suffering from type 2 diabetes to reverse the condition by adhering to a radical diet. By consuming just 800 calories a day, can they “fast themselves better”? Concludes tomorrow Big Beasts: Last of the Giants Sky One, 9.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee explores why size matters in the natural world. Beginning in the Americas, he checks out the planet’s largest predator, the sperm whale; comes face to face with a grizzly bear and gets rather too close to an anaconda that’s as long as a bus. GO How to Start an Airline Channel 4, 10.30pm This documentary follows Bangladeshi-British entrepreneur Kazi Shafiqur Rahman as he attempts to break into the fiercely competitive airline industry while also fulfilling the demands of his faith by insisting that the airline must comply with the teachings of Islam. GO Regarding Henry (1991) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 6.50pm Telling the story of a hotshot lawyer (Harrison Ford) who learns to question his values after a head injury, this film formed a companion piece to Wolf (1994), with Jack Nicholson as a publisher who is bitten by a wolf and turns into a boardroom predator. Directed by Mike Nichols, whose Oscar-winning movie The Graduate was a cinematic landmark of the 1960s, it’s a bit of an embarrassment, but interesting nevertheless. Source Code (2011) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal repeatedly finds himself reliving the last eight minutes in the life of a man on board a train which is about to be destroyed by a bomb as part of an experiment. Meanwhile, scientists Vera Farmiga and Jeffrey Wright are monitoring Gyllenhaal’s exploits. Duncan Jones confirmed the promise of his directing debut Moon with this thrilling whodunit, which also serves as a moving meditation on life. Beetlejuice (1988) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm Michael Keaton is an actor of rare versatility (as his triumphant role in Birdman proved). In this cult, Oscar-winning film by Tim Burton, Keaton shines as a con artist ghost called Beetlejuice, who aims to help two other ghosts (Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis) to scare the obnoxious new residents out of their old house. But he then falls for lovely goth Lydia (Winona Ryder), the family’s daughter. Thursday 14 June It’s kicking off: Mark Pugatch (centre) leads ITV’s presenting team Credit: ITV FIFA World Cup 2018: Opening Ceremony ITV, 2.30pm Regardless of how you think Russia got to be awarded the 21st staging of football’s biggest tournament (by corrupt means or otherwise), it’s time to cast those aspersions aside because the Russia 2018 championship is here. But, two hours before a ball is kicked, the opening ceremony marks the official start of the highest prize in football. And as we all know, entertaining opening ceremonies can be a great curtain-raiser for sport events, if they are done well – think the London 2012 Olympics. This one takes place at the 80,000-seat Luzhniki Stadium, which is the jewel in Russia’s crown of stadiums and will also host the final on July 15. Mark Pougatch presents the live coverage of the ceremony, which is headlined by actor and rapper Will Smith and Nicky Jam, who will perform Live It Up, the official World Cup song, which has received mixed reviews. As well as that, the ceremony will include local performers showing off different aspects of Russian culture, with gymnasts and trampolinists in among the fireworks and performances on display. The matches get under way following the ceremony with the host nation against Saudi Arabia. Clive Morgan Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm While the BBC’s post-Bake Off cookery contest may not have set the world alight, it’s given the judges plenty to get their teeth into. This week, it’s the final, and three challenges stand between the contestants and the title: a summer favourite, their best main course and a pudding. Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm After three weeks of cute animals, Springwatch comes to an end with Chris Packham, Michaela Strachan and co reliving this year’s best moments at Sherborne Park Estate. The Trouble with Women with Anne Robinson BBC One, 9.00pm As a journalist and TV presenter, Anne Robinson shattered the glass ceiling as she built her career. She imagined that now, 50 years later, we’d be much closer to achieving equality than we are. With the ongoing discussions about gender pay, Robinson asks women around the UK what’s preventing parity? Inside HM Prison Wormwood Scrubs Channel 5, 9.00pm Wormwood Scrubs has had some infamous inmates: from serial killers Ian Brady and Peter Sutcliffe to rockers Pete Docherty and Keith Richards. This documentary exploring the prison’s history tells the stories of a Soviet spy who escaped from the jail and its best-known inmate, Charles Bronson. CM Missions BBC Four, 10.00pm and 10.20pm The absorbing French sci-fi drama about the first manned mission to Mars concludes with its final double header. This week, psychiatrist Jeanne (Hélène Viviès) discovers the reason behind cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov’s (Arben Bajraktaraj) mission. I Am Evidence Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Even though Mariska Hargitay spent almost 20 years as crime fighter Olivia Benson in Law & Order: SVU, nothing prepared her for what she was to learn in real life. In this shocking documentary, Hargitay investigates the flaws in the US justice system that have allowed tens of thousands of rape kits to go untested for years. It’s a tough film to watch at times, especially as it highlights the issue through deeply personal and harrowing, first-person accounts from four women whose attacks are still fresh in their minds decades after the assaults due to a lack of closure. “I felt like my body was a crime scene,” one of the women recalls. CM Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby (2006) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm Will Ferrell fans will need little encouragement to lap up this affectionate send-up of Nascar racing, redneck culture and male bonding. Ferrell pays a Nascar speed-demon who is challenged by a gay, French Formula One driver (Sacha Baron Cohen), to see who is the ultimate racer. It’s a full throttle comedy that plays to Ferrell’s strengths. The Hills Have Eyes (2006) ★★★☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm French director Alexandre Aja makes his Hollywood debut with this grim but gripping remake of Wes Craven’s semi-cult horror film about a family battling a brood of mutants in the New Mexico desert. Aja ups the visceral violence, and the characters – including Ted Levine and Kathleen Quinlan as the parents – are sufficiently well-drawn to make the outcome shocking. The Ghost (2010) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor plays a talented ghost writer, who lands a lucrative contract to edit the memoirs of Adam Lang (Pierce Brosnan), the former UK Prime Minister, in this Roman Polanski adaptation of the Robert Harris novel. Soon after, Lang is accused of committing a war crime and the Ghost finds himself drawn into a world of dangerous secrets that put his life at risk. This is a deeply unsettling thriller. Friday 15 June One connected flow: Dan Jones on the Grand Union Canal Building Britain’s Canals Channel 5, 8.00pm His tattoos may have a nerdish medieval theme, but historian Dan Jones still seems too hip to be fronting a stuffy-sounding series about Britain’s iconic canals. Jones’s lively style and eye for interesting detail, however, keeps this subject surprisingly fresh, as he begins this three-part run with a look at the Grand Union Canal, the longest stretch of man-made waterway in Britain. It’s a story that reaches back 200 years, when the demands of the Industrial Revolution called for a speedy way to move goods between Birmingham and London, and the country’s engineering super-brains found ingenious means to link seven separate channels into one connected flow. As Jones explains, while the financial benefits were big, construction of the Grand Union was time consuming and dangerous. The 12-year stop-start struggle to complete the technically complex Blisworth Hill tunnel, for example, saw the deaths of up to 60 workers. Unable to compete with the advent of the speedy steam train, the Grand Union itself soon declined too. The canal is now a source of summertime pleasure, so this is a welcome reminder of its once vital purpose. Toby Dantzic Queer Eye Netflix, from today The success of this heart-warming makeover series, which returned to much acclaim earlier this year, was something of a surprise. Netflix then have been quick to capitalise, snappily rolling out another run barely four months later, with the likeable quintet all returning for more lifestyle revamping. Details are so far scant, but the show’s culture guru Karamo Brown has hinted that women and the trans community could be featured. World Cup 2018: Portugal v Spain BBC One, 6.20pm The pick of this week’s World Cup matches happens on day two at the Fisht Stadium in Sochi and comes from Group B. Expect a tense affair as Spain, who suffered the ignominy of failing to make it to the knockout rounds four years ago, take on their bitter rivals Portugal. The Crystal Maze: Celebrity Special Channel 4, 9.00pm Former footballer Dennis Wise heads the team of celebrity hopefuls, joined by Katie Price, Roman Kemp, Bez and Binky Felstead.Wise struggles with a fiendish skill game, while a number-based challenge sets Felstead’s head spinning. Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm Jane McDonald wraps up her Antipodean adventure in New Zealand’s North Island. She rubs noses with a Maori tribe in Napier, explores Rotorua’s dramatic geothermal landscapes and views Auckland’s skyline from a helicopter. Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.40pm This is a final bout of topical treats from veteran impressionist Tracey Ullman. Favourites Angela Merkel and Rupert Murdoch get a look in, alongside more takes on Jeremy Corbyn, Michael Gove and Nanny, the dedicated carer of Jacob Rees-Mogg. Africa: A Journey Into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm Apart from the occasional act on Later… with Jools Holland, world music doesn’t get much airtime on our TVs, so this beguiling series helmed by DJ Rita Ray offers a welcome insight into its traditions. For her final foray, Ray heads to Mali, home to more Grammy award-winning artists than any other African country. From her attempts at a sinuous wedding dance to meeting renowned harp player Toumani Diabaté, Ray’s journey is full of stirring encounters. TD Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 10.00pm A fitting reminder of Dale Winton’s easy-going charm, this swansong travelogue series resumes after a hiatus with our host in ocean-front Miami. Highlights include a trip to Little Havana, the city’s Cuban quarter, and a look at fashion designer Versace’s opulent former home. TD Blade Runner 2049 (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm In a similar but distinct way to Ridley Scott’s masterful original, Blade Runner 2049 mulls one of the meatiest questions around: is surface all that there is, or do life’s currents run deeper than the things we can see, hear and touch? Denis Villeneuve’s film toys with both options, making neither a comfort – and in the process, maps out a provocative blockbuster. Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford star. Red (2010) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. The Wolf of Wall Street (2013) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 11.40pm Soaked in sex, drugs and scandal, Martin Scorsese’s epic is based on the memoir of stockbroker Jordan Belfort, who spent the Nineties illegally amassing a vast personal fortune. With a fantastic performance from Leonardo DiCaprio, this morally bankrupt romp was lauded by audiences and critics alike. Jonah Hill and Margot Robbie co-star. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Friday 8 June The Crystal Maze: Celebrity Special Channel 4, 9.00pm Channel 4’s successful reboot of the cult Eighties series continues its golden run of form with another charity special featuring people who, in the words of Maze Master Richard Ayoade, “we have all agreed, for some reason, to call… celebrities”. Ayoade is unstinting in his good-natured jibes, and his targets are equally obliging in laughing them off: this time around, it’s Olympians Kelly Holmes and Greg Rutherford, Hollyoaks actress Jorgie Porter, YouTube vlogger Alfie Deyes and grime MC Big Narstie. The latter comes in for the roughest ride, and indeed you may not see a more agonising sequence all year than Big Narstie wrestling with Jarhead’s (Adam Buxton) not-enormously taxing riddles, but his utter delight at being involved (“I’m GASSED!”) earns him a pass. The tasks are the usual ingenious grab-bag, honouring the heritage of the series while also advancing it, from the daft (balancing on space hoppers) to the fiendish (blowing a ball around a maze with “directional guffs” from an air pump). For his part, Ayoade once again proves himself the natural heir to Richard O’Brien in surreal wit (pace Ed Tudor-Pole and Stephan Merchant), and the cause, Stand Up 2 Cancer, is unimpeachable. GT Dispatches: After Grenfell Channel 4, 7.30pm In spite of a wealth of promises in the wake of the catastrophic fire in Grenfell Tower, claims abound that too many of the country’s tower blocks remain unsafe. Ed Howker investigates whether expert advice has been heeded and looks at the risks, both existing and newly discovered, for the tower’s residents. GT Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm Channel 5’s first-ever Bafta-winning show returns for a trip down under, with former cruise ship singer Jane McDonald exploring Sydney, Tasmania, Dunedin and Christchurch. GT Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm Ullman continues to play to her strengths with her roll call of uncanny impersonations of famous people. Theresa May, Angela Merkle and Nicola Sturgeon are back, along with her bizarrely convincing Michael Gove, while Jacob Rees-Mogg (Liam Hourican) and his Nanny (Ullman) endure yet more humiliation. GT Arctic Monkeys Live at the BBC BBC Two, 11.05pm Alex Turner and his band play selections from their divisive new album, Tranquillity Base Hotel & Casino, as well as a few oldies, including A Certain Romance, to reassure their more conservative fans. GT Cloak and Dagger Amazon Prime, from today Marvel’s latest TV offering is this teen series in which Tandy Bowen (Olivia Holt) and Tyrone Johnson (Aubrey Joseph) discover new, mysteriously connected superpowers. GT Sense8 Netflix, from today The Wachowskis’ kaleidoscopic saga ends with a two-hour episode created after its fans demanded closure when the series was axed. With Wolfgang (Max Riemelt) missing, Capheus (Toby Onwumere) running for office, Sun Bak (Bae Doona) on the run and the mysterious Chairman still at large, there’s no shortage of loose ends. GT The Staircase Netflix, from today This 2004 eight-parter documented the 16-year court battle over the fate of novelist Michael Peterson, accused of pushing his wife down the stairs to her death. Landing on Netflix with new, equally gripping episodes, Jean-Xavier de Lestrade’s series is both the old and the new Making a Murderer. GT The Way Way Back (2013) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.55pm This coming-of-age story feels like familiar terrain, but it’s agreeably done. Duncan (Liam James) learns about life, love and self-esteem from a gang of water-park employees, including the excellent Sam Rockwell, when forced to go on holiday with his mother (Toni Collette) and her boyfriend (Steve Carrell). The script flows and there’s enough melancholy and edge to the overall comic tone for its charm to prevail. Bend It Like Beckham (2002) ★★★☆☆ ITV, 10.45pm Keira Knightley’s career kicked off with this feelgood football-themed comedy drama from Bhaji on the Beach director Gurinder Chadha. She stars alongside Parminder Nagra as one of two 18-year-old girls who set out to make it as professional footballers, despite their families’ best efforts to stop them. Next of Kin’s Archie Panjabi and Shaznay Lewis (of reunited Nineties girl band All Saints fame) co-star. Platoon (1986) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 11.00pm This is a chance to see a young Charlie Sheen at the start of his turbulent career. The horrors of the Vietnam War are seen through the prism of a fresh-faced college dropout (Sheen) who finds himself in the thick of battle while Willem Dafoe plays his sympathetic sergeant. Director Oliver Stone used his own experiences of serving in the US army during the war to inform this harrowing film that won four Oscars. Saturday 9 June Controversial: the writer and intellectual Germaine Greer is profiled Credit: BBC Germaine Bloody Greer BBC Two, 9.00pm The personal views of Germaine Greer once had a universality and pungency about them that the world so desperately needed. But her recent comments about rape, violence on TV and transpeople, by contrast, resemble self-important trolling: wilfully controversial, dreadfully retrograde and a blight on a considerable legacy. This thrilling profile is a reminder of why she still matters, albeit perhaps more for what she was than what she has become. Novelist Zoë Heller and journalist Rosie Boycott are among those singing her praises, while Greer herself proves as unable as ever to avoid calling out a daft question or savaging a sacred cow. The footage is exciting and superbly mounted by director Clare Beavan. Whether it’s Greer’s early films, her steadfastness in the face of the abuse sent her way after The Female Eunuch was published, and her evisceration of Norman Mailer during a famous 1971 set-to in New York, Greer remains a most rugged individual. “I don’t think Germaine and the word ‘sisterhood’ are natural bedfellows,” reckons Boycott. What about that legacy? “I don’t do regret and I don’t do things that I regret,” Greer concludes. By any standards, a remarkable life. Gabriel Tate Trooping the Colour BBC One, 10.30am Marking the official birthday of the Queen, the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards will conduct their annual pageant on Horse Guards Parade, introduced by Huw Edwards and with J J Chalmers offering behind-the-scenes insights. There are highlights at 7.30pm on BBC Two. French Open Tennis: The women’s final ITV, 1.30pm Action on the 14th day at Roland Garros features the women’s singles final in the second Grand Slam tournament of the year. Jelena Ostapenko met Simona Halep in last year’s showpiece match, where the Latvian defeated the number three seed 4-6, 6-4, 6-3 to become the first person from her country to win a Grand Slam tournament and the first unseeded player to win the French Open since 1933. The men’s final, which was won for a record 10th time by Spaniard Rafael Nadal last year, takes place on Sunday at 1.30pm on ITV. Women’s International One-Day Cricket: England Women v South Africa Women Sky Sports Main Event, 1.30pm It’s the opening one-day international of the three-match series, which takes place at New Road in Worcester. Katherine Brunt, Georgia Elwiss, Laura Marsh, Sarah Taylor and Lauren Winfield all return to the England squad after missing out on the Indian tour. World Cup-winning duo Fran Wilson and Alex Hartley miss out, however. International Rugby Union: South Africa v England Sky Sports Main Event, 3.00pm This afternoon England will be looking to dispatch the Springboks at a venue Eddie Jones has described as the “spiritual home of rugby”. They’ve not won at Ellis Park in Johannesburg since 1972 – their only triumph at the venue – and their last appearance here was a 36-27 defeat under Stuart Lancaster in 2012. Ellis Park was the setting for the Springboks’ World Cup final victory over New Zealand in 1995 and one of the sport’s finest moments – Nelson Mandela handing Francois Pienaar the Webb Ellis Cup. “It will be hostile but it’s fantastic and I am so excited about it,” says Jones. “In world rugby who do you want to beat? The Springboks at Ellis Park.” Owen Farrell will captain England, while the hugely talented New Zealand-born flanker Brad Shields is expected to play a part for the visitors. The River Wye with Will Millard BBC Two, 5.30pm; Scotland, 2.45pm After deconstructing the exploration documentary in the fascinating and alarming My Year with the Tribe, explorer Will Millard is on slightly surer ground with this new series in which he journeys down the River Wye. He begins his journey with a search for the river’s source on the slopes of Plynlimon, before he has an encounter with an entrepreneurial local sheep farmer. Take Me Out: Over 50s Special ITV, 8.00pm Three “older gentlemen” (I’m sure host Paddy McGuinness will make plenty of gags here) face 30 single “Golden Girls”, including a former nun and an ex-partner of action hero Jason Statham, in this one-off special of the ever-popular dating show. Hidden BBC Four, 9.00pm After Hinterland and Keeping Faith comes the BBC’s latest Welsh language crime thriller. Hidden has a familiar set-up – the discovery of a young girl’s body in a disused quarry tears a small community apart – but Sian Reese-Williams and Sion Alun Davies as DIs Cadi John and Owen Vaughan area leading pair to reckon with, and the atmosphere of unease benefits hugely from the mountainous surroundings. Come Together: the Rise of the Festival Sky Arts, 9.00pm The line-up for this documentary would grace any festival, with Pete Townshend and Noel Gallagher among the interviewees explaining the evolution of the modern music festival from its earliest jazz and blues incarnations in Newport, through the hippy beanfeasts of Monterey and Woodstock to Glastonbury and Coachella. There are also contributions from those who promote and document festivals, including Michael Eavis and D A Pennebaker. GT A Girl’s Guide to TV BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI Comedian Rachel Parris of The Mash Report presents her typically tongue-in-cheek advice for women looking to get ahead in television. GT Maleficent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 6.05pm Angelina Jolie stars as the titular Maleficent in Disney’s live-action reimagining of Sleeping Beauty, which follows her from a carefree fairy to Mistress of All Evil, muddling the distinction between hero and villain. Maleficent is happy in a kingdom of peculiar CGI beasts until her heart is broken by Stefan (Sharlto Copley), who inherits the throne. Seeking vengeance, she curses his baby, Princess Aurora (Elle Fanning). Thor: The Dark World (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 10.35pm This is a follow-up to the popular Norse god/superhero blockbuster. The rather flabby plot is alleviated by Chris Hemsworth’s hearty charisma, which provides frequent relief from Natalie Portman’s bland damsel-in-distress (attempts to beef up her character by making her an astrophysicist are undermined by her constant fainting). Highlights include Thor sliding down The Gherkin skyscraper. Made in Dagenham (2010) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.45pm Industrial action in pursuit of equal pay for women doesn’t sound too thrilling a subject, but Nigel Cole’s (Calendar Girls) film, based around the real-life strike from 1968, turns out to be a rousing crowd-pleaser. Sally Hawkins plays the reluctant ringleader of the workers who sew car seats at Ford’s Dagenham plant; Bob Hoskins is a union rep; Miranda Richardson is wonderful as Labour MP Barbara Castle. Sunday 10 June Smoldering: Aidan Turner returns as the eponymous hero Credit: BBC Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Not since Daniel Craig emerged from the waves in Casino Royale has there been so much fuss over a pair of wet pecs. Yes, Poldark is back for a fourth series and star Aidan Turner bares his chest for the fans in an opening scene that, if nothing else, suggests that he’s spent a lot of time exercising since the end of series three. This opener finds our swashbuckling hero Ross Poldark (Turner) back in full-on Cornish crusader mode when, following a disturbance in Truro, he locks horns with old enemy George Warleggan (Jack Farthing) over the fate of three good pals accused of riot and murder. Meanwhile, his flame-haired wife Demelza (Eleanor Tomlinson) can’t fend off her intimate longings following that illicit clinch in the dunes with poetry-penning aristo Hugh Armitage (Josh Whitehouse) – who, with the announcement of a general election, looks set to be diverted into a career at Westminster. But as Dr Dwight (Luke Norris) is at pains to point out, Armitage has a delicate constitution that might not suit the rough and tumble of parliamentary politics. Could Ross be persuaded to think again about throwing his hat in the ring? Gerard O’Donovan One-Day International Cricket: Scotland v England Sky Sports Main Event, 10.30am Having responded brilliantly to tie the Test series with Pakistan 1-1, England now turn their attention to Scotland, with this ODI at the Grange in Edinburgh. Songs of Praise BBC One, 1.25pm A year on from the Grenfell Tower disaster, Aled Jones presents a commemorative special edition exploring how the local community in North Kensington is coping and recovering. Britain Celebrates Live: 100 Years of Women’s Votes BBC One, 2.00pm Live coverage of today’s public processions through Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh and London to celebrate the centenary of women winning the right to vote. Tonight’s Antiques Roadshow, at 8pm, also takes up the theme, devoting its time to items with links to remarkable women. Formula 1: Canadian Grand Prix Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm After a Monaco Grand Prix that left championship leader Lewis Hamilton, in his words, “cold”, all eyes are on the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal, where Daniel Riccardio will be aiming to win back-to-back races. Soccer Aid for Unicef 2018 ITV, 6.30pm Live from Old Trafford, it’s the annual England v World XI charity football match between teams mixing celebrities and professional athletes. This year Robbie Williams’s England is taking on a team of international stars led by Usain Bolt. Other players include Mo Farah, Gordon Ramsay, Olly Murs, and Eric Cantona, and there’s live music from Jessie Ware. Countryfile BBC One, 7.00pm The last of three specials heads for Sandringham in Norfolk, the most private of the Royal retreats. Matt Baker discovers one of the Queen’s less-known interests – racing pigeons – while Ellie Harrison learns more about her love of horses. GO Patrick Melrose Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch’s brilliantly judged bravura performance has been one of the television highlights of 2018. Tonight, he brings the series to an entertaining and emotionally charged close as Patrick, separated and back in London in 2006, hopes to put the past to rest following his mother’s funeral. Cosby: The Women Speak Sony Crime Channel, 9.00pm Following Bill Cosby’s conviction on three counts of aggravated indecent assault, here’s another opportunity to see the A&E network’s 2015 one-hour special in which the extent of the allegations against the former TV icon for predatory sexual behaviour came to light. Over a dozen of the 50-plus women who accused him of rape and sexual assault going back decades talk of their experiences on screen for the first time, and how statute of limitation laws threatened to deprive them of justice. GO Despicable Me 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 5.10pm Despicable Me, 2010’s animated supervillain comedy, had a neat enough premise. It’s gone in this sequel, though, as Steve Carell’s bald antihero, Gru, is now a reformed soul, occupied with childcare rather than dastardly plots to steal the moon. Gru’s Minions – those knee-high yellow Tic-Tacs – provide the film’s one inspired idea as they’re injected with mutating serum by the film’s mystery baddy. Hulk (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.15pm Ang Lee’s dark and stylised version (a split screen mimics the panels of a comic book page) of the Incredible Hulk’s adventures is one of the best and underrated Marvel adaptations, even if it’s too complex at times. Eric Bana stars as Bruce, a scientist who’s exposed to gamma radiation and becomes a not-so-jolly green giant. This is a rampaging tale with bold special effects. Jennifer Connolly co-stars as his love interest. It (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Stephen King’s evil clown tale is no laughing matter. First a Warners miniseries in 1990, starring an unforgettable Tim Curry, and now a two-part film version. Here we continue the terrifying tale of Pennywise (Bill Skarsgård), but jump forward three decades to the summer of 1988, buying into the current vogue for Eighties teen-flick nostalgia. The scary stuff is petrifying when it peaks. Monday 11 June Community spirit: those affected by the fire tell their stories Credit: BBC Grenfell BBC One, 8.30pm Bafta-winning director Ben Anthony’s unmissable documentary about last year’s Grenfell Tower tragedy opens with a sea of faces, all of which gain poignant individual focus as the film progresses. The blaze at the 24-storey block of public housing in the London borough of Kensington, which resulted in 72 deaths, left a lasting impression in those featured here as each person tells their unique story about the horrific events and their impact. Survivors who lost their homes, the bereaved, bystanders and police all share their stories, although it’s a surprising omission that the firefighters who witnessed the horrors first hand don’t offer their account. Split screens give multiple perspectives on the same moment, and what starts out as a patchwork of personal experience knits together into a mighty whole, the collective voice of a community broken but defiant. In fact, much of the film focuses on the efforts of those affected to unite in the face of seeming indifference from the local council, who also have their say. As the ongoing inquiry continues, this devastating account offers a damning testament of its own, rife with accusations of injustice and neglect, underpinned by blistering rage and grief. Toby Dantzic Fight Like a Girl BBC One, 7.30pm The ferocious sport of female wrestling comes under the spotlight with this lively film following Scottish fighter Kimberly Benson. She combines a gruelling training regime with her daytime job, as she aims for her first world title in Japan. Long Lost Family: What Happened Next ITV, 9.00pm Nicky Campbell and Davina McCall catch up with families they’ve reunited. Cathie Cutler Evans, who met her half-sister in 2016, has found joy in her extended clan. But for Maureen Charlton, separated from her brother Michael for 40 years, progress been painstaking. Dan Snow’s Norman Walks PBS America, 9.00pm Dan Snow sorts fact from fiction as he investigates the history of Norman Britain in this new series. He starts off on the Sussex coast, where aided by evidence from the Bayeux Tapestry, he pieces together William the Conqueror’s 11th-century coastal invasion. Flowers Channel 4, 10.00pm Will Sharpe’s gloriously dark comedy about a dysfunctional family returns with a double bill, then continues each night this week. A seemingly chipper Maurice (Julian Bennett) and Deborah (Olivia Colman) are on a caravanning holiday, while daughter Amy (Sophia di Martino) has a brash new girlfriend. Storyville: City Of Ghosts BBC Four, 10.30pm There are images of death in Matthew Heineman’s film so harrowing that it’s hard to keep watching, but these are the sights that Heineman’s subject, rebel group Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered, face daily. The renegade collective have made it their task to secretly film the atrocities committed by Isil in the Syrian city of Raqqa, and show the rest of the world the reality of the regime. It’s an astonishing act of citizen-led journalism, and the participants’ fear and grief, as well as their sense of purpose, are starkly captured in Heineman’s blunt and brutal chronicle of a city in turmoil. TD Prisons Uncovered: Out Of Control? ITV, 10.45pm; Scotland, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.15pm; not UTV In 2016, HMP Birmingham saw the worst prison riot for 25 years, in which 600 inmates were freed from their cells. This sobering documentary looks at the factors behind the incident and reflects on the prison system. TD Our Kind of Traitor (2016) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor stars in this so-so John le Carré adaptation as poetry lecturer Perry Makepeace, who becomes embroiled in negotiations to bring Dima (Stellan Skarsgård), a well-connected Russian oligarch, into the fold of British intelligence. Skarsgård is the standout here, charging into his role with pungency, playing Dima as a bedraggled beast of Moscow’s criminal underworld. The Shining (1980) ★★★★★ TCM, 9.00pm Set in a deserted hotel that’s in the care of writer Jack (Jack Nicholson) and his family for the winter, Stanley Kubrick’s brilliant psycho-horror, based on the novel by Stephen King, is subtly unsettling. But it’s stuffed, too, with unforgettable nerve-jangling shocks, including the moment when the crazed Jack smashes his way through a door with an axe as his wife (Shelley Duvall) cowers in the corner. Teen Wolf (1985) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 12.10am Critics howled at this preposterous teenage comedy but audiences loved it, perhaps because it came out shortly after its star Michael J Fox’s finest hour: Back to the Future. The plot – in which Fox’s likeable nerd morphs into a basketball-playing werewolf – is almost as unlikely as the fact that he still looked fresh out of the 11th grade at the ripe old age of 25. An unparalleled analysis of puberty and adolescence. Tuesday 12 June Hitting the books: Tanisha is a pupil at Townley Grammar Credit: BBC Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland & Wales, 11.15pm Jamie Pickup’s series has walked a tightrope with considerable skill, highlighting the inarguable inequities of our educational system that favours a selective approach, while also acknowledging its considerable benefits and observing the situation from the points of view of both pupils and teachers. It concludes with mock GCSE exams approaching and students at Erith School, a secondary modern, and neighbouring institution Townley Grammar, having to assess their suitability for further education. Some, it’s fair to say, are taking it more seriously than others. Townley pupil Tanisha is underperforming and low on confidence, yet keen to raise her game and nurtured by staff aware of her limitations and capabilities. At Erith, meanwhile, Denisa is angling for a place in Townley Sixth Form and seems more than capable of attaining it, but staffing shortages are crippling science classes amid an endless round of supply teachers and stand-ins. “It keeps me awake at night,” says the admirable faculty head Mr Appiah-Gates. It’s a desperately difficult situation and one that reaches an unexpected conclusion, as common ground is found between two unlikely bedfellows. Gabriel Tate The Champions Netflix, from today Created by Mindy Kaling, this new NBC sitcom plays a bachelor gym owner (Anders Holm) off against his gay, estranged son-cum-new flatmate (the brilliant J J Totah). Smartly written and nimbly performed, it’s a solid mainstream hit. Ackley Bridge Channel 4, 8.00pm Matt Evans and Penny Woolcock continue to keep an implausible number of plates spinning as the fizzy pre-watershed drama continues to conduct its handbrake narrative turns. Both Jordan (Samuel Bottomley) and Missy (Poppy Lee Friar) handle cash shortages in an equally desperate manner, and the arrival of Steve’s ex Claire (Kimberly Walsh) puts head teacher Mandy’s (Jo Joyner) nose out of joint. Our Girl BBC One, 9.00pm Georgie (Michelle Keegan) learns an astonishing secret about the local crime boss, before a major rescue operation begins as the flawed but well-meaning military drama continues. Flights from Hell: Caught on Camera ITV, 9.00pm ITV lays down its prime-time weapons as the World Cup looms, as demonstrated by this daft three-part series of incidents filmed at 30,000 feet. These include what an engine explosion feels like to those on board the plane to the impact of volcanic ash and an extraordinarily dramatic landing. Seeing Daylight: the Photography of Dorothy Bohm Sky Arts, 9.00pm Arriving in England in 1939 to escape the Nazis, Dorothy Bohm became a pioneer of street photography and portraiture of deep humanity. This profile examines her life and work. Elvis: the Searcher Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on Peter Guralnick’s epochal two-part biography, Thom Zimny’s HBO epic is a treat, focusing as much on Presley the man as Elvis the icon, Part one follows him out of Tupelo, into Sun Records and on to the US army, with part two’s fall, rise and fall again airing Wednesday at 10.00pm. GT Ugly Me: My Life with Body Dysmorphia BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm First shown on BBC Three, this harrowing film follows 29-year-old Liane, seeking treatment for the titular condition which has left her self-worth in tatters. GT Field of Dreams (1989) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.50pm Kevin Costner clearly likes a baseball movie – he’s made five of them. In this one he’s an Iowa farmer instructed by a mysterious voice to build a baseball pitch in the middle of a cornfield, which is soon occupied by a gang of ghostly players from the past. Enjoyably dotty, and responsible for the misquote, “If you build it, they will come” – it’s actually “he will come” – the fantasy is elevated by brilliant performances all around. A Good Day to Die Hard (2013) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The fifth film in the Die Hard franchise takes place in Russia, where our hero, Bruce Willis’s now grizzled John McClane, arrives in Moscow to hunt for his estranged son Jack (Jai Courtney). McClane suspects that he may have become a drug dealer, but it transpires he is in fact working undercover for the CIA, and Dad blunders in on him mid-mission. An enjoyable but clunky thriller. The Departed (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Nothing beats watching a great director in his comfort zone. Martin Scorsese’s gangland thriller – the film that finally won him an Oscar – is riveting. The plot revolves around the local police force’s efforts to stamp out Boston crime lord Frank Costello (a magnificently malevolent Jack Nicholson). There are powerhouse performances, too, from Leonardo Di Caprio, Matt Damon and Mark Wahlberg. Wednesday 13 June From Russia with love: David Dimbleby Credit: BBC Putin’s Russia with David Dimbleby BBC One, 9.00pm, Wales, 11.05pm “In a democracy if you fail to deliver on economic promises, if you surround yourself with cronies and use the law to suppress opposition, you would rightly be thrown out on your ear. But this is Russia, they do things differently here…” So begins David Dimbleby’s thoughtful film in which – as the eyes of the world turn towards Moscow for the 2018 World Cup football tournament – he takes the opportunity to cast an eye over Vladimir Putin’s 18 years as leader and assess the state of Russia today, especially in regard to the West. What he finds is a country in deep economic crisis yet with a people that seem to happily hero-worship Putin and mostly accept a state machine that controls almost every aspect of their lives with the willing assistance of security services, media, military and church. Dimbleby meets ordinary contented Russians as well as protesters, human rights lawyers, journalists and official spokespeople, coming away with a sense, ultimately, that Putin’s popularity is rooted in his strongman image and media-backed levels of suspicion and hostility towards the West unseen since the end of the Cold War. Gerard O’Donovan The Fight for Women’s Bodies BBC Three, from 10.00am Following the landmark vote to legalise abortion in the Republic of Ireland, Ellie Flynn looks back at the issues through the eyes of campaigners on both sides. Great Rail Restorations with Peter Snow Channel 4, 8.00pm Here is a visit to the Isle of Wight, where Peter Snow and his team set out to restore an 1864 wooden train carriage that has served as a holiday chalet since it was decommissioned in the Twenties. Before Grenfell: A Hidden History BBC Two, 9.00pm A year since the Grenfell Tower fire, residents of Kensington relate how the London borough has become the most unequal place in Britain, with the gap between rich and poor once again as extreme as in the 1860s when developers first built housing for the rich in Notting Hill next to the worst slum in London. Can Science Make Me Perfect? With Alice Roberts BBC Four, 9.00pm Millions of years have gone into the human body: lots of great evolutionary adaptations but lots of imperfections, too. In a film that’s as entertaining as it is instructive, anatomist Alice Roberts takes on a challenge to design a better body than the one we get at birth. The Fast Fix: Diabetes ITV, 9.00pm Anita Rani presents a new two-part series exploring whether it is possible for people suffering from type 2 diabetes to reverse the condition by adhering to a radical diet. By consuming just 800 calories a day, can they “fast themselves better”? Concludes tomorrow Big Beasts: Last of the Giants Sky One, 9.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee explores why size matters in the natural world. Beginning in the Americas, he checks out the planet’s largest predator, the sperm whale; comes face to face with a grizzly bear and gets rather too close to an anaconda that’s as long as a bus. GO How to Start an Airline Channel 4, 10.30pm This documentary follows Bangladeshi-British entrepreneur Kazi Shafiqur Rahman as he attempts to break into the fiercely competitive airline industry while also fulfilling the demands of his faith by insisting that the airline must comply with the teachings of Islam. GO Regarding Henry (1991) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 6.50pm Telling the story of a hotshot lawyer (Harrison Ford) who learns to question his values after a head injury, this film formed a companion piece to Wolf (1994), with Jack Nicholson as a publisher who is bitten by a wolf and turns into a boardroom predator. Directed by Mike Nichols, whose Oscar-winning movie The Graduate was a cinematic landmark of the 1960s, it’s a bit of an embarrassment, but interesting nevertheless. Source Code (2011) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal repeatedly finds himself reliving the last eight minutes in the life of a man on board a train which is about to be destroyed by a bomb as part of an experiment. Meanwhile, scientists Vera Farmiga and Jeffrey Wright are monitoring Gyllenhaal’s exploits. Duncan Jones confirmed the promise of his directing debut Moon with this thrilling whodunit, which also serves as a moving meditation on life. Beetlejuice (1988) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm Michael Keaton is an actor of rare versatility (as his triumphant role in Birdman proved). In this cult, Oscar-winning film by Tim Burton, Keaton shines as a con artist ghost called Beetlejuice, who aims to help two other ghosts (Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis) to scare the obnoxious new residents out of their old house. But he then falls for lovely goth Lydia (Winona Ryder), the family’s daughter. Thursday 14 June It’s kicking off: Mark Pugatch (centre) leads ITV’s presenting team Credit: ITV FIFA World Cup 2018: Opening Ceremony ITV, 2.30pm Regardless of how you think Russia got to be awarded the 21st staging of football’s biggest tournament (by corrupt means or otherwise), it’s time to cast those aspersions aside because the Russia 2018 championship is here. But, two hours before a ball is kicked, the opening ceremony marks the official start of the highest prize in football. And as we all know, entertaining opening ceremonies can be a great curtain-raiser for sport events, if they are done well – think the London 2012 Olympics. This one takes place at the 80,000-seat Luzhniki Stadium, which is the jewel in Russia’s crown of stadiums and will also host the final on July 15. Mark Pougatch presents the live coverage of the ceremony, which is headlined by actor and rapper Will Smith and Nicky Jam, who will perform Live It Up, the official World Cup song, which has received mixed reviews. As well as that, the ceremony will include local performers showing off different aspects of Russian culture, with gymnasts and trampolinists in among the fireworks and performances on display. The matches get under way following the ceremony with the host nation against Saudi Arabia. Clive Morgan Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm While the BBC’s post-Bake Off cookery contest may not have set the world alight, it’s given the judges plenty to get their teeth into. This week, it’s the final, and three challenges stand between the contestants and the title: a summer favourite, their best main course and a pudding. Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm After three weeks of cute animals, Springwatch comes to an end with Chris Packham, Michaela Strachan and co reliving this year’s best moments at Sherborne Park Estate. The Trouble with Women with Anne Robinson BBC One, 9.00pm As a journalist and TV presenter, Anne Robinson shattered the glass ceiling as she built her career. She imagined that now, 50 years later, we’d be much closer to achieving equality than we are. With the ongoing discussions about gender pay, Robinson asks women around the UK what’s preventing parity? Inside HM Prison Wormwood Scrubs Channel 5, 9.00pm Wormwood Scrubs has had some infamous inmates: from serial killers Ian Brady and Peter Sutcliffe to rockers Pete Docherty and Keith Richards. This documentary exploring the prison’s history tells the stories of a Soviet spy who escaped from the jail and its best-known inmate, Charles Bronson. CM Missions BBC Four, 10.00pm and 10.20pm The absorbing French sci-fi drama about the first manned mission to Mars concludes with its final double header. This week, psychiatrist Jeanne (Hélène Viviès) discovers the reason behind cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov’s (Arben Bajraktaraj) mission. I Am Evidence Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Even though Mariska Hargitay spent almost 20 years as crime fighter Olivia Benson in Law & Order: SVU, nothing prepared her for what she was to learn in real life. In this shocking documentary, Hargitay investigates the flaws in the US justice system that have allowed tens of thousands of rape kits to go untested for years. It’s a tough film to watch at times, especially as it highlights the issue through deeply personal and harrowing, first-person accounts from four women whose attacks are still fresh in their minds decades after the assaults due to a lack of closure. “I felt like my body was a crime scene,” one of the women recalls. CM Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby (2006) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm Will Ferrell fans will need little encouragement to lap up this affectionate send-up of Nascar racing, redneck culture and male bonding. Ferrell pays a Nascar speed-demon who is challenged by a gay, French Formula One driver (Sacha Baron Cohen), to see who is the ultimate racer. It’s a full throttle comedy that plays to Ferrell’s strengths. The Hills Have Eyes (2006) ★★★☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm French director Alexandre Aja makes his Hollywood debut with this grim but gripping remake of Wes Craven’s semi-cult horror film about a family battling a brood of mutants in the New Mexico desert. Aja ups the visceral violence, and the characters – including Ted Levine and Kathleen Quinlan as the parents – are sufficiently well-drawn to make the outcome shocking. The Ghost (2010) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor plays a talented ghost writer, who lands a lucrative contract to edit the memoirs of Adam Lang (Pierce Brosnan), the former UK Prime Minister, in this Roman Polanski adaptation of the Robert Harris novel. Soon after, Lang is accused of committing a war crime and the Ghost finds himself drawn into a world of dangerous secrets that put his life at risk. This is a deeply unsettling thriller. Friday 15 June One connected flow: Dan Jones on the Grand Union Canal Building Britain’s Canals Channel 5, 8.00pm His tattoos may have a nerdish medieval theme, but historian Dan Jones still seems too hip to be fronting a stuffy-sounding series about Britain’s iconic canals. Jones’s lively style and eye for interesting detail, however, keeps this subject surprisingly fresh, as he begins this three-part run with a look at the Grand Union Canal, the longest stretch of man-made waterway in Britain. It’s a story that reaches back 200 years, when the demands of the Industrial Revolution called for a speedy way to move goods between Birmingham and London, and the country’s engineering super-brains found ingenious means to link seven separate channels into one connected flow. As Jones explains, while the financial benefits were big, construction of the Grand Union was time consuming and dangerous. The 12-year stop-start struggle to complete the technically complex Blisworth Hill tunnel, for example, saw the deaths of up to 60 workers. Unable to compete with the advent of the speedy steam train, the Grand Union itself soon declined too. The canal is now a source of summertime pleasure, so this is a welcome reminder of its once vital purpose. Toby Dantzic Queer Eye Netflix, from today The success of this heart-warming makeover series, which returned to much acclaim earlier this year, was something of a surprise. Netflix then have been quick to capitalise, snappily rolling out another run barely four months later, with the likeable quintet all returning for more lifestyle revamping. Details are so far scant, but the show’s culture guru Karamo Brown has hinted that women and the trans community could be featured. World Cup 2018: Portugal v Spain BBC One, 6.20pm The pick of this week’s World Cup matches happens on day two at the Fisht Stadium in Sochi and comes from Group B. Expect a tense affair as Spain, who suffered the ignominy of failing to make it to the knockout rounds four years ago, take on their bitter rivals Portugal. The Crystal Maze: Celebrity Special Channel 4, 9.00pm Former footballer Dennis Wise heads the team of celebrity hopefuls, joined by Katie Price, Roman Kemp, Bez and Binky Felstead.Wise struggles with a fiendish skill game, while a number-based challenge sets Felstead’s head spinning. Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm Jane McDonald wraps up her Antipodean adventure in New Zealand’s North Island. She rubs noses with a Maori tribe in Napier, explores Rotorua’s dramatic geothermal landscapes and views Auckland’s skyline from a helicopter. Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.40pm This is a final bout of topical treats from veteran impressionist Tracey Ullman. Favourites Angela Merkel and Rupert Murdoch get a look in, alongside more takes on Jeremy Corbyn, Michael Gove and Nanny, the dedicated carer of Jacob Rees-Mogg. Africa: A Journey Into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm Apart from the occasional act on Later… with Jools Holland, world music doesn’t get much airtime on our TVs, so this beguiling series helmed by DJ Rita Ray offers a welcome insight into its traditions. For her final foray, Ray heads to Mali, home to more Grammy award-winning artists than any other African country. From her attempts at a sinuous wedding dance to meeting renowned harp player Toumani Diabaté, Ray’s journey is full of stirring encounters. TD Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 10.00pm A fitting reminder of Dale Winton’s easy-going charm, this swansong travelogue series resumes after a hiatus with our host in ocean-front Miami. Highlights include a trip to Little Havana, the city’s Cuban quarter, and a look at fashion designer Versace’s opulent former home. TD Blade Runner 2049 (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm In a similar but distinct way to Ridley Scott’s masterful original, Blade Runner 2049 mulls one of the meatiest questions around: is surface all that there is, or do life’s currents run deeper than the things we can see, hear and touch? Denis Villeneuve’s film toys with both options, making neither a comfort – and in the process, maps out a provocative blockbuster. Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford star. Red (2010) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. The Wolf of Wall Street (2013) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 11.40pm Soaked in sex, drugs and scandal, Martin Scorsese’s epic is based on the memoir of stockbroker Jordan Belfort, who spent the Nineties illegally amassing a vast personal fortune. With a fantastic performance from Leonardo DiCaprio, this morally bankrupt romp was lauded by audiences and critics alike. Jonah Hill and Margot Robbie co-star. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: The Crystal Maze, Sense8 and Arctic Monkeys Live at the BBC
Friday 8 June The Crystal Maze: Celebrity Special Channel 4, 9.00pm Channel 4’s successful reboot of the cult Eighties series continues its golden run of form with another charity special featuring people who, in the words of Maze Master Richard Ayoade, “we have all agreed, for some reason, to call… celebrities”. Ayoade is unstinting in his good-natured jibes, and his targets are equally obliging in laughing them off: this time around, it’s Olympians Kelly Holmes and Greg Rutherford, Hollyoaks actress Jorgie Porter, YouTube vlogger Alfie Deyes and grime MC Big Narstie. The latter comes in for the roughest ride, and indeed you may not see a more agonising sequence all year than Big Narstie wrestling with Jarhead’s (Adam Buxton) not-enormously taxing riddles, but his utter delight at being involved (“I’m GASSED!”) earns him a pass. The tasks are the usual ingenious grab-bag, honouring the heritage of the series while also advancing it, from the daft (balancing on space hoppers) to the fiendish (blowing a ball around a maze with “directional guffs” from an air pump). For his part, Ayoade once again proves himself the natural heir to Richard O’Brien in surreal wit (pace Ed Tudor-Pole and Stephan Merchant), and the cause, Stand Up 2 Cancer, is unimpeachable. GT Dispatches: After Grenfell Channel 4, 7.30pm In spite of a wealth of promises in the wake of the catastrophic fire in Grenfell Tower, claims abound that too many of the country’s tower blocks remain unsafe. Ed Howker investigates whether expert advice has been heeded and looks at the risks, both existing and newly discovered, for the tower’s residents. GT Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm Channel 5’s first-ever Bafta-winning show returns for a trip down under, with former cruise ship singer Jane McDonald exploring Sydney, Tasmania, Dunedin and Christchurch. GT Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm Ullman continues to play to her strengths with her roll call of uncanny impersonations of famous people. Theresa May, Angela Merkle and Nicola Sturgeon are back, along with her bizarrely convincing Michael Gove, while Jacob Rees-Mogg (Liam Hourican) and his Nanny (Ullman) endure yet more humiliation. GT Arctic Monkeys Live at the BBC BBC Two, 11.05pm Alex Turner and his band play selections from their divisive new album, Tranquillity Base Hotel & Casino, as well as a few oldies, including A Certain Romance, to reassure their more conservative fans. GT Cloak and Dagger Amazon Prime, from today Marvel’s latest TV offering is this teen series in which Tandy Bowen (Olivia Holt) and Tyrone Johnson (Aubrey Joseph) discover new, mysteriously connected superpowers. GT Sense8 Netflix, from today The Wachowskis’ kaleidoscopic saga ends with a two-hour episode created after its fans demanded closure when the series was axed. With Wolfgang (Max Riemelt) missing, Capheus (Toby Onwumere) running for office, Sun Bak (Bae Doona) on the run and the mysterious Chairman still at large, there’s no shortage of loose ends. GT The Staircase Netflix, from today This 2004 eight-parter documented the 16-year court battle over the fate of novelist Michael Peterson, accused of pushing his wife down the stairs to her death. Landing on Netflix with new, equally gripping episodes, Jean-Xavier de Lestrade’s series is both the old and the new Making a Murderer. GT The Way Way Back (2013) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.55pm This coming-of-age story feels like familiar terrain, but it’s agreeably done. Duncan (Liam James) learns about life, love and self-esteem from a gang of water-park employees, including the excellent Sam Rockwell, when forced to go on holiday with his mother (Toni Collette) and her boyfriend (Steve Carrell). The script flows and there’s enough melancholy and edge to the overall comic tone for its charm to prevail. Bend It Like Beckham (2002) ★★★☆☆ ITV, 10.45pm Keira Knightley’s career kicked off with this feelgood football-themed comedy drama from Bhaji on the Beach director Gurinder Chadha. She stars alongside Parminder Nagra as one of two 18-year-old girls who set out to make it as professional footballers, despite their families’ best efforts to stop them. Next of Kin’s Archie Panjabi and Shaznay Lewis (of reunited Nineties girl band All Saints fame) co-star. Platoon (1986) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 11.00pm This is a chance to see a young Charlie Sheen at the start of his turbulent career. The horrors of the Vietnam War are seen through the prism of a fresh-faced college dropout (Sheen) who finds himself in the thick of battle while Willem Dafoe plays his sympathetic sergeant. Director Oliver Stone used his own experiences of serving in the US army during the war to inform this harrowing film that won four Oscars. Saturday 9 June Controversial: the writer and intellectual Germaine Greer is profiled Credit: BBC Germaine Bloody Greer BBC Two, 9.00pm The personal views of Germaine Greer once had a universality and pungency about them that the world so desperately needed. But her recent comments about rape, violence on TV and transpeople, by contrast, resemble self-important trolling: wilfully controversial, dreadfully retrograde and a blight on a considerable legacy. This thrilling profile is a reminder of why she still matters, albeit perhaps more for what she was than what she has become. Novelist Zoë Heller and journalist Rosie Boycott are among those singing her praises, while Greer herself proves as unable as ever to avoid calling out a daft question or savaging a sacred cow. The footage is exciting and superbly mounted by director Clare Beavan. Whether it’s Greer’s early films, her steadfastness in the face of the abuse sent her way after The Female Eunuch was published, and her evisceration of Norman Mailer during a famous 1971 set-to in New York, Greer remains a most rugged individual. “I don’t think Germaine and the word ‘sisterhood’ are natural bedfellows,” reckons Boycott. What about that legacy? “I don’t do regret and I don’t do things that I regret,” Greer concludes. By any standards, a remarkable life. Gabriel Tate Trooping the Colour BBC One, 10.30am Marking the official birthday of the Queen, the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards will conduct their annual pageant on Horse Guards Parade, introduced by Huw Edwards and with J J Chalmers offering behind-the-scenes insights. There are highlights at 7.30pm on BBC Two. French Open Tennis: The women’s final ITV, 1.30pm Action on the 14th day at Roland Garros features the women’s singles final in the second Grand Slam tournament of the year. Jelena Ostapenko met Simona Halep in last year’s showpiece match, where the Latvian defeated the number three seed 4-6, 6-4, 6-3 to become the first person from her country to win a Grand Slam tournament and the first unseeded player to win the French Open since 1933. The men’s final, which was won for a record 10th time by Spaniard Rafael Nadal last year, takes place on Sunday at 1.30pm on ITV. Women’s International One-Day Cricket: England Women v South Africa Women Sky Sports Main Event, 1.30pm It’s the opening one-day international of the three-match series, which takes place at New Road in Worcester. Katherine Brunt, Georgia Elwiss, Laura Marsh, Sarah Taylor and Lauren Winfield all return to the England squad after missing out on the Indian tour. World Cup-winning duo Fran Wilson and Alex Hartley miss out, however. International Rugby Union: South Africa v England Sky Sports Main Event, 3.00pm This afternoon England will be looking to dispatch the Springboks at a venue Eddie Jones has described as the “spiritual home of rugby”. They’ve not won at Ellis Park in Johannesburg since 1972 – their only triumph at the venue – and their last appearance here was a 36-27 defeat under Stuart Lancaster in 2012. Ellis Park was the setting for the Springboks’ World Cup final victory over New Zealand in 1995 and one of the sport’s finest moments – Nelson Mandela handing Francois Pienaar the Webb Ellis Cup. “It will be hostile but it’s fantastic and I am so excited about it,” says Jones. “In world rugby who do you want to beat? The Springboks at Ellis Park.” Owen Farrell will captain England, while the hugely talented New Zealand-born flanker Brad Shields is expected to play a part for the visitors. The River Wye with Will Millard BBC Two, 5.30pm; Scotland, 2.45pm After deconstructing the exploration documentary in the fascinating and alarming My Year with the Tribe, explorer Will Millard is on slightly surer ground with this new series in which he journeys down the River Wye. He begins his journey with a search for the river’s source on the slopes of Plynlimon, before he has an encounter with an entrepreneurial local sheep farmer. Take Me Out: Over 50s Special ITV, 8.00pm Three “older gentlemen” (I’m sure host Paddy McGuinness will make plenty of gags here) face 30 single “Golden Girls”, including a former nun and an ex-partner of action hero Jason Statham, in this one-off special of the ever-popular dating show. Hidden BBC Four, 9.00pm After Hinterland and Keeping Faith comes the BBC’s latest Welsh language crime thriller. Hidden has a familiar set-up – the discovery of a young girl’s body in a disused quarry tears a small community apart – but Sian Reese-Williams and Sion Alun Davies as DIs Cadi John and Owen Vaughan area leading pair to reckon with, and the atmosphere of unease benefits hugely from the mountainous surroundings. Come Together: the Rise of the Festival Sky Arts, 9.00pm The line-up for this documentary would grace any festival, with Pete Townshend and Noel Gallagher among the interviewees explaining the evolution of the modern music festival from its earliest jazz and blues incarnations in Newport, through the hippy beanfeasts of Monterey and Woodstock to Glastonbury and Coachella. There are also contributions from those who promote and document festivals, including Michael Eavis and D A Pennebaker. GT A Girl’s Guide to TV BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI Comedian Rachel Parris of The Mash Report presents her typically tongue-in-cheek advice for women looking to get ahead in television. GT Maleficent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 6.05pm Angelina Jolie stars as the titular Maleficent in Disney’s live-action reimagining of Sleeping Beauty, which follows her from a carefree fairy to Mistress of All Evil, muddling the distinction between hero and villain. Maleficent is happy in a kingdom of peculiar CGI beasts until her heart is broken by Stefan (Sharlto Copley), who inherits the throne. Seeking vengeance, she curses his baby, Princess Aurora (Elle Fanning). Thor: The Dark World (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 10.35pm This is a follow-up to the popular Norse god/superhero blockbuster. The rather flabby plot is alleviated by Chris Hemsworth’s hearty charisma, which provides frequent relief from Natalie Portman’s bland damsel-in-distress (attempts to beef up her character by making her an astrophysicist are undermined by her constant fainting). Highlights include Thor sliding down The Gherkin skyscraper. Made in Dagenham (2010) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.45pm Industrial action in pursuit of equal pay for women doesn’t sound too thrilling a subject, but Nigel Cole’s (Calendar Girls) film, based around the real-life strike from 1968, turns out to be a rousing crowd-pleaser. Sally Hawkins plays the reluctant ringleader of the workers who sew car seats at Ford’s Dagenham plant; Bob Hoskins is a union rep; Miranda Richardson is wonderful as Labour MP Barbara Castle. Sunday 10 June Smoldering: Aidan Turner returns as the eponymous hero Credit: BBC Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Not since Daniel Craig emerged from the waves in Casino Royale has there been so much fuss over a pair of wet pecs. Yes, Poldark is back for a fourth series and star Aidan Turner bares his chest for the fans in an opening scene that, if nothing else, suggests that he’s spent a lot of time exercising since the end of series three. This opener finds our swashbuckling hero Ross Poldark (Turner) back in full-on Cornish crusader mode when, following a disturbance in Truro, he locks horns with old enemy George Warleggan (Jack Farthing) over the fate of three good pals accused of riot and murder. Meanwhile, his flame-haired wife Demelza (Eleanor Tomlinson) can’t fend off her intimate longings following that illicit clinch in the dunes with poetry-penning aristo Hugh Armitage (Josh Whitehouse) – who, with the announcement of a general election, looks set to be diverted into a career at Westminster. But as Dr Dwight (Luke Norris) is at pains to point out, Armitage has a delicate constitution that might not suit the rough and tumble of parliamentary politics. Could Ross be persuaded to think again about throwing his hat in the ring? Gerard O’Donovan One-Day International Cricket: Scotland v England Sky Sports Main Event, 10.30am Having responded brilliantly to tie the Test series with Pakistan 1-1, England now turn their attention to Scotland, with this ODI at the Grange in Edinburgh. Songs of Praise BBC One, 1.25pm A year on from the Grenfell Tower disaster, Aled Jones presents a commemorative special edition exploring how the local community in North Kensington is coping and recovering. Britain Celebrates Live: 100 Years of Women’s Votes BBC One, 2.00pm Live coverage of today’s public processions through Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh and London to celebrate the centenary of women winning the right to vote. Tonight’s Antiques Roadshow, at 8pm, also takes up the theme, devoting its time to items with links to remarkable women. Formula 1: Canadian Grand Prix Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm After a Monaco Grand Prix that left championship leader Lewis Hamilton, in his words, “cold”, all eyes are on the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal, where Daniel Riccardio will be aiming to win back-to-back races. Soccer Aid for Unicef 2018 ITV, 6.30pm Live from Old Trafford, it’s the annual England v World XI charity football match between teams mixing celebrities and professional athletes. This year Robbie Williams’s England is taking on a team of international stars led by Usain Bolt. Other players include Mo Farah, Gordon Ramsay, Olly Murs, and Eric Cantona, and there’s live music from Jessie Ware. Countryfile BBC One, 7.00pm The last of three specials heads for Sandringham in Norfolk, the most private of the Royal retreats. Matt Baker discovers one of the Queen’s less-known interests – racing pigeons – while Ellie Harrison learns more about her love of horses. GO Patrick Melrose Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch’s brilliantly judged bravura performance has been one of the television highlights of 2018. Tonight, he brings the series to an entertaining and emotionally charged close as Patrick, separated and back in London in 2006, hopes to put the past to rest following his mother’s funeral. Cosby: The Women Speak Sony Crime Channel, 9.00pm Following Bill Cosby’s conviction on three counts of aggravated indecent assault, here’s another opportunity to see the A&E network’s 2015 one-hour special in which the extent of the allegations against the former TV icon for predatory sexual behaviour came to light. Over a dozen of the 50-plus women who accused him of rape and sexual assault going back decades talk of their experiences on screen for the first time, and how statute of limitation laws threatened to deprive them of justice. GO Despicable Me 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 5.10pm Despicable Me, 2010’s animated supervillain comedy, had a neat enough premise. It’s gone in this sequel, though, as Steve Carell’s bald antihero, Gru, is now a reformed soul, occupied with childcare rather than dastardly plots to steal the moon. Gru’s Minions – those knee-high yellow Tic-Tacs – provide the film’s one inspired idea as they’re injected with mutating serum by the film’s mystery baddy. Hulk (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.15pm Ang Lee’s dark and stylised version (a split screen mimics the panels of a comic book page) of the Incredible Hulk’s adventures is one of the best and underrated Marvel adaptations, even if it’s too complex at times. Eric Bana stars as Bruce, a scientist who’s exposed to gamma radiation and becomes a not-so-jolly green giant. This is a rampaging tale with bold special effects. Jennifer Connolly co-stars as his love interest. It (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Stephen King’s evil clown tale is no laughing matter. First a Warners miniseries in 1990, starring an unforgettable Tim Curry, and now a two-part film version. Here we continue the terrifying tale of Pennywise (Bill Skarsgård), but jump forward three decades to the summer of 1988, buying into the current vogue for Eighties teen-flick nostalgia. The scary stuff is petrifying when it peaks. Monday 11 June Community spirit: those affected by the fire tell their stories Credit: BBC Grenfell BBC One, 8.30pm Bafta-winning director Ben Anthony’s unmissable documentary about last year’s Grenfell Tower tragedy opens with a sea of faces, all of which gain poignant individual focus as the film progresses. The blaze at the 24-storey block of public housing in the London borough of Kensington, which resulted in 72 deaths, left a lasting impression in those featured here as each person tells their unique story about the horrific events and their impact. Survivors who lost their homes, the bereaved, bystanders and police all share their stories, although it’s a surprising omission that the firefighters who witnessed the horrors first hand don’t offer their account. Split screens give multiple perspectives on the same moment, and what starts out as a patchwork of personal experience knits together into a mighty whole, the collective voice of a community broken but defiant. In fact, much of the film focuses on the efforts of those affected to unite in the face of seeming indifference from the local council, who also have their say. As the ongoing inquiry continues, this devastating account offers a damning testament of its own, rife with accusations of injustice and neglect, underpinned by blistering rage and grief. Toby Dantzic Fight Like a Girl BBC One, 7.30pm The ferocious sport of female wrestling comes under the spotlight with this lively film following Scottish fighter Kimberly Benson. She combines a gruelling training regime with her daytime job, as she aims for her first world title in Japan. Long Lost Family: What Happened Next ITV, 9.00pm Nicky Campbell and Davina McCall catch up with families they’ve reunited. Cathie Cutler Evans, who met her half-sister in 2016, has found joy in her extended clan. But for Maureen Charlton, separated from her brother Michael for 40 years, progress been painstaking. Dan Snow’s Norman Walks PBS America, 9.00pm Dan Snow sorts fact from fiction as he investigates the history of Norman Britain in this new series. He starts off on the Sussex coast, where aided by evidence from the Bayeux Tapestry, he pieces together William the Conqueror’s 11th-century coastal invasion. Flowers Channel 4, 10.00pm Will Sharpe’s gloriously dark comedy about a dysfunctional family returns with a double bill, then continues each night this week. A seemingly chipper Maurice (Julian Bennett) and Deborah (Olivia Colman) are on a caravanning holiday, while daughter Amy (Sophia di Martino) has a brash new girlfriend. Storyville: City Of Ghosts BBC Four, 10.30pm There are images of death in Matthew Heineman’s film so harrowing that it’s hard to keep watching, but these are the sights that Heineman’s subject, rebel group Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered, face daily. The renegade collective have made it their task to secretly film the atrocities committed by Isil in the Syrian city of Raqqa, and show the rest of the world the reality of the regime. It’s an astonishing act of citizen-led journalism, and the participants’ fear and grief, as well as their sense of purpose, are starkly captured in Heineman’s blunt and brutal chronicle of a city in turmoil. TD Prisons Uncovered: Out Of Control? ITV, 10.45pm; Scotland, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.15pm; not UTV In 2016, HMP Birmingham saw the worst prison riot for 25 years, in which 600 inmates were freed from their cells. This sobering documentary looks at the factors behind the incident and reflects on the prison system. TD Our Kind of Traitor (2016) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor stars in this so-so John le Carré adaptation as poetry lecturer Perry Makepeace, who becomes embroiled in negotiations to bring Dima (Stellan Skarsgård), a well-connected Russian oligarch, into the fold of British intelligence. Skarsgård is the standout here, charging into his role with pungency, playing Dima as a bedraggled beast of Moscow’s criminal underworld. The Shining (1980) ★★★★★ TCM, 9.00pm Set in a deserted hotel that’s in the care of writer Jack (Jack Nicholson) and his family for the winter, Stanley Kubrick’s brilliant psycho-horror, based on the novel by Stephen King, is subtly unsettling. But it’s stuffed, too, with unforgettable nerve-jangling shocks, including the moment when the crazed Jack smashes his way through a door with an axe as his wife (Shelley Duvall) cowers in the corner. Teen Wolf (1985) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 12.10am Critics howled at this preposterous teenage comedy but audiences loved it, perhaps because it came out shortly after its star Michael J Fox’s finest hour: Back to the Future. The plot – in which Fox’s likeable nerd morphs into a basketball-playing werewolf – is almost as unlikely as the fact that he still looked fresh out of the 11th grade at the ripe old age of 25. An unparalleled analysis of puberty and adolescence. Tuesday 12 June Hitting the books: Tanisha is a pupil at Townley Grammar Credit: BBC Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland & Wales, 11.15pm Jamie Pickup’s series has walked a tightrope with considerable skill, highlighting the inarguable inequities of our educational system that favours a selective approach, while also acknowledging its considerable benefits and observing the situation from the points of view of both pupils and teachers. It concludes with mock GCSE exams approaching and students at Erith School, a secondary modern, and neighbouring institution Townley Grammar, having to assess their suitability for further education. Some, it’s fair to say, are taking it more seriously than others. Townley pupil Tanisha is underperforming and low on confidence, yet keen to raise her game and nurtured by staff aware of her limitations and capabilities. At Erith, meanwhile, Denisa is angling for a place in Townley Sixth Form and seems more than capable of attaining it, but staffing shortages are crippling science classes amid an endless round of supply teachers and stand-ins. “It keeps me awake at night,” says the admirable faculty head Mr Appiah-Gates. It’s a desperately difficult situation and one that reaches an unexpected conclusion, as common ground is found between two unlikely bedfellows. Gabriel Tate The Champions Netflix, from today Created by Mindy Kaling, this new NBC sitcom plays a bachelor gym owner (Anders Holm) off against his gay, estranged son-cum-new flatmate (the brilliant J J Totah). Smartly written and nimbly performed, it’s a solid mainstream hit. Ackley Bridge Channel 4, 8.00pm Matt Evans and Penny Woolcock continue to keep an implausible number of plates spinning as the fizzy pre-watershed drama continues to conduct its handbrake narrative turns. Both Jordan (Samuel Bottomley) and Missy (Poppy Lee Friar) handle cash shortages in an equally desperate manner, and the arrival of Steve’s ex Claire (Kimberly Walsh) puts head teacher Mandy’s (Jo Joyner) nose out of joint. Our Girl BBC One, 9.00pm Georgie (Michelle Keegan) learns an astonishing secret about the local crime boss, before a major rescue operation begins as the flawed but well-meaning military drama continues. Flights from Hell: Caught on Camera ITV, 9.00pm ITV lays down its prime-time weapons as the World Cup looms, as demonstrated by this daft three-part series of incidents filmed at 30,000 feet. These include what an engine explosion feels like to those on board the plane to the impact of volcanic ash and an extraordinarily dramatic landing. Seeing Daylight: the Photography of Dorothy Bohm Sky Arts, 9.00pm Arriving in England in 1939 to escape the Nazis, Dorothy Bohm became a pioneer of street photography and portraiture of deep humanity. This profile examines her life and work. Elvis: the Searcher Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on Peter Guralnick’s epochal two-part biography, Thom Zimny’s HBO epic is a treat, focusing as much on Presley the man as Elvis the icon, Part one follows him out of Tupelo, into Sun Records and on to the US army, with part two’s fall, rise and fall again airing Wednesday at 10.00pm. GT Ugly Me: My Life with Body Dysmorphia BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm First shown on BBC Three, this harrowing film follows 29-year-old Liane, seeking treatment for the titular condition which has left her self-worth in tatters. GT Field of Dreams (1989) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.50pm Kevin Costner clearly likes a baseball movie – he’s made five of them. In this one he’s an Iowa farmer instructed by a mysterious voice to build a baseball pitch in the middle of a cornfield, which is soon occupied by a gang of ghostly players from the past. Enjoyably dotty, and responsible for the misquote, “If you build it, they will come” – it’s actually “he will come” – the fantasy is elevated by brilliant performances all around. A Good Day to Die Hard (2013) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The fifth film in the Die Hard franchise takes place in Russia, where our hero, Bruce Willis’s now grizzled John McClane, arrives in Moscow to hunt for his estranged son Jack (Jai Courtney). McClane suspects that he may have become a drug dealer, but it transpires he is in fact working undercover for the CIA, and Dad blunders in on him mid-mission. An enjoyable but clunky thriller. The Departed (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Nothing beats watching a great director in his comfort zone. Martin Scorsese’s gangland thriller – the film that finally won him an Oscar – is riveting. The plot revolves around the local police force’s efforts to stamp out Boston crime lord Frank Costello (a magnificently malevolent Jack Nicholson). There are powerhouse performances, too, from Leonardo Di Caprio, Matt Damon and Mark Wahlberg. Wednesday 13 June From Russia with love: David Dimbleby Credit: BBC Putin’s Russia with David Dimbleby BBC One, 9.00pm, Wales, 11.05pm “In a democracy if you fail to deliver on economic promises, if you surround yourself with cronies and use the law to suppress opposition, you would rightly be thrown out on your ear. But this is Russia, they do things differently here…” So begins David Dimbleby’s thoughtful film in which – as the eyes of the world turn towards Moscow for the 2018 World Cup football tournament – he takes the opportunity to cast an eye over Vladimir Putin’s 18 years as leader and assess the state of Russia today, especially in regard to the West. What he finds is a country in deep economic crisis yet with a people that seem to happily hero-worship Putin and mostly accept a state machine that controls almost every aspect of their lives with the willing assistance of security services, media, military and church. Dimbleby meets ordinary contented Russians as well as protesters, human rights lawyers, journalists and official spokespeople, coming away with a sense, ultimately, that Putin’s popularity is rooted in his strongman image and media-backed levels of suspicion and hostility towards the West unseen since the end of the Cold War. Gerard O’Donovan The Fight for Women’s Bodies BBC Three, from 10.00am Following the landmark vote to legalise abortion in the Republic of Ireland, Ellie Flynn looks back at the issues through the eyes of campaigners on both sides. Great Rail Restorations with Peter Snow Channel 4, 8.00pm Here is a visit to the Isle of Wight, where Peter Snow and his team set out to restore an 1864 wooden train carriage that has served as a holiday chalet since it was decommissioned in the Twenties. Before Grenfell: A Hidden History BBC Two, 9.00pm A year since the Grenfell Tower fire, residents of Kensington relate how the London borough has become the most unequal place in Britain, with the gap between rich and poor once again as extreme as in the 1860s when developers first built housing for the rich in Notting Hill next to the worst slum in London. Can Science Make Me Perfect? With Alice Roberts BBC Four, 9.00pm Millions of years have gone into the human body: lots of great evolutionary adaptations but lots of imperfections, too. In a film that’s as entertaining as it is instructive, anatomist Alice Roberts takes on a challenge to design a better body than the one we get at birth. The Fast Fix: Diabetes ITV, 9.00pm Anita Rani presents a new two-part series exploring whether it is possible for people suffering from type 2 diabetes to reverse the condition by adhering to a radical diet. By consuming just 800 calories a day, can they “fast themselves better”? Concludes tomorrow Big Beasts: Last of the Giants Sky One, 9.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee explores why size matters in the natural world. Beginning in the Americas, he checks out the planet’s largest predator, the sperm whale; comes face to face with a grizzly bear and gets rather too close to an anaconda that’s as long as a bus. GO How to Start an Airline Channel 4, 10.30pm This documentary follows Bangladeshi-British entrepreneur Kazi Shafiqur Rahman as he attempts to break into the fiercely competitive airline industry while also fulfilling the demands of his faith by insisting that the airline must comply with the teachings of Islam. GO Regarding Henry (1991) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 6.50pm Telling the story of a hotshot lawyer (Harrison Ford) who learns to question his values after a head injury, this film formed a companion piece to Wolf (1994), with Jack Nicholson as a publisher who is bitten by a wolf and turns into a boardroom predator. Directed by Mike Nichols, whose Oscar-winning movie The Graduate was a cinematic landmark of the 1960s, it’s a bit of an embarrassment, but interesting nevertheless. Source Code (2011) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal repeatedly finds himself reliving the last eight minutes in the life of a man on board a train which is about to be destroyed by a bomb as part of an experiment. Meanwhile, scientists Vera Farmiga and Jeffrey Wright are monitoring Gyllenhaal’s exploits. Duncan Jones confirmed the promise of his directing debut Moon with this thrilling whodunit, which also serves as a moving meditation on life. Beetlejuice (1988) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm Michael Keaton is an actor of rare versatility (as his triumphant role in Birdman proved). In this cult, Oscar-winning film by Tim Burton, Keaton shines as a con artist ghost called Beetlejuice, who aims to help two other ghosts (Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis) to scare the obnoxious new residents out of their old house. But he then falls for lovely goth Lydia (Winona Ryder), the family’s daughter. Thursday 14 June It’s kicking off: Mark Pugatch (centre) leads ITV’s presenting team Credit: ITV FIFA World Cup 2018: Opening Ceremony ITV, 2.30pm Regardless of how you think Russia got to be awarded the 21st staging of football’s biggest tournament (by corrupt means or otherwise), it’s time to cast those aspersions aside because the Russia 2018 championship is here. But, two hours before a ball is kicked, the opening ceremony marks the official start of the highest prize in football. And as we all know, entertaining opening ceremonies can be a great curtain-raiser for sport events, if they are done well – think the London 2012 Olympics. This one takes place at the 80,000-seat Luzhniki Stadium, which is the jewel in Russia’s crown of stadiums and will also host the final on July 15. Mark Pougatch presents the live coverage of the ceremony, which is headlined by actor and rapper Will Smith and Nicky Jam, who will perform Live It Up, the official World Cup song, which has received mixed reviews. As well as that, the ceremony will include local performers showing off different aspects of Russian culture, with gymnasts and trampolinists in among the fireworks and performances on display. The matches get under way following the ceremony with the host nation against Saudi Arabia. Clive Morgan Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm While the BBC’s post-Bake Off cookery contest may not have set the world alight, it’s given the judges plenty to get their teeth into. This week, it’s the final, and three challenges stand between the contestants and the title: a summer favourite, their best main course and a pudding. Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm After three weeks of cute animals, Springwatch comes to an end with Chris Packham, Michaela Strachan and co reliving this year’s best moments at Sherborne Park Estate. The Trouble with Women with Anne Robinson BBC One, 9.00pm As a journalist and TV presenter, Anne Robinson shattered the glass ceiling as she built her career. She imagined that now, 50 years later, we’d be much closer to achieving equality than we are. With the ongoing discussions about gender pay, Robinson asks women around the UK what’s preventing parity? Inside HM Prison Wormwood Scrubs Channel 5, 9.00pm Wormwood Scrubs has had some infamous inmates: from serial killers Ian Brady and Peter Sutcliffe to rockers Pete Docherty and Keith Richards. This documentary exploring the prison’s history tells the stories of a Soviet spy who escaped from the jail and its best-known inmate, Charles Bronson. CM Missions BBC Four, 10.00pm and 10.20pm The absorbing French sci-fi drama about the first manned mission to Mars concludes with its final double header. This week, psychiatrist Jeanne (Hélène Viviès) discovers the reason behind cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov’s (Arben Bajraktaraj) mission. I Am Evidence Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Even though Mariska Hargitay spent almost 20 years as crime fighter Olivia Benson in Law & Order: SVU, nothing prepared her for what she was to learn in real life. In this shocking documentary, Hargitay investigates the flaws in the US justice system that have allowed tens of thousands of rape kits to go untested for years. It’s a tough film to watch at times, especially as it highlights the issue through deeply personal and harrowing, first-person accounts from four women whose attacks are still fresh in their minds decades after the assaults due to a lack of closure. “I felt like my body was a crime scene,” one of the women recalls. CM Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby (2006) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm Will Ferrell fans will need little encouragement to lap up this affectionate send-up of Nascar racing, redneck culture and male bonding. Ferrell pays a Nascar speed-demon who is challenged by a gay, French Formula One driver (Sacha Baron Cohen), to see who is the ultimate racer. It’s a full throttle comedy that plays to Ferrell’s strengths. The Hills Have Eyes (2006) ★★★☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm French director Alexandre Aja makes his Hollywood debut with this grim but gripping remake of Wes Craven’s semi-cult horror film about a family battling a brood of mutants in the New Mexico desert. Aja ups the visceral violence, and the characters – including Ted Levine and Kathleen Quinlan as the parents – are sufficiently well-drawn to make the outcome shocking. The Ghost (2010) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor plays a talented ghost writer, who lands a lucrative contract to edit the memoirs of Adam Lang (Pierce Brosnan), the former UK Prime Minister, in this Roman Polanski adaptation of the Robert Harris novel. Soon after, Lang is accused of committing a war crime and the Ghost finds himself drawn into a world of dangerous secrets that put his life at risk. This is a deeply unsettling thriller. Friday 15 June One connected flow: Dan Jones on the Grand Union Canal Building Britain’s Canals Channel 5, 8.00pm His tattoos may have a nerdish medieval theme, but historian Dan Jones still seems too hip to be fronting a stuffy-sounding series about Britain’s iconic canals. Jones’s lively style and eye for interesting detail, however, keeps this subject surprisingly fresh, as he begins this three-part run with a look at the Grand Union Canal, the longest stretch of man-made waterway in Britain. It’s a story that reaches back 200 years, when the demands of the Industrial Revolution called for a speedy way to move goods between Birmingham and London, and the country’s engineering super-brains found ingenious means to link seven separate channels into one connected flow. As Jones explains, while the financial benefits were big, construction of the Grand Union was time consuming and dangerous. The 12-year stop-start struggle to complete the technically complex Blisworth Hill tunnel, for example, saw the deaths of up to 60 workers. Unable to compete with the advent of the speedy steam train, the Grand Union itself soon declined too. The canal is now a source of summertime pleasure, so this is a welcome reminder of its once vital purpose. Toby Dantzic Queer Eye Netflix, from today The success of this heart-warming makeover series, which returned to much acclaim earlier this year, was something of a surprise. Netflix then have been quick to capitalise, snappily rolling out another run barely four months later, with the likeable quintet all returning for more lifestyle revamping. Details are so far scant, but the show’s culture guru Karamo Brown has hinted that women and the trans community could be featured. World Cup 2018: Portugal v Spain BBC One, 6.20pm The pick of this week’s World Cup matches happens on day two at the Fisht Stadium in Sochi and comes from Group B. Expect a tense affair as Spain, who suffered the ignominy of failing to make it to the knockout rounds four years ago, take on their bitter rivals Portugal. The Crystal Maze: Celebrity Special Channel 4, 9.00pm Former footballer Dennis Wise heads the team of celebrity hopefuls, joined by Katie Price, Roman Kemp, Bez and Binky Felstead.Wise struggles with a fiendish skill game, while a number-based challenge sets Felstead’s head spinning. Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm Jane McDonald wraps up her Antipodean adventure in New Zealand’s North Island. She rubs noses with a Maori tribe in Napier, explores Rotorua’s dramatic geothermal landscapes and views Auckland’s skyline from a helicopter. Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.40pm This is a final bout of topical treats from veteran impressionist Tracey Ullman. Favourites Angela Merkel and Rupert Murdoch get a look in, alongside more takes on Jeremy Corbyn, Michael Gove and Nanny, the dedicated carer of Jacob Rees-Mogg. Africa: A Journey Into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm Apart from the occasional act on Later… with Jools Holland, world music doesn’t get much airtime on our TVs, so this beguiling series helmed by DJ Rita Ray offers a welcome insight into its traditions. For her final foray, Ray heads to Mali, home to more Grammy award-winning artists than any other African country. From her attempts at a sinuous wedding dance to meeting renowned harp player Toumani Diabaté, Ray’s journey is full of stirring encounters. TD Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 10.00pm A fitting reminder of Dale Winton’s easy-going charm, this swansong travelogue series resumes after a hiatus with our host in ocean-front Miami. Highlights include a trip to Little Havana, the city’s Cuban quarter, and a look at fashion designer Versace’s opulent former home. TD Blade Runner 2049 (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm In a similar but distinct way to Ridley Scott’s masterful original, Blade Runner 2049 mulls one of the meatiest questions around: is surface all that there is, or do life’s currents run deeper than the things we can see, hear and touch? Denis Villeneuve’s film toys with both options, making neither a comfort – and in the process, maps out a provocative blockbuster. Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford star. Red (2010) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. The Wolf of Wall Street (2013) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 11.40pm Soaked in sex, drugs and scandal, Martin Scorsese’s epic is based on the memoir of stockbroker Jordan Belfort, who spent the Nineties illegally amassing a vast personal fortune. With a fantastic performance from Leonardo DiCaprio, this morally bankrupt romp was lauded by audiences and critics alike. Jonah Hill and Margot Robbie co-star. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Friday 8 June The Crystal Maze: Celebrity Special Channel 4, 9.00pm Channel 4’s successful reboot of the cult Eighties series continues its golden run of form with another charity special featuring people who, in the words of Maze Master Richard Ayoade, “we have all agreed, for some reason, to call… celebrities”. Ayoade is unstinting in his good-natured jibes, and his targets are equally obliging in laughing them off: this time around, it’s Olympians Kelly Holmes and Greg Rutherford, Hollyoaks actress Jorgie Porter, YouTube vlogger Alfie Deyes and grime MC Big Narstie. The latter comes in for the roughest ride, and indeed you may not see a more agonising sequence all year than Big Narstie wrestling with Jarhead’s (Adam Buxton) not-enormously taxing riddles, but his utter delight at being involved (“I’m GASSED!”) earns him a pass. The tasks are the usual ingenious grab-bag, honouring the heritage of the series while also advancing it, from the daft (balancing on space hoppers) to the fiendish (blowing a ball around a maze with “directional guffs” from an air pump). For his part, Ayoade once again proves himself the natural heir to Richard O’Brien in surreal wit (pace Ed Tudor-Pole and Stephan Merchant), and the cause, Stand Up 2 Cancer, is unimpeachable. GT Dispatches: After Grenfell Channel 4, 7.30pm In spite of a wealth of promises in the wake of the catastrophic fire in Grenfell Tower, claims abound that too many of the country’s tower blocks remain unsafe. Ed Howker investigates whether expert advice has been heeded and looks at the risks, both existing and newly discovered, for the tower’s residents. GT Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm Channel 5’s first-ever Bafta-winning show returns for a trip down under, with former cruise ship singer Jane McDonald exploring Sydney, Tasmania, Dunedin and Christchurch. GT Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm Ullman continues to play to her strengths with her roll call of uncanny impersonations of famous people. Theresa May, Angela Merkle and Nicola Sturgeon are back, along with her bizarrely convincing Michael Gove, while Jacob Rees-Mogg (Liam Hourican) and his Nanny (Ullman) endure yet more humiliation. GT Arctic Monkeys Live at the BBC BBC Two, 11.05pm Alex Turner and his band play selections from their divisive new album, Tranquillity Base Hotel & Casino, as well as a few oldies, including A Certain Romance, to reassure their more conservative fans. GT Cloak and Dagger Amazon Prime, from today Marvel’s latest TV offering is this teen series in which Tandy Bowen (Olivia Holt) and Tyrone Johnson (Aubrey Joseph) discover new, mysteriously connected superpowers. GT Sense8 Netflix, from today The Wachowskis’ kaleidoscopic saga ends with a two-hour episode created after its fans demanded closure when the series was axed. With Wolfgang (Max Riemelt) missing, Capheus (Toby Onwumere) running for office, Sun Bak (Bae Doona) on the run and the mysterious Chairman still at large, there’s no shortage of loose ends. GT The Staircase Netflix, from today This 2004 eight-parter documented the 16-year court battle over the fate of novelist Michael Peterson, accused of pushing his wife down the stairs to her death. Landing on Netflix with new, equally gripping episodes, Jean-Xavier de Lestrade’s series is both the old and the new Making a Murderer. GT The Way Way Back (2013) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.55pm This coming-of-age story feels like familiar terrain, but it’s agreeably done. Duncan (Liam James) learns about life, love and self-esteem from a gang of water-park employees, including the excellent Sam Rockwell, when forced to go on holiday with his mother (Toni Collette) and her boyfriend (Steve Carrell). The script flows and there’s enough melancholy and edge to the overall comic tone for its charm to prevail. Bend It Like Beckham (2002) ★★★☆☆ ITV, 10.45pm Keira Knightley’s career kicked off with this feelgood football-themed comedy drama from Bhaji on the Beach director Gurinder Chadha. She stars alongside Parminder Nagra as one of two 18-year-old girls who set out to make it as professional footballers, despite their families’ best efforts to stop them. Next of Kin’s Archie Panjabi and Shaznay Lewis (of reunited Nineties girl band All Saints fame) co-star. Platoon (1986) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 11.00pm This is a chance to see a young Charlie Sheen at the start of his turbulent career. The horrors of the Vietnam War are seen through the prism of a fresh-faced college dropout (Sheen) who finds himself in the thick of battle while Willem Dafoe plays his sympathetic sergeant. Director Oliver Stone used his own experiences of serving in the US army during the war to inform this harrowing film that won four Oscars. Saturday 9 June Controversial: the writer and intellectual Germaine Greer is profiled Credit: BBC Germaine Bloody Greer BBC Two, 9.00pm The personal views of Germaine Greer once had a universality and pungency about them that the world so desperately needed. But her recent comments about rape, violence on TV and transpeople, by contrast, resemble self-important trolling: wilfully controversial, dreadfully retrograde and a blight on a considerable legacy. This thrilling profile is a reminder of why she still matters, albeit perhaps more for what she was than what she has become. Novelist Zoë Heller and journalist Rosie Boycott are among those singing her praises, while Greer herself proves as unable as ever to avoid calling out a daft question or savaging a sacred cow. The footage is exciting and superbly mounted by director Clare Beavan. Whether it’s Greer’s early films, her steadfastness in the face of the abuse sent her way after The Female Eunuch was published, and her evisceration of Norman Mailer during a famous 1971 set-to in New York, Greer remains a most rugged individual. “I don’t think Germaine and the word ‘sisterhood’ are natural bedfellows,” reckons Boycott. What about that legacy? “I don’t do regret and I don’t do things that I regret,” Greer concludes. By any standards, a remarkable life. Gabriel Tate Trooping the Colour BBC One, 10.30am Marking the official birthday of the Queen, the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards will conduct their annual pageant on Horse Guards Parade, introduced by Huw Edwards and with J J Chalmers offering behind-the-scenes insights. There are highlights at 7.30pm on BBC Two. French Open Tennis: The women’s final ITV, 1.30pm Action on the 14th day at Roland Garros features the women’s singles final in the second Grand Slam tournament of the year. Jelena Ostapenko met Simona Halep in last year’s showpiece match, where the Latvian defeated the number three seed 4-6, 6-4, 6-3 to become the first person from her country to win a Grand Slam tournament and the first unseeded player to win the French Open since 1933. The men’s final, which was won for a record 10th time by Spaniard Rafael Nadal last year, takes place on Sunday at 1.30pm on ITV. Women’s International One-Day Cricket: England Women v South Africa Women Sky Sports Main Event, 1.30pm It’s the opening one-day international of the three-match series, which takes place at New Road in Worcester. Katherine Brunt, Georgia Elwiss, Laura Marsh, Sarah Taylor and Lauren Winfield all return to the England squad after missing out on the Indian tour. World Cup-winning duo Fran Wilson and Alex Hartley miss out, however. International Rugby Union: South Africa v England Sky Sports Main Event, 3.00pm This afternoon England will be looking to dispatch the Springboks at a venue Eddie Jones has described as the “spiritual home of rugby”. They’ve not won at Ellis Park in Johannesburg since 1972 – their only triumph at the venue – and their last appearance here was a 36-27 defeat under Stuart Lancaster in 2012. Ellis Park was the setting for the Springboks’ World Cup final victory over New Zealand in 1995 and one of the sport’s finest moments – Nelson Mandela handing Francois Pienaar the Webb Ellis Cup. “It will be hostile but it’s fantastic and I am so excited about it,” says Jones. “In world rugby who do you want to beat? The Springboks at Ellis Park.” Owen Farrell will captain England, while the hugely talented New Zealand-born flanker Brad Shields is expected to play a part for the visitors. The River Wye with Will Millard BBC Two, 5.30pm; Scotland, 2.45pm After deconstructing the exploration documentary in the fascinating and alarming My Year with the Tribe, explorer Will Millard is on slightly surer ground with this new series in which he journeys down the River Wye. He begins his journey with a search for the river’s source on the slopes of Plynlimon, before he has an encounter with an entrepreneurial local sheep farmer. Take Me Out: Over 50s Special ITV, 8.00pm Three “older gentlemen” (I’m sure host Paddy McGuinness will make plenty of gags here) face 30 single “Golden Girls”, including a former nun and an ex-partner of action hero Jason Statham, in this one-off special of the ever-popular dating show. Hidden BBC Four, 9.00pm After Hinterland and Keeping Faith comes the BBC’s latest Welsh language crime thriller. Hidden has a familiar set-up – the discovery of a young girl’s body in a disused quarry tears a small community apart – but Sian Reese-Williams and Sion Alun Davies as DIs Cadi John and Owen Vaughan area leading pair to reckon with, and the atmosphere of unease benefits hugely from the mountainous surroundings. Come Together: the Rise of the Festival Sky Arts, 9.00pm The line-up for this documentary would grace any festival, with Pete Townshend and Noel Gallagher among the interviewees explaining the evolution of the modern music festival from its earliest jazz and blues incarnations in Newport, through the hippy beanfeasts of Monterey and Woodstock to Glastonbury and Coachella. There are also contributions from those who promote and document festivals, including Michael Eavis and D A Pennebaker. GT A Girl’s Guide to TV BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI Comedian Rachel Parris of The Mash Report presents her typically tongue-in-cheek advice for women looking to get ahead in television. GT Maleficent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 6.05pm Angelina Jolie stars as the titular Maleficent in Disney’s live-action reimagining of Sleeping Beauty, which follows her from a carefree fairy to Mistress of All Evil, muddling the distinction between hero and villain. Maleficent is happy in a kingdom of peculiar CGI beasts until her heart is broken by Stefan (Sharlto Copley), who inherits the throne. Seeking vengeance, she curses his baby, Princess Aurora (Elle Fanning). Thor: The Dark World (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 10.35pm This is a follow-up to the popular Norse god/superhero blockbuster. The rather flabby plot is alleviated by Chris Hemsworth’s hearty charisma, which provides frequent relief from Natalie Portman’s bland damsel-in-distress (attempts to beef up her character by making her an astrophysicist are undermined by her constant fainting). Highlights include Thor sliding down The Gherkin skyscraper. Made in Dagenham (2010) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.45pm Industrial action in pursuit of equal pay for women doesn’t sound too thrilling a subject, but Nigel Cole’s (Calendar Girls) film, based around the real-life strike from 1968, turns out to be a rousing crowd-pleaser. Sally Hawkins plays the reluctant ringleader of the workers who sew car seats at Ford’s Dagenham plant; Bob Hoskins is a union rep; Miranda Richardson is wonderful as Labour MP Barbara Castle. Sunday 10 June Smoldering: Aidan Turner returns as the eponymous hero Credit: BBC Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Not since Daniel Craig emerged from the waves in Casino Royale has there been so much fuss over a pair of wet pecs. Yes, Poldark is back for a fourth series and star Aidan Turner bares his chest for the fans in an opening scene that, if nothing else, suggests that he’s spent a lot of time exercising since the end of series three. This opener finds our swashbuckling hero Ross Poldark (Turner) back in full-on Cornish crusader mode when, following a disturbance in Truro, he locks horns with old enemy George Warleggan (Jack Farthing) over the fate of three good pals accused of riot and murder. Meanwhile, his flame-haired wife Demelza (Eleanor Tomlinson) can’t fend off her intimate longings following that illicit clinch in the dunes with poetry-penning aristo Hugh Armitage (Josh Whitehouse) – who, with the announcement of a general election, looks set to be diverted into a career at Westminster. But as Dr Dwight (Luke Norris) is at pains to point out, Armitage has a delicate constitution that might not suit the rough and tumble of parliamentary politics. Could Ross be persuaded to think again about throwing his hat in the ring? Gerard O’Donovan One-Day International Cricket: Scotland v England Sky Sports Main Event, 10.30am Having responded brilliantly to tie the Test series with Pakistan 1-1, England now turn their attention to Scotland, with this ODI at the Grange in Edinburgh. Songs of Praise BBC One, 1.25pm A year on from the Grenfell Tower disaster, Aled Jones presents a commemorative special edition exploring how the local community in North Kensington is coping and recovering. Britain Celebrates Live: 100 Years of Women’s Votes BBC One, 2.00pm Live coverage of today’s public processions through Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh and London to celebrate the centenary of women winning the right to vote. Tonight’s Antiques Roadshow, at 8pm, also takes up the theme, devoting its time to items with links to remarkable women. Formula 1: Canadian Grand Prix Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm After a Monaco Grand Prix that left championship leader Lewis Hamilton, in his words, “cold”, all eyes are on the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal, where Daniel Riccardio will be aiming to win back-to-back races. Soccer Aid for Unicef 2018 ITV, 6.30pm Live from Old Trafford, it’s the annual England v World XI charity football match between teams mixing celebrities and professional athletes. This year Robbie Williams’s England is taking on a team of international stars led by Usain Bolt. Other players include Mo Farah, Gordon Ramsay, Olly Murs, and Eric Cantona, and there’s live music from Jessie Ware. Countryfile BBC One, 7.00pm The last of three specials heads for Sandringham in Norfolk, the most private of the Royal retreats. Matt Baker discovers one of the Queen’s less-known interests – racing pigeons – while Ellie Harrison learns more about her love of horses. GO Patrick Melrose Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch’s brilliantly judged bravura performance has been one of the television highlights of 2018. Tonight, he brings the series to an entertaining and emotionally charged close as Patrick, separated and back in London in 2006, hopes to put the past to rest following his mother’s funeral. Cosby: The Women Speak Sony Crime Channel, 9.00pm Following Bill Cosby’s conviction on three counts of aggravated indecent assault, here’s another opportunity to see the A&E network’s 2015 one-hour special in which the extent of the allegations against the former TV icon for predatory sexual behaviour came to light. Over a dozen of the 50-plus women who accused him of rape and sexual assault going back decades talk of their experiences on screen for the first time, and how statute of limitation laws threatened to deprive them of justice. GO Despicable Me 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 5.10pm Despicable Me, 2010’s animated supervillain comedy, had a neat enough premise. It’s gone in this sequel, though, as Steve Carell’s bald antihero, Gru, is now a reformed soul, occupied with childcare rather than dastardly plots to steal the moon. Gru’s Minions – those knee-high yellow Tic-Tacs – provide the film’s one inspired idea as they’re injected with mutating serum by the film’s mystery baddy. Hulk (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.15pm Ang Lee’s dark and stylised version (a split screen mimics the panels of a comic book page) of the Incredible Hulk’s adventures is one of the best and underrated Marvel adaptations, even if it’s too complex at times. Eric Bana stars as Bruce, a scientist who’s exposed to gamma radiation and becomes a not-so-jolly green giant. This is a rampaging tale with bold special effects. Jennifer Connolly co-stars as his love interest. It (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Stephen King’s evil clown tale is no laughing matter. First a Warners miniseries in 1990, starring an unforgettable Tim Curry, and now a two-part film version. Here we continue the terrifying tale of Pennywise (Bill Skarsgård), but jump forward three decades to the summer of 1988, buying into the current vogue for Eighties teen-flick nostalgia. The scary stuff is petrifying when it peaks. Monday 11 June Community spirit: those affected by the fire tell their stories Credit: BBC Grenfell BBC One, 8.30pm Bafta-winning director Ben Anthony’s unmissable documentary about last year’s Grenfell Tower tragedy opens with a sea of faces, all of which gain poignant individual focus as the film progresses. The blaze at the 24-storey block of public housing in the London borough of Kensington, which resulted in 72 deaths, left a lasting impression in those featured here as each person tells their unique story about the horrific events and their impact. Survivors who lost their homes, the bereaved, bystanders and police all share their stories, although it’s a surprising omission that the firefighters who witnessed the horrors first hand don’t offer their account. Split screens give multiple perspectives on the same moment, and what starts out as a patchwork of personal experience knits together into a mighty whole, the collective voice of a community broken but defiant. In fact, much of the film focuses on the efforts of those affected to unite in the face of seeming indifference from the local council, who also have their say. As the ongoing inquiry continues, this devastating account offers a damning testament of its own, rife with accusations of injustice and neglect, underpinned by blistering rage and grief. Toby Dantzic Fight Like a Girl BBC One, 7.30pm The ferocious sport of female wrestling comes under the spotlight with this lively film following Scottish fighter Kimberly Benson. She combines a gruelling training regime with her daytime job, as she aims for her first world title in Japan. Long Lost Family: What Happened Next ITV, 9.00pm Nicky Campbell and Davina McCall catch up with families they’ve reunited. Cathie Cutler Evans, who met her half-sister in 2016, has found joy in her extended clan. But for Maureen Charlton, separated from her brother Michael for 40 years, progress been painstaking. Dan Snow’s Norman Walks PBS America, 9.00pm Dan Snow sorts fact from fiction as he investigates the history of Norman Britain in this new series. He starts off on the Sussex coast, where aided by evidence from the Bayeux Tapestry, he pieces together William the Conqueror’s 11th-century coastal invasion. Flowers Channel 4, 10.00pm Will Sharpe’s gloriously dark comedy about a dysfunctional family returns with a double bill, then continues each night this week. A seemingly chipper Maurice (Julian Bennett) and Deborah (Olivia Colman) are on a caravanning holiday, while daughter Amy (Sophia di Martino) has a brash new girlfriend. Storyville: City Of Ghosts BBC Four, 10.30pm There are images of death in Matthew Heineman’s film so harrowing that it’s hard to keep watching, but these are the sights that Heineman’s subject, rebel group Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered, face daily. The renegade collective have made it their task to secretly film the atrocities committed by Isil in the Syrian city of Raqqa, and show the rest of the world the reality of the regime. It’s an astonishing act of citizen-led journalism, and the participants’ fear and grief, as well as their sense of purpose, are starkly captured in Heineman’s blunt and brutal chronicle of a city in turmoil. TD Prisons Uncovered: Out Of Control? ITV, 10.45pm; Scotland, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.15pm; not UTV In 2016, HMP Birmingham saw the worst prison riot for 25 years, in which 600 inmates were freed from their cells. This sobering documentary looks at the factors behind the incident and reflects on the prison system. TD Our Kind of Traitor (2016) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor stars in this so-so John le Carré adaptation as poetry lecturer Perry Makepeace, who becomes embroiled in negotiations to bring Dima (Stellan Skarsgård), a well-connected Russian oligarch, into the fold of British intelligence. Skarsgård is the standout here, charging into his role with pungency, playing Dima as a bedraggled beast of Moscow’s criminal underworld. The Shining (1980) ★★★★★ TCM, 9.00pm Set in a deserted hotel that’s in the care of writer Jack (Jack Nicholson) and his family for the winter, Stanley Kubrick’s brilliant psycho-horror, based on the novel by Stephen King, is subtly unsettling. But it’s stuffed, too, with unforgettable nerve-jangling shocks, including the moment when the crazed Jack smashes his way through a door with an axe as his wife (Shelley Duvall) cowers in the corner. Teen Wolf (1985) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 12.10am Critics howled at this preposterous teenage comedy but audiences loved it, perhaps because it came out shortly after its star Michael J Fox’s finest hour: Back to the Future. The plot – in which Fox’s likeable nerd morphs into a basketball-playing werewolf – is almost as unlikely as the fact that he still looked fresh out of the 11th grade at the ripe old age of 25. An unparalleled analysis of puberty and adolescence. Tuesday 12 June Hitting the books: Tanisha is a pupil at Townley Grammar Credit: BBC Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland & Wales, 11.15pm Jamie Pickup’s series has walked a tightrope with considerable skill, highlighting the inarguable inequities of our educational system that favours a selective approach, while also acknowledging its considerable benefits and observing the situation from the points of view of both pupils and teachers. It concludes with mock GCSE exams approaching and students at Erith School, a secondary modern, and neighbouring institution Townley Grammar, having to assess their suitability for further education. Some, it’s fair to say, are taking it more seriously than others. Townley pupil Tanisha is underperforming and low on confidence, yet keen to raise her game and nurtured by staff aware of her limitations and capabilities. At Erith, meanwhile, Denisa is angling for a place in Townley Sixth Form and seems more than capable of attaining it, but staffing shortages are crippling science classes amid an endless round of supply teachers and stand-ins. “It keeps me awake at night,” says the admirable faculty head Mr Appiah-Gates. It’s a desperately difficult situation and one that reaches an unexpected conclusion, as common ground is found between two unlikely bedfellows. Gabriel Tate The Champions Netflix, from today Created by Mindy Kaling, this new NBC sitcom plays a bachelor gym owner (Anders Holm) off against his gay, estranged son-cum-new flatmate (the brilliant J J Totah). Smartly written and nimbly performed, it’s a solid mainstream hit. Ackley Bridge Channel 4, 8.00pm Matt Evans and Penny Woolcock continue to keep an implausible number of plates spinning as the fizzy pre-watershed drama continues to conduct its handbrake narrative turns. Both Jordan (Samuel Bottomley) and Missy (Poppy Lee Friar) handle cash shortages in an equally desperate manner, and the arrival of Steve’s ex Claire (Kimberly Walsh) puts head teacher Mandy’s (Jo Joyner) nose out of joint. Our Girl BBC One, 9.00pm Georgie (Michelle Keegan) learns an astonishing secret about the local crime boss, before a major rescue operation begins as the flawed but well-meaning military drama continues. Flights from Hell: Caught on Camera ITV, 9.00pm ITV lays down its prime-time weapons as the World Cup looms, as demonstrated by this daft three-part series of incidents filmed at 30,000 feet. These include what an engine explosion feels like to those on board the plane to the impact of volcanic ash and an extraordinarily dramatic landing. Seeing Daylight: the Photography of Dorothy Bohm Sky Arts, 9.00pm Arriving in England in 1939 to escape the Nazis, Dorothy Bohm became a pioneer of street photography and portraiture of deep humanity. This profile examines her life and work. Elvis: the Searcher Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on Peter Guralnick’s epochal two-part biography, Thom Zimny’s HBO epic is a treat, focusing as much on Presley the man as Elvis the icon, Part one follows him out of Tupelo, into Sun Records and on to the US army, with part two’s fall, rise and fall again airing Wednesday at 10.00pm. GT Ugly Me: My Life with Body Dysmorphia BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm First shown on BBC Three, this harrowing film follows 29-year-old Liane, seeking treatment for the titular condition which has left her self-worth in tatters. GT Field of Dreams (1989) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.50pm Kevin Costner clearly likes a baseball movie – he’s made five of them. In this one he’s an Iowa farmer instructed by a mysterious voice to build a baseball pitch in the middle of a cornfield, which is soon occupied by a gang of ghostly players from the past. Enjoyably dotty, and responsible for the misquote, “If you build it, they will come” – it’s actually “he will come” – the fantasy is elevated by brilliant performances all around. A Good Day to Die Hard (2013) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The fifth film in the Die Hard franchise takes place in Russia, where our hero, Bruce Willis’s now grizzled John McClane, arrives in Moscow to hunt for his estranged son Jack (Jai Courtney). McClane suspects that he may have become a drug dealer, but it transpires he is in fact working undercover for the CIA, and Dad blunders in on him mid-mission. An enjoyable but clunky thriller. The Departed (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Nothing beats watching a great director in his comfort zone. Martin Scorsese’s gangland thriller – the film that finally won him an Oscar – is riveting. The plot revolves around the local police force’s efforts to stamp out Boston crime lord Frank Costello (a magnificently malevolent Jack Nicholson). There are powerhouse performances, too, from Leonardo Di Caprio, Matt Damon and Mark Wahlberg. Wednesday 13 June From Russia with love: David Dimbleby Credit: BBC Putin’s Russia with David Dimbleby BBC One, 9.00pm, Wales, 11.05pm “In a democracy if you fail to deliver on economic promises, if you surround yourself with cronies and use the law to suppress opposition, you would rightly be thrown out on your ear. But this is Russia, they do things differently here…” So begins David Dimbleby’s thoughtful film in which – as the eyes of the world turn towards Moscow for the 2018 World Cup football tournament – he takes the opportunity to cast an eye over Vladimir Putin’s 18 years as leader and assess the state of Russia today, especially in regard to the West. What he finds is a country in deep economic crisis yet with a people that seem to happily hero-worship Putin and mostly accept a state machine that controls almost every aspect of their lives with the willing assistance of security services, media, military and church. Dimbleby meets ordinary contented Russians as well as protesters, human rights lawyers, journalists and official spokespeople, coming away with a sense, ultimately, that Putin’s popularity is rooted in his strongman image and media-backed levels of suspicion and hostility towards the West unseen since the end of the Cold War. Gerard O’Donovan The Fight for Women’s Bodies BBC Three, from 10.00am Following the landmark vote to legalise abortion in the Republic of Ireland, Ellie Flynn looks back at the issues through the eyes of campaigners on both sides. Great Rail Restorations with Peter Snow Channel 4, 8.00pm Here is a visit to the Isle of Wight, where Peter Snow and his team set out to restore an 1864 wooden train carriage that has served as a holiday chalet since it was decommissioned in the Twenties. Before Grenfell: A Hidden History BBC Two, 9.00pm A year since the Grenfell Tower fire, residents of Kensington relate how the London borough has become the most unequal place in Britain, with the gap between rich and poor once again as extreme as in the 1860s when developers first built housing for the rich in Notting Hill next to the worst slum in London. Can Science Make Me Perfect? With Alice Roberts BBC Four, 9.00pm Millions of years have gone into the human body: lots of great evolutionary adaptations but lots of imperfections, too. In a film that’s as entertaining as it is instructive, anatomist Alice Roberts takes on a challenge to design a better body than the one we get at birth. The Fast Fix: Diabetes ITV, 9.00pm Anita Rani presents a new two-part series exploring whether it is possible for people suffering from type 2 diabetes to reverse the condition by adhering to a radical diet. By consuming just 800 calories a day, can they “fast themselves better”? Concludes tomorrow Big Beasts: Last of the Giants Sky One, 9.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee explores why size matters in the natural world. Beginning in the Americas, he checks out the planet’s largest predator, the sperm whale; comes face to face with a grizzly bear and gets rather too close to an anaconda that’s as long as a bus. GO How to Start an Airline Channel 4, 10.30pm This documentary follows Bangladeshi-British entrepreneur Kazi Shafiqur Rahman as he attempts to break into the fiercely competitive airline industry while also fulfilling the demands of his faith by insisting that the airline must comply with the teachings of Islam. GO Regarding Henry (1991) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 6.50pm Telling the story of a hotshot lawyer (Harrison Ford) who learns to question his values after a head injury, this film formed a companion piece to Wolf (1994), with Jack Nicholson as a publisher who is bitten by a wolf and turns into a boardroom predator. Directed by Mike Nichols, whose Oscar-winning movie The Graduate was a cinematic landmark of the 1960s, it’s a bit of an embarrassment, but interesting nevertheless. Source Code (2011) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal repeatedly finds himself reliving the last eight minutes in the life of a man on board a train which is about to be destroyed by a bomb as part of an experiment. Meanwhile, scientists Vera Farmiga and Jeffrey Wright are monitoring Gyllenhaal’s exploits. Duncan Jones confirmed the promise of his directing debut Moon with this thrilling whodunit, which also serves as a moving meditation on life. Beetlejuice (1988) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm Michael Keaton is an actor of rare versatility (as his triumphant role in Birdman proved). In this cult, Oscar-winning film by Tim Burton, Keaton shines as a con artist ghost called Beetlejuice, who aims to help two other ghosts (Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis) to scare the obnoxious new residents out of their old house. But he then falls for lovely goth Lydia (Winona Ryder), the family’s daughter. Thursday 14 June It’s kicking off: Mark Pugatch (centre) leads ITV’s presenting team Credit: ITV FIFA World Cup 2018: Opening Ceremony ITV, 2.30pm Regardless of how you think Russia got to be awarded the 21st staging of football’s biggest tournament (by corrupt means or otherwise), it’s time to cast those aspersions aside because the Russia 2018 championship is here. But, two hours before a ball is kicked, the opening ceremony marks the official start of the highest prize in football. And as we all know, entertaining opening ceremonies can be a great curtain-raiser for sport events, if they are done well – think the London 2012 Olympics. This one takes place at the 80,000-seat Luzhniki Stadium, which is the jewel in Russia’s crown of stadiums and will also host the final on July 15. Mark Pougatch presents the live coverage of the ceremony, which is headlined by actor and rapper Will Smith and Nicky Jam, who will perform Live It Up, the official World Cup song, which has received mixed reviews. As well as that, the ceremony will include local performers showing off different aspects of Russian culture, with gymnasts and trampolinists in among the fireworks and performances on display. The matches get under way following the ceremony with the host nation against Saudi Arabia. Clive Morgan Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm While the BBC’s post-Bake Off cookery contest may not have set the world alight, it’s given the judges plenty to get their teeth into. This week, it’s the final, and three challenges stand between the contestants and the title: a summer favourite, their best main course and a pudding. Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm After three weeks of cute animals, Springwatch comes to an end with Chris Packham, Michaela Strachan and co reliving this year’s best moments at Sherborne Park Estate. The Trouble with Women with Anne Robinson BBC One, 9.00pm As a journalist and TV presenter, Anne Robinson shattered the glass ceiling as she built her career. She imagined that now, 50 years later, we’d be much closer to achieving equality than we are. With the ongoing discussions about gender pay, Robinson asks women around the UK what’s preventing parity? Inside HM Prison Wormwood Scrubs Channel 5, 9.00pm Wormwood Scrubs has had some infamous inmates: from serial killers Ian Brady and Peter Sutcliffe to rockers Pete Docherty and Keith Richards. This documentary exploring the prison’s history tells the stories of a Soviet spy who escaped from the jail and its best-known inmate, Charles Bronson. CM Missions BBC Four, 10.00pm and 10.20pm The absorbing French sci-fi drama about the first manned mission to Mars concludes with its final double header. This week, psychiatrist Jeanne (Hélène Viviès) discovers the reason behind cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov’s (Arben Bajraktaraj) mission. I Am Evidence Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Even though Mariska Hargitay spent almost 20 years as crime fighter Olivia Benson in Law & Order: SVU, nothing prepared her for what she was to learn in real life. In this shocking documentary, Hargitay investigates the flaws in the US justice system that have allowed tens of thousands of rape kits to go untested for years. It’s a tough film to watch at times, especially as it highlights the issue through deeply personal and harrowing, first-person accounts from four women whose attacks are still fresh in their minds decades after the assaults due to a lack of closure. “I felt like my body was a crime scene,” one of the women recalls. CM Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby (2006) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm Will Ferrell fans will need little encouragement to lap up this affectionate send-up of Nascar racing, redneck culture and male bonding. Ferrell pays a Nascar speed-demon who is challenged by a gay, French Formula One driver (Sacha Baron Cohen), to see who is the ultimate racer. It’s a full throttle comedy that plays to Ferrell’s strengths. The Hills Have Eyes (2006) ★★★☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm French director Alexandre Aja makes his Hollywood debut with this grim but gripping remake of Wes Craven’s semi-cult horror film about a family battling a brood of mutants in the New Mexico desert. Aja ups the visceral violence, and the characters – including Ted Levine and Kathleen Quinlan as the parents – are sufficiently well-drawn to make the outcome shocking. The Ghost (2010) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor plays a talented ghost writer, who lands a lucrative contract to edit the memoirs of Adam Lang (Pierce Brosnan), the former UK Prime Minister, in this Roman Polanski adaptation of the Robert Harris novel. Soon after, Lang is accused of committing a war crime and the Ghost finds himself drawn into a world of dangerous secrets that put his life at risk. This is a deeply unsettling thriller. Friday 15 June One connected flow: Dan Jones on the Grand Union Canal Building Britain’s Canals Channel 5, 8.00pm His tattoos may have a nerdish medieval theme, but historian Dan Jones still seems too hip to be fronting a stuffy-sounding series about Britain’s iconic canals. Jones’s lively style and eye for interesting detail, however, keeps this subject surprisingly fresh, as he begins this three-part run with a look at the Grand Union Canal, the longest stretch of man-made waterway in Britain. It’s a story that reaches back 200 years, when the demands of the Industrial Revolution called for a speedy way to move goods between Birmingham and London, and the country’s engineering super-brains found ingenious means to link seven separate channels into one connected flow. As Jones explains, while the financial benefits were big, construction of the Grand Union was time consuming and dangerous. The 12-year stop-start struggle to complete the technically complex Blisworth Hill tunnel, for example, saw the deaths of up to 60 workers. Unable to compete with the advent of the speedy steam train, the Grand Union itself soon declined too. The canal is now a source of summertime pleasure, so this is a welcome reminder of its once vital purpose. Toby Dantzic Queer Eye Netflix, from today The success of this heart-warming makeover series, which returned to much acclaim earlier this year, was something of a surprise. Netflix then have been quick to capitalise, snappily rolling out another run barely four months later, with the likeable quintet all returning for more lifestyle revamping. Details are so far scant, but the show’s culture guru Karamo Brown has hinted that women and the trans community could be featured. World Cup 2018: Portugal v Spain BBC One, 6.20pm The pick of this week’s World Cup matches happens on day two at the Fisht Stadium in Sochi and comes from Group B. Expect a tense affair as Spain, who suffered the ignominy of failing to make it to the knockout rounds four years ago, take on their bitter rivals Portugal. The Crystal Maze: Celebrity Special Channel 4, 9.00pm Former footballer Dennis Wise heads the team of celebrity hopefuls, joined by Katie Price, Roman Kemp, Bez and Binky Felstead.Wise struggles with a fiendish skill game, while a number-based challenge sets Felstead’s head spinning. Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm Jane McDonald wraps up her Antipodean adventure in New Zealand’s North Island. She rubs noses with a Maori tribe in Napier, explores Rotorua’s dramatic geothermal landscapes and views Auckland’s skyline from a helicopter. Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.40pm This is a final bout of topical treats from veteran impressionist Tracey Ullman. Favourites Angela Merkel and Rupert Murdoch get a look in, alongside more takes on Jeremy Corbyn, Michael Gove and Nanny, the dedicated carer of Jacob Rees-Mogg. Africa: A Journey Into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm Apart from the occasional act on Later… with Jools Holland, world music doesn’t get much airtime on our TVs, so this beguiling series helmed by DJ Rita Ray offers a welcome insight into its traditions. For her final foray, Ray heads to Mali, home to more Grammy award-winning artists than any other African country. From her attempts at a sinuous wedding dance to meeting renowned harp player Toumani Diabaté, Ray’s journey is full of stirring encounters. TD Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 10.00pm A fitting reminder of Dale Winton’s easy-going charm, this swansong travelogue series resumes after a hiatus with our host in ocean-front Miami. Highlights include a trip to Little Havana, the city’s Cuban quarter, and a look at fashion designer Versace’s opulent former home. TD Blade Runner 2049 (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm In a similar but distinct way to Ridley Scott’s masterful original, Blade Runner 2049 mulls one of the meatiest questions around: is surface all that there is, or do life’s currents run deeper than the things we can see, hear and touch? Denis Villeneuve’s film toys with both options, making neither a comfort – and in the process, maps out a provocative blockbuster. Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford star. Red (2010) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. The Wolf of Wall Street (2013) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 11.40pm Soaked in sex, drugs and scandal, Martin Scorsese’s epic is based on the memoir of stockbroker Jordan Belfort, who spent the Nineties illegally amassing a vast personal fortune. With a fantastic performance from Leonardo DiCaprio, this morally bankrupt romp was lauded by audiences and critics alike. Jonah Hill and Margot Robbie co-star. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: The Crystal Maze, Sense8 and Arctic Monkeys Live at the BBC
Friday 8 June The Crystal Maze: Celebrity Special Channel 4, 9.00pm Channel 4’s successful reboot of the cult Eighties series continues its golden run of form with another charity special featuring people who, in the words of Maze Master Richard Ayoade, “we have all agreed, for some reason, to call… celebrities”. Ayoade is unstinting in his good-natured jibes, and his targets are equally obliging in laughing them off: this time around, it’s Olympians Kelly Holmes and Greg Rutherford, Hollyoaks actress Jorgie Porter, YouTube vlogger Alfie Deyes and grime MC Big Narstie. The latter comes in for the roughest ride, and indeed you may not see a more agonising sequence all year than Big Narstie wrestling with Jarhead’s (Adam Buxton) not-enormously taxing riddles, but his utter delight at being involved (“I’m GASSED!”) earns him a pass. The tasks are the usual ingenious grab-bag, honouring the heritage of the series while also advancing it, from the daft (balancing on space hoppers) to the fiendish (blowing a ball around a maze with “directional guffs” from an air pump). For his part, Ayoade once again proves himself the natural heir to Richard O’Brien in surreal wit (pace Ed Tudor-Pole and Stephan Merchant), and the cause, Stand Up 2 Cancer, is unimpeachable. GT Dispatches: After Grenfell Channel 4, 7.30pm In spite of a wealth of promises in the wake of the catastrophic fire in Grenfell Tower, claims abound that too many of the country’s tower blocks remain unsafe. Ed Howker investigates whether expert advice has been heeded and looks at the risks, both existing and newly discovered, for the tower’s residents. GT Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm Channel 5’s first-ever Bafta-winning show returns for a trip down under, with former cruise ship singer Jane McDonald exploring Sydney, Tasmania, Dunedin and Christchurch. GT Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm Ullman continues to play to her strengths with her roll call of uncanny impersonations of famous people. Theresa May, Angela Merkle and Nicola Sturgeon are back, along with her bizarrely convincing Michael Gove, while Jacob Rees-Mogg (Liam Hourican) and his Nanny (Ullman) endure yet more humiliation. GT Arctic Monkeys Live at the BBC BBC Two, 11.05pm Alex Turner and his band play selections from their divisive new album, Tranquillity Base Hotel & Casino, as well as a few oldies, including A Certain Romance, to reassure their more conservative fans. GT Cloak and Dagger Amazon Prime, from today Marvel’s latest TV offering is this teen series in which Tandy Bowen (Olivia Holt) and Tyrone Johnson (Aubrey Joseph) discover new, mysteriously connected superpowers. GT Sense8 Netflix, from today The Wachowskis’ kaleidoscopic saga ends with a two-hour episode created after its fans demanded closure when the series was axed. With Wolfgang (Max Riemelt) missing, Capheus (Toby Onwumere) running for office, Sun Bak (Bae Doona) on the run and the mysterious Chairman still at large, there’s no shortage of loose ends. GT The Staircase Netflix, from today This 2004 eight-parter documented the 16-year court battle over the fate of novelist Michael Peterson, accused of pushing his wife down the stairs to her death. Landing on Netflix with new, equally gripping episodes, Jean-Xavier de Lestrade’s series is both the old and the new Making a Murderer. GT The Way Way Back (2013) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.55pm This coming-of-age story feels like familiar terrain, but it’s agreeably done. Duncan (Liam James) learns about life, love and self-esteem from a gang of water-park employees, including the excellent Sam Rockwell, when forced to go on holiday with his mother (Toni Collette) and her boyfriend (Steve Carrell). The script flows and there’s enough melancholy and edge to the overall comic tone for its charm to prevail. Bend It Like Beckham (2002) ★★★☆☆ ITV, 10.45pm Keira Knightley’s career kicked off with this feelgood football-themed comedy drama from Bhaji on the Beach director Gurinder Chadha. She stars alongside Parminder Nagra as one of two 18-year-old girls who set out to make it as professional footballers, despite their families’ best efforts to stop them. Next of Kin’s Archie Panjabi and Shaznay Lewis (of reunited Nineties girl band All Saints fame) co-star. Platoon (1986) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 11.00pm This is a chance to see a young Charlie Sheen at the start of his turbulent career. The horrors of the Vietnam War are seen through the prism of a fresh-faced college dropout (Sheen) who finds himself in the thick of battle while Willem Dafoe plays his sympathetic sergeant. Director Oliver Stone used his own experiences of serving in the US army during the war to inform this harrowing film that won four Oscars. Saturday 9 June Controversial: the writer and intellectual Germaine Greer is profiled Credit: BBC Germaine Bloody Greer BBC Two, 9.00pm The personal views of Germaine Greer once had a universality and pungency about them that the world so desperately needed. But her recent comments about rape, violence on TV and transpeople, by contrast, resemble self-important trolling: wilfully controversial, dreadfully retrograde and a blight on a considerable legacy. This thrilling profile is a reminder of why she still matters, albeit perhaps more for what she was than what she has become. Novelist Zoë Heller and journalist Rosie Boycott are among those singing her praises, while Greer herself proves as unable as ever to avoid calling out a daft question or savaging a sacred cow. The footage is exciting and superbly mounted by director Clare Beavan. Whether it’s Greer’s early films, her steadfastness in the face of the abuse sent her way after The Female Eunuch was published, and her evisceration of Norman Mailer during a famous 1971 set-to in New York, Greer remains a most rugged individual. “I don’t think Germaine and the word ‘sisterhood’ are natural bedfellows,” reckons Boycott. What about that legacy? “I don’t do regret and I don’t do things that I regret,” Greer concludes. By any standards, a remarkable life. Gabriel Tate Trooping the Colour BBC One, 10.30am Marking the official birthday of the Queen, the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards will conduct their annual pageant on Horse Guards Parade, introduced by Huw Edwards and with J J Chalmers offering behind-the-scenes insights. There are highlights at 7.30pm on BBC Two. French Open Tennis: The women’s final ITV, 1.30pm Action on the 14th day at Roland Garros features the women’s singles final in the second Grand Slam tournament of the year. Jelena Ostapenko met Simona Halep in last year’s showpiece match, where the Latvian defeated the number three seed 4-6, 6-4, 6-3 to become the first person from her country to win a Grand Slam tournament and the first unseeded player to win the French Open since 1933. The men’s final, which was won for a record 10th time by Spaniard Rafael Nadal last year, takes place on Sunday at 1.30pm on ITV. Women’s International One-Day Cricket: England Women v South Africa Women Sky Sports Main Event, 1.30pm It’s the opening one-day international of the three-match series, which takes place at New Road in Worcester. Katherine Brunt, Georgia Elwiss, Laura Marsh, Sarah Taylor and Lauren Winfield all return to the England squad after missing out on the Indian tour. World Cup-winning duo Fran Wilson and Alex Hartley miss out, however. International Rugby Union: South Africa v England Sky Sports Main Event, 3.00pm This afternoon England will be looking to dispatch the Springboks at a venue Eddie Jones has described as the “spiritual home of rugby”. They’ve not won at Ellis Park in Johannesburg since 1972 – their only triumph at the venue – and their last appearance here was a 36-27 defeat under Stuart Lancaster in 2012. Ellis Park was the setting for the Springboks’ World Cup final victory over New Zealand in 1995 and one of the sport’s finest moments – Nelson Mandela handing Francois Pienaar the Webb Ellis Cup. “It will be hostile but it’s fantastic and I am so excited about it,” says Jones. “In world rugby who do you want to beat? The Springboks at Ellis Park.” Owen Farrell will captain England, while the hugely talented New Zealand-born flanker Brad Shields is expected to play a part for the visitors. The River Wye with Will Millard BBC Two, 5.30pm; Scotland, 2.45pm After deconstructing the exploration documentary in the fascinating and alarming My Year with the Tribe, explorer Will Millard is on slightly surer ground with this new series in which he journeys down the River Wye. He begins his journey with a search for the river’s source on the slopes of Plynlimon, before he has an encounter with an entrepreneurial local sheep farmer. Take Me Out: Over 50s Special ITV, 8.00pm Three “older gentlemen” (I’m sure host Paddy McGuinness will make plenty of gags here) face 30 single “Golden Girls”, including a former nun and an ex-partner of action hero Jason Statham, in this one-off special of the ever-popular dating show. Hidden BBC Four, 9.00pm After Hinterland and Keeping Faith comes the BBC’s latest Welsh language crime thriller. Hidden has a familiar set-up – the discovery of a young girl’s body in a disused quarry tears a small community apart – but Sian Reese-Williams and Sion Alun Davies as DIs Cadi John and Owen Vaughan area leading pair to reckon with, and the atmosphere of unease benefits hugely from the mountainous surroundings. Come Together: the Rise of the Festival Sky Arts, 9.00pm The line-up for this documentary would grace any festival, with Pete Townshend and Noel Gallagher among the interviewees explaining the evolution of the modern music festival from its earliest jazz and blues incarnations in Newport, through the hippy beanfeasts of Monterey and Woodstock to Glastonbury and Coachella. There are also contributions from those who promote and document festivals, including Michael Eavis and D A Pennebaker. GT A Girl’s Guide to TV BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI Comedian Rachel Parris of The Mash Report presents her typically tongue-in-cheek advice for women looking to get ahead in television. GT Maleficent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 6.05pm Angelina Jolie stars as the titular Maleficent in Disney’s live-action reimagining of Sleeping Beauty, which follows her from a carefree fairy to Mistress of All Evil, muddling the distinction between hero and villain. Maleficent is happy in a kingdom of peculiar CGI beasts until her heart is broken by Stefan (Sharlto Copley), who inherits the throne. Seeking vengeance, she curses his baby, Princess Aurora (Elle Fanning). Thor: The Dark World (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 10.35pm This is a follow-up to the popular Norse god/superhero blockbuster. The rather flabby plot is alleviated by Chris Hemsworth’s hearty charisma, which provides frequent relief from Natalie Portman’s bland damsel-in-distress (attempts to beef up her character by making her an astrophysicist are undermined by her constant fainting). Highlights include Thor sliding down The Gherkin skyscraper. Made in Dagenham (2010) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.45pm Industrial action in pursuit of equal pay for women doesn’t sound too thrilling a subject, but Nigel Cole’s (Calendar Girls) film, based around the real-life strike from 1968, turns out to be a rousing crowd-pleaser. Sally Hawkins plays the reluctant ringleader of the workers who sew car seats at Ford’s Dagenham plant; Bob Hoskins is a union rep; Miranda Richardson is wonderful as Labour MP Barbara Castle. Sunday 10 June Smoldering: Aidan Turner returns as the eponymous hero Credit: BBC Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Not since Daniel Craig emerged from the waves in Casino Royale has there been so much fuss over a pair of wet pecs. Yes, Poldark is back for a fourth series and star Aidan Turner bares his chest for the fans in an opening scene that, if nothing else, suggests that he’s spent a lot of time exercising since the end of series three. This opener finds our swashbuckling hero Ross Poldark (Turner) back in full-on Cornish crusader mode when, following a disturbance in Truro, he locks horns with old enemy George Warleggan (Jack Farthing) over the fate of three good pals accused of riot and murder. Meanwhile, his flame-haired wife Demelza (Eleanor Tomlinson) can’t fend off her intimate longings following that illicit clinch in the dunes with poetry-penning aristo Hugh Armitage (Josh Whitehouse) – who, with the announcement of a general election, looks set to be diverted into a career at Westminster. But as Dr Dwight (Luke Norris) is at pains to point out, Armitage has a delicate constitution that might not suit the rough and tumble of parliamentary politics. Could Ross be persuaded to think again about throwing his hat in the ring? Gerard O’Donovan One-Day International Cricket: Scotland v England Sky Sports Main Event, 10.30am Having responded brilliantly to tie the Test series with Pakistan 1-1, England now turn their attention to Scotland, with this ODI at the Grange in Edinburgh. Songs of Praise BBC One, 1.25pm A year on from the Grenfell Tower disaster, Aled Jones presents a commemorative special edition exploring how the local community in North Kensington is coping and recovering. Britain Celebrates Live: 100 Years of Women’s Votes BBC One, 2.00pm Live coverage of today’s public processions through Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh and London to celebrate the centenary of women winning the right to vote. Tonight’s Antiques Roadshow, at 8pm, also takes up the theme, devoting its time to items with links to remarkable women. Formula 1: Canadian Grand Prix Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm After a Monaco Grand Prix that left championship leader Lewis Hamilton, in his words, “cold”, all eyes are on the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal, where Daniel Riccardio will be aiming to win back-to-back races. Soccer Aid for Unicef 2018 ITV, 6.30pm Live from Old Trafford, it’s the annual England v World XI charity football match between teams mixing celebrities and professional athletes. This year Robbie Williams’s England is taking on a team of international stars led by Usain Bolt. Other players include Mo Farah, Gordon Ramsay, Olly Murs, and Eric Cantona, and there’s live music from Jessie Ware. Countryfile BBC One, 7.00pm The last of three specials heads for Sandringham in Norfolk, the most private of the Royal retreats. Matt Baker discovers one of the Queen’s less-known interests – racing pigeons – while Ellie Harrison learns more about her love of horses. GO Patrick Melrose Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch’s brilliantly judged bravura performance has been one of the television highlights of 2018. Tonight, he brings the series to an entertaining and emotionally charged close as Patrick, separated and back in London in 2006, hopes to put the past to rest following his mother’s funeral. Cosby: The Women Speak Sony Crime Channel, 9.00pm Following Bill Cosby’s conviction on three counts of aggravated indecent assault, here’s another opportunity to see the A&E network’s 2015 one-hour special in which the extent of the allegations against the former TV icon for predatory sexual behaviour came to light. Over a dozen of the 50-plus women who accused him of rape and sexual assault going back decades talk of their experiences on screen for the first time, and how statute of limitation laws threatened to deprive them of justice. GO Despicable Me 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 5.10pm Despicable Me, 2010’s animated supervillain comedy, had a neat enough premise. It’s gone in this sequel, though, as Steve Carell’s bald antihero, Gru, is now a reformed soul, occupied with childcare rather than dastardly plots to steal the moon. Gru’s Minions – those knee-high yellow Tic-Tacs – provide the film’s one inspired idea as they’re injected with mutating serum by the film’s mystery baddy. Hulk (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.15pm Ang Lee’s dark and stylised version (a split screen mimics the panels of a comic book page) of the Incredible Hulk’s adventures is one of the best and underrated Marvel adaptations, even if it’s too complex at times. Eric Bana stars as Bruce, a scientist who’s exposed to gamma radiation and becomes a not-so-jolly green giant. This is a rampaging tale with bold special effects. Jennifer Connolly co-stars as his love interest. It (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Stephen King’s evil clown tale is no laughing matter. First a Warners miniseries in 1990, starring an unforgettable Tim Curry, and now a two-part film version. Here we continue the terrifying tale of Pennywise (Bill Skarsgård), but jump forward three decades to the summer of 1988, buying into the current vogue for Eighties teen-flick nostalgia. The scary stuff is petrifying when it peaks. Monday 11 June Community spirit: those affected by the fire tell their stories Credit: BBC Grenfell BBC One, 8.30pm Bafta-winning director Ben Anthony’s unmissable documentary about last year’s Grenfell Tower tragedy opens with a sea of faces, all of which gain poignant individual focus as the film progresses. The blaze at the 24-storey block of public housing in the London borough of Kensington, which resulted in 72 deaths, left a lasting impression in those featured here as each person tells their unique story about the horrific events and their impact. Survivors who lost their homes, the bereaved, bystanders and police all share their stories, although it’s a surprising omission that the firefighters who witnessed the horrors first hand don’t offer their account. Split screens give multiple perspectives on the same moment, and what starts out as a patchwork of personal experience knits together into a mighty whole, the collective voice of a community broken but defiant. In fact, much of the film focuses on the efforts of those affected to unite in the face of seeming indifference from the local council, who also have their say. As the ongoing inquiry continues, this devastating account offers a damning testament of its own, rife with accusations of injustice and neglect, underpinned by blistering rage and grief. Toby Dantzic Fight Like a Girl BBC One, 7.30pm The ferocious sport of female wrestling comes under the spotlight with this lively film following Scottish fighter Kimberly Benson. She combines a gruelling training regime with her daytime job, as she aims for her first world title in Japan. Long Lost Family: What Happened Next ITV, 9.00pm Nicky Campbell and Davina McCall catch up with families they’ve reunited. Cathie Cutler Evans, who met her half-sister in 2016, has found joy in her extended clan. But for Maureen Charlton, separated from her brother Michael for 40 years, progress been painstaking. Dan Snow’s Norman Walks PBS America, 9.00pm Dan Snow sorts fact from fiction as he investigates the history of Norman Britain in this new series. He starts off on the Sussex coast, where aided by evidence from the Bayeux Tapestry, he pieces together William the Conqueror’s 11th-century coastal invasion. Flowers Channel 4, 10.00pm Will Sharpe’s gloriously dark comedy about a dysfunctional family returns with a double bill, then continues each night this week. A seemingly chipper Maurice (Julian Bennett) and Deborah (Olivia Colman) are on a caravanning holiday, while daughter Amy (Sophia di Martino) has a brash new girlfriend. Storyville: City Of Ghosts BBC Four, 10.30pm There are images of death in Matthew Heineman’s film so harrowing that it’s hard to keep watching, but these are the sights that Heineman’s subject, rebel group Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered, face daily. The renegade collective have made it their task to secretly film the atrocities committed by Isil in the Syrian city of Raqqa, and show the rest of the world the reality of the regime. It’s an astonishing act of citizen-led journalism, and the participants’ fear and grief, as well as their sense of purpose, are starkly captured in Heineman’s blunt and brutal chronicle of a city in turmoil. TD Prisons Uncovered: Out Of Control? ITV, 10.45pm; Scotland, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.15pm; not UTV In 2016, HMP Birmingham saw the worst prison riot for 25 years, in which 600 inmates were freed from their cells. This sobering documentary looks at the factors behind the incident and reflects on the prison system. TD Our Kind of Traitor (2016) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor stars in this so-so John le Carré adaptation as poetry lecturer Perry Makepeace, who becomes embroiled in negotiations to bring Dima (Stellan Skarsgård), a well-connected Russian oligarch, into the fold of British intelligence. Skarsgård is the standout here, charging into his role with pungency, playing Dima as a bedraggled beast of Moscow’s criminal underworld. The Shining (1980) ★★★★★ TCM, 9.00pm Set in a deserted hotel that’s in the care of writer Jack (Jack Nicholson) and his family for the winter, Stanley Kubrick’s brilliant psycho-horror, based on the novel by Stephen King, is subtly unsettling. But it’s stuffed, too, with unforgettable nerve-jangling shocks, including the moment when the crazed Jack smashes his way through a door with an axe as his wife (Shelley Duvall) cowers in the corner. Teen Wolf (1985) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 12.10am Critics howled at this preposterous teenage comedy but audiences loved it, perhaps because it came out shortly after its star Michael J Fox’s finest hour: Back to the Future. The plot – in which Fox’s likeable nerd morphs into a basketball-playing werewolf – is almost as unlikely as the fact that he still looked fresh out of the 11th grade at the ripe old age of 25. An unparalleled analysis of puberty and adolescence. Tuesday 12 June Hitting the books: Tanisha is a pupil at Townley Grammar Credit: BBC Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland & Wales, 11.15pm Jamie Pickup’s series has walked a tightrope with considerable skill, highlighting the inarguable inequities of our educational system that favours a selective approach, while also acknowledging its considerable benefits and observing the situation from the points of view of both pupils and teachers. It concludes with mock GCSE exams approaching and students at Erith School, a secondary modern, and neighbouring institution Townley Grammar, having to assess their suitability for further education. Some, it’s fair to say, are taking it more seriously than others. Townley pupil Tanisha is underperforming and low on confidence, yet keen to raise her game and nurtured by staff aware of her limitations and capabilities. At Erith, meanwhile, Denisa is angling for a place in Townley Sixth Form and seems more than capable of attaining it, but staffing shortages are crippling science classes amid an endless round of supply teachers and stand-ins. “It keeps me awake at night,” says the admirable faculty head Mr Appiah-Gates. It’s a desperately difficult situation and one that reaches an unexpected conclusion, as common ground is found between two unlikely bedfellows. Gabriel Tate The Champions Netflix, from today Created by Mindy Kaling, this new NBC sitcom plays a bachelor gym owner (Anders Holm) off against his gay, estranged son-cum-new flatmate (the brilliant J J Totah). Smartly written and nimbly performed, it’s a solid mainstream hit. Ackley Bridge Channel 4, 8.00pm Matt Evans and Penny Woolcock continue to keep an implausible number of plates spinning as the fizzy pre-watershed drama continues to conduct its handbrake narrative turns. Both Jordan (Samuel Bottomley) and Missy (Poppy Lee Friar) handle cash shortages in an equally desperate manner, and the arrival of Steve’s ex Claire (Kimberly Walsh) puts head teacher Mandy’s (Jo Joyner) nose out of joint. Our Girl BBC One, 9.00pm Georgie (Michelle Keegan) learns an astonishing secret about the local crime boss, before a major rescue operation begins as the flawed but well-meaning military drama continues. Flights from Hell: Caught on Camera ITV, 9.00pm ITV lays down its prime-time weapons as the World Cup looms, as demonstrated by this daft three-part series of incidents filmed at 30,000 feet. These include what an engine explosion feels like to those on board the plane to the impact of volcanic ash and an extraordinarily dramatic landing. Seeing Daylight: the Photography of Dorothy Bohm Sky Arts, 9.00pm Arriving in England in 1939 to escape the Nazis, Dorothy Bohm became a pioneer of street photography and portraiture of deep humanity. This profile examines her life and work. Elvis: the Searcher Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on Peter Guralnick’s epochal two-part biography, Thom Zimny’s HBO epic is a treat, focusing as much on Presley the man as Elvis the icon, Part one follows him out of Tupelo, into Sun Records and on to the US army, with part two’s fall, rise and fall again airing Wednesday at 10.00pm. GT Ugly Me: My Life with Body Dysmorphia BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm First shown on BBC Three, this harrowing film follows 29-year-old Liane, seeking treatment for the titular condition which has left her self-worth in tatters. GT Field of Dreams (1989) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.50pm Kevin Costner clearly likes a baseball movie – he’s made five of them. In this one he’s an Iowa farmer instructed by a mysterious voice to build a baseball pitch in the middle of a cornfield, which is soon occupied by a gang of ghostly players from the past. Enjoyably dotty, and responsible for the misquote, “If you build it, they will come” – it’s actually “he will come” – the fantasy is elevated by brilliant performances all around. A Good Day to Die Hard (2013) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The fifth film in the Die Hard franchise takes place in Russia, where our hero, Bruce Willis’s now grizzled John McClane, arrives in Moscow to hunt for his estranged son Jack (Jai Courtney). McClane suspects that he may have become a drug dealer, but it transpires he is in fact working undercover for the CIA, and Dad blunders in on him mid-mission. An enjoyable but clunky thriller. The Departed (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Nothing beats watching a great director in his comfort zone. Martin Scorsese’s gangland thriller – the film that finally won him an Oscar – is riveting. The plot revolves around the local police force’s efforts to stamp out Boston crime lord Frank Costello (a magnificently malevolent Jack Nicholson). There are powerhouse performances, too, from Leonardo Di Caprio, Matt Damon and Mark Wahlberg. Wednesday 13 June From Russia with love: David Dimbleby Credit: BBC Putin’s Russia with David Dimbleby BBC One, 9.00pm, Wales, 11.05pm “In a democracy if you fail to deliver on economic promises, if you surround yourself with cronies and use the law to suppress opposition, you would rightly be thrown out on your ear. But this is Russia, they do things differently here…” So begins David Dimbleby’s thoughtful film in which – as the eyes of the world turn towards Moscow for the 2018 World Cup football tournament – he takes the opportunity to cast an eye over Vladimir Putin’s 18 years as leader and assess the state of Russia today, especially in regard to the West. What he finds is a country in deep economic crisis yet with a people that seem to happily hero-worship Putin and mostly accept a state machine that controls almost every aspect of their lives with the willing assistance of security services, media, military and church. Dimbleby meets ordinary contented Russians as well as protesters, human rights lawyers, journalists and official spokespeople, coming away with a sense, ultimately, that Putin’s popularity is rooted in his strongman image and media-backed levels of suspicion and hostility towards the West unseen since the end of the Cold War. Gerard O’Donovan The Fight for Women’s Bodies BBC Three, from 10.00am Following the landmark vote to legalise abortion in the Republic of Ireland, Ellie Flynn looks back at the issues through the eyes of campaigners on both sides. Great Rail Restorations with Peter Snow Channel 4, 8.00pm Here is a visit to the Isle of Wight, where Peter Snow and his team set out to restore an 1864 wooden train carriage that has served as a holiday chalet since it was decommissioned in the Twenties. Before Grenfell: A Hidden History BBC Two, 9.00pm A year since the Grenfell Tower fire, residents of Kensington relate how the London borough has become the most unequal place in Britain, with the gap between rich and poor once again as extreme as in the 1860s when developers first built housing for the rich in Notting Hill next to the worst slum in London. Can Science Make Me Perfect? With Alice Roberts BBC Four, 9.00pm Millions of years have gone into the human body: lots of great evolutionary adaptations but lots of imperfections, too. In a film that’s as entertaining as it is instructive, anatomist Alice Roberts takes on a challenge to design a better body than the one we get at birth. The Fast Fix: Diabetes ITV, 9.00pm Anita Rani presents a new two-part series exploring whether it is possible for people suffering from type 2 diabetes to reverse the condition by adhering to a radical diet. By consuming just 800 calories a day, can they “fast themselves better”? Concludes tomorrow Big Beasts: Last of the Giants Sky One, 9.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee explores why size matters in the natural world. Beginning in the Americas, he checks out the planet’s largest predator, the sperm whale; comes face to face with a grizzly bear and gets rather too close to an anaconda that’s as long as a bus. GO How to Start an Airline Channel 4, 10.30pm This documentary follows Bangladeshi-British entrepreneur Kazi Shafiqur Rahman as he attempts to break into the fiercely competitive airline industry while also fulfilling the demands of his faith by insisting that the airline must comply with the teachings of Islam. GO Regarding Henry (1991) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 6.50pm Telling the story of a hotshot lawyer (Harrison Ford) who learns to question his values after a head injury, this film formed a companion piece to Wolf (1994), with Jack Nicholson as a publisher who is bitten by a wolf and turns into a boardroom predator. Directed by Mike Nichols, whose Oscar-winning movie The Graduate was a cinematic landmark of the 1960s, it’s a bit of an embarrassment, but interesting nevertheless. Source Code (2011) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal repeatedly finds himself reliving the last eight minutes in the life of a man on board a train which is about to be destroyed by a bomb as part of an experiment. Meanwhile, scientists Vera Farmiga and Jeffrey Wright are monitoring Gyllenhaal’s exploits. Duncan Jones confirmed the promise of his directing debut Moon with this thrilling whodunit, which also serves as a moving meditation on life. Beetlejuice (1988) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm Michael Keaton is an actor of rare versatility (as his triumphant role in Birdman proved). In this cult, Oscar-winning film by Tim Burton, Keaton shines as a con artist ghost called Beetlejuice, who aims to help two other ghosts (Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis) to scare the obnoxious new residents out of their old house. But he then falls for lovely goth Lydia (Winona Ryder), the family’s daughter. Thursday 14 June It’s kicking off: Mark Pugatch (centre) leads ITV’s presenting team Credit: ITV FIFA World Cup 2018: Opening Ceremony ITV, 2.30pm Regardless of how you think Russia got to be awarded the 21st staging of football’s biggest tournament (by corrupt means or otherwise), it’s time to cast those aspersions aside because the Russia 2018 championship is here. But, two hours before a ball is kicked, the opening ceremony marks the official start of the highest prize in football. And as we all know, entertaining opening ceremonies can be a great curtain-raiser for sport events, if they are done well – think the London 2012 Olympics. This one takes place at the 80,000-seat Luzhniki Stadium, which is the jewel in Russia’s crown of stadiums and will also host the final on July 15. Mark Pougatch presents the live coverage of the ceremony, which is headlined by actor and rapper Will Smith and Nicky Jam, who will perform Live It Up, the official World Cup song, which has received mixed reviews. As well as that, the ceremony will include local performers showing off different aspects of Russian culture, with gymnasts and trampolinists in among the fireworks and performances on display. The matches get under way following the ceremony with the host nation against Saudi Arabia. Clive Morgan Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm While the BBC’s post-Bake Off cookery contest may not have set the world alight, it’s given the judges plenty to get their teeth into. This week, it’s the final, and three challenges stand between the contestants and the title: a summer favourite, their best main course and a pudding. Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm After three weeks of cute animals, Springwatch comes to an end with Chris Packham, Michaela Strachan and co reliving this year’s best moments at Sherborne Park Estate. The Trouble with Women with Anne Robinson BBC One, 9.00pm As a journalist and TV presenter, Anne Robinson shattered the glass ceiling as she built her career. She imagined that now, 50 years later, we’d be much closer to achieving equality than we are. With the ongoing discussions about gender pay, Robinson asks women around the UK what’s preventing parity? Inside HM Prison Wormwood Scrubs Channel 5, 9.00pm Wormwood Scrubs has had some infamous inmates: from serial killers Ian Brady and Peter Sutcliffe to rockers Pete Docherty and Keith Richards. This documentary exploring the prison’s history tells the stories of a Soviet spy who escaped from the jail and its best-known inmate, Charles Bronson. CM Missions BBC Four, 10.00pm and 10.20pm The absorbing French sci-fi drama about the first manned mission to Mars concludes with its final double header. This week, psychiatrist Jeanne (Hélène Viviès) discovers the reason behind cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov’s (Arben Bajraktaraj) mission. I Am Evidence Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Even though Mariska Hargitay spent almost 20 years as crime fighter Olivia Benson in Law & Order: SVU, nothing prepared her for what she was to learn in real life. In this shocking documentary, Hargitay investigates the flaws in the US justice system that have allowed tens of thousands of rape kits to go untested for years. It’s a tough film to watch at times, especially as it highlights the issue through deeply personal and harrowing, first-person accounts from four women whose attacks are still fresh in their minds decades after the assaults due to a lack of closure. “I felt like my body was a crime scene,” one of the women recalls. CM Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby (2006) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm Will Ferrell fans will need little encouragement to lap up this affectionate send-up of Nascar racing, redneck culture and male bonding. Ferrell pays a Nascar speed-demon who is challenged by a gay, French Formula One driver (Sacha Baron Cohen), to see who is the ultimate racer. It’s a full throttle comedy that plays to Ferrell’s strengths. The Hills Have Eyes (2006) ★★★☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm French director Alexandre Aja makes his Hollywood debut with this grim but gripping remake of Wes Craven’s semi-cult horror film about a family battling a brood of mutants in the New Mexico desert. Aja ups the visceral violence, and the characters – including Ted Levine and Kathleen Quinlan as the parents – are sufficiently well-drawn to make the outcome shocking. The Ghost (2010) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor plays a talented ghost writer, who lands a lucrative contract to edit the memoirs of Adam Lang (Pierce Brosnan), the former UK Prime Minister, in this Roman Polanski adaptation of the Robert Harris novel. Soon after, Lang is accused of committing a war crime and the Ghost finds himself drawn into a world of dangerous secrets that put his life at risk. This is a deeply unsettling thriller. Friday 15 June One connected flow: Dan Jones on the Grand Union Canal Building Britain’s Canals Channel 5, 8.00pm His tattoos may have a nerdish medieval theme, but historian Dan Jones still seems too hip to be fronting a stuffy-sounding series about Britain’s iconic canals. Jones’s lively style and eye for interesting detail, however, keeps this subject surprisingly fresh, as he begins this three-part run with a look at the Grand Union Canal, the longest stretch of man-made waterway in Britain. It’s a story that reaches back 200 years, when the demands of the Industrial Revolution called for a speedy way to move goods between Birmingham and London, and the country’s engineering super-brains found ingenious means to link seven separate channels into one connected flow. As Jones explains, while the financial benefits were big, construction of the Grand Union was time consuming and dangerous. The 12-year stop-start struggle to complete the technically complex Blisworth Hill tunnel, for example, saw the deaths of up to 60 workers. Unable to compete with the advent of the speedy steam train, the Grand Union itself soon declined too. The canal is now a source of summertime pleasure, so this is a welcome reminder of its once vital purpose. Toby Dantzic Queer Eye Netflix, from today The success of this heart-warming makeover series, which returned to much acclaim earlier this year, was something of a surprise. Netflix then have been quick to capitalise, snappily rolling out another run barely four months later, with the likeable quintet all returning for more lifestyle revamping. Details are so far scant, but the show’s culture guru Karamo Brown has hinted that women and the trans community could be featured. World Cup 2018: Portugal v Spain BBC One, 6.20pm The pick of this week’s World Cup matches happens on day two at the Fisht Stadium in Sochi and comes from Group B. Expect a tense affair as Spain, who suffered the ignominy of failing to make it to the knockout rounds four years ago, take on their bitter rivals Portugal. The Crystal Maze: Celebrity Special Channel 4, 9.00pm Former footballer Dennis Wise heads the team of celebrity hopefuls, joined by Katie Price, Roman Kemp, Bez and Binky Felstead.Wise struggles with a fiendish skill game, while a number-based challenge sets Felstead’s head spinning. Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm Jane McDonald wraps up her Antipodean adventure in New Zealand’s North Island. She rubs noses with a Maori tribe in Napier, explores Rotorua’s dramatic geothermal landscapes and views Auckland’s skyline from a helicopter. Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.40pm This is a final bout of topical treats from veteran impressionist Tracey Ullman. Favourites Angela Merkel and Rupert Murdoch get a look in, alongside more takes on Jeremy Corbyn, Michael Gove and Nanny, the dedicated carer of Jacob Rees-Mogg. Africa: A Journey Into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm Apart from the occasional act on Later… with Jools Holland, world music doesn’t get much airtime on our TVs, so this beguiling series helmed by DJ Rita Ray offers a welcome insight into its traditions. For her final foray, Ray heads to Mali, home to more Grammy award-winning artists than any other African country. From her attempts at a sinuous wedding dance to meeting renowned harp player Toumani Diabaté, Ray’s journey is full of stirring encounters. TD Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 10.00pm A fitting reminder of Dale Winton’s easy-going charm, this swansong travelogue series resumes after a hiatus with our host in ocean-front Miami. Highlights include a trip to Little Havana, the city’s Cuban quarter, and a look at fashion designer Versace’s opulent former home. TD Blade Runner 2049 (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm In a similar but distinct way to Ridley Scott’s masterful original, Blade Runner 2049 mulls one of the meatiest questions around: is surface all that there is, or do life’s currents run deeper than the things we can see, hear and touch? Denis Villeneuve’s film toys with both options, making neither a comfort – and in the process, maps out a provocative blockbuster. Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford star. Red (2010) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. The Wolf of Wall Street (2013) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 11.40pm Soaked in sex, drugs and scandal, Martin Scorsese’s epic is based on the memoir of stockbroker Jordan Belfort, who spent the Nineties illegally amassing a vast personal fortune. With a fantastic performance from Leonardo DiCaprio, this morally bankrupt romp was lauded by audiences and critics alike. Jonah Hill and Margot Robbie co-star. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
RHS Chatsworth Flower Show BBC Two, 7.00pm; not Scotland or Wales Anyone mourning the end of the Chelsea Flower Show can seek solace in the RHS’s newest horticultural event, the Chatsworth Flower Show. Although its debut last year was marred by inclement weather, the event deserves to become a magnet for enthusiasts, its USP being its setting in the glorious Capability Brown-designed gardens of Derbyshire’s most famous stately home. This year’s occasion features a show-stopping installation of more than 100 varieties of orchid, a floral river display of 12,000 Cosmos, and eight art installations dotted among the 1,000-acre estate. We begin with Gardeners’ World favourites Carol Klein, Adam Frost and Arit Anderson giving us an overview of the five-day event. Among the five show gardens, the most intriguing-sounding are Elspeth Stockwell’s John Deere Garden, which celebrates 100 years of tractors, and Chris Myers’ Hay Time in the Dales, which is a celebration of wildflower meadows. The gardening experts ask whether conifers are coming back into fashion and explore Chatsworth’s rich orchid history – the Victorian head gardener Joseph Paxton introduced 80 species there. If the weather holds, RHS Chatsworth should become a jewel in the RHS crown. VP Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This over-egged cookery contest, with too many judges, hasn’t recreated Great British Bake Off’s magic, but goes down easily enough. This week, the five remaining amateurs create a sharing feast and a dish of squid or mackerel. VP Supershoppers Channel 4, 8.00pm This perky take on the consumer show, hosted by Anna Richardson and Sabrina Grant, storms back with an item attacking John Lewis. They argue that the department store’s price promise can’t always be believed, alongside other items looking at faddy dairy-free milks and battery life. VP Secrets of the Chocolate Factory: Inside Cadbury Channel 5, 9.00pm This breezy documentary looks at the history of our favourite chocolate brand, from its founding as a well-meaning Victorian social experiment to the hostile takeover by Kraft in 2010. It’s packed fuller than a Fruit & Nut bar with fascinating titbits, making it a satisfying treat. VP Mock the Week BBC Two, 10.00pm TV’s most competitive panel show is back to take a sideways look at the news, with James Acaster and Zoe Lyons among the stand-ups joining stalwart Hugh Dennis and host Dara O’Briain. Donald Trump and Brexit ensure there’s be no shortage of material. VP Quantico Alibi, 9.00pm Priyanka Chopra, a close friend of the duchess formerly known as Meghan Markle, guest stars in the third run of this crime thriller. This new series, set three years after the last, sees Chopra’s ex-FBI agent, Alex Parrish, living under a pseudonym, until men with guns find her. VP Billions Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm It’s a pleasure to watch Paul Giamatti and Damian Lewis slug it out each week as hot-shot attorney Chuck and shady banker Axe in this drama about high finance. This week, Axe and Taylor (Asia Kate Dillon) fall out over her worth to the firm. VP Missions BBC Four, from 10.00pm Another double helping of the French sci-fi drama about the first manned mission to Mars, in bite-sized 25-minute chunks. This week, Jeanne (Hélène Viviès) wallows in memories of her father, while back in 1960s’ Moscow we meet Vladimir Komarov (Arben Bajraktaraj), who was a real cosmonaut. VP Two Rode Together (1961) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 12.20pm Working for the first time with director John Ford, James Stewart stars in this slow western, based on the novel Comanche Captives by Will Cook and which has thematic echoes of Ford’s The Searchers. Guthrie McCabe (Stewart) is a corrupt town marshal who is hired by a Cavalry lieutenant (Richard Widmark) to help rescue captives held by the Comanche in 1880s Texas. Shirley Jones co-stars. Calendar Girls (2003) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 6.00pm This gentle, eye-moistening comedy, which has been turned into a successful play, is based on the true story of a group of Women’s Institute members in Yorkshire who raised money for leukaemia research by posing naked for a calendar. Helen Mirren, Julie Walters and Celia Imrie are among the women stripping off (well, more or less: certain body parts are always obscured by tea- cups, cream buns, etc). The Karate Kid (1984) ★★★★☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm One of the Eighties’ best-loved films, and far superior to the 2010 remake starring Jaden Smith (son of Will). It tells the story of bullied Daniel Larusso (Ralph Macchio), who’s taken under the wing of handyman Mr Miyagi (Pat Morita) and taught how to wash cars and paint fences. Of course, this turns out to be masterly martial arts training. Elisabeth Shue also stars as Larusso’s love interest Ali. Friday 8 June YouTube blogger Alfie Deyes, actress Jorgie Porter, long jumper Greg Rutherford, Dame Kelly Holmes, and MC Big Narstie take part in The Crystal Maze Credit: Channel 4 The Crystal Maze: Celebrity Special Channel 4, 9.00pm Channel 4’s successful reboot of the cult Eighties series continues its golden run of form with another charity special featuring people who, in the words of Maze Master Richard Ayoade, “we have all agreed, for some reason, to call… celebrities”. Ayoade is unstinting in his good-natured jibes, and his targets are equally obliging in laughing them off: this time around, it’s Olympians Kelly Holmes and Greg Rutherford, Hollyoaks actress Jorgie Porter, YouTube vlogger Alfie Deyes and grime MC Big Narstie. The latter comes in for the roughest ride, and indeed you may not see a more agonising sequence all year than Big Narstie wrestling with Jarhead’s (Adam Buxton) not-enormously taxing riddles, but his utter delight at being involved (“I’m GASSED!”) earns him a pass. The tasks are the usual ingenious grab-bag, honouring the heritage of the series while also advancing it, from the daft (balancing on space hoppers) to the fiendish (blowing a ball around a maze with “directional guffs” from an air pump). For his part, Ayoade once again proves himself the natural heir to Richard O’Brien in surreal wit (pace Ed Tudor-Pole and Stephan Merchant), and the cause, Stand Up 2 Cancer, is unimpeachable. GT Dispatches: After Grenfell Channel 4, 7.30pm In spite of a wealth of promises in the wake of the catastrophic fire in Grenfell Tower, claims abound that too many of the country’s tower blocks remain unsafe. Ed Howker investigates whether expert advice has been heeded and looks at the risks, both existing and newly discovered, for the tower’s residents. GT Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm Channel 5’s first-ever Bafta-winning show returns for a trip down under, with former cruise ship singer Jane McDonald exploring Sydney, Tasmania, Dunedin and Christchurch. GT Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm Ullman continues to play to her strengths with her roll call of uncanny impersonations of famous people. Theresa May, Angela Merkle and Nicola Sturgeon are back, along with her bizarrely convincing Michael Gove, while Jacob Rees-Mogg (Liam Hourican) and his Nanny (Ullman) endure yet more humiliation. GT Arctic Monkeys Live at the BBC BBC Two, 11.05pm Alex Turner and his band play selections from their divisive new album, Tranquillity Base Hotel & Casino, as well as a few oldies, including A Certain Romance, to reassure their more conservative fans. GT Cloak and Dagger Amazon Prime, from today Marvel’s latest TV offering is this teen series in which Tandy Bowen (Olivia Holt) and Tyrone Johnson (Aubrey Joseph) discover new, mysteriously connected superpowers. GT Sense8 Netflix, from today The Wachowskis’ kaleidoscopic saga ends with a two-hour episode created after its fans demanded closure when the series was axed. With Wolfgang (Max Riemelt) missing, Capheus (Toby Onwumere) running for office, Sun Bak (Bae Doona) on the run and the mysterious Chairman still at large, there’s no shortage of loose ends. GT The Staircase Netflix, from today This 2004 eight-parter documented the 16-year court battle over the fate of novelist Michael Peterson, accused of pushing his wife down the stairs to her death. Landing on Netflix with new, equally gripping episodes, Jean-Xavier de Lestrade’s series is both the old and the new Making a Murderer. GT The Way Way Back (2013) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.55pm This coming-of-age story feels like familiar terrain, but it’s agreeably done. Duncan (Liam James) learns about life, love and self-esteem from a gang of water-park employees, including the excellent Sam Rockwell, when forced to go on holiday with his mother (Toni Collette) and her boyfriend (Steve Carrell). The script flows and there’s enough melancholy and edge to the overall comic tone for its charm to prevail. Bend It Like Beckham (2002) ★★★☆☆ ITV, 10.45pm Keira Knightley’s career kicked off with this feelgood football-themed comedy drama from Bhaji on the Beach director Gurinder Chadha. She stars alongside Parminder Nagra as one of two 18-year-old girls who set out to make it as professional footballers, despite their families’ best efforts to stop them. Next of Kin’s Archie Panjabi and Shaznay Lewis (of reunited Nineties girl band All Saints fame) co-star. Platoon (1986) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 11.00pm This is a chance to see a young Charlie Sheen at the start of his turbulent career. The horrors of the Vietnam War are seen through the prism of a fresh-faced college dropout (Sheen) who finds himself in the thick of battle while Willem Dafoe plays his sympathetic sergeant. Director Oliver Stone used his own experiences of serving in the US army during the war to inform this harrowing film that won four Oscars. Saturday 9 June Controversial: the writer and intellectual Germaine Greer is profiled Credit: BBC Germaine Bloody Greer BBC Two, 9.00pm The personal views of Germaine Greer once had a universality and pungency about them that the world so desperately needed. But her recent comments about rape, violence on TV and transpeople, by contrast, resemble self-important trolling: wilfully controversial, dreadfully retrograde and a blight on a considerable legacy. This thrilling profile is a reminder of why she still matters, albeit perhaps more for what she was than what she has become. Novelist Zoë Heller and journalist Rosie Boycott are among those singing her praises, while Greer herself proves as unable as ever to avoid calling out a daft question or savaging a sacred cow. The footage is exciting and superbly mounted by director Clare Beavan. Whether it’s Greer’s early films, her steadfastness in the face of the abuse sent her way after The Female Eunuch was published, and her evisceration of Norman Mailer during a famous 1971 set-to in New York, Greer remains a most rugged individual. “I don’t think Germaine and the word ‘sisterhood’ are natural bedfellows,” reckons Boycott. What about that legacy? “I don’t do regret and I don’t do things that I regret,” Greer concludes. By any standards, a remarkable life. Gabriel Tate Trooping the Colour BBC One, 10.30am Marking the official birthday of the Queen, the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards will conduct their annual pageant on Horse Guards Parade, introduced by Huw Edwards and with J J Chalmers offering behind-the-scenes insights. There are highlights at 7.30pm on BBC Two. French Open Tennis: The women’s final ITV, 1.30pm Action on the 14th day at Roland Garros features the women’s singles final in the second Grand Slam tournament of the year. Jelena Ostapenko met Simona Halep in last year’s showpiece match, where the Latvian defeated the number three seed 4-6, 6-4, 6-3 to become the first person from her country to win a Grand Slam tournament and the first unseeded player to win the French Open since 1933. The men’s final, which was won for a record 10th time by Spaniard Rafael Nadal last year, takes place on Sunday at 1.30pm on ITV. Women’s International One-Day Cricket: England Women v South Africa Women Sky Sports Main Event, 1.30pm It’s the opening one-day international of the three-match series, which takes place at New Road in Worcester. Katherine Brunt, Georgia Elwiss, Laura Marsh, Sarah Taylor and Lauren Winfield all return to the England squad after missing out on the Indian tour. World Cup-winning duo Fran Wilson and Alex Hartley miss out, however. International Rugby Union: South Africa v England Sky Sports Main Event, 3.00pm This afternoon England will be looking to dispatch the Springboks at a venue Eddie Jones has described as the “spiritual home of rugby”. They’ve not won at Ellis Park in Johannesburg since 1972 – their only triumph at the venue – and their last appearance here was a 36-27 defeat under Stuart Lancaster in 2012. Ellis Park was the setting for the Springboks’ World Cup final victory over New Zealand in 1995 and one of the sport’s finest moments – Nelson Mandela handing Francois Pienaar the Webb Ellis Cup. “It will be hostile but it’s fantastic and I am so excited about it,” says Jones. “In world rugby who do you want to beat? The Springboks at Ellis Park.” Owen Farrell will captain England, while the hugely talented New Zealand-born flanker Brad Shields is expected to play a part for the visitors. The River Wye with Will Millard BBC Two, 5.30pm; Scotland, 2.45pm After deconstructing the exploration documentary in the fascinating and alarming My Year with the Tribe, explorer Will Millard is on slightly surer ground with this new series in which he journeys down the River Wye. He begins his journey with a search for the river’s source on the slopes of Plynlimon, before he has an encounter with an entrepreneurial local sheep farmer. Take Me Out: Over 50s Special ITV, 8.00pm Three “older gentlemen” (I’m sure host Paddy McGuinness will make plenty of gags here) face 30 single “Golden Girls”, including a former nun and an ex-partner of action hero Jason Statham, in this one-off special of the ever-popular dating show. Hidden BBC Four, 9.00pm After Hinterland and Keeping Faith comes the BBC’s latest Welsh language crime thriller. Hidden has a familiar set-up – the discovery of a young girl’s body in a disused quarry tears a small community apart – but Sian Reese-Williams and Sion Alun Davies as DIs Cadi John and Owen Vaughan area leading pair to reckon with, and the atmosphere of unease benefits hugely from the mountainous surroundings. Come Together: the Rise of the Festival Sky Arts, 9.00pm The line-up for this documentary would grace any festival, with Pete Townshend and Noel Gallagher among the interviewees explaining the evolution of the modern music festival from its earliest jazz and blues incarnations in Newport, through the hippy beanfeasts of Monterey and Woodstock to Glastonbury and Coachella. There are also contributions from those who promote and document festivals, including Michael Eavis and D A Pennebaker. GT A Girl’s Guide to TV BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI Comedian Rachel Parris of The Mash Report presents her typically tongue-in-cheek advice for women looking to get ahead in television. GT Maleficent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 6.05pm Angelina Jolie stars as the titular Maleficent in Disney’s live-action reimagining of Sleeping Beauty, which follows her from a carefree fairy to Mistress of All Evil, muddling the distinction between hero and villain. Maleficent is happy in a kingdom of peculiar CGI beasts until her heart is broken by Stefan (Sharlto Copley), who inherits the throne. Seeking vengeance, she curses his baby, Princess Aurora (Elle Fanning). Thor: The Dark World (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 10.35pm This is a follow-up to the popular Norse god/superhero blockbuster. The rather flabby plot is alleviated by Chris Hemsworth’s hearty charisma, which provides frequent relief from Natalie Portman’s bland damsel-in-distress (attempts to beef up her character by making her an astrophysicist are undermined by her constant fainting). Highlights include Thor sliding down The Gherkin skyscraper. Made in Dagenham (2010) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.45pm Industrial action in pursuit of equal pay for women doesn’t sound too thrilling a subject, but Nigel Cole’s (Calendar Girls) film, based around the real-life strike from 1968, turns out to be a rousing crowd-pleaser. Sally Hawkins plays the reluctant ringleader of the workers who sew car seats at Ford’s Dagenham plant; Bob Hoskins is a union rep; Miranda Richardson is wonderful as Labour MP Barbara Castle. Sunday 10 June Smoldering: Aidan Turner returns as the eponymous hero Credit: BBC Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Not since Daniel Craig emerged from the waves in Casino Royale has there been so much fuss over a pair of wet pecs. Yes, Poldark is back for a fourth series and star Aidan Turner bares his chest for the fans in an opening scene that, if nothing else, suggests that he’s spent a lot of time exercising since the end of series three. This opener finds our swashbuckling hero Ross Poldark (Turner) back in full-on Cornish crusader mode when, following a disturbance in Truro, he locks horns with old enemy George Warleggan (Jack Farthing) over the fate of three good pals accused of riot and murder. Meanwhile, his flame-haired wife Demelza (Eleanor Tomlinson) can’t fend off her intimate longings following that illicit clinch in the dunes with poetry-penning aristo Hugh Armitage (Josh Whitehouse) – who, with the announcement of a general election, looks set to be diverted into a career at Westminster. But as Dr Dwight (Luke Norris) is at pains to point out, Armitage has a delicate constitution that might not suit the rough and tumble of parliamentary politics. Could Ross be persuaded to think again about throwing his hat in the ring? Gerard O’Donovan One-Day International Cricket: Scotland v England Sky Sports Main Event, 10.30am Having responded brilliantly to tie the Test series with Pakistan 1-1, England now turn their attention to Scotland, with this ODI at the Grange in Edinburgh. Songs of Praise BBC One, 1.25pm A year on from the Grenfell Tower disaster, Aled Jones presents a commemorative special edition exploring how the local community in North Kensington is coping and recovering. Britain Celebrates Live: 100 Years of Women’s Votes BBC One, 2.00pm Live coverage of today’s public processions through Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh and London to celebrate the centenary of women winning the right to vote. Tonight’s Antiques Roadshow, at 8pm, also takes up the theme, devoting its time to items with links to remarkable women. Formula 1: Canadian Grand Prix Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm After a Monaco Grand Prix that left championship leader Lewis Hamilton, in his words, “cold”, all eyes are on the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal, where Daniel Riccardio will be aiming to win back-to-back races. Soccer Aid for Unicef 2018 ITV, 6.30pm Live from Old Trafford, it’s the annual England v World XI charity football match between teams mixing celebrities and professional athletes. This year Robbie Williams’s England is taking on a team of international stars led by Usain Bolt. Other players include Mo Farah, Gordon Ramsay, Olly Murs, and Eric Cantona, and there’s live music from Jessie Ware. Countryfile BBC One, 7.00pm The last of three specials heads for Sandringham in Norfolk, the most private of the Royal retreats. Matt Baker discovers one of the Queen’s less-known interests – racing pigeons – while Ellie Harrison learns more about her love of horses. GO Patrick Melrose Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch’s brilliantly judged bravura performance has been one of the television highlights of 2018. Tonight, he brings the series to an entertaining and emotionally charged close as Patrick, separated and back in London in 2006, hopes to put the past to rest following his mother’s funeral. Cosby: The Women Speak Sony Crime Channel, 9.00pm Following Bill Cosby’s conviction on three counts of aggravated indecent assault, here’s another opportunity to see the A&E network’s 2015 one-hour special in which the extent of the allegations against the former TV icon for predatory sexual behaviour came to light. Over a dozen of the 50-plus women who accused him of rape and sexual assault going back decades talk of their experiences on screen for the first time, and how statute of limitation laws threatened to deprive them of justice. GO Despicable Me 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 5.10pm Despicable Me, 2010’s animated supervillain comedy, had a neat enough premise. It’s gone in this sequel, though, as Steve Carell’s bald antihero, Gru, is now a reformed soul, occupied with childcare rather than dastardly plots to steal the moon. Gru’s Minions – those knee-high yellow Tic-Tacs – provide the film’s one inspired idea as they’re injected with mutating serum by the film’s mystery baddy. Hulk (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.15pm Ang Lee’s dark and stylised version (a split screen mimics the panels of a comic book page) of the Incredible Hulk’s adventures is one of the best and underrated Marvel adaptations, even if it’s too complex at times. Eric Bana stars as Bruce, a scientist who’s exposed to gamma radiation and becomes a not-so-jolly green giant. This is a rampaging tale with bold special effects. Jennifer Connolly co-stars as his love interest. It (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Stephen King’s evil clown tale is no laughing matter. First a Warners miniseries in 1990, starring an unforgettable Tim Curry, and now a two-part film version. Here we continue the terrifying tale of Pennywise (Bill Skarsgård), but jump forward three decades to the summer of 1988, buying into the current vogue for Eighties teen-flick nostalgia. The scary stuff is petrifying when it peaks. Monday 11 June Community spirit: those affected by the fire tell their stories Credit: BBC Grenfell BBC One, 8.30pm Bafta-winning director Ben Anthony’s unmissable documentary about last year’s Grenfell Tower tragedy opens with a sea of faces, all of which gain poignant individual focus as the film progresses. The blaze at the 24-storey block of public housing in the London borough of Kensington, which resulted in 72 deaths, left a lasting impression in those featured here as each person tells their unique story about the horrific events and their impact. Survivors who lost their homes, the bereaved, bystanders and police all share their stories, although it’s a surprising omission that the firefighters who witnessed the horrors first hand don’t offer their account. Split screens give multiple perspectives on the same moment, and what starts out as a patchwork of personal experience knits together into a mighty whole, the collective voice of a community broken but defiant. In fact, much of the film focuses on the efforts of those affected to unite in the face of seeming indifference from the local council, who also have their say. As the ongoing inquiry continues, this devastating account offers a damning testament of its own, rife with accusations of injustice and neglect, underpinned by blistering rage and grief. Toby Dantzic Fight Like a Girl BBC One, 7.30pm The ferocious sport of female wrestling comes under the spotlight with this lively film following Scottish fighter Kimberly Benson. She combines a gruelling training regime with her daytime job, as she aims for her first world title in Japan. Long Lost Family: What Happened Next ITV, 9.00pm Nicky Campbell and Davina McCall catch up with families they’ve reunited. Cathie Cutler Evans, who met her half-sister in 2016, has found joy in her extended clan. But for Maureen Charlton, separated from her brother Michael for 40 years, progress been painstaking. Dan Snow’s Norman Walks PBS America, 9.00pm Dan Snow sorts fact from fiction as he investigates the history of Norman Britain in this new series. He starts off on the Sussex coast, where aided by evidence from the Bayeux Tapestry, he pieces together William the Conqueror’s 11th-century coastal invasion. Flowers Channel 4, 10.00pm Will Sharpe’s gloriously dark comedy about a dysfunctional family returns with a double bill, then continues each night this week. A seemingly chipper Maurice (Julian Bennett) and Deborah (Olivia Colman) are on a caravanning holiday, while daughter Amy (Sophia di Martino) has a brash new girlfriend. Storyville: City Of Ghosts BBC Four, 10.30pm There are images of death in Matthew Heineman’s film so harrowing that it’s hard to keep watching, but these are the sights that Heineman’s subject, rebel group Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered, face daily. The renegade collective have made it their task to secretly film the atrocities committed by Isil in the Syrian city of Raqqa, and show the rest of the world the reality of the regime. It’s an astonishing act of citizen-led journalism, and the participants’ fear and grief, as well as their sense of purpose, are starkly captured in Heineman’s blunt and brutal chronicle of a city in turmoil. TD Prisons Uncovered: Out Of Control? ITV, 10.45pm; Scotland, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.15pm; not UTV In 2016, HMP Birmingham saw the worst prison riot for 25 years, in which 600 inmates were freed from their cells. This sobering documentary looks at the factors behind the incident and reflects on the prison system. TD Our Kind of Traitor (2016) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor stars in this so-so John le Carré adaptation as poetry lecturer Perry Makepeace, who becomes embroiled in negotiations to bring Dima (Stellan Skarsgård), a well-connected Russian oligarch, into the fold of British intelligence. Skarsgård is the standout here, charging into his role with pungency, playing Dima as a bedraggled beast of Moscow’s criminal underworld. The Shining (1980) ★★★★★ TCM, 9.00pm Set in a deserted hotel that’s in the care of writer Jack (Jack Nicholson) and his family for the winter, Stanley Kubrick’s brilliant psycho-horror, based on the novel by Stephen King, is subtly unsettling. But it’s stuffed, too, with unforgettable nerve-jangling shocks, including the moment when the crazed Jack smashes his way through a door with an axe as his wife (Shelley Duvall) cowers in the corner. Teen Wolf (1985) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 12.10am Critics howled at this preposterous teenage comedy but audiences loved it, perhaps because it came out shortly after its star Michael J Fox’s finest hour: Back to the Future. The plot – in which Fox’s likeable nerd morphs into a basketball-playing werewolf – is almost as unlikely as the fact that he still looked fresh out of the 11th grade at the ripe old age of 25. An unparalleled analysis of puberty and adolescence. Tuesday 12 June Hitting the books: Tanisha is a pupil at Townley Grammar Credit: BBC Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland & Wales, 11.15pm Jamie Pickup’s series has walked a tightrope with considerable skill, highlighting the inarguable inequities of our educational system that favours a selective approach, while also acknowledging its considerable benefits and observing the situation from the points of view of both pupils and teachers. It concludes with mock GCSE exams approaching and students at Erith School, a secondary modern, and neighbouring institution Townley Grammar, having to assess their suitability for further education. Some, it’s fair to say, are taking it more seriously than others. Townley pupil Tanisha is underperforming and low on confidence, yet keen to raise her game and nurtured by staff aware of her limitations and capabilities. At Erith, meanwhile, Denisa is angling for a place in Townley Sixth Form and seems more than capable of attaining it, but staffing shortages are crippling science classes amid an endless round of supply teachers and stand-ins. “It keeps me awake at night,” says the admirable faculty head Mr Appiah-Gates. It’s a desperately difficult situation and one that reaches an unexpected conclusion, as common ground is found between two unlikely bedfellows. Gabriel Tate The Champions Netflix, from today Created by Mindy Kaling, this new NBC sitcom plays a bachelor gym owner (Anders Holm) off against his gay, estranged son-cum-new flatmate (the brilliant J J Totah). Smartly written and nimbly performed, it’s a solid mainstream hit. Ackley Bridge Channel 4, 8.00pm Matt Evans and Penny Woolcock continue to keep an implausible number of plates spinning as the fizzy pre-watershed drama continues to conduct its handbrake narrative turns. Both Jordan (Samuel Bottomley) and Missy (Poppy Lee Friar) handle cash shortages in an equally desperate manner, and the arrival of Steve’s ex Claire (Kimberly Walsh) puts head teacher Mandy’s (Jo Joyner) nose out of joint. Our Girl BBC One, 9.00pm Georgie (Michelle Keegan) learns an astonishing secret about the local crime boss, before a major rescue operation begins as the flawed but well-meaning military drama continues. Flights from Hell: Caught on Camera ITV, 9.00pm ITV lays down its prime-time weapons as the World Cup looms, as demonstrated by this daft three-part series of incidents filmed at 30,000 feet. These include what an engine explosion feels like to those on board the plane to the impact of volcanic ash and an extraordinarily dramatic landing. Seeing Daylight: the Photography of Dorothy Bohm Sky Arts, 9.00pm Arriving in England in 1939 to escape the Nazis, Dorothy Bohm became a pioneer of street photography and portraiture of deep humanity. This profile examines her life and work. Elvis: the Searcher Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on Peter Guralnick’s epochal two-part biography, Thom Zimny’s HBO epic is a treat, focusing as much on Presley the man as Elvis the icon, Part one follows him out of Tupelo, into Sun Records and on to the US army, with part two’s fall, rise and fall again airing Wednesday at 10.00pm. GT Ugly Me: My Life with Body Dysmorphia BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm First shown on BBC Three, this harrowing film follows 29-year-old Liane, seeking treatment for the titular condition which has left her self-worth in tatters. GT Field of Dreams (1989) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.50pm Kevin Costner clearly likes a baseball movie – he’s made five of them. In this one he’s an Iowa farmer instructed by a mysterious voice to build a baseball pitch in the middle of a cornfield, which is soon occupied by a gang of ghostly players from the past. Enjoyably dotty, and responsible for the misquote, “If you build it, they will come” – it’s actually “he will come” – the fantasy is elevated by brilliant performances all around. A Good Day to Die Hard (2013) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The fifth film in the Die Hard franchise takes place in Russia, where our hero, Bruce Willis’s now grizzled John McClane, arrives in Moscow to hunt for his estranged son Jack (Jai Courtney). McClane suspects that he may have become a drug dealer, but it transpires he is in fact working undercover for the CIA, and Dad blunders in on him mid-mission. An enjoyable but clunky thriller. The Departed (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Nothing beats watching a great director in his comfort zone. Martin Scorsese’s gangland thriller – the film that finally won him an Oscar – is riveting. The plot revolves around the local police force’s efforts to stamp out Boston crime lord Frank Costello (a magnificently malevolent Jack Nicholson). There are powerhouse performances, too, from Leonardo Di Caprio, Matt Damon and Mark Wahlberg. Wednesday 13 June From Russia with love: David Dimbleby Credit: BBC Putin’s Russia with David Dimbleby BBC One, 9.00pm, Wales, 11.05pm “In a democracy if you fail to deliver on economic promises, if you surround yourself with cronies and use the law to suppress opposition, you would rightly be thrown out on your ear. But this is Russia, they do things differently here…” So begins David Dimbleby’s thoughtful film in which – as the eyes of the world turn towards Moscow for the 2018 World Cup football tournament – he takes the opportunity to cast an eye over Vladimir Putin’s 18 years as leader and assess the state of Russia today, especially in regard to the West. What he finds is a country in deep economic crisis yet with a people that seem to happily hero-worship Putin and mostly accept a state machine that controls almost every aspect of their lives with the willing assistance of security services, media, military and church. Dimbleby meets ordinary contented Russians as well as protesters, human rights lawyers, journalists and official spokespeople, coming away with a sense, ultimately, that Putin’s popularity is rooted in his strongman image and media-backed levels of suspicion and hostility towards the West unseen since the end of the Cold War. Gerard O’Donovan The Fight for Women’s Bodies BBC Three, from 10.00am Following the landmark vote to legalise abortion in the Republic of Ireland, Ellie Flynn looks back at the issues through the eyes of campaigners on both sides. Great Rail Restorations with Peter Snow Channel 4, 8.00pm Here is a visit to the Isle of Wight, where Peter Snow and his team set out to restore an 1864 wooden train carriage that has served as a holiday chalet since it was decommissioned in the Twenties. Before Grenfell: A Hidden History BBC Two, 9.00pm A year since the Grenfell Tower fire, residents of Kensington relate how the London borough has become the most unequal place in Britain, with the gap between rich and poor once again as extreme as in the 1860s when developers first built housing for the rich in Notting Hill next to the worst slum in London. Can Science Make Me Perfect? With Alice Roberts BBC Four, 9.00pm Millions of years have gone into the human body: lots of great evolutionary adaptations but lots of imperfections, too. In a film that’s as entertaining as it is instructive, anatomist Alice Roberts takes on a challenge to design a better body than the one we get at birth. The Fast Fix: Diabetes ITV, 9.00pm Anita Rani presents a new two-part series exploring whether it is possible for people suffering from type 2 diabetes to reverse the condition by adhering to a radical diet. By consuming just 800 calories a day, can they “fast themselves better”? Concludes tomorrow Big Beasts: Last of the Giants Sky One, 9.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee explores why size matters in the natural world. Beginning in the Americas, he checks out the planet’s largest predator, the sperm whale; comes face to face with a grizzly bear and gets rather too close to an anaconda that’s as long as a bus. GO How to Start an Airline Channel 4, 10.30pm This documentary follows Bangladeshi-British entrepreneur Kazi Shafiqur Rahman as he attempts to break into the fiercely competitive airline industry while also fulfilling the demands of his faith by insisting that the airline must comply with the teachings of Islam. GO Regarding Henry (1991) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 6.50pm Telling the story of a hotshot lawyer (Harrison Ford) who learns to question his values after a head injury, this film formed a companion piece to Wolf (1994), with Jack Nicholson as a publisher who is bitten by a wolf and turns into a boardroom predator. Directed by Mike Nichols, whose Oscar-winning movie The Graduate was a cinematic landmark of the 1960s, it’s a bit of an embarrassment, but interesting nevertheless. Source Code (2011) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal repeatedly finds himself reliving the last eight minutes in the life of a man on board a train which is about to be destroyed by a bomb as part of an experiment. Meanwhile, scientists Vera Farmiga and Jeffrey Wright are monitoring Gyllenhaal’s exploits. Duncan Jones confirmed the promise of his directing debut Moon with this thrilling whodunit, which also serves as a moving meditation on life. Beetlejuice (1988) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm Michael Keaton is an actor of rare versatility (as his triumphant role in Birdman proved). In this cult, Oscar-winning film by Tim Burton, Keaton shines as a con artist ghost called Beetlejuice, who aims to help two other ghosts (Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis) to scare the obnoxious new residents out of their old house. But he then falls for lovely goth Lydia (Winona Ryder), the family’s daughter. Thursday 14 June It’s kicking off: Mark Pugatch (centre) leads ITV’s presenting team Credit: ITV FIFA World Cup 2018: Opening Ceremony ITV, 2.30pm Regardless of how you think Russia got to be awarded the 21st staging of football’s biggest tournament (by corrupt means or otherwise), it’s time to cast those aspersions aside because the Russia 2018 championship is here. But, two hours before a ball is kicked, the opening ceremony marks the official start of the highest prize in football. And as we all know, entertaining opening ceremonies can be a great curtain-raiser for sport events, if they are done well – think the London 2012 Olympics. This one takes place at the 80,000-seat Luzhniki Stadium, which is the jewel in Russia’s crown of stadiums and will also host the final on July 15. Mark Pougatch presents the live coverage of the ceremony, which is headlined by actor and rapper Will Smith and Nicky Jam, who will perform Live It Up, the official World Cup song, which has received mixed reviews. As well as that, the ceremony will include local performers showing off different aspects of Russian culture, with gymnasts and trampolinists in among the fireworks and performances on display. The matches get under way following the ceremony with the host nation against Saudi Arabia. Clive Morgan Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm While the BBC’s post-Bake Off cookery contest may not have set the world alight, it’s given the judges plenty to get their teeth into. This week, it’s the final, and three challenges stand between the contestants and the title: a summer favourite, their best main course and a pudding. Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm After three weeks of cute animals, Springwatch comes to an end with Chris Packham, Michaela Strachan and co reliving this year’s best moments at Sherborne Park Estate. The Trouble with Women with Anne Robinson BBC One, 9.00pm As a journalist and TV presenter, Anne Robinson shattered the glass ceiling as she built her career. She imagined that now, 50 years later, we’d be much closer to achieving equality than we are. With the ongoing discussions about gender pay, Robinson asks women around the UK what’s preventing parity? Inside HM Prison Wormwood Scrubs Channel 5, 9.00pm Wormwood Scrubs has had some infamous inmates: from serial killers Ian Brady and Peter Sutcliffe to rockers Pete Docherty and Keith Richards. This documentary exploring the prison’s history tells the stories of a Soviet spy who escaped from the jail and its best-known inmate, Charles Bronson. CM Missions BBC Four, 10.00pm and 10.20pm The absorbing French sci-fi drama about the first manned mission to Mars concludes with its final double header. This week, psychiatrist Jeanne (Hélène Viviès) discovers the reason behind cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov’s (Arben Bajraktaraj) mission. I Am Evidence Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Even though Mariska Hargitay spent almost 20 years as crime fighter Olivia Benson in Law & Order: SVU, nothing prepared her for what she was to learn in real life. In this shocking documentary, Hargitay investigates the flaws in the US justice system that have allowed tens of thousands of rape kits to go untested for years. It’s a tough film to watch at times, especially as it highlights the issue through deeply personal and harrowing, first-person accounts from four women whose attacks are still fresh in their minds decades after the assaults due to a lack of closure. “I felt like my body was a crime scene,” one of the women recalls. CM Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby (2006) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm Will Ferrell fans will need little encouragement to lap up this affectionate send-up of Nascar racing, redneck culture and male bonding. Ferrell pays a Nascar speed-demon who is challenged by a gay, French Formula One driver (Sacha Baron Cohen), to see who is the ultimate racer. It’s a full throttle comedy that plays to Ferrell’s strengths. The Hills Have Eyes (2006) ★★★☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm French director Alexandre Aja makes his Hollywood debut with this grim but gripping remake of Wes Craven’s semi-cult horror film about a family battling a brood of mutants in the New Mexico desert. Aja ups the visceral violence, and the characters – including Ted Levine and Kathleen Quinlan as the parents – are sufficiently well-drawn to make the outcome shocking. The Ghost (2010) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor plays a talented ghost writer, who lands a lucrative contract to edit the memoirs of Adam Lang (Pierce Brosnan), the former UK Prime Minister, in this Roman Polanski adaptation of the Robert Harris novel. Soon after, Lang is accused of committing a war crime and the Ghost finds himself drawn into a world of dangerous secrets that put his life at risk. This is a deeply unsettling thriller. Friday 15 June One connected flow: Dan Jones on the Grand Union Canal Building Britain’s Canals Channel 5, 8.00pm His tattoos may have a nerdish medieval theme, but historian Dan Jones still seems too hip to be fronting a stuffy-sounding series about Britain’s iconic canals. Jones’s lively style and eye for interesting detail, however, keeps this subject surprisingly fresh, as he begins this three-part run with a look at the Grand Union Canal, the longest stretch of man-made waterway in Britain. It’s a story that reaches back 200 years, when the demands of the Industrial Revolution called for a speedy way to move goods between Birmingham and London, and the country’s engineering super-brains found ingenious means to link seven separate channels into one connected flow. As Jones explains, while the financial benefits were big, construction of the Grand Union was time consuming and dangerous. The 12-year stop-start struggle to complete the technically complex Blisworth Hill tunnel, for example, saw the deaths of up to 60 workers. Unable to compete with the advent of the speedy steam train, the Grand Union itself soon declined too. The canal is now a source of summertime pleasure, so this is a welcome reminder of its once vital purpose. Toby Dantzic Queer Eye Netflix, from today The success of this heart-warming makeover series, which returned to much acclaim earlier this year, was something of a surprise. Netflix then have been quick to capitalise, snappily rolling out another run barely four months later, with the likeable quintet all returning for more lifestyle revamping. Details are so far scant, but the show’s culture guru Karamo Brown has hinted that women and the trans community could be featured. World Cup 2018: Portugal v Spain BBC One, 6.20pm The pick of this week’s World Cup matches happens on day two at the Fisht Stadium in Sochi and comes from Group B. Expect a tense affair as Spain, who suffered the ignominy of failing to make it to the knockout rounds four years ago, take on their bitter rivals Portugal. The Crystal Maze: Celebrity Special Channel 4, 9.00pm Former footballer Dennis Wise heads the team of celebrity hopefuls, joined by Katie Price, Roman Kemp, Bez and Binky Felstead.Wise struggles with a fiendish skill game, while a number-based challenge sets Felstead’s head spinning. Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm Jane McDonald wraps up her Antipodean adventure in New Zealand’s North Island. She rubs noses with a Maori tribe in Napier, explores Rotorua’s dramatic geothermal landscapes and views Auckland’s skyline from a helicopter. Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.40pm This is a final bout of topical treats from veteran impressionist Tracey Ullman. Favourites Angela Merkel and Rupert Murdoch get a look in, alongside more takes on Jeremy Corbyn, Michael Gove and Nanny, the dedicated carer of Jacob Rees-Mogg. Africa: A Journey Into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm Apart from the occasional act on Later… with Jools Holland, world music doesn’t get much airtime on our TVs, so this beguiling series helmed by DJ Rita Ray offers a welcome insight into its traditions. For her final foray, Ray heads to Mali, home to more Grammy award-winning artists than any other African country. From her attempts at a sinuous wedding dance to meeting renowned harp player Toumani Diabaté, Ray’s journey is full of stirring encounters. TD Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 10.00pm A fitting reminder of Dale Winton’s easy-going charm, this swansong travelogue series resumes after a hiatus with our host in ocean-front Miami. Highlights include a trip to Little Havana, the city’s Cuban quarter, and a look at fashion designer Versace’s opulent former home. TD Blade Runner 2049 (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm In a similar but distinct way to Ridley Scott’s masterful original, Blade Runner 2049 mulls one of the meatiest questions around: is surface all that there is, or do life’s currents run deeper than the things we can see, hear and touch? Denis Villeneuve’s film toys with both options, making neither a comfort – and in the process, maps out a provocative blockbuster. Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford star. Red (2010) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. The Wolf of Wall Street (2013) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 11.40pm Soaked in sex, drugs and scandal, Martin Scorsese’s epic is based on the memoir of stockbroker Jordan Belfort, who spent the Nineties illegally amassing a vast personal fortune. With a fantastic performance from Leonardo DiCaprio, this morally bankrupt romp was lauded by audiences and critics alike. Jonah Hill and Margot Robbie co-star. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: RHS Chatsworth Flower Show, Supershoppers and more
RHS Chatsworth Flower Show BBC Two, 7.00pm; not Scotland or Wales Anyone mourning the end of the Chelsea Flower Show can seek solace in the RHS’s newest horticultural event, the Chatsworth Flower Show. Although its debut last year was marred by inclement weather, the event deserves to become a magnet for enthusiasts, its USP being its setting in the glorious Capability Brown-designed gardens of Derbyshire’s most famous stately home. This year’s occasion features a show-stopping installation of more than 100 varieties of orchid, a floral river display of 12,000 Cosmos, and eight art installations dotted among the 1,000-acre estate. We begin with Gardeners’ World favourites Carol Klein, Adam Frost and Arit Anderson giving us an overview of the five-day event. Among the five show gardens, the most intriguing-sounding are Elspeth Stockwell’s John Deere Garden, which celebrates 100 years of tractors, and Chris Myers’ Hay Time in the Dales, which is a celebration of wildflower meadows. The gardening experts ask whether conifers are coming back into fashion and explore Chatsworth’s rich orchid history – the Victorian head gardener Joseph Paxton introduced 80 species there. If the weather holds, RHS Chatsworth should become a jewel in the RHS crown. VP Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This over-egged cookery contest, with too many judges, hasn’t recreated Great British Bake Off’s magic, but goes down easily enough. This week, the five remaining amateurs create a sharing feast and a dish of squid or mackerel. VP Supershoppers Channel 4, 8.00pm This perky take on the consumer show, hosted by Anna Richardson and Sabrina Grant, storms back with an item attacking John Lewis. They argue that the department store’s price promise can’t always be believed, alongside other items looking at faddy dairy-free milks and battery life. VP Secrets of the Chocolate Factory: Inside Cadbury Channel 5, 9.00pm This breezy documentary looks at the history of our favourite chocolate brand, from its founding as a well-meaning Victorian social experiment to the hostile takeover by Kraft in 2010. It’s packed fuller than a Fruit & Nut bar with fascinating titbits, making it a satisfying treat. VP Mock the Week BBC Two, 10.00pm TV’s most competitive panel show is back to take a sideways look at the news, with James Acaster and Zoe Lyons among the stand-ups joining stalwart Hugh Dennis and host Dara O’Briain. Donald Trump and Brexit ensure there’s be no shortage of material. VP Quantico Alibi, 9.00pm Priyanka Chopra, a close friend of the duchess formerly known as Meghan Markle, guest stars in the third run of this crime thriller. This new series, set three years after the last, sees Chopra’s ex-FBI agent, Alex Parrish, living under a pseudonym, until men with guns find her. VP Billions Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm It’s a pleasure to watch Paul Giamatti and Damian Lewis slug it out each week as hot-shot attorney Chuck and shady banker Axe in this drama about high finance. This week, Axe and Taylor (Asia Kate Dillon) fall out over her worth to the firm. VP Missions BBC Four, from 10.00pm Another double helping of the French sci-fi drama about the first manned mission to Mars, in bite-sized 25-minute chunks. This week, Jeanne (Hélène Viviès) wallows in memories of her father, while back in 1960s’ Moscow we meet Vladimir Komarov (Arben Bajraktaraj), who was a real cosmonaut. VP Two Rode Together (1961) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 12.20pm Working for the first time with director John Ford, James Stewart stars in this slow western, based on the novel Comanche Captives by Will Cook and which has thematic echoes of Ford’s The Searchers. Guthrie McCabe (Stewart) is a corrupt town marshal who is hired by a Cavalry lieutenant (Richard Widmark) to help rescue captives held by the Comanche in 1880s Texas. Shirley Jones co-stars. Calendar Girls (2003) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 6.00pm This gentle, eye-moistening comedy, which has been turned into a successful play, is based on the true story of a group of Women’s Institute members in Yorkshire who raised money for leukaemia research by posing naked for a calendar. Helen Mirren, Julie Walters and Celia Imrie are among the women stripping off (well, more or less: certain body parts are always obscured by tea- cups, cream buns, etc). The Karate Kid (1984) ★★★★☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm One of the Eighties’ best-loved films, and far superior to the 2010 remake starring Jaden Smith (son of Will). It tells the story of bullied Daniel Larusso (Ralph Macchio), who’s taken under the wing of handyman Mr Miyagi (Pat Morita) and taught how to wash cars and paint fences. Of course, this turns out to be masterly martial arts training. Elisabeth Shue also stars as Larusso’s love interest Ali. Friday 8 June YouTube blogger Alfie Deyes, actress Jorgie Porter, long jumper Greg Rutherford, Dame Kelly Holmes, and MC Big Narstie take part in The Crystal Maze Credit: Channel 4 The Crystal Maze: Celebrity Special Channel 4, 9.00pm Channel 4’s successful reboot of the cult Eighties series continues its golden run of form with another charity special featuring people who, in the words of Maze Master Richard Ayoade, “we have all agreed, for some reason, to call… celebrities”. Ayoade is unstinting in his good-natured jibes, and his targets are equally obliging in laughing them off: this time around, it’s Olympians Kelly Holmes and Greg Rutherford, Hollyoaks actress Jorgie Porter, YouTube vlogger Alfie Deyes and grime MC Big Narstie. The latter comes in for the roughest ride, and indeed you may not see a more agonising sequence all year than Big Narstie wrestling with Jarhead’s (Adam Buxton) not-enormously taxing riddles, but his utter delight at being involved (“I’m GASSED!”) earns him a pass. The tasks are the usual ingenious grab-bag, honouring the heritage of the series while also advancing it, from the daft (balancing on space hoppers) to the fiendish (blowing a ball around a maze with “directional guffs” from an air pump). For his part, Ayoade once again proves himself the natural heir to Richard O’Brien in surreal wit (pace Ed Tudor-Pole and Stephan Merchant), and the cause, Stand Up 2 Cancer, is unimpeachable. GT Dispatches: After Grenfell Channel 4, 7.30pm In spite of a wealth of promises in the wake of the catastrophic fire in Grenfell Tower, claims abound that too many of the country’s tower blocks remain unsafe. Ed Howker investigates whether expert advice has been heeded and looks at the risks, both existing and newly discovered, for the tower’s residents. GT Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm Channel 5’s first-ever Bafta-winning show returns for a trip down under, with former cruise ship singer Jane McDonald exploring Sydney, Tasmania, Dunedin and Christchurch. GT Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm Ullman continues to play to her strengths with her roll call of uncanny impersonations of famous people. Theresa May, Angela Merkle and Nicola Sturgeon are back, along with her bizarrely convincing Michael Gove, while Jacob Rees-Mogg (Liam Hourican) and his Nanny (Ullman) endure yet more humiliation. GT Arctic Monkeys Live at the BBC BBC Two, 11.05pm Alex Turner and his band play selections from their divisive new album, Tranquillity Base Hotel & Casino, as well as a few oldies, including A Certain Romance, to reassure their more conservative fans. GT Cloak and Dagger Amazon Prime, from today Marvel’s latest TV offering is this teen series in which Tandy Bowen (Olivia Holt) and Tyrone Johnson (Aubrey Joseph) discover new, mysteriously connected superpowers. GT Sense8 Netflix, from today The Wachowskis’ kaleidoscopic saga ends with a two-hour episode created after its fans demanded closure when the series was axed. With Wolfgang (Max Riemelt) missing, Capheus (Toby Onwumere) running for office, Sun Bak (Bae Doona) on the run and the mysterious Chairman still at large, there’s no shortage of loose ends. GT The Staircase Netflix, from today This 2004 eight-parter documented the 16-year court battle over the fate of novelist Michael Peterson, accused of pushing his wife down the stairs to her death. Landing on Netflix with new, equally gripping episodes, Jean-Xavier de Lestrade’s series is both the old and the new Making a Murderer. GT The Way Way Back (2013) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.55pm This coming-of-age story feels like familiar terrain, but it’s agreeably done. Duncan (Liam James) learns about life, love and self-esteem from a gang of water-park employees, including the excellent Sam Rockwell, when forced to go on holiday with his mother (Toni Collette) and her boyfriend (Steve Carrell). The script flows and there’s enough melancholy and edge to the overall comic tone for its charm to prevail. Bend It Like Beckham (2002) ★★★☆☆ ITV, 10.45pm Keira Knightley’s career kicked off with this feelgood football-themed comedy drama from Bhaji on the Beach director Gurinder Chadha. She stars alongside Parminder Nagra as one of two 18-year-old girls who set out to make it as professional footballers, despite their families’ best efforts to stop them. Next of Kin’s Archie Panjabi and Shaznay Lewis (of reunited Nineties girl band All Saints fame) co-star. Platoon (1986) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 11.00pm This is a chance to see a young Charlie Sheen at the start of his turbulent career. The horrors of the Vietnam War are seen through the prism of a fresh-faced college dropout (Sheen) who finds himself in the thick of battle while Willem Dafoe plays his sympathetic sergeant. Director Oliver Stone used his own experiences of serving in the US army during the war to inform this harrowing film that won four Oscars. Saturday 9 June Controversial: the writer and intellectual Germaine Greer is profiled Credit: BBC Germaine Bloody Greer BBC Two, 9.00pm The personal views of Germaine Greer once had a universality and pungency about them that the world so desperately needed. But her recent comments about rape, violence on TV and transpeople, by contrast, resemble self-important trolling: wilfully controversial, dreadfully retrograde and a blight on a considerable legacy. This thrilling profile is a reminder of why she still matters, albeit perhaps more for what she was than what she has become. Novelist Zoë Heller and journalist Rosie Boycott are among those singing her praises, while Greer herself proves as unable as ever to avoid calling out a daft question or savaging a sacred cow. The footage is exciting and superbly mounted by director Clare Beavan. Whether it’s Greer’s early films, her steadfastness in the face of the abuse sent her way after The Female Eunuch was published, and her evisceration of Norman Mailer during a famous 1971 set-to in New York, Greer remains a most rugged individual. “I don’t think Germaine and the word ‘sisterhood’ are natural bedfellows,” reckons Boycott. What about that legacy? “I don’t do regret and I don’t do things that I regret,” Greer concludes. By any standards, a remarkable life. Gabriel Tate Trooping the Colour BBC One, 10.30am Marking the official birthday of the Queen, the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards will conduct their annual pageant on Horse Guards Parade, introduced by Huw Edwards and with J J Chalmers offering behind-the-scenes insights. There are highlights at 7.30pm on BBC Two. French Open Tennis: The women’s final ITV, 1.30pm Action on the 14th day at Roland Garros features the women’s singles final in the second Grand Slam tournament of the year. Jelena Ostapenko met Simona Halep in last year’s showpiece match, where the Latvian defeated the number three seed 4-6, 6-4, 6-3 to become the first person from her country to win a Grand Slam tournament and the first unseeded player to win the French Open since 1933. The men’s final, which was won for a record 10th time by Spaniard Rafael Nadal last year, takes place on Sunday at 1.30pm on ITV. Women’s International One-Day Cricket: England Women v South Africa Women Sky Sports Main Event, 1.30pm It’s the opening one-day international of the three-match series, which takes place at New Road in Worcester. Katherine Brunt, Georgia Elwiss, Laura Marsh, Sarah Taylor and Lauren Winfield all return to the England squad after missing out on the Indian tour. World Cup-winning duo Fran Wilson and Alex Hartley miss out, however. International Rugby Union: South Africa v England Sky Sports Main Event, 3.00pm This afternoon England will be looking to dispatch the Springboks at a venue Eddie Jones has described as the “spiritual home of rugby”. They’ve not won at Ellis Park in Johannesburg since 1972 – their only triumph at the venue – and their last appearance here was a 36-27 defeat under Stuart Lancaster in 2012. Ellis Park was the setting for the Springboks’ World Cup final victory over New Zealand in 1995 and one of the sport’s finest moments – Nelson Mandela handing Francois Pienaar the Webb Ellis Cup. “It will be hostile but it’s fantastic and I am so excited about it,” says Jones. “In world rugby who do you want to beat? The Springboks at Ellis Park.” Owen Farrell will captain England, while the hugely talented New Zealand-born flanker Brad Shields is expected to play a part for the visitors. The River Wye with Will Millard BBC Two, 5.30pm; Scotland, 2.45pm After deconstructing the exploration documentary in the fascinating and alarming My Year with the Tribe, explorer Will Millard is on slightly surer ground with this new series in which he journeys down the River Wye. He begins his journey with a search for the river’s source on the slopes of Plynlimon, before he has an encounter with an entrepreneurial local sheep farmer. Take Me Out: Over 50s Special ITV, 8.00pm Three “older gentlemen” (I’m sure host Paddy McGuinness will make plenty of gags here) face 30 single “Golden Girls”, including a former nun and an ex-partner of action hero Jason Statham, in this one-off special of the ever-popular dating show. Hidden BBC Four, 9.00pm After Hinterland and Keeping Faith comes the BBC’s latest Welsh language crime thriller. Hidden has a familiar set-up – the discovery of a young girl’s body in a disused quarry tears a small community apart – but Sian Reese-Williams and Sion Alun Davies as DIs Cadi John and Owen Vaughan area leading pair to reckon with, and the atmosphere of unease benefits hugely from the mountainous surroundings. Come Together: the Rise of the Festival Sky Arts, 9.00pm The line-up for this documentary would grace any festival, with Pete Townshend and Noel Gallagher among the interviewees explaining the evolution of the modern music festival from its earliest jazz and blues incarnations in Newport, through the hippy beanfeasts of Monterey and Woodstock to Glastonbury and Coachella. There are also contributions from those who promote and document festivals, including Michael Eavis and D A Pennebaker. GT A Girl’s Guide to TV BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI Comedian Rachel Parris of The Mash Report presents her typically tongue-in-cheek advice for women looking to get ahead in television. GT Maleficent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 6.05pm Angelina Jolie stars as the titular Maleficent in Disney’s live-action reimagining of Sleeping Beauty, which follows her from a carefree fairy to Mistress of All Evil, muddling the distinction between hero and villain. Maleficent is happy in a kingdom of peculiar CGI beasts until her heart is broken by Stefan (Sharlto Copley), who inherits the throne. Seeking vengeance, she curses his baby, Princess Aurora (Elle Fanning). Thor: The Dark World (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 10.35pm This is a follow-up to the popular Norse god/superhero blockbuster. The rather flabby plot is alleviated by Chris Hemsworth’s hearty charisma, which provides frequent relief from Natalie Portman’s bland damsel-in-distress (attempts to beef up her character by making her an astrophysicist are undermined by her constant fainting). Highlights include Thor sliding down The Gherkin skyscraper. Made in Dagenham (2010) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.45pm Industrial action in pursuit of equal pay for women doesn’t sound too thrilling a subject, but Nigel Cole’s (Calendar Girls) film, based around the real-life strike from 1968, turns out to be a rousing crowd-pleaser. Sally Hawkins plays the reluctant ringleader of the workers who sew car seats at Ford’s Dagenham plant; Bob Hoskins is a union rep; Miranda Richardson is wonderful as Labour MP Barbara Castle. Sunday 10 June Smoldering: Aidan Turner returns as the eponymous hero Credit: BBC Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Not since Daniel Craig emerged from the waves in Casino Royale has there been so much fuss over a pair of wet pecs. Yes, Poldark is back for a fourth series and star Aidan Turner bares his chest for the fans in an opening scene that, if nothing else, suggests that he’s spent a lot of time exercising since the end of series three. This opener finds our swashbuckling hero Ross Poldark (Turner) back in full-on Cornish crusader mode when, following a disturbance in Truro, he locks horns with old enemy George Warleggan (Jack Farthing) over the fate of three good pals accused of riot and murder. Meanwhile, his flame-haired wife Demelza (Eleanor Tomlinson) can’t fend off her intimate longings following that illicit clinch in the dunes with poetry-penning aristo Hugh Armitage (Josh Whitehouse) – who, with the announcement of a general election, looks set to be diverted into a career at Westminster. But as Dr Dwight (Luke Norris) is at pains to point out, Armitage has a delicate constitution that might not suit the rough and tumble of parliamentary politics. Could Ross be persuaded to think again about throwing his hat in the ring? Gerard O’Donovan One-Day International Cricket: Scotland v England Sky Sports Main Event, 10.30am Having responded brilliantly to tie the Test series with Pakistan 1-1, England now turn their attention to Scotland, with this ODI at the Grange in Edinburgh. Songs of Praise BBC One, 1.25pm A year on from the Grenfell Tower disaster, Aled Jones presents a commemorative special edition exploring how the local community in North Kensington is coping and recovering. Britain Celebrates Live: 100 Years of Women’s Votes BBC One, 2.00pm Live coverage of today’s public processions through Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh and London to celebrate the centenary of women winning the right to vote. Tonight’s Antiques Roadshow, at 8pm, also takes up the theme, devoting its time to items with links to remarkable women. Formula 1: Canadian Grand Prix Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm After a Monaco Grand Prix that left championship leader Lewis Hamilton, in his words, “cold”, all eyes are on the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal, where Daniel Riccardio will be aiming to win back-to-back races. Soccer Aid for Unicef 2018 ITV, 6.30pm Live from Old Trafford, it’s the annual England v World XI charity football match between teams mixing celebrities and professional athletes. This year Robbie Williams’s England is taking on a team of international stars led by Usain Bolt. Other players include Mo Farah, Gordon Ramsay, Olly Murs, and Eric Cantona, and there’s live music from Jessie Ware. Countryfile BBC One, 7.00pm The last of three specials heads for Sandringham in Norfolk, the most private of the Royal retreats. Matt Baker discovers one of the Queen’s less-known interests – racing pigeons – while Ellie Harrison learns more about her love of horses. GO Patrick Melrose Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch’s brilliantly judged bravura performance has been one of the television highlights of 2018. Tonight, he brings the series to an entertaining and emotionally charged close as Patrick, separated and back in London in 2006, hopes to put the past to rest following his mother’s funeral. Cosby: The Women Speak Sony Crime Channel, 9.00pm Following Bill Cosby’s conviction on three counts of aggravated indecent assault, here’s another opportunity to see the A&E network’s 2015 one-hour special in which the extent of the allegations against the former TV icon for predatory sexual behaviour came to light. Over a dozen of the 50-plus women who accused him of rape and sexual assault going back decades talk of their experiences on screen for the first time, and how statute of limitation laws threatened to deprive them of justice. GO Despicable Me 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 5.10pm Despicable Me, 2010’s animated supervillain comedy, had a neat enough premise. It’s gone in this sequel, though, as Steve Carell’s bald antihero, Gru, is now a reformed soul, occupied with childcare rather than dastardly plots to steal the moon. Gru’s Minions – those knee-high yellow Tic-Tacs – provide the film’s one inspired idea as they’re injected with mutating serum by the film’s mystery baddy. Hulk (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.15pm Ang Lee’s dark and stylised version (a split screen mimics the panels of a comic book page) of the Incredible Hulk’s adventures is one of the best and underrated Marvel adaptations, even if it’s too complex at times. Eric Bana stars as Bruce, a scientist who’s exposed to gamma radiation and becomes a not-so-jolly green giant. This is a rampaging tale with bold special effects. Jennifer Connolly co-stars as his love interest. It (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Stephen King’s evil clown tale is no laughing matter. First a Warners miniseries in 1990, starring an unforgettable Tim Curry, and now a two-part film version. Here we continue the terrifying tale of Pennywise (Bill Skarsgård), but jump forward three decades to the summer of 1988, buying into the current vogue for Eighties teen-flick nostalgia. The scary stuff is petrifying when it peaks. Monday 11 June Community spirit: those affected by the fire tell their stories Credit: BBC Grenfell BBC One, 8.30pm Bafta-winning director Ben Anthony’s unmissable documentary about last year’s Grenfell Tower tragedy opens with a sea of faces, all of which gain poignant individual focus as the film progresses. The blaze at the 24-storey block of public housing in the London borough of Kensington, which resulted in 72 deaths, left a lasting impression in those featured here as each person tells their unique story about the horrific events and their impact. Survivors who lost their homes, the bereaved, bystanders and police all share their stories, although it’s a surprising omission that the firefighters who witnessed the horrors first hand don’t offer their account. Split screens give multiple perspectives on the same moment, and what starts out as a patchwork of personal experience knits together into a mighty whole, the collective voice of a community broken but defiant. In fact, much of the film focuses on the efforts of those affected to unite in the face of seeming indifference from the local council, who also have their say. As the ongoing inquiry continues, this devastating account offers a damning testament of its own, rife with accusations of injustice and neglect, underpinned by blistering rage and grief. Toby Dantzic Fight Like a Girl BBC One, 7.30pm The ferocious sport of female wrestling comes under the spotlight with this lively film following Scottish fighter Kimberly Benson. She combines a gruelling training regime with her daytime job, as she aims for her first world title in Japan. Long Lost Family: What Happened Next ITV, 9.00pm Nicky Campbell and Davina McCall catch up with families they’ve reunited. Cathie Cutler Evans, who met her half-sister in 2016, has found joy in her extended clan. But for Maureen Charlton, separated from her brother Michael for 40 years, progress been painstaking. Dan Snow’s Norman Walks PBS America, 9.00pm Dan Snow sorts fact from fiction as he investigates the history of Norman Britain in this new series. He starts off on the Sussex coast, where aided by evidence from the Bayeux Tapestry, he pieces together William the Conqueror’s 11th-century coastal invasion. Flowers Channel 4, 10.00pm Will Sharpe’s gloriously dark comedy about a dysfunctional family returns with a double bill, then continues each night this week. A seemingly chipper Maurice (Julian Bennett) and Deborah (Olivia Colman) are on a caravanning holiday, while daughter Amy (Sophia di Martino) has a brash new girlfriend. Storyville: City Of Ghosts BBC Four, 10.30pm There are images of death in Matthew Heineman’s film so harrowing that it’s hard to keep watching, but these are the sights that Heineman’s subject, rebel group Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered, face daily. The renegade collective have made it their task to secretly film the atrocities committed by Isil in the Syrian city of Raqqa, and show the rest of the world the reality of the regime. It’s an astonishing act of citizen-led journalism, and the participants’ fear and grief, as well as their sense of purpose, are starkly captured in Heineman’s blunt and brutal chronicle of a city in turmoil. TD Prisons Uncovered: Out Of Control? ITV, 10.45pm; Scotland, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.15pm; not UTV In 2016, HMP Birmingham saw the worst prison riot for 25 years, in which 600 inmates were freed from their cells. This sobering documentary looks at the factors behind the incident and reflects on the prison system. TD Our Kind of Traitor (2016) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor stars in this so-so John le Carré adaptation as poetry lecturer Perry Makepeace, who becomes embroiled in negotiations to bring Dima (Stellan Skarsgård), a well-connected Russian oligarch, into the fold of British intelligence. Skarsgård is the standout here, charging into his role with pungency, playing Dima as a bedraggled beast of Moscow’s criminal underworld. The Shining (1980) ★★★★★ TCM, 9.00pm Set in a deserted hotel that’s in the care of writer Jack (Jack Nicholson) and his family for the winter, Stanley Kubrick’s brilliant psycho-horror, based on the novel by Stephen King, is subtly unsettling. But it’s stuffed, too, with unforgettable nerve-jangling shocks, including the moment when the crazed Jack smashes his way through a door with an axe as his wife (Shelley Duvall) cowers in the corner. Teen Wolf (1985) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 12.10am Critics howled at this preposterous teenage comedy but audiences loved it, perhaps because it came out shortly after its star Michael J Fox’s finest hour: Back to the Future. The plot – in which Fox’s likeable nerd morphs into a basketball-playing werewolf – is almost as unlikely as the fact that he still looked fresh out of the 11th grade at the ripe old age of 25. An unparalleled analysis of puberty and adolescence. Tuesday 12 June Hitting the books: Tanisha is a pupil at Townley Grammar Credit: BBC Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland & Wales, 11.15pm Jamie Pickup’s series has walked a tightrope with considerable skill, highlighting the inarguable inequities of our educational system that favours a selective approach, while also acknowledging its considerable benefits and observing the situation from the points of view of both pupils and teachers. It concludes with mock GCSE exams approaching and students at Erith School, a secondary modern, and neighbouring institution Townley Grammar, having to assess their suitability for further education. Some, it’s fair to say, are taking it more seriously than others. Townley pupil Tanisha is underperforming and low on confidence, yet keen to raise her game and nurtured by staff aware of her limitations and capabilities. At Erith, meanwhile, Denisa is angling for a place in Townley Sixth Form and seems more than capable of attaining it, but staffing shortages are crippling science classes amid an endless round of supply teachers and stand-ins. “It keeps me awake at night,” says the admirable faculty head Mr Appiah-Gates. It’s a desperately difficult situation and one that reaches an unexpected conclusion, as common ground is found between two unlikely bedfellows. Gabriel Tate The Champions Netflix, from today Created by Mindy Kaling, this new NBC sitcom plays a bachelor gym owner (Anders Holm) off against his gay, estranged son-cum-new flatmate (the brilliant J J Totah). Smartly written and nimbly performed, it’s a solid mainstream hit. Ackley Bridge Channel 4, 8.00pm Matt Evans and Penny Woolcock continue to keep an implausible number of plates spinning as the fizzy pre-watershed drama continues to conduct its handbrake narrative turns. Both Jordan (Samuel Bottomley) and Missy (Poppy Lee Friar) handle cash shortages in an equally desperate manner, and the arrival of Steve’s ex Claire (Kimberly Walsh) puts head teacher Mandy’s (Jo Joyner) nose out of joint. Our Girl BBC One, 9.00pm Georgie (Michelle Keegan) learns an astonishing secret about the local crime boss, before a major rescue operation begins as the flawed but well-meaning military drama continues. Flights from Hell: Caught on Camera ITV, 9.00pm ITV lays down its prime-time weapons as the World Cup looms, as demonstrated by this daft three-part series of incidents filmed at 30,000 feet. These include what an engine explosion feels like to those on board the plane to the impact of volcanic ash and an extraordinarily dramatic landing. Seeing Daylight: the Photography of Dorothy Bohm Sky Arts, 9.00pm Arriving in England in 1939 to escape the Nazis, Dorothy Bohm became a pioneer of street photography and portraiture of deep humanity. This profile examines her life and work. Elvis: the Searcher Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on Peter Guralnick’s epochal two-part biography, Thom Zimny’s HBO epic is a treat, focusing as much on Presley the man as Elvis the icon, Part one follows him out of Tupelo, into Sun Records and on to the US army, with part two’s fall, rise and fall again airing Wednesday at 10.00pm. GT Ugly Me: My Life with Body Dysmorphia BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm First shown on BBC Three, this harrowing film follows 29-year-old Liane, seeking treatment for the titular condition which has left her self-worth in tatters. GT Field of Dreams (1989) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.50pm Kevin Costner clearly likes a baseball movie – he’s made five of them. In this one he’s an Iowa farmer instructed by a mysterious voice to build a baseball pitch in the middle of a cornfield, which is soon occupied by a gang of ghostly players from the past. Enjoyably dotty, and responsible for the misquote, “If you build it, they will come” – it’s actually “he will come” – the fantasy is elevated by brilliant performances all around. A Good Day to Die Hard (2013) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The fifth film in the Die Hard franchise takes place in Russia, where our hero, Bruce Willis’s now grizzled John McClane, arrives in Moscow to hunt for his estranged son Jack (Jai Courtney). McClane suspects that he may have become a drug dealer, but it transpires he is in fact working undercover for the CIA, and Dad blunders in on him mid-mission. An enjoyable but clunky thriller. The Departed (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Nothing beats watching a great director in his comfort zone. Martin Scorsese’s gangland thriller – the film that finally won him an Oscar – is riveting. The plot revolves around the local police force’s efforts to stamp out Boston crime lord Frank Costello (a magnificently malevolent Jack Nicholson). There are powerhouse performances, too, from Leonardo Di Caprio, Matt Damon and Mark Wahlberg. Wednesday 13 June From Russia with love: David Dimbleby Credit: BBC Putin’s Russia with David Dimbleby BBC One, 9.00pm, Wales, 11.05pm “In a democracy if you fail to deliver on economic promises, if you surround yourself with cronies and use the law to suppress opposition, you would rightly be thrown out on your ear. But this is Russia, they do things differently here…” So begins David Dimbleby’s thoughtful film in which – as the eyes of the world turn towards Moscow for the 2018 World Cup football tournament – he takes the opportunity to cast an eye over Vladimir Putin’s 18 years as leader and assess the state of Russia today, especially in regard to the West. What he finds is a country in deep economic crisis yet with a people that seem to happily hero-worship Putin and mostly accept a state machine that controls almost every aspect of their lives with the willing assistance of security services, media, military and church. Dimbleby meets ordinary contented Russians as well as protesters, human rights lawyers, journalists and official spokespeople, coming away with a sense, ultimately, that Putin’s popularity is rooted in his strongman image and media-backed levels of suspicion and hostility towards the West unseen since the end of the Cold War. Gerard O’Donovan The Fight for Women’s Bodies BBC Three, from 10.00am Following the landmark vote to legalise abortion in the Republic of Ireland, Ellie Flynn looks back at the issues through the eyes of campaigners on both sides. Great Rail Restorations with Peter Snow Channel 4, 8.00pm Here is a visit to the Isle of Wight, where Peter Snow and his team set out to restore an 1864 wooden train carriage that has served as a holiday chalet since it was decommissioned in the Twenties. Before Grenfell: A Hidden History BBC Two, 9.00pm A year since the Grenfell Tower fire, residents of Kensington relate how the London borough has become the most unequal place in Britain, with the gap between rich and poor once again as extreme as in the 1860s when developers first built housing for the rich in Notting Hill next to the worst slum in London. Can Science Make Me Perfect? With Alice Roberts BBC Four, 9.00pm Millions of years have gone into the human body: lots of great evolutionary adaptations but lots of imperfections, too. In a film that’s as entertaining as it is instructive, anatomist Alice Roberts takes on a challenge to design a better body than the one we get at birth. The Fast Fix: Diabetes ITV, 9.00pm Anita Rani presents a new two-part series exploring whether it is possible for people suffering from type 2 diabetes to reverse the condition by adhering to a radical diet. By consuming just 800 calories a day, can they “fast themselves better”? Concludes tomorrow Big Beasts: Last of the Giants Sky One, 9.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee explores why size matters in the natural world. Beginning in the Americas, he checks out the planet’s largest predator, the sperm whale; comes face to face with a grizzly bear and gets rather too close to an anaconda that’s as long as a bus. GO How to Start an Airline Channel 4, 10.30pm This documentary follows Bangladeshi-British entrepreneur Kazi Shafiqur Rahman as he attempts to break into the fiercely competitive airline industry while also fulfilling the demands of his faith by insisting that the airline must comply with the teachings of Islam. GO Regarding Henry (1991) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 6.50pm Telling the story of a hotshot lawyer (Harrison Ford) who learns to question his values after a head injury, this film formed a companion piece to Wolf (1994), with Jack Nicholson as a publisher who is bitten by a wolf and turns into a boardroom predator. Directed by Mike Nichols, whose Oscar-winning movie The Graduate was a cinematic landmark of the 1960s, it’s a bit of an embarrassment, but interesting nevertheless. Source Code (2011) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal repeatedly finds himself reliving the last eight minutes in the life of a man on board a train which is about to be destroyed by a bomb as part of an experiment. Meanwhile, scientists Vera Farmiga and Jeffrey Wright are monitoring Gyllenhaal’s exploits. Duncan Jones confirmed the promise of his directing debut Moon with this thrilling whodunit, which also serves as a moving meditation on life. Beetlejuice (1988) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm Michael Keaton is an actor of rare versatility (as his triumphant role in Birdman proved). In this cult, Oscar-winning film by Tim Burton, Keaton shines as a con artist ghost called Beetlejuice, who aims to help two other ghosts (Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis) to scare the obnoxious new residents out of their old house. But he then falls for lovely goth Lydia (Winona Ryder), the family’s daughter. Thursday 14 June It’s kicking off: Mark Pugatch (centre) leads ITV’s presenting team Credit: ITV FIFA World Cup 2018: Opening Ceremony ITV, 2.30pm Regardless of how you think Russia got to be awarded the 21st staging of football’s biggest tournament (by corrupt means or otherwise), it’s time to cast those aspersions aside because the Russia 2018 championship is here. But, two hours before a ball is kicked, the opening ceremony marks the official start of the highest prize in football. And as we all know, entertaining opening ceremonies can be a great curtain-raiser for sport events, if they are done well – think the London 2012 Olympics. This one takes place at the 80,000-seat Luzhniki Stadium, which is the jewel in Russia’s crown of stadiums and will also host the final on July 15. Mark Pougatch presents the live coverage of the ceremony, which is headlined by actor and rapper Will Smith and Nicky Jam, who will perform Live It Up, the official World Cup song, which has received mixed reviews. As well as that, the ceremony will include local performers showing off different aspects of Russian culture, with gymnasts and trampolinists in among the fireworks and performances on display. The matches get under way following the ceremony with the host nation against Saudi Arabia. Clive Morgan Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm While the BBC’s post-Bake Off cookery contest may not have set the world alight, it’s given the judges plenty to get their teeth into. This week, it’s the final, and three challenges stand between the contestants and the title: a summer favourite, their best main course and a pudding. Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm After three weeks of cute animals, Springwatch comes to an end with Chris Packham, Michaela Strachan and co reliving this year’s best moments at Sherborne Park Estate. The Trouble with Women with Anne Robinson BBC One, 9.00pm As a journalist and TV presenter, Anne Robinson shattered the glass ceiling as she built her career. She imagined that now, 50 years later, we’d be much closer to achieving equality than we are. With the ongoing discussions about gender pay, Robinson asks women around the UK what’s preventing parity? Inside HM Prison Wormwood Scrubs Channel 5, 9.00pm Wormwood Scrubs has had some infamous inmates: from serial killers Ian Brady and Peter Sutcliffe to rockers Pete Docherty and Keith Richards. This documentary exploring the prison’s history tells the stories of a Soviet spy who escaped from the jail and its best-known inmate, Charles Bronson. CM Missions BBC Four, 10.00pm and 10.20pm The absorbing French sci-fi drama about the first manned mission to Mars concludes with its final double header. This week, psychiatrist Jeanne (Hélène Viviès) discovers the reason behind cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov’s (Arben Bajraktaraj) mission. I Am Evidence Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Even though Mariska Hargitay spent almost 20 years as crime fighter Olivia Benson in Law & Order: SVU, nothing prepared her for what she was to learn in real life. In this shocking documentary, Hargitay investigates the flaws in the US justice system that have allowed tens of thousands of rape kits to go untested for years. It’s a tough film to watch at times, especially as it highlights the issue through deeply personal and harrowing, first-person accounts from four women whose attacks are still fresh in their minds decades after the assaults due to a lack of closure. “I felt like my body was a crime scene,” one of the women recalls. CM Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby (2006) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm Will Ferrell fans will need little encouragement to lap up this affectionate send-up of Nascar racing, redneck culture and male bonding. Ferrell pays a Nascar speed-demon who is challenged by a gay, French Formula One driver (Sacha Baron Cohen), to see who is the ultimate racer. It’s a full throttle comedy that plays to Ferrell’s strengths. The Hills Have Eyes (2006) ★★★☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm French director Alexandre Aja makes his Hollywood debut with this grim but gripping remake of Wes Craven’s semi-cult horror film about a family battling a brood of mutants in the New Mexico desert. Aja ups the visceral violence, and the characters – including Ted Levine and Kathleen Quinlan as the parents – are sufficiently well-drawn to make the outcome shocking. The Ghost (2010) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor plays a talented ghost writer, who lands a lucrative contract to edit the memoirs of Adam Lang (Pierce Brosnan), the former UK Prime Minister, in this Roman Polanski adaptation of the Robert Harris novel. Soon after, Lang is accused of committing a war crime and the Ghost finds himself drawn into a world of dangerous secrets that put his life at risk. This is a deeply unsettling thriller. Friday 15 June One connected flow: Dan Jones on the Grand Union Canal Building Britain’s Canals Channel 5, 8.00pm His tattoos may have a nerdish medieval theme, but historian Dan Jones still seems too hip to be fronting a stuffy-sounding series about Britain’s iconic canals. Jones’s lively style and eye for interesting detail, however, keeps this subject surprisingly fresh, as he begins this three-part run with a look at the Grand Union Canal, the longest stretch of man-made waterway in Britain. It’s a story that reaches back 200 years, when the demands of the Industrial Revolution called for a speedy way to move goods between Birmingham and London, and the country’s engineering super-brains found ingenious means to link seven separate channels into one connected flow. As Jones explains, while the financial benefits were big, construction of the Grand Union was time consuming and dangerous. The 12-year stop-start struggle to complete the technically complex Blisworth Hill tunnel, for example, saw the deaths of up to 60 workers. Unable to compete with the advent of the speedy steam train, the Grand Union itself soon declined too. The canal is now a source of summertime pleasure, so this is a welcome reminder of its once vital purpose. Toby Dantzic Queer Eye Netflix, from today The success of this heart-warming makeover series, which returned to much acclaim earlier this year, was something of a surprise. Netflix then have been quick to capitalise, snappily rolling out another run barely four months later, with the likeable quintet all returning for more lifestyle revamping. Details are so far scant, but the show’s culture guru Karamo Brown has hinted that women and the trans community could be featured. World Cup 2018: Portugal v Spain BBC One, 6.20pm The pick of this week’s World Cup matches happens on day two at the Fisht Stadium in Sochi and comes from Group B. Expect a tense affair as Spain, who suffered the ignominy of failing to make it to the knockout rounds four years ago, take on their bitter rivals Portugal. The Crystal Maze: Celebrity Special Channel 4, 9.00pm Former footballer Dennis Wise heads the team of celebrity hopefuls, joined by Katie Price, Roman Kemp, Bez and Binky Felstead.Wise struggles with a fiendish skill game, while a number-based challenge sets Felstead’s head spinning. Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm Jane McDonald wraps up her Antipodean adventure in New Zealand’s North Island. She rubs noses with a Maori tribe in Napier, explores Rotorua’s dramatic geothermal landscapes and views Auckland’s skyline from a helicopter. Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.40pm This is a final bout of topical treats from veteran impressionist Tracey Ullman. Favourites Angela Merkel and Rupert Murdoch get a look in, alongside more takes on Jeremy Corbyn, Michael Gove and Nanny, the dedicated carer of Jacob Rees-Mogg. Africa: A Journey Into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm Apart from the occasional act on Later… with Jools Holland, world music doesn’t get much airtime on our TVs, so this beguiling series helmed by DJ Rita Ray offers a welcome insight into its traditions. For her final foray, Ray heads to Mali, home to more Grammy award-winning artists than any other African country. From her attempts at a sinuous wedding dance to meeting renowned harp player Toumani Diabaté, Ray’s journey is full of stirring encounters. TD Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 10.00pm A fitting reminder of Dale Winton’s easy-going charm, this swansong travelogue series resumes after a hiatus with our host in ocean-front Miami. Highlights include a trip to Little Havana, the city’s Cuban quarter, and a look at fashion designer Versace’s opulent former home. TD Blade Runner 2049 (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm In a similar but distinct way to Ridley Scott’s masterful original, Blade Runner 2049 mulls one of the meatiest questions around: is surface all that there is, or do life’s currents run deeper than the things we can see, hear and touch? Denis Villeneuve’s film toys with both options, making neither a comfort – and in the process, maps out a provocative blockbuster. Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford star. Red (2010) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. The Wolf of Wall Street (2013) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 11.40pm Soaked in sex, drugs and scandal, Martin Scorsese’s epic is based on the memoir of stockbroker Jordan Belfort, who spent the Nineties illegally amassing a vast personal fortune. With a fantastic performance from Leonardo DiCaprio, this morally bankrupt romp was lauded by audiences and critics alike. Jonah Hill and Margot Robbie co-star. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
RHS Chatsworth Flower Show BBC Two, 7.00pm; not Scotland or Wales Anyone mourning the end of the Chelsea Flower Show can seek solace in the RHS’s newest horticultural event, the Chatsworth Flower Show. Although its debut last year was marred by inclement weather, the event deserves to become a magnet for enthusiasts, its USP being its setting in the glorious Capability Brown-designed gardens of Derbyshire’s most famous stately home. This year’s occasion features a show-stopping installation of more than 100 varieties of orchid, a floral river display of 12,000 Cosmos, and eight art installations dotted among the 1,000-acre estate. We begin with Gardeners’ World favourites Carol Klein, Adam Frost and Arit Anderson giving us an overview of the five-day event. Among the five show gardens, the most intriguing-sounding are Elspeth Stockwell’s John Deere Garden, which celebrates 100 years of tractors, and Chris Myers’ Hay Time in the Dales, which is a celebration of wildflower meadows. The gardening experts ask whether conifers are coming back into fashion and explore Chatsworth’s rich orchid history – the Victorian head gardener Joseph Paxton introduced 80 species there. If the weather holds, RHS Chatsworth should become a jewel in the RHS crown. VP Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This over-egged cookery contest, with too many judges, hasn’t recreated Great British Bake Off’s magic, but goes down easily enough. This week, the five remaining amateurs create a sharing feast and a dish of squid or mackerel. VP Supershoppers Channel 4, 8.00pm This perky take on the consumer show, hosted by Anna Richardson and Sabrina Grant, storms back with an item attacking John Lewis. They argue that the department store’s price promise can’t always be believed, alongside other items looking at faddy dairy-free milks and battery life. VP Secrets of the Chocolate Factory: Inside Cadbury Channel 5, 9.00pm This breezy documentary looks at the history of our favourite chocolate brand, from its founding as a well-meaning Victorian social experiment to the hostile takeover by Kraft in 2010. It’s packed fuller than a Fruit & Nut bar with fascinating titbits, making it a satisfying treat. VP Mock the Week BBC Two, 10.00pm TV’s most competitive panel show is back to take a sideways look at the news, with James Acaster and Zoe Lyons among the stand-ups joining stalwart Hugh Dennis and host Dara O’Briain. Donald Trump and Brexit ensure there’s be no shortage of material. VP Quantico Alibi, 9.00pm Priyanka Chopra, a close friend of the duchess formerly known as Meghan Markle, guest stars in the third run of this crime thriller. This new series, set three years after the last, sees Chopra’s ex-FBI agent, Alex Parrish, living under a pseudonym, until men with guns find her. VP Billions Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm It’s a pleasure to watch Paul Giamatti and Damian Lewis slug it out each week as hot-shot attorney Chuck and shady banker Axe in this drama about high finance. This week, Axe and Taylor (Asia Kate Dillon) fall out over her worth to the firm. VP Missions BBC Four, from 10.00pm Another double helping of the French sci-fi drama about the first manned mission to Mars, in bite-sized 25-minute chunks. This week, Jeanne (Hélène Viviès) wallows in memories of her father, while back in 1960s’ Moscow we meet Vladimir Komarov (Arben Bajraktaraj), who was a real cosmonaut. VP Two Rode Together (1961) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 12.20pm Working for the first time with director John Ford, James Stewart stars in this slow western, based on the novel Comanche Captives by Will Cook and which has thematic echoes of Ford’s The Searchers. Guthrie McCabe (Stewart) is a corrupt town marshal who is hired by a Cavalry lieutenant (Richard Widmark) to help rescue captives held by the Comanche in 1880s Texas. Shirley Jones co-stars. Calendar Girls (2003) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 6.00pm This gentle, eye-moistening comedy, which has been turned into a successful play, is based on the true story of a group of Women’s Institute members in Yorkshire who raised money for leukaemia research by posing naked for a calendar. Helen Mirren, Julie Walters and Celia Imrie are among the women stripping off (well, more or less: certain body parts are always obscured by tea- cups, cream buns, etc). The Karate Kid (1984) ★★★★☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm One of the Eighties’ best-loved films, and far superior to the 2010 remake starring Jaden Smith (son of Will). It tells the story of bullied Daniel Larusso (Ralph Macchio), who’s taken under the wing of handyman Mr Miyagi (Pat Morita) and taught how to wash cars and paint fences. Of course, this turns out to be masterly martial arts training. Elisabeth Shue also stars as Larusso’s love interest Ali. Friday 8 June YouTube blogger Alfie Deyes, actress Jorgie Porter, long jumper Greg Rutherford, Dame Kelly Holmes, and MC Big Narstie take part in The Crystal Maze Credit: Channel 4 The Crystal Maze: Celebrity Special Channel 4, 9.00pm Channel 4’s successful reboot of the cult Eighties series continues its golden run of form with another charity special featuring people who, in the words of Maze Master Richard Ayoade, “we have all agreed, for some reason, to call… celebrities”. Ayoade is unstinting in his good-natured jibes, and his targets are equally obliging in laughing them off: this time around, it’s Olympians Kelly Holmes and Greg Rutherford, Hollyoaks actress Jorgie Porter, YouTube vlogger Alfie Deyes and grime MC Big Narstie. The latter comes in for the roughest ride, and indeed you may not see a more agonising sequence all year than Big Narstie wrestling with Jarhead’s (Adam Buxton) not-enormously taxing riddles, but his utter delight at being involved (“I’m GASSED!”) earns him a pass. The tasks are the usual ingenious grab-bag, honouring the heritage of the series while also advancing it, from the daft (balancing on space hoppers) to the fiendish (blowing a ball around a maze with “directional guffs” from an air pump). For his part, Ayoade once again proves himself the natural heir to Richard O’Brien in surreal wit (pace Ed Tudor-Pole and Stephan Merchant), and the cause, Stand Up 2 Cancer, is unimpeachable. GT Dispatches: After Grenfell Channel 4, 7.30pm In spite of a wealth of promises in the wake of the catastrophic fire in Grenfell Tower, claims abound that too many of the country’s tower blocks remain unsafe. Ed Howker investigates whether expert advice has been heeded and looks at the risks, both existing and newly discovered, for the tower’s residents. GT Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm Channel 5’s first-ever Bafta-winning show returns for a trip down under, with former cruise ship singer Jane McDonald exploring Sydney, Tasmania, Dunedin and Christchurch. GT Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm Ullman continues to play to her strengths with her roll call of uncanny impersonations of famous people. Theresa May, Angela Merkle and Nicola Sturgeon are back, along with her bizarrely convincing Michael Gove, while Jacob Rees-Mogg (Liam Hourican) and his Nanny (Ullman) endure yet more humiliation. GT Arctic Monkeys Live at the BBC BBC Two, 11.05pm Alex Turner and his band play selections from their divisive new album, Tranquillity Base Hotel & Casino, as well as a few oldies, including A Certain Romance, to reassure their more conservative fans. GT Cloak and Dagger Amazon Prime, from today Marvel’s latest TV offering is this teen series in which Tandy Bowen (Olivia Holt) and Tyrone Johnson (Aubrey Joseph) discover new, mysteriously connected superpowers. GT Sense8 Netflix, from today The Wachowskis’ kaleidoscopic saga ends with a two-hour episode created after its fans demanded closure when the series was axed. With Wolfgang (Max Riemelt) missing, Capheus (Toby Onwumere) running for office, Sun Bak (Bae Doona) on the run and the mysterious Chairman still at large, there’s no shortage of loose ends. GT The Staircase Netflix, from today This 2004 eight-parter documented the 16-year court battle over the fate of novelist Michael Peterson, accused of pushing his wife down the stairs to her death. Landing on Netflix with new, equally gripping episodes, Jean-Xavier de Lestrade’s series is both the old and the new Making a Murderer. GT The Way Way Back (2013) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.55pm This coming-of-age story feels like familiar terrain, but it’s agreeably done. Duncan (Liam James) learns about life, love and self-esteem from a gang of water-park employees, including the excellent Sam Rockwell, when forced to go on holiday with his mother (Toni Collette) and her boyfriend (Steve Carrell). The script flows and there’s enough melancholy and edge to the overall comic tone for its charm to prevail. Bend It Like Beckham (2002) ★★★☆☆ ITV, 10.45pm Keira Knightley’s career kicked off with this feelgood football-themed comedy drama from Bhaji on the Beach director Gurinder Chadha. She stars alongside Parminder Nagra as one of two 18-year-old girls who set out to make it as professional footballers, despite their families’ best efforts to stop them. Next of Kin’s Archie Panjabi and Shaznay Lewis (of reunited Nineties girl band All Saints fame) co-star. Platoon (1986) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 11.00pm This is a chance to see a young Charlie Sheen at the start of his turbulent career. The horrors of the Vietnam War are seen through the prism of a fresh-faced college dropout (Sheen) who finds himself in the thick of battle while Willem Dafoe plays his sympathetic sergeant. Director Oliver Stone used his own experiences of serving in the US army during the war to inform this harrowing film that won four Oscars. Saturday 9 June Controversial: the writer and intellectual Germaine Greer is profiled Credit: BBC Germaine Bloody Greer BBC Two, 9.00pm The personal views of Germaine Greer once had a universality and pungency about them that the world so desperately needed. But her recent comments about rape, violence on TV and transpeople, by contrast, resemble self-important trolling: wilfully controversial, dreadfully retrograde and a blight on a considerable legacy. This thrilling profile is a reminder of why she still matters, albeit perhaps more for what she was than what she has become. Novelist Zoë Heller and journalist Rosie Boycott are among those singing her praises, while Greer herself proves as unable as ever to avoid calling out a daft question or savaging a sacred cow. The footage is exciting and superbly mounted by director Clare Beavan. Whether it’s Greer’s early films, her steadfastness in the face of the abuse sent her way after The Female Eunuch was published, and her evisceration of Norman Mailer during a famous 1971 set-to in New York, Greer remains a most rugged individual. “I don’t think Germaine and the word ‘sisterhood’ are natural bedfellows,” reckons Boycott. What about that legacy? “I don’t do regret and I don’t do things that I regret,” Greer concludes. By any standards, a remarkable life. Gabriel Tate Trooping the Colour BBC One, 10.30am Marking the official birthday of the Queen, the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards will conduct their annual pageant on Horse Guards Parade, introduced by Huw Edwards and with J J Chalmers offering behind-the-scenes insights. There are highlights at 7.30pm on BBC Two. French Open Tennis: The women’s final ITV, 1.30pm Action on the 14th day at Roland Garros features the women’s singles final in the second Grand Slam tournament of the year. Jelena Ostapenko met Simona Halep in last year’s showpiece match, where the Latvian defeated the number three seed 4-6, 6-4, 6-3 to become the first person from her country to win a Grand Slam tournament and the first unseeded player to win the French Open since 1933. The men’s final, which was won for a record 10th time by Spaniard Rafael Nadal last year, takes place on Sunday at 1.30pm on ITV. Women’s International One-Day Cricket: England Women v South Africa Women Sky Sports Main Event, 1.30pm It’s the opening one-day international of the three-match series, which takes place at New Road in Worcester. Katherine Brunt, Georgia Elwiss, Laura Marsh, Sarah Taylor and Lauren Winfield all return to the England squad after missing out on the Indian tour. World Cup-winning duo Fran Wilson and Alex Hartley miss out, however. International Rugby Union: South Africa v England Sky Sports Main Event, 3.00pm This afternoon England will be looking to dispatch the Springboks at a venue Eddie Jones has described as the “spiritual home of rugby”. They’ve not won at Ellis Park in Johannesburg since 1972 – their only triumph at the venue – and their last appearance here was a 36-27 defeat under Stuart Lancaster in 2012. Ellis Park was the setting for the Springboks’ World Cup final victory over New Zealand in 1995 and one of the sport’s finest moments – Nelson Mandela handing Francois Pienaar the Webb Ellis Cup. “It will be hostile but it’s fantastic and I am so excited about it,” says Jones. “In world rugby who do you want to beat? The Springboks at Ellis Park.” Owen Farrell will captain England, while the hugely talented New Zealand-born flanker Brad Shields is expected to play a part for the visitors. The River Wye with Will Millard BBC Two, 5.30pm; Scotland, 2.45pm After deconstructing the exploration documentary in the fascinating and alarming My Year with the Tribe, explorer Will Millard is on slightly surer ground with this new series in which he journeys down the River Wye. He begins his journey with a search for the river’s source on the slopes of Plynlimon, before he has an encounter with an entrepreneurial local sheep farmer. Take Me Out: Over 50s Special ITV, 8.00pm Three “older gentlemen” (I’m sure host Paddy McGuinness will make plenty of gags here) face 30 single “Golden Girls”, including a former nun and an ex-partner of action hero Jason Statham, in this one-off special of the ever-popular dating show. Hidden BBC Four, 9.00pm After Hinterland and Keeping Faith comes the BBC’s latest Welsh language crime thriller. Hidden has a familiar set-up – the discovery of a young girl’s body in a disused quarry tears a small community apart – but Sian Reese-Williams and Sion Alun Davies as DIs Cadi John and Owen Vaughan area leading pair to reckon with, and the atmosphere of unease benefits hugely from the mountainous surroundings. Come Together: the Rise of the Festival Sky Arts, 9.00pm The line-up for this documentary would grace any festival, with Pete Townshend and Noel Gallagher among the interviewees explaining the evolution of the modern music festival from its earliest jazz and blues incarnations in Newport, through the hippy beanfeasts of Monterey and Woodstock to Glastonbury and Coachella. There are also contributions from those who promote and document festivals, including Michael Eavis and D A Pennebaker. GT A Girl’s Guide to TV BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI Comedian Rachel Parris of The Mash Report presents her typically tongue-in-cheek advice for women looking to get ahead in television. GT Maleficent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 6.05pm Angelina Jolie stars as the titular Maleficent in Disney’s live-action reimagining of Sleeping Beauty, which follows her from a carefree fairy to Mistress of All Evil, muddling the distinction between hero and villain. Maleficent is happy in a kingdom of peculiar CGI beasts until her heart is broken by Stefan (Sharlto Copley), who inherits the throne. Seeking vengeance, she curses his baby, Princess Aurora (Elle Fanning). Thor: The Dark World (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 10.35pm This is a follow-up to the popular Norse god/superhero blockbuster. The rather flabby plot is alleviated by Chris Hemsworth’s hearty charisma, which provides frequent relief from Natalie Portman’s bland damsel-in-distress (attempts to beef up her character by making her an astrophysicist are undermined by her constant fainting). Highlights include Thor sliding down The Gherkin skyscraper. Made in Dagenham (2010) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.45pm Industrial action in pursuit of equal pay for women doesn’t sound too thrilling a subject, but Nigel Cole’s (Calendar Girls) film, based around the real-life strike from 1968, turns out to be a rousing crowd-pleaser. Sally Hawkins plays the reluctant ringleader of the workers who sew car seats at Ford’s Dagenham plant; Bob Hoskins is a union rep; Miranda Richardson is wonderful as Labour MP Barbara Castle. Sunday 10 June Smoldering: Aidan Turner returns as the eponymous hero Credit: BBC Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Not since Daniel Craig emerged from the waves in Casino Royale has there been so much fuss over a pair of wet pecs. Yes, Poldark is back for a fourth series and star Aidan Turner bares his chest for the fans in an opening scene that, if nothing else, suggests that he’s spent a lot of time exercising since the end of series three. This opener finds our swashbuckling hero Ross Poldark (Turner) back in full-on Cornish crusader mode when, following a disturbance in Truro, he locks horns with old enemy George Warleggan (Jack Farthing) over the fate of three good pals accused of riot and murder. Meanwhile, his flame-haired wife Demelza (Eleanor Tomlinson) can’t fend off her intimate longings following that illicit clinch in the dunes with poetry-penning aristo Hugh Armitage (Josh Whitehouse) – who, with the announcement of a general election, looks set to be diverted into a career at Westminster. But as Dr Dwight (Luke Norris) is at pains to point out, Armitage has a delicate constitution that might not suit the rough and tumble of parliamentary politics. Could Ross be persuaded to think again about throwing his hat in the ring? Gerard O’Donovan One-Day International Cricket: Scotland v England Sky Sports Main Event, 10.30am Having responded brilliantly to tie the Test series with Pakistan 1-1, England now turn their attention to Scotland, with this ODI at the Grange in Edinburgh. Songs of Praise BBC One, 1.25pm A year on from the Grenfell Tower disaster, Aled Jones presents a commemorative special edition exploring how the local community in North Kensington is coping and recovering. Britain Celebrates Live: 100 Years of Women’s Votes BBC One, 2.00pm Live coverage of today’s public processions through Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh and London to celebrate the centenary of women winning the right to vote. Tonight’s Antiques Roadshow, at 8pm, also takes up the theme, devoting its time to items with links to remarkable women. Formula 1: Canadian Grand Prix Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm After a Monaco Grand Prix that left championship leader Lewis Hamilton, in his words, “cold”, all eyes are on the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal, where Daniel Riccardio will be aiming to win back-to-back races. Soccer Aid for Unicef 2018 ITV, 6.30pm Live from Old Trafford, it’s the annual England v World XI charity football match between teams mixing celebrities and professional athletes. This year Robbie Williams’s England is taking on a team of international stars led by Usain Bolt. Other players include Mo Farah, Gordon Ramsay, Olly Murs, and Eric Cantona, and there’s live music from Jessie Ware. Countryfile BBC One, 7.00pm The last of three specials heads for Sandringham in Norfolk, the most private of the Royal retreats. Matt Baker discovers one of the Queen’s less-known interests – racing pigeons – while Ellie Harrison learns more about her love of horses. GO Patrick Melrose Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch’s brilliantly judged bravura performance has been one of the television highlights of 2018. Tonight, he brings the series to an entertaining and emotionally charged close as Patrick, separated and back in London in 2006, hopes to put the past to rest following his mother’s funeral. Cosby: The Women Speak Sony Crime Channel, 9.00pm Following Bill Cosby’s conviction on three counts of aggravated indecent assault, here’s another opportunity to see the A&E network’s 2015 one-hour special in which the extent of the allegations against the former TV icon for predatory sexual behaviour came to light. Over a dozen of the 50-plus women who accused him of rape and sexual assault going back decades talk of their experiences on screen for the first time, and how statute of limitation laws threatened to deprive them of justice. GO Despicable Me 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 5.10pm Despicable Me, 2010’s animated supervillain comedy, had a neat enough premise. It’s gone in this sequel, though, as Steve Carell’s bald antihero, Gru, is now a reformed soul, occupied with childcare rather than dastardly plots to steal the moon. Gru’s Minions – those knee-high yellow Tic-Tacs – provide the film’s one inspired idea as they’re injected with mutating serum by the film’s mystery baddy. Hulk (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.15pm Ang Lee’s dark and stylised version (a split screen mimics the panels of a comic book page) of the Incredible Hulk’s adventures is one of the best and underrated Marvel adaptations, even if it’s too complex at times. Eric Bana stars as Bruce, a scientist who’s exposed to gamma radiation and becomes a not-so-jolly green giant. This is a rampaging tale with bold special effects. Jennifer Connolly co-stars as his love interest. It (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Stephen King’s evil clown tale is no laughing matter. First a Warners miniseries in 1990, starring an unforgettable Tim Curry, and now a two-part film version. Here we continue the terrifying tale of Pennywise (Bill Skarsgård), but jump forward three decades to the summer of 1988, buying into the current vogue for Eighties teen-flick nostalgia. The scary stuff is petrifying when it peaks. Monday 11 June Community spirit: those affected by the fire tell their stories Credit: BBC Grenfell BBC One, 8.30pm Bafta-winning director Ben Anthony’s unmissable documentary about last year’s Grenfell Tower tragedy opens with a sea of faces, all of which gain poignant individual focus as the film progresses. The blaze at the 24-storey block of public housing in the London borough of Kensington, which resulted in 72 deaths, left a lasting impression in those featured here as each person tells their unique story about the horrific events and their impact. Survivors who lost their homes, the bereaved, bystanders and police all share their stories, although it’s a surprising omission that the firefighters who witnessed the horrors first hand don’t offer their account. Split screens give multiple perspectives on the same moment, and what starts out as a patchwork of personal experience knits together into a mighty whole, the collective voice of a community broken but defiant. In fact, much of the film focuses on the efforts of those affected to unite in the face of seeming indifference from the local council, who also have their say. As the ongoing inquiry continues, this devastating account offers a damning testament of its own, rife with accusations of injustice and neglect, underpinned by blistering rage and grief. Toby Dantzic Fight Like a Girl BBC One, 7.30pm The ferocious sport of female wrestling comes under the spotlight with this lively film following Scottish fighter Kimberly Benson. She combines a gruelling training regime with her daytime job, as she aims for her first world title in Japan. Long Lost Family: What Happened Next ITV, 9.00pm Nicky Campbell and Davina McCall catch up with families they’ve reunited. Cathie Cutler Evans, who met her half-sister in 2016, has found joy in her extended clan. But for Maureen Charlton, separated from her brother Michael for 40 years, progress been painstaking. Dan Snow’s Norman Walks PBS America, 9.00pm Dan Snow sorts fact from fiction as he investigates the history of Norman Britain in this new series. He starts off on the Sussex coast, where aided by evidence from the Bayeux Tapestry, he pieces together William the Conqueror’s 11th-century coastal invasion. Flowers Channel 4, 10.00pm Will Sharpe’s gloriously dark comedy about a dysfunctional family returns with a double bill, then continues each night this week. A seemingly chipper Maurice (Julian Bennett) and Deborah (Olivia Colman) are on a caravanning holiday, while daughter Amy (Sophia di Martino) has a brash new girlfriend. Storyville: City Of Ghosts BBC Four, 10.30pm There are images of death in Matthew Heineman’s film so harrowing that it’s hard to keep watching, but these are the sights that Heineman’s subject, rebel group Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered, face daily. The renegade collective have made it their task to secretly film the atrocities committed by Isil in the Syrian city of Raqqa, and show the rest of the world the reality of the regime. It’s an astonishing act of citizen-led journalism, and the participants’ fear and grief, as well as their sense of purpose, are starkly captured in Heineman’s blunt and brutal chronicle of a city in turmoil. TD Prisons Uncovered: Out Of Control? ITV, 10.45pm; Scotland, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.15pm; not UTV In 2016, HMP Birmingham saw the worst prison riot for 25 years, in which 600 inmates were freed from their cells. This sobering documentary looks at the factors behind the incident and reflects on the prison system. TD Our Kind of Traitor (2016) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor stars in this so-so John le Carré adaptation as poetry lecturer Perry Makepeace, who becomes embroiled in negotiations to bring Dima (Stellan Skarsgård), a well-connected Russian oligarch, into the fold of British intelligence. Skarsgård is the standout here, charging into his role with pungency, playing Dima as a bedraggled beast of Moscow’s criminal underworld. The Shining (1980) ★★★★★ TCM, 9.00pm Set in a deserted hotel that’s in the care of writer Jack (Jack Nicholson) and his family for the winter, Stanley Kubrick’s brilliant psycho-horror, based on the novel by Stephen King, is subtly unsettling. But it’s stuffed, too, with unforgettable nerve-jangling shocks, including the moment when the crazed Jack smashes his way through a door with an axe as his wife (Shelley Duvall) cowers in the corner. Teen Wolf (1985) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 12.10am Critics howled at this preposterous teenage comedy but audiences loved it, perhaps because it came out shortly after its star Michael J Fox’s finest hour: Back to the Future. The plot – in which Fox’s likeable nerd morphs into a basketball-playing werewolf – is almost as unlikely as the fact that he still looked fresh out of the 11th grade at the ripe old age of 25. An unparalleled analysis of puberty and adolescence. Tuesday 12 June Hitting the books: Tanisha is a pupil at Townley Grammar Credit: BBC Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland & Wales, 11.15pm Jamie Pickup’s series has walked a tightrope with considerable skill, highlighting the inarguable inequities of our educational system that favours a selective approach, while also acknowledging its considerable benefits and observing the situation from the points of view of both pupils and teachers. It concludes with mock GCSE exams approaching and students at Erith School, a secondary modern, and neighbouring institution Townley Grammar, having to assess their suitability for further education. Some, it’s fair to say, are taking it more seriously than others. Townley pupil Tanisha is underperforming and low on confidence, yet keen to raise her game and nurtured by staff aware of her limitations and capabilities. At Erith, meanwhile, Denisa is angling for a place in Townley Sixth Form and seems more than capable of attaining it, but staffing shortages are crippling science classes amid an endless round of supply teachers and stand-ins. “It keeps me awake at night,” says the admirable faculty head Mr Appiah-Gates. It’s a desperately difficult situation and one that reaches an unexpected conclusion, as common ground is found between two unlikely bedfellows. Gabriel Tate The Champions Netflix, from today Created by Mindy Kaling, this new NBC sitcom plays a bachelor gym owner (Anders Holm) off against his gay, estranged son-cum-new flatmate (the brilliant J J Totah). Smartly written and nimbly performed, it’s a solid mainstream hit. Ackley Bridge Channel 4, 8.00pm Matt Evans and Penny Woolcock continue to keep an implausible number of plates spinning as the fizzy pre-watershed drama continues to conduct its handbrake narrative turns. Both Jordan (Samuel Bottomley) and Missy (Poppy Lee Friar) handle cash shortages in an equally desperate manner, and the arrival of Steve’s ex Claire (Kimberly Walsh) puts head teacher Mandy’s (Jo Joyner) nose out of joint. Our Girl BBC One, 9.00pm Georgie (Michelle Keegan) learns an astonishing secret about the local crime boss, before a major rescue operation begins as the flawed but well-meaning military drama continues. Flights from Hell: Caught on Camera ITV, 9.00pm ITV lays down its prime-time weapons as the World Cup looms, as demonstrated by this daft three-part series of incidents filmed at 30,000 feet. These include what an engine explosion feels like to those on board the plane to the impact of volcanic ash and an extraordinarily dramatic landing. Seeing Daylight: the Photography of Dorothy Bohm Sky Arts, 9.00pm Arriving in England in 1939 to escape the Nazis, Dorothy Bohm became a pioneer of street photography and portraiture of deep humanity. This profile examines her life and work. Elvis: the Searcher Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on Peter Guralnick’s epochal two-part biography, Thom Zimny’s HBO epic is a treat, focusing as much on Presley the man as Elvis the icon, Part one follows him out of Tupelo, into Sun Records and on to the US army, with part two’s fall, rise and fall again airing Wednesday at 10.00pm. GT Ugly Me: My Life with Body Dysmorphia BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm First shown on BBC Three, this harrowing film follows 29-year-old Liane, seeking treatment for the titular condition which has left her self-worth in tatters. GT Field of Dreams (1989) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.50pm Kevin Costner clearly likes a baseball movie – he’s made five of them. In this one he’s an Iowa farmer instructed by a mysterious voice to build a baseball pitch in the middle of a cornfield, which is soon occupied by a gang of ghostly players from the past. Enjoyably dotty, and responsible for the misquote, “If you build it, they will come” – it’s actually “he will come” – the fantasy is elevated by brilliant performances all around. A Good Day to Die Hard (2013) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The fifth film in the Die Hard franchise takes place in Russia, where our hero, Bruce Willis’s now grizzled John McClane, arrives in Moscow to hunt for his estranged son Jack (Jai Courtney). McClane suspects that he may have become a drug dealer, but it transpires he is in fact working undercover for the CIA, and Dad blunders in on him mid-mission. An enjoyable but clunky thriller. The Departed (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Nothing beats watching a great director in his comfort zone. Martin Scorsese’s gangland thriller – the film that finally won him an Oscar – is riveting. The plot revolves around the local police force’s efforts to stamp out Boston crime lord Frank Costello (a magnificently malevolent Jack Nicholson). There are powerhouse performances, too, from Leonardo Di Caprio, Matt Damon and Mark Wahlberg. Wednesday 13 June From Russia with love: David Dimbleby Credit: BBC Putin’s Russia with David Dimbleby BBC One, 9.00pm, Wales, 11.05pm “In a democracy if you fail to deliver on economic promises, if you surround yourself with cronies and use the law to suppress opposition, you would rightly be thrown out on your ear. But this is Russia, they do things differently here…” So begins David Dimbleby’s thoughtful film in which – as the eyes of the world turn towards Moscow for the 2018 World Cup football tournament – he takes the opportunity to cast an eye over Vladimir Putin’s 18 years as leader and assess the state of Russia today, especially in regard to the West. What he finds is a country in deep economic crisis yet with a people that seem to happily hero-worship Putin and mostly accept a state machine that controls almost every aspect of their lives with the willing assistance of security services, media, military and church. Dimbleby meets ordinary contented Russians as well as protesters, human rights lawyers, journalists and official spokespeople, coming away with a sense, ultimately, that Putin’s popularity is rooted in his strongman image and media-backed levels of suspicion and hostility towards the West unseen since the end of the Cold War. Gerard O’Donovan The Fight for Women’s Bodies BBC Three, from 10.00am Following the landmark vote to legalise abortion in the Republic of Ireland, Ellie Flynn looks back at the issues through the eyes of campaigners on both sides. Great Rail Restorations with Peter Snow Channel 4, 8.00pm Here is a visit to the Isle of Wight, where Peter Snow and his team set out to restore an 1864 wooden train carriage that has served as a holiday chalet since it was decommissioned in the Twenties. Before Grenfell: A Hidden History BBC Two, 9.00pm A year since the Grenfell Tower fire, residents of Kensington relate how the London borough has become the most unequal place in Britain, with the gap between rich and poor once again as extreme as in the 1860s when developers first built housing for the rich in Notting Hill next to the worst slum in London. Can Science Make Me Perfect? With Alice Roberts BBC Four, 9.00pm Millions of years have gone into the human body: lots of great evolutionary adaptations but lots of imperfections, too. In a film that’s as entertaining as it is instructive, anatomist Alice Roberts takes on a challenge to design a better body than the one we get at birth. The Fast Fix: Diabetes ITV, 9.00pm Anita Rani presents a new two-part series exploring whether it is possible for people suffering from type 2 diabetes to reverse the condition by adhering to a radical diet. By consuming just 800 calories a day, can they “fast themselves better”? Concludes tomorrow Big Beasts: Last of the Giants Sky One, 9.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee explores why size matters in the natural world. Beginning in the Americas, he checks out the planet’s largest predator, the sperm whale; comes face to face with a grizzly bear and gets rather too close to an anaconda that’s as long as a bus. GO How to Start an Airline Channel 4, 10.30pm This documentary follows Bangladeshi-British entrepreneur Kazi Shafiqur Rahman as he attempts to break into the fiercely competitive airline industry while also fulfilling the demands of his faith by insisting that the airline must comply with the teachings of Islam. GO Regarding Henry (1991) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 6.50pm Telling the story of a hotshot lawyer (Harrison Ford) who learns to question his values after a head injury, this film formed a companion piece to Wolf (1994), with Jack Nicholson as a publisher who is bitten by a wolf and turns into a boardroom predator. Directed by Mike Nichols, whose Oscar-winning movie The Graduate was a cinematic landmark of the 1960s, it’s a bit of an embarrassment, but interesting nevertheless. Source Code (2011) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal repeatedly finds himself reliving the last eight minutes in the life of a man on board a train which is about to be destroyed by a bomb as part of an experiment. Meanwhile, scientists Vera Farmiga and Jeffrey Wright are monitoring Gyllenhaal’s exploits. Duncan Jones confirmed the promise of his directing debut Moon with this thrilling whodunit, which also serves as a moving meditation on life. Beetlejuice (1988) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm Michael Keaton is an actor of rare versatility (as his triumphant role in Birdman proved). In this cult, Oscar-winning film by Tim Burton, Keaton shines as a con artist ghost called Beetlejuice, who aims to help two other ghosts (Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis) to scare the obnoxious new residents out of their old house. But he then falls for lovely goth Lydia (Winona Ryder), the family’s daughter. Thursday 14 June It’s kicking off: Mark Pugatch (centre) leads ITV’s presenting team Credit: ITV FIFA World Cup 2018: Opening Ceremony ITV, 2.30pm Regardless of how you think Russia got to be awarded the 21st staging of football’s biggest tournament (by corrupt means or otherwise), it’s time to cast those aspersions aside because the Russia 2018 championship is here. But, two hours before a ball is kicked, the opening ceremony marks the official start of the highest prize in football. And as we all know, entertaining opening ceremonies can be a great curtain-raiser for sport events, if they are done well – think the London 2012 Olympics. This one takes place at the 80,000-seat Luzhniki Stadium, which is the jewel in Russia’s crown of stadiums and will also host the final on July 15. Mark Pougatch presents the live coverage of the ceremony, which is headlined by actor and rapper Will Smith and Nicky Jam, who will perform Live It Up, the official World Cup song, which has received mixed reviews. As well as that, the ceremony will include local performers showing off different aspects of Russian culture, with gymnasts and trampolinists in among the fireworks and performances on display. The matches get under way following the ceremony with the host nation against Saudi Arabia. Clive Morgan Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm While the BBC’s post-Bake Off cookery contest may not have set the world alight, it’s given the judges plenty to get their teeth into. This week, it’s the final, and three challenges stand between the contestants and the title: a summer favourite, their best main course and a pudding. Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm After three weeks of cute animals, Springwatch comes to an end with Chris Packham, Michaela Strachan and co reliving this year’s best moments at Sherborne Park Estate. The Trouble with Women with Anne Robinson BBC One, 9.00pm As a journalist and TV presenter, Anne Robinson shattered the glass ceiling as she built her career. She imagined that now, 50 years later, we’d be much closer to achieving equality than we are. With the ongoing discussions about gender pay, Robinson asks women around the UK what’s preventing parity? Inside HM Prison Wormwood Scrubs Channel 5, 9.00pm Wormwood Scrubs has had some infamous inmates: from serial killers Ian Brady and Peter Sutcliffe to rockers Pete Docherty and Keith Richards. This documentary exploring the prison’s history tells the stories of a Soviet spy who escaped from the jail and its best-known inmate, Charles Bronson. CM Missions BBC Four, 10.00pm and 10.20pm The absorbing French sci-fi drama about the first manned mission to Mars concludes with its final double header. This week, psychiatrist Jeanne (Hélène Viviès) discovers the reason behind cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov’s (Arben Bajraktaraj) mission. I Am Evidence Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Even though Mariska Hargitay spent almost 20 years as crime fighter Olivia Benson in Law & Order: SVU, nothing prepared her for what she was to learn in real life. In this shocking documentary, Hargitay investigates the flaws in the US justice system that have allowed tens of thousands of rape kits to go untested for years. It’s a tough film to watch at times, especially as it highlights the issue through deeply personal and harrowing, first-person accounts from four women whose attacks are still fresh in their minds decades after the assaults due to a lack of closure. “I felt like my body was a crime scene,” one of the women recalls. CM Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby (2006) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm Will Ferrell fans will need little encouragement to lap up this affectionate send-up of Nascar racing, redneck culture and male bonding. Ferrell pays a Nascar speed-demon who is challenged by a gay, French Formula One driver (Sacha Baron Cohen), to see who is the ultimate racer. It’s a full throttle comedy that plays to Ferrell’s strengths. The Hills Have Eyes (2006) ★★★☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm French director Alexandre Aja makes his Hollywood debut with this grim but gripping remake of Wes Craven’s semi-cult horror film about a family battling a brood of mutants in the New Mexico desert. Aja ups the visceral violence, and the characters – including Ted Levine and Kathleen Quinlan as the parents – are sufficiently well-drawn to make the outcome shocking. The Ghost (2010) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor plays a talented ghost writer, who lands a lucrative contract to edit the memoirs of Adam Lang (Pierce Brosnan), the former UK Prime Minister, in this Roman Polanski adaptation of the Robert Harris novel. Soon after, Lang is accused of committing a war crime and the Ghost finds himself drawn into a world of dangerous secrets that put his life at risk. This is a deeply unsettling thriller. Friday 15 June One connected flow: Dan Jones on the Grand Union Canal Building Britain’s Canals Channel 5, 8.00pm His tattoos may have a nerdish medieval theme, but historian Dan Jones still seems too hip to be fronting a stuffy-sounding series about Britain’s iconic canals. Jones’s lively style and eye for interesting detail, however, keeps this subject surprisingly fresh, as he begins this three-part run with a look at the Grand Union Canal, the longest stretch of man-made waterway in Britain. It’s a story that reaches back 200 years, when the demands of the Industrial Revolution called for a speedy way to move goods between Birmingham and London, and the country’s engineering super-brains found ingenious means to link seven separate channels into one connected flow. As Jones explains, while the financial benefits were big, construction of the Grand Union was time consuming and dangerous. The 12-year stop-start struggle to complete the technically complex Blisworth Hill tunnel, for example, saw the deaths of up to 60 workers. Unable to compete with the advent of the speedy steam train, the Grand Union itself soon declined too. The canal is now a source of summertime pleasure, so this is a welcome reminder of its once vital purpose. Toby Dantzic Queer Eye Netflix, from today The success of this heart-warming makeover series, which returned to much acclaim earlier this year, was something of a surprise. Netflix then have been quick to capitalise, snappily rolling out another run barely four months later, with the likeable quintet all returning for more lifestyle revamping. Details are so far scant, but the show’s culture guru Karamo Brown has hinted that women and the trans community could be featured. World Cup 2018: Portugal v Spain BBC One, 6.20pm The pick of this week’s World Cup matches happens on day two at the Fisht Stadium in Sochi and comes from Group B. Expect a tense affair as Spain, who suffered the ignominy of failing to make it to the knockout rounds four years ago, take on their bitter rivals Portugal. The Crystal Maze: Celebrity Special Channel 4, 9.00pm Former footballer Dennis Wise heads the team of celebrity hopefuls, joined by Katie Price, Roman Kemp, Bez and Binky Felstead.Wise struggles with a fiendish skill game, while a number-based challenge sets Felstead’s head spinning. Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm Jane McDonald wraps up her Antipodean adventure in New Zealand’s North Island. She rubs noses with a Maori tribe in Napier, explores Rotorua’s dramatic geothermal landscapes and views Auckland’s skyline from a helicopter. Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.40pm This is a final bout of topical treats from veteran impressionist Tracey Ullman. Favourites Angela Merkel and Rupert Murdoch get a look in, alongside more takes on Jeremy Corbyn, Michael Gove and Nanny, the dedicated carer of Jacob Rees-Mogg. Africa: A Journey Into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm Apart from the occasional act on Later… with Jools Holland, world music doesn’t get much airtime on our TVs, so this beguiling series helmed by DJ Rita Ray offers a welcome insight into its traditions. For her final foray, Ray heads to Mali, home to more Grammy award-winning artists than any other African country. From her attempts at a sinuous wedding dance to meeting renowned harp player Toumani Diabaté, Ray’s journey is full of stirring encounters. TD Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 10.00pm A fitting reminder of Dale Winton’s easy-going charm, this swansong travelogue series resumes after a hiatus with our host in ocean-front Miami. Highlights include a trip to Little Havana, the city’s Cuban quarter, and a look at fashion designer Versace’s opulent former home. TD Blade Runner 2049 (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm In a similar but distinct way to Ridley Scott’s masterful original, Blade Runner 2049 mulls one of the meatiest questions around: is surface all that there is, or do life’s currents run deeper than the things we can see, hear and touch? Denis Villeneuve’s film toys with both options, making neither a comfort – and in the process, maps out a provocative blockbuster. Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford star. Red (2010) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. The Wolf of Wall Street (2013) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 11.40pm Soaked in sex, drugs and scandal, Martin Scorsese’s epic is based on the memoir of stockbroker Jordan Belfort, who spent the Nineties illegally amassing a vast personal fortune. With a fantastic performance from Leonardo DiCaprio, this morally bankrupt romp was lauded by audiences and critics alike. Jonah Hill and Margot Robbie co-star. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: RHS Chatsworth Flower Show, Supershoppers and more
RHS Chatsworth Flower Show BBC Two, 7.00pm; not Scotland or Wales Anyone mourning the end of the Chelsea Flower Show can seek solace in the RHS’s newest horticultural event, the Chatsworth Flower Show. Although its debut last year was marred by inclement weather, the event deserves to become a magnet for enthusiasts, its USP being its setting in the glorious Capability Brown-designed gardens of Derbyshire’s most famous stately home. This year’s occasion features a show-stopping installation of more than 100 varieties of orchid, a floral river display of 12,000 Cosmos, and eight art installations dotted among the 1,000-acre estate. We begin with Gardeners’ World favourites Carol Klein, Adam Frost and Arit Anderson giving us an overview of the five-day event. Among the five show gardens, the most intriguing-sounding are Elspeth Stockwell’s John Deere Garden, which celebrates 100 years of tractors, and Chris Myers’ Hay Time in the Dales, which is a celebration of wildflower meadows. The gardening experts ask whether conifers are coming back into fashion and explore Chatsworth’s rich orchid history – the Victorian head gardener Joseph Paxton introduced 80 species there. If the weather holds, RHS Chatsworth should become a jewel in the RHS crown. VP Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This over-egged cookery contest, with too many judges, hasn’t recreated Great British Bake Off’s magic, but goes down easily enough. This week, the five remaining amateurs create a sharing feast and a dish of squid or mackerel. VP Supershoppers Channel 4, 8.00pm This perky take on the consumer show, hosted by Anna Richardson and Sabrina Grant, storms back with an item attacking John Lewis. They argue that the department store’s price promise can’t always be believed, alongside other items looking at faddy dairy-free milks and battery life. VP Secrets of the Chocolate Factory: Inside Cadbury Channel 5, 9.00pm This breezy documentary looks at the history of our favourite chocolate brand, from its founding as a well-meaning Victorian social experiment to the hostile takeover by Kraft in 2010. It’s packed fuller than a Fruit & Nut bar with fascinating titbits, making it a satisfying treat. VP Mock the Week BBC Two, 10.00pm TV’s most competitive panel show is back to take a sideways look at the news, with James Acaster and Zoe Lyons among the stand-ups joining stalwart Hugh Dennis and host Dara O’Briain. Donald Trump and Brexit ensure there’s be no shortage of material. VP Quantico Alibi, 9.00pm Priyanka Chopra, a close friend of the duchess formerly known as Meghan Markle, guest stars in the third run of this crime thriller. This new series, set three years after the last, sees Chopra’s ex-FBI agent, Alex Parrish, living under a pseudonym, until men with guns find her. VP Billions Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm It’s a pleasure to watch Paul Giamatti and Damian Lewis slug it out each week as hot-shot attorney Chuck and shady banker Axe in this drama about high finance. This week, Axe and Taylor (Asia Kate Dillon) fall out over her worth to the firm. VP Missions BBC Four, from 10.00pm Another double helping of the French sci-fi drama about the first manned mission to Mars, in bite-sized 25-minute chunks. This week, Jeanne (Hélène Viviès) wallows in memories of her father, while back in 1960s’ Moscow we meet Vladimir Komarov (Arben Bajraktaraj), who was a real cosmonaut. VP Two Rode Together (1961) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 12.20pm Working for the first time with director John Ford, James Stewart stars in this slow western, based on the novel Comanche Captives by Will Cook and which has thematic echoes of Ford’s The Searchers. Guthrie McCabe (Stewart) is a corrupt town marshal who is hired by a Cavalry lieutenant (Richard Widmark) to help rescue captives held by the Comanche in 1880s Texas. Shirley Jones co-stars. Calendar Girls (2003) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 6.00pm This gentle, eye-moistening comedy, which has been turned into a successful play, is based on the true story of a group of Women’s Institute members in Yorkshire who raised money for leukaemia research by posing naked for a calendar. Helen Mirren, Julie Walters and Celia Imrie are among the women stripping off (well, more or less: certain body parts are always obscured by tea- cups, cream buns, etc). The Karate Kid (1984) ★★★★☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm One of the Eighties’ best-loved films, and far superior to the 2010 remake starring Jaden Smith (son of Will). It tells the story of bullied Daniel Larusso (Ralph Macchio), who’s taken under the wing of handyman Mr Miyagi (Pat Morita) and taught how to wash cars and paint fences. Of course, this turns out to be masterly martial arts training. Elisabeth Shue also stars as Larusso’s love interest Ali. Friday 8 June YouTube blogger Alfie Deyes, actress Jorgie Porter, long jumper Greg Rutherford, Dame Kelly Holmes, and MC Big Narstie take part in The Crystal Maze Credit: Channel 4 The Crystal Maze: Celebrity Special Channel 4, 9.00pm Channel 4’s successful reboot of the cult Eighties series continues its golden run of form with another charity special featuring people who, in the words of Maze Master Richard Ayoade, “we have all agreed, for some reason, to call… celebrities”. Ayoade is unstinting in his good-natured jibes, and his targets are equally obliging in laughing them off: this time around, it’s Olympians Kelly Holmes and Greg Rutherford, Hollyoaks actress Jorgie Porter, YouTube vlogger Alfie Deyes and grime MC Big Narstie. The latter comes in for the roughest ride, and indeed you may not see a more agonising sequence all year than Big Narstie wrestling with Jarhead’s (Adam Buxton) not-enormously taxing riddles, but his utter delight at being involved (“I’m GASSED!”) earns him a pass. The tasks are the usual ingenious grab-bag, honouring the heritage of the series while also advancing it, from the daft (balancing on space hoppers) to the fiendish (blowing a ball around a maze with “directional guffs” from an air pump). For his part, Ayoade once again proves himself the natural heir to Richard O’Brien in surreal wit (pace Ed Tudor-Pole and Stephan Merchant), and the cause, Stand Up 2 Cancer, is unimpeachable. GT Dispatches: After Grenfell Channel 4, 7.30pm In spite of a wealth of promises in the wake of the catastrophic fire in Grenfell Tower, claims abound that too many of the country’s tower blocks remain unsafe. Ed Howker investigates whether expert advice has been heeded and looks at the risks, both existing and newly discovered, for the tower’s residents. GT Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm Channel 5’s first-ever Bafta-winning show returns for a trip down under, with former cruise ship singer Jane McDonald exploring Sydney, Tasmania, Dunedin and Christchurch. GT Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm Ullman continues to play to her strengths with her roll call of uncanny impersonations of famous people. Theresa May, Angela Merkle and Nicola Sturgeon are back, along with her bizarrely convincing Michael Gove, while Jacob Rees-Mogg (Liam Hourican) and his Nanny (Ullman) endure yet more humiliation. GT Arctic Monkeys Live at the BBC BBC Two, 11.05pm Alex Turner and his band play selections from their divisive new album, Tranquillity Base Hotel & Casino, as well as a few oldies, including A Certain Romance, to reassure their more conservative fans. GT Cloak and Dagger Amazon Prime, from today Marvel’s latest TV offering is this teen series in which Tandy Bowen (Olivia Holt) and Tyrone Johnson (Aubrey Joseph) discover new, mysteriously connected superpowers. GT Sense8 Netflix, from today The Wachowskis’ kaleidoscopic saga ends with a two-hour episode created after its fans demanded closure when the series was axed. With Wolfgang (Max Riemelt) missing, Capheus (Toby Onwumere) running for office, Sun Bak (Bae Doona) on the run and the mysterious Chairman still at large, there’s no shortage of loose ends. GT The Staircase Netflix, from today This 2004 eight-parter documented the 16-year court battle over the fate of novelist Michael Peterson, accused of pushing his wife down the stairs to her death. Landing on Netflix with new, equally gripping episodes, Jean-Xavier de Lestrade’s series is both the old and the new Making a Murderer. GT The Way Way Back (2013) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.55pm This coming-of-age story feels like familiar terrain, but it’s agreeably done. Duncan (Liam James) learns about life, love and self-esteem from a gang of water-park employees, including the excellent Sam Rockwell, when forced to go on holiday with his mother (Toni Collette) and her boyfriend (Steve Carrell). The script flows and there’s enough melancholy and edge to the overall comic tone for its charm to prevail. Bend It Like Beckham (2002) ★★★☆☆ ITV, 10.45pm Keira Knightley’s career kicked off with this feelgood football-themed comedy drama from Bhaji on the Beach director Gurinder Chadha. She stars alongside Parminder Nagra as one of two 18-year-old girls who set out to make it as professional footballers, despite their families’ best efforts to stop them. Next of Kin’s Archie Panjabi and Shaznay Lewis (of reunited Nineties girl band All Saints fame) co-star. Platoon (1986) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 11.00pm This is a chance to see a young Charlie Sheen at the start of his turbulent career. The horrors of the Vietnam War are seen through the prism of a fresh-faced college dropout (Sheen) who finds himself in the thick of battle while Willem Dafoe plays his sympathetic sergeant. Director Oliver Stone used his own experiences of serving in the US army during the war to inform this harrowing film that won four Oscars. Saturday 9 June Controversial: the writer and intellectual Germaine Greer is profiled Credit: BBC Germaine Bloody Greer BBC Two, 9.00pm The personal views of Germaine Greer once had a universality and pungency about them that the world so desperately needed. But her recent comments about rape, violence on TV and transpeople, by contrast, resemble self-important trolling: wilfully controversial, dreadfully retrograde and a blight on a considerable legacy. This thrilling profile is a reminder of why she still matters, albeit perhaps more for what she was than what she has become. Novelist Zoë Heller and journalist Rosie Boycott are among those singing her praises, while Greer herself proves as unable as ever to avoid calling out a daft question or savaging a sacred cow. The footage is exciting and superbly mounted by director Clare Beavan. Whether it’s Greer’s early films, her steadfastness in the face of the abuse sent her way after The Female Eunuch was published, and her evisceration of Norman Mailer during a famous 1971 set-to in New York, Greer remains a most rugged individual. “I don’t think Germaine and the word ‘sisterhood’ are natural bedfellows,” reckons Boycott. What about that legacy? “I don’t do regret and I don’t do things that I regret,” Greer concludes. By any standards, a remarkable life. Gabriel Tate Trooping the Colour BBC One, 10.30am Marking the official birthday of the Queen, the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards will conduct their annual pageant on Horse Guards Parade, introduced by Huw Edwards and with J J Chalmers offering behind-the-scenes insights. There are highlights at 7.30pm on BBC Two. French Open Tennis: The women’s final ITV, 1.30pm Action on the 14th day at Roland Garros features the women’s singles final in the second Grand Slam tournament of the year. Jelena Ostapenko met Simona Halep in last year’s showpiece match, where the Latvian defeated the number three seed 4-6, 6-4, 6-3 to become the first person from her country to win a Grand Slam tournament and the first unseeded player to win the French Open since 1933. The men’s final, which was won for a record 10th time by Spaniard Rafael Nadal last year, takes place on Sunday at 1.30pm on ITV. Women’s International One-Day Cricket: England Women v South Africa Women Sky Sports Main Event, 1.30pm It’s the opening one-day international of the three-match series, which takes place at New Road in Worcester. Katherine Brunt, Georgia Elwiss, Laura Marsh, Sarah Taylor and Lauren Winfield all return to the England squad after missing out on the Indian tour. World Cup-winning duo Fran Wilson and Alex Hartley miss out, however. International Rugby Union: South Africa v England Sky Sports Main Event, 3.00pm This afternoon England will be looking to dispatch the Springboks at a venue Eddie Jones has described as the “spiritual home of rugby”. They’ve not won at Ellis Park in Johannesburg since 1972 – their only triumph at the venue – and their last appearance here was a 36-27 defeat under Stuart Lancaster in 2012. Ellis Park was the setting for the Springboks’ World Cup final victory over New Zealand in 1995 and one of the sport’s finest moments – Nelson Mandela handing Francois Pienaar the Webb Ellis Cup. “It will be hostile but it’s fantastic and I am so excited about it,” says Jones. “In world rugby who do you want to beat? The Springboks at Ellis Park.” Owen Farrell will captain England, while the hugely talented New Zealand-born flanker Brad Shields is expected to play a part for the visitors. The River Wye with Will Millard BBC Two, 5.30pm; Scotland, 2.45pm After deconstructing the exploration documentary in the fascinating and alarming My Year with the Tribe, explorer Will Millard is on slightly surer ground with this new series in which he journeys down the River Wye. He begins his journey with a search for the river’s source on the slopes of Plynlimon, before he has an encounter with an entrepreneurial local sheep farmer. Take Me Out: Over 50s Special ITV, 8.00pm Three “older gentlemen” (I’m sure host Paddy McGuinness will make plenty of gags here) face 30 single “Golden Girls”, including a former nun and an ex-partner of action hero Jason Statham, in this one-off special of the ever-popular dating show. Hidden BBC Four, 9.00pm After Hinterland and Keeping Faith comes the BBC’s latest Welsh language crime thriller. Hidden has a familiar set-up – the discovery of a young girl’s body in a disused quarry tears a small community apart – but Sian Reese-Williams and Sion Alun Davies as DIs Cadi John and Owen Vaughan area leading pair to reckon with, and the atmosphere of unease benefits hugely from the mountainous surroundings. Come Together: the Rise of the Festival Sky Arts, 9.00pm The line-up for this documentary would grace any festival, with Pete Townshend and Noel Gallagher among the interviewees explaining the evolution of the modern music festival from its earliest jazz and blues incarnations in Newport, through the hippy beanfeasts of Monterey and Woodstock to Glastonbury and Coachella. There are also contributions from those who promote and document festivals, including Michael Eavis and D A Pennebaker. GT A Girl’s Guide to TV BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI Comedian Rachel Parris of The Mash Report presents her typically tongue-in-cheek advice for women looking to get ahead in television. GT Maleficent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 6.05pm Angelina Jolie stars as the titular Maleficent in Disney’s live-action reimagining of Sleeping Beauty, which follows her from a carefree fairy to Mistress of All Evil, muddling the distinction between hero and villain. Maleficent is happy in a kingdom of peculiar CGI beasts until her heart is broken by Stefan (Sharlto Copley), who inherits the throne. Seeking vengeance, she curses his baby, Princess Aurora (Elle Fanning). Thor: The Dark World (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 10.35pm This is a follow-up to the popular Norse god/superhero blockbuster. The rather flabby plot is alleviated by Chris Hemsworth’s hearty charisma, which provides frequent relief from Natalie Portman’s bland damsel-in-distress (attempts to beef up her character by making her an astrophysicist are undermined by her constant fainting). Highlights include Thor sliding down The Gherkin skyscraper. Made in Dagenham (2010) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.45pm Industrial action in pursuit of equal pay for women doesn’t sound too thrilling a subject, but Nigel Cole’s (Calendar Girls) film, based around the real-life strike from 1968, turns out to be a rousing crowd-pleaser. Sally Hawkins plays the reluctant ringleader of the workers who sew car seats at Ford’s Dagenham plant; Bob Hoskins is a union rep; Miranda Richardson is wonderful as Labour MP Barbara Castle. Sunday 10 June Smoldering: Aidan Turner returns as the eponymous hero Credit: BBC Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Not since Daniel Craig emerged from the waves in Casino Royale has there been so much fuss over a pair of wet pecs. Yes, Poldark is back for a fourth series and star Aidan Turner bares his chest for the fans in an opening scene that, if nothing else, suggests that he’s spent a lot of time exercising since the end of series three. This opener finds our swashbuckling hero Ross Poldark (Turner) back in full-on Cornish crusader mode when, following a disturbance in Truro, he locks horns with old enemy George Warleggan (Jack Farthing) over the fate of three good pals accused of riot and murder. Meanwhile, his flame-haired wife Demelza (Eleanor Tomlinson) can’t fend off her intimate longings following that illicit clinch in the dunes with poetry-penning aristo Hugh Armitage (Josh Whitehouse) – who, with the announcement of a general election, looks set to be diverted into a career at Westminster. But as Dr Dwight (Luke Norris) is at pains to point out, Armitage has a delicate constitution that might not suit the rough and tumble of parliamentary politics. Could Ross be persuaded to think again about throwing his hat in the ring? Gerard O’Donovan One-Day International Cricket: Scotland v England Sky Sports Main Event, 10.30am Having responded brilliantly to tie the Test series with Pakistan 1-1, England now turn their attention to Scotland, with this ODI at the Grange in Edinburgh. Songs of Praise BBC One, 1.25pm A year on from the Grenfell Tower disaster, Aled Jones presents a commemorative special edition exploring how the local community in North Kensington is coping and recovering. Britain Celebrates Live: 100 Years of Women’s Votes BBC One, 2.00pm Live coverage of today’s public processions through Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh and London to celebrate the centenary of women winning the right to vote. Tonight’s Antiques Roadshow, at 8pm, also takes up the theme, devoting its time to items with links to remarkable women. Formula 1: Canadian Grand Prix Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm After a Monaco Grand Prix that left championship leader Lewis Hamilton, in his words, “cold”, all eyes are on the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal, where Daniel Riccardio will be aiming to win back-to-back races. Soccer Aid for Unicef 2018 ITV, 6.30pm Live from Old Trafford, it’s the annual England v World XI charity football match between teams mixing celebrities and professional athletes. This year Robbie Williams’s England is taking on a team of international stars led by Usain Bolt. Other players include Mo Farah, Gordon Ramsay, Olly Murs, and Eric Cantona, and there’s live music from Jessie Ware. Countryfile BBC One, 7.00pm The last of three specials heads for Sandringham in Norfolk, the most private of the Royal retreats. Matt Baker discovers one of the Queen’s less-known interests – racing pigeons – while Ellie Harrison learns more about her love of horses. GO Patrick Melrose Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch’s brilliantly judged bravura performance has been one of the television highlights of 2018. Tonight, he brings the series to an entertaining and emotionally charged close as Patrick, separated and back in London in 2006, hopes to put the past to rest following his mother’s funeral. Cosby: The Women Speak Sony Crime Channel, 9.00pm Following Bill Cosby’s conviction on three counts of aggravated indecent assault, here’s another opportunity to see the A&E network’s 2015 one-hour special in which the extent of the allegations against the former TV icon for predatory sexual behaviour came to light. Over a dozen of the 50-plus women who accused him of rape and sexual assault going back decades talk of their experiences on screen for the first time, and how statute of limitation laws threatened to deprive them of justice. GO Despicable Me 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 5.10pm Despicable Me, 2010’s animated supervillain comedy, had a neat enough premise. It’s gone in this sequel, though, as Steve Carell’s bald antihero, Gru, is now a reformed soul, occupied with childcare rather than dastardly plots to steal the moon. Gru’s Minions – those knee-high yellow Tic-Tacs – provide the film’s one inspired idea as they’re injected with mutating serum by the film’s mystery baddy. Hulk (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.15pm Ang Lee’s dark and stylised version (a split screen mimics the panels of a comic book page) of the Incredible Hulk’s adventures is one of the best and underrated Marvel adaptations, even if it’s too complex at times. Eric Bana stars as Bruce, a scientist who’s exposed to gamma radiation and becomes a not-so-jolly green giant. This is a rampaging tale with bold special effects. Jennifer Connolly co-stars as his love interest. It (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Stephen King’s evil clown tale is no laughing matter. First a Warners miniseries in 1990, starring an unforgettable Tim Curry, and now a two-part film version. Here we continue the terrifying tale of Pennywise (Bill Skarsgård), but jump forward three decades to the summer of 1988, buying into the current vogue for Eighties teen-flick nostalgia. The scary stuff is petrifying when it peaks. Monday 11 June Community spirit: those affected by the fire tell their stories Credit: BBC Grenfell BBC One, 8.30pm Bafta-winning director Ben Anthony’s unmissable documentary about last year’s Grenfell Tower tragedy opens with a sea of faces, all of which gain poignant individual focus as the film progresses. The blaze at the 24-storey block of public housing in the London borough of Kensington, which resulted in 72 deaths, left a lasting impression in those featured here as each person tells their unique story about the horrific events and their impact. Survivors who lost their homes, the bereaved, bystanders and police all share their stories, although it’s a surprising omission that the firefighters who witnessed the horrors first hand don’t offer their account. Split screens give multiple perspectives on the same moment, and what starts out as a patchwork of personal experience knits together into a mighty whole, the collective voice of a community broken but defiant. In fact, much of the film focuses on the efforts of those affected to unite in the face of seeming indifference from the local council, who also have their say. As the ongoing inquiry continues, this devastating account offers a damning testament of its own, rife with accusations of injustice and neglect, underpinned by blistering rage and grief. Toby Dantzic Fight Like a Girl BBC One, 7.30pm The ferocious sport of female wrestling comes under the spotlight with this lively film following Scottish fighter Kimberly Benson. She combines a gruelling training regime with her daytime job, as she aims for her first world title in Japan. Long Lost Family: What Happened Next ITV, 9.00pm Nicky Campbell and Davina McCall catch up with families they’ve reunited. Cathie Cutler Evans, who met her half-sister in 2016, has found joy in her extended clan. But for Maureen Charlton, separated from her brother Michael for 40 years, progress been painstaking. Dan Snow’s Norman Walks PBS America, 9.00pm Dan Snow sorts fact from fiction as he investigates the history of Norman Britain in this new series. He starts off on the Sussex coast, where aided by evidence from the Bayeux Tapestry, he pieces together William the Conqueror’s 11th-century coastal invasion. Flowers Channel 4, 10.00pm Will Sharpe’s gloriously dark comedy about a dysfunctional family returns with a double bill, then continues each night this week. A seemingly chipper Maurice (Julian Bennett) and Deborah (Olivia Colman) are on a caravanning holiday, while daughter Amy (Sophia di Martino) has a brash new girlfriend. Storyville: City Of Ghosts BBC Four, 10.30pm There are images of death in Matthew Heineman’s film so harrowing that it’s hard to keep watching, but these are the sights that Heineman’s subject, rebel group Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered, face daily. The renegade collective have made it their task to secretly film the atrocities committed by Isil in the Syrian city of Raqqa, and show the rest of the world the reality of the regime. It’s an astonishing act of citizen-led journalism, and the participants’ fear and grief, as well as their sense of purpose, are starkly captured in Heineman’s blunt and brutal chronicle of a city in turmoil. TD Prisons Uncovered: Out Of Control? ITV, 10.45pm; Scotland, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.15pm; not UTV In 2016, HMP Birmingham saw the worst prison riot for 25 years, in which 600 inmates were freed from their cells. This sobering documentary looks at the factors behind the incident and reflects on the prison system. TD Our Kind of Traitor (2016) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor stars in this so-so John le Carré adaptation as poetry lecturer Perry Makepeace, who becomes embroiled in negotiations to bring Dima (Stellan Skarsgård), a well-connected Russian oligarch, into the fold of British intelligence. Skarsgård is the standout here, charging into his role with pungency, playing Dima as a bedraggled beast of Moscow’s criminal underworld. The Shining (1980) ★★★★★ TCM, 9.00pm Set in a deserted hotel that’s in the care of writer Jack (Jack Nicholson) and his family for the winter, Stanley Kubrick’s brilliant psycho-horror, based on the novel by Stephen King, is subtly unsettling. But it’s stuffed, too, with unforgettable nerve-jangling shocks, including the moment when the crazed Jack smashes his way through a door with an axe as his wife (Shelley Duvall) cowers in the corner. Teen Wolf (1985) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 12.10am Critics howled at this preposterous teenage comedy but audiences loved it, perhaps because it came out shortly after its star Michael J Fox’s finest hour: Back to the Future. The plot – in which Fox’s likeable nerd morphs into a basketball-playing werewolf – is almost as unlikely as the fact that he still looked fresh out of the 11th grade at the ripe old age of 25. An unparalleled analysis of puberty and adolescence. Tuesday 12 June Hitting the books: Tanisha is a pupil at Townley Grammar Credit: BBC Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland & Wales, 11.15pm Jamie Pickup’s series has walked a tightrope with considerable skill, highlighting the inarguable inequities of our educational system that favours a selective approach, while also acknowledging its considerable benefits and observing the situation from the points of view of both pupils and teachers. It concludes with mock GCSE exams approaching and students at Erith School, a secondary modern, and neighbouring institution Townley Grammar, having to assess their suitability for further education. Some, it’s fair to say, are taking it more seriously than others. Townley pupil Tanisha is underperforming and low on confidence, yet keen to raise her game and nurtured by staff aware of her limitations and capabilities. At Erith, meanwhile, Denisa is angling for a place in Townley Sixth Form and seems more than capable of attaining it, but staffing shortages are crippling science classes amid an endless round of supply teachers and stand-ins. “It keeps me awake at night,” says the admirable faculty head Mr Appiah-Gates. It’s a desperately difficult situation and one that reaches an unexpected conclusion, as common ground is found between two unlikely bedfellows. Gabriel Tate The Champions Netflix, from today Created by Mindy Kaling, this new NBC sitcom plays a bachelor gym owner (Anders Holm) off against his gay, estranged son-cum-new flatmate (the brilliant J J Totah). Smartly written and nimbly performed, it’s a solid mainstream hit. Ackley Bridge Channel 4, 8.00pm Matt Evans and Penny Woolcock continue to keep an implausible number of plates spinning as the fizzy pre-watershed drama continues to conduct its handbrake narrative turns. Both Jordan (Samuel Bottomley) and Missy (Poppy Lee Friar) handle cash shortages in an equally desperate manner, and the arrival of Steve’s ex Claire (Kimberly Walsh) puts head teacher Mandy’s (Jo Joyner) nose out of joint. Our Girl BBC One, 9.00pm Georgie (Michelle Keegan) learns an astonishing secret about the local crime boss, before a major rescue operation begins as the flawed but well-meaning military drama continues. Flights from Hell: Caught on Camera ITV, 9.00pm ITV lays down its prime-time weapons as the World Cup looms, as demonstrated by this daft three-part series of incidents filmed at 30,000 feet. These include what an engine explosion feels like to those on board the plane to the impact of volcanic ash and an extraordinarily dramatic landing. Seeing Daylight: the Photography of Dorothy Bohm Sky Arts, 9.00pm Arriving in England in 1939 to escape the Nazis, Dorothy Bohm became a pioneer of street photography and portraiture of deep humanity. This profile examines her life and work. Elvis: the Searcher Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on Peter Guralnick’s epochal two-part biography, Thom Zimny’s HBO epic is a treat, focusing as much on Presley the man as Elvis the icon, Part one follows him out of Tupelo, into Sun Records and on to the US army, with part two’s fall, rise and fall again airing Wednesday at 10.00pm. GT Ugly Me: My Life with Body Dysmorphia BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm First shown on BBC Three, this harrowing film follows 29-year-old Liane, seeking treatment for the titular condition which has left her self-worth in tatters. GT Field of Dreams (1989) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.50pm Kevin Costner clearly likes a baseball movie – he’s made five of them. In this one he’s an Iowa farmer instructed by a mysterious voice to build a baseball pitch in the middle of a cornfield, which is soon occupied by a gang of ghostly players from the past. Enjoyably dotty, and responsible for the misquote, “If you build it, they will come” – it’s actually “he will come” – the fantasy is elevated by brilliant performances all around. A Good Day to Die Hard (2013) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The fifth film in the Die Hard franchise takes place in Russia, where our hero, Bruce Willis’s now grizzled John McClane, arrives in Moscow to hunt for his estranged son Jack (Jai Courtney). McClane suspects that he may have become a drug dealer, but it transpires he is in fact working undercover for the CIA, and Dad blunders in on him mid-mission. An enjoyable but clunky thriller. The Departed (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Nothing beats watching a great director in his comfort zone. Martin Scorsese’s gangland thriller – the film that finally won him an Oscar – is riveting. The plot revolves around the local police force’s efforts to stamp out Boston crime lord Frank Costello (a magnificently malevolent Jack Nicholson). There are powerhouse performances, too, from Leonardo Di Caprio, Matt Damon and Mark Wahlberg. Wednesday 13 June From Russia with love: David Dimbleby Credit: BBC Putin’s Russia with David Dimbleby BBC One, 9.00pm, Wales, 11.05pm “In a democracy if you fail to deliver on economic promises, if you surround yourself with cronies and use the law to suppress opposition, you would rightly be thrown out on your ear. But this is Russia, they do things differently here…” So begins David Dimbleby’s thoughtful film in which – as the eyes of the world turn towards Moscow for the 2018 World Cup football tournament – he takes the opportunity to cast an eye over Vladimir Putin’s 18 years as leader and assess the state of Russia today, especially in regard to the West. What he finds is a country in deep economic crisis yet with a people that seem to happily hero-worship Putin and mostly accept a state machine that controls almost every aspect of their lives with the willing assistance of security services, media, military and church. Dimbleby meets ordinary contented Russians as well as protesters, human rights lawyers, journalists and official spokespeople, coming away with a sense, ultimately, that Putin’s popularity is rooted in his strongman image and media-backed levels of suspicion and hostility towards the West unseen since the end of the Cold War. Gerard O’Donovan The Fight for Women’s Bodies BBC Three, from 10.00am Following the landmark vote to legalise abortion in the Republic of Ireland, Ellie Flynn looks back at the issues through the eyes of campaigners on both sides. Great Rail Restorations with Peter Snow Channel 4, 8.00pm Here is a visit to the Isle of Wight, where Peter Snow and his team set out to restore an 1864 wooden train carriage that has served as a holiday chalet since it was decommissioned in the Twenties. Before Grenfell: A Hidden History BBC Two, 9.00pm A year since the Grenfell Tower fire, residents of Kensington relate how the London borough has become the most unequal place in Britain, with the gap between rich and poor once again as extreme as in the 1860s when developers first built housing for the rich in Notting Hill next to the worst slum in London. Can Science Make Me Perfect? With Alice Roberts BBC Four, 9.00pm Millions of years have gone into the human body: lots of great evolutionary adaptations but lots of imperfections, too. In a film that’s as entertaining as it is instructive, anatomist Alice Roberts takes on a challenge to design a better body than the one we get at birth. The Fast Fix: Diabetes ITV, 9.00pm Anita Rani presents a new two-part series exploring whether it is possible for people suffering from type 2 diabetes to reverse the condition by adhering to a radical diet. By consuming just 800 calories a day, can they “fast themselves better”? Concludes tomorrow Big Beasts: Last of the Giants Sky One, 9.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee explores why size matters in the natural world. Beginning in the Americas, he checks out the planet’s largest predator, the sperm whale; comes face to face with a grizzly bear and gets rather too close to an anaconda that’s as long as a bus. GO How to Start an Airline Channel 4, 10.30pm This documentary follows Bangladeshi-British entrepreneur Kazi Shafiqur Rahman as he attempts to break into the fiercely competitive airline industry while also fulfilling the demands of his faith by insisting that the airline must comply with the teachings of Islam. GO Regarding Henry (1991) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 6.50pm Telling the story of a hotshot lawyer (Harrison Ford) who learns to question his values after a head injury, this film formed a companion piece to Wolf (1994), with Jack Nicholson as a publisher who is bitten by a wolf and turns into a boardroom predator. Directed by Mike Nichols, whose Oscar-winning movie The Graduate was a cinematic landmark of the 1960s, it’s a bit of an embarrassment, but interesting nevertheless. Source Code (2011) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal repeatedly finds himself reliving the last eight minutes in the life of a man on board a train which is about to be destroyed by a bomb as part of an experiment. Meanwhile, scientists Vera Farmiga and Jeffrey Wright are monitoring Gyllenhaal’s exploits. Duncan Jones confirmed the promise of his directing debut Moon with this thrilling whodunit, which also serves as a moving meditation on life. Beetlejuice (1988) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm Michael Keaton is an actor of rare versatility (as his triumphant role in Birdman proved). In this cult, Oscar-winning film by Tim Burton, Keaton shines as a con artist ghost called Beetlejuice, who aims to help two other ghosts (Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis) to scare the obnoxious new residents out of their old house. But he then falls for lovely goth Lydia (Winona Ryder), the family’s daughter. Thursday 14 June It’s kicking off: Mark Pugatch (centre) leads ITV’s presenting team Credit: ITV FIFA World Cup 2018: Opening Ceremony ITV, 2.30pm Regardless of how you think Russia got to be awarded the 21st staging of football’s biggest tournament (by corrupt means or otherwise), it’s time to cast those aspersions aside because the Russia 2018 championship is here. But, two hours before a ball is kicked, the opening ceremony marks the official start of the highest prize in football. And as we all know, entertaining opening ceremonies can be a great curtain-raiser for sport events, if they are done well – think the London 2012 Olympics. This one takes place at the 80,000-seat Luzhniki Stadium, which is the jewel in Russia’s crown of stadiums and will also host the final on July 15. Mark Pougatch presents the live coverage of the ceremony, which is headlined by actor and rapper Will Smith and Nicky Jam, who will perform Live It Up, the official World Cup song, which has received mixed reviews. As well as that, the ceremony will include local performers showing off different aspects of Russian culture, with gymnasts and trampolinists in among the fireworks and performances on display. The matches get under way following the ceremony with the host nation against Saudi Arabia. Clive Morgan Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm While the BBC’s post-Bake Off cookery contest may not have set the world alight, it’s given the judges plenty to get their teeth into. This week, it’s the final, and three challenges stand between the contestants and the title: a summer favourite, their best main course and a pudding. Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm After three weeks of cute animals, Springwatch comes to an end with Chris Packham, Michaela Strachan and co reliving this year’s best moments at Sherborne Park Estate. The Trouble with Women with Anne Robinson BBC One, 9.00pm As a journalist and TV presenter, Anne Robinson shattered the glass ceiling as she built her career. She imagined that now, 50 years later, we’d be much closer to achieving equality than we are. With the ongoing discussions about gender pay, Robinson asks women around the UK what’s preventing parity? Inside HM Prison Wormwood Scrubs Channel 5, 9.00pm Wormwood Scrubs has had some infamous inmates: from serial killers Ian Brady and Peter Sutcliffe to rockers Pete Docherty and Keith Richards. This documentary exploring the prison’s history tells the stories of a Soviet spy who escaped from the jail and its best-known inmate, Charles Bronson. CM Missions BBC Four, 10.00pm and 10.20pm The absorbing French sci-fi drama about the first manned mission to Mars concludes with its final double header. This week, psychiatrist Jeanne (Hélène Viviès) discovers the reason behind cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov’s (Arben Bajraktaraj) mission. I Am Evidence Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Even though Mariska Hargitay spent almost 20 years as crime fighter Olivia Benson in Law & Order: SVU, nothing prepared her for what she was to learn in real life. In this shocking documentary, Hargitay investigates the flaws in the US justice system that have allowed tens of thousands of rape kits to go untested for years. It’s a tough film to watch at times, especially as it highlights the issue through deeply personal and harrowing, first-person accounts from four women whose attacks are still fresh in their minds decades after the assaults due to a lack of closure. “I felt like my body was a crime scene,” one of the women recalls. CM Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby (2006) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm Will Ferrell fans will need little encouragement to lap up this affectionate send-up of Nascar racing, redneck culture and male bonding. Ferrell pays a Nascar speed-demon who is challenged by a gay, French Formula One driver (Sacha Baron Cohen), to see who is the ultimate racer. It’s a full throttle comedy that plays to Ferrell’s strengths. The Hills Have Eyes (2006) ★★★☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm French director Alexandre Aja makes his Hollywood debut with this grim but gripping remake of Wes Craven’s semi-cult horror film about a family battling a brood of mutants in the New Mexico desert. Aja ups the visceral violence, and the characters – including Ted Levine and Kathleen Quinlan as the parents – are sufficiently well-drawn to make the outcome shocking. The Ghost (2010) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Ewan McGregor plays a talented ghost writer, who lands a lucrative contract to edit the memoirs of Adam Lang (Pierce Brosnan), the former UK Prime Minister, in this Roman Polanski adaptation of the Robert Harris novel. Soon after, Lang is accused of committing a war crime and the Ghost finds himself drawn into a world of dangerous secrets that put his life at risk. This is a deeply unsettling thriller. Friday 15 June One connected flow: Dan Jones on the Grand Union Canal Building Britain’s Canals Channel 5, 8.00pm His tattoos may have a nerdish medieval theme, but historian Dan Jones still seems too hip to be fronting a stuffy-sounding series about Britain’s iconic canals. Jones’s lively style and eye for interesting detail, however, keeps this subject surprisingly fresh, as he begins this three-part run with a look at the Grand Union Canal, the longest stretch of man-made waterway in Britain. It’s a story that reaches back 200 years, when the demands of the Industrial Revolution called for a speedy way to move goods between Birmingham and London, and the country’s engineering super-brains found ingenious means to link seven separate channels into one connected flow. As Jones explains, while the financial benefits were big, construction of the Grand Union was time consuming and dangerous. The 12-year stop-start struggle to complete the technically complex Blisworth Hill tunnel, for example, saw the deaths of up to 60 workers. Unable to compete with the advent of the speedy steam train, the Grand Union itself soon declined too. The canal is now a source of summertime pleasure, so this is a welcome reminder of its once vital purpose. Toby Dantzic Queer Eye Netflix, from today The success of this heart-warming makeover series, which returned to much acclaim earlier this year, was something of a surprise. Netflix then have been quick to capitalise, snappily rolling out another run barely four months later, with the likeable quintet all returning for more lifestyle revamping. Details are so far scant, but the show’s culture guru Karamo Brown has hinted that women and the trans community could be featured. World Cup 2018: Portugal v Spain BBC One, 6.20pm The pick of this week’s World Cup matches happens on day two at the Fisht Stadium in Sochi and comes from Group B. Expect a tense affair as Spain, who suffered the ignominy of failing to make it to the knockout rounds four years ago, take on their bitter rivals Portugal. The Crystal Maze: Celebrity Special Channel 4, 9.00pm Former footballer Dennis Wise heads the team of celebrity hopefuls, joined by Katie Price, Roman Kemp, Bez and Binky Felstead.Wise struggles with a fiendish skill game, while a number-based challenge sets Felstead’s head spinning. Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm Jane McDonald wraps up her Antipodean adventure in New Zealand’s North Island. She rubs noses with a Maori tribe in Napier, explores Rotorua’s dramatic geothermal landscapes and views Auckland’s skyline from a helicopter. Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.40pm This is a final bout of topical treats from veteran impressionist Tracey Ullman. Favourites Angela Merkel and Rupert Murdoch get a look in, alongside more takes on Jeremy Corbyn, Michael Gove and Nanny, the dedicated carer of Jacob Rees-Mogg. Africa: A Journey Into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm Apart from the occasional act on Later… with Jools Holland, world music doesn’t get much airtime on our TVs, so this beguiling series helmed by DJ Rita Ray offers a welcome insight into its traditions. For her final foray, Ray heads to Mali, home to more Grammy award-winning artists than any other African country. From her attempts at a sinuous wedding dance to meeting renowned harp player Toumani Diabaté, Ray’s journey is full of stirring encounters. TD Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 10.00pm A fitting reminder of Dale Winton’s easy-going charm, this swansong travelogue series resumes after a hiatus with our host in ocean-front Miami. Highlights include a trip to Little Havana, the city’s Cuban quarter, and a look at fashion designer Versace’s opulent former home. TD Blade Runner 2049 (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm In a similar but distinct way to Ridley Scott’s masterful original, Blade Runner 2049 mulls one of the meatiest questions around: is surface all that there is, or do life’s currents run deeper than the things we can see, hear and touch? Denis Villeneuve’s film toys with both options, making neither a comfort – and in the process, maps out a provocative blockbuster. Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford star. Red (2010) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. The Wolf of Wall Street (2013) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 11.40pm Soaked in sex, drugs and scandal, Martin Scorsese’s epic is based on the memoir of stockbroker Jordan Belfort, who spent the Nineties illegally amassing a vast personal fortune. With a fantastic performance from Leonardo DiCaprio, this morally bankrupt romp was lauded by audiences and critics alike. Jonah Hill and Margot Robbie co-star. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Saturday 7 April Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm It can’t be easy hosting a show as exuberant as Saturday Night Takeaway on your own but Declan Donnelly made a solid if understandably restrained go of it last week. He ensured that the light entertainment series proceeded pretty much as normal in the absence of long-time work partner Ant McPartlin, whose travails were sensibly referenced only in very brief passing (“I’ve got twice the amount of work to do,” Donnelly noted at one point before mock-berating the production crew that “I’ll have to do it myself, like everything else around here this week”). That said, this final episode ups the ante as Donnelly takes the show on the road to the Universal Orlando Resort in Florida. Once there we’re promised a “super-sized” edition featuring stunts, surprises and “extra-special” guests. No word yet as to who those guests will be but expect Donnelly to continue making the best of a difficult situation, buoyed by extra support from Scarlett Moffatt, who is in charge of ensuring that the Place on the Plane winners have a wonderful time, and Stephen Mulhern, who has the possibly less than enviable task of explaining In for a Penny to an American audience. Sarah Hughes Premier League Football: Everton v Liverpool Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30pm Tired, perhaps, from their Champions League quarter-final first leg against Man City, Liverpool face their bitter local rivals Everton at Goodison Park. The home side, who’ve won three of their last six games, haven’t beaten Liverpool since October 2010, when Tim Cahill and Mikel Arteta gave them a 2-0 victory. Premiership Rugby Union: Bath v Leicester Tigers Channel 5, 1.30pm Time was when Bath and Leicester were the titans of English rugby. Currently they are fifth and eighth in the league, respectively. In September, Bath claimed a 27-23 win at Welford Road, as they held on for their first away win at Leicester since 2003, ensuring an unhappy return for George Ford against the club he left in the summer. The two sides also met in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at the Recreation Ground in November, where Bath also emerged victorious, beating Leicester 33-31 on that occasion. Premier League Football: Manchester City v Manchester United Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm What better way for Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City to clinch the title than by beating second-placed Manchester United at the Etihad Stadium. Sixteen points ahead of them in the table, City have been formidable this season, winning 27 of the 31 league games they’ve played. One of those victories came at Old Trafford, with a goal from Nicolas Otamendi giving City a 2-1 victory when these sides met in December. Britain’s Most Historic Towns Channel 4, 8.00pm Alice Roberts is our guide for this new six-part series, which sees her search the UK for the places that best sum up an historical era. The first era is Roman Britain, so Roberts heads to Chester, where she abseils down walls, hunkers in caves and uncovers the truth about the city. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm The medical drama’s storyline about Dylan’s (William Beck) alcoholism continues to be sensitively handled as the medic’s ex-wife Sam (Charlotte Salt) worries about whether she can help him. Meanwhile, Ethan (George Hardy) struggles with his own demons as he realises that a patient is related to his brother’s killer. The Voice UK: Live Final ITV, 8.30pm Every reality TV idea has an allotted shelf life and it’s hard not to feel that musical talent contests have come to the end of their run. For those who disagree, The Voice UK’s grand finale is here and the final four battle it out for public approval. Below the Surface BBC Four, 9.00pm & 9.45pm BBC Four’s latest Scandi drama started off tensely but like its predecessor, Modus, it has gone on to become ever more ludicrous. Now it’s the final two episodes, and Philip Norgaard (Johannes Lassen) faces off against Mark (Jakob Oftebro), the man behind the hostage crisis. Much heartfelt talking follows, although you may end up feeling more sympathetic towards the damaged Mark than the chilly Norgaard. Pearl Jam: Let’s Play Two Sky Arts, 9.00pm When is a music documentary not a music documentary? When it’s also a sports film. This exuberant film, which was made following the Chicago Cubs’ victory in baseball’s World Series in 2016, follows die-hard Cubs fan and Pearl Jam lead singer Eddie Vedder as he cheers on his team during their championship run while also preparing the band for two August shows at the team’s Wrigley Field Stadium. The result is an affectionate portrait of the singer as fan. SH Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm David Farr’s epic series reaches its climax with the arrival of the most famous horse in history. After an uninspiring start, Troy has picked up in recent weeks and the final episode is a well-handled tale of betrayal and death. It’s a curate’s egg of a series, let down by poor casting. SH X-Men (2000) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm Bryan Singer directs an all-star cast that includes Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, Ian McKellen and Halle Berry, in the first of the X-Men franchise. A group of mutants must decide whether to side with Professor Xavier (Stewart) or the evil Magneto (McKellen) in what is a solid opening to the series and which paved the way for plenty of big-budget sequels. This is followed by X-Men 2 and X-Men 3 at 9.00pm and 11.35pm respectively. Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and this inconsistency leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Lethal Weapon 2 (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm Mel Gibson sports his signature Eighties mullet in the second film of this daft-but-fun action franchise. LAPD officer Riggs (Gibson) teams up once again with his partner Murtaugh (Danny Glover) to track down a band of South African criminals while protecting a painfully frenzied witness (Joe Pesci). Naturally, the pair find themselves drawn into violent action sequences orchestrated by stereotypical bad guys. Sunday 8 April Hostess with the mostest: Catherine Tate presents the awards Credit: ITV The Olivier Awards 2018 ITV, 10.20pm Last year, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child swept the board with nine Olivier Awards, something that looked impossible to top. But then came Lin Manuel Miranda’s blockbuster musical Hamilton, whose West End run has received reviews every bit as rapturous as those from its Broadway debut. The show has a record-breaking 13 nominations, which it is thought will be translated into awards. After being snubbed for Jerusalem, Jez Butterworth will surely be rewarded for his equally magisterial play The Ferryman (its eight nominations include best play and best director for Sam Mendes), while contenders in the acting categories include Bryan Cranston for Network, Andrew Garfield for Angels in America and Lesley Manville for Long Day’s Journey into Night. Catherine Tate will be on hosting duties for the event at the Royal Albert Hall, which will, as usual, feature a crop of stellar performances; this one will include a special tribute to Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, which turns 50 this year. Let’s hope the organisers bring together Josephs of the past for a big singalong: Jason Donovan, Phillip Schofield, Ian “H” Watkins and Lee Mead will all, one suspects, be available. Gabriel Tate Sex Robots and Us BBC Three, from 10.00am James Young, an amputee who created his own bionic arm, meets the people who design sex robots and hears about their plans for them, from being given to old people’s homes to “employment” in brothels. But is it the harmless, even socially responsible pursuit thatthey claim? Formula 1: The Bahrain Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 3.30pm After the Australian Grand Prix – in which Sebastian Vettel took advantage of a safety-car blunder to win under pristine Melbourne skies – attention turns to the second round of the season at the Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir. Another blunder cost Lewis Hamilton on this circuit last year – this time it happened in the pit lane, with Vettel capitalising to win by 6.6 seconds. The Generation Game BBC One, 8.00pm How do you top last week’s cavalcade of silliness in this rebooted game show? You rope in Danny Dyer to join Mel Giedroyc, Sue Perkins and panellists Melvin Odoom and Roisin Conaty for challenges that include cake decorating, balloon modelling and dancing the Argentine Tango. The Durrells ITV, 8.00pm In the fourth episode of the popular drama, Larry (Josh O’Connor) visits Athens with two oddly named guests – Captain Creech (James Cosmo) and Prince Jeejeebuoy (Tanmay Dhanania) – in tow. There, they offer advice to Gerry (Milo Parker), who is applying for a new school. Jesus’ Female Disciples: the New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm For centuries, the birth of Christianity was regarded as a largely male affair, with women as only bit-part players. Now, Bible experts Helen Bond and Joan Taylor have discovered evidence that women were involved in everything from preaching and baptising to funding the movement as it grew. This absorbing documentary follows the historians’ progress. Golf: The Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00pm Prepare for a dramatic finale as this year’s first Major – from the Augusta National in Georgia – concludes. Last year, Spain’s Sergio Garcia won the coveted green jacket, beating Justin Rose in a tense play-off. Ordeal by Innocence BBC One, 9.00pm Sarah Phelps’s splendid adaptation continues, as Arthur Calgary (Luke Treadaway) resolves to prove the truth about Jack Argyll’s (Anthony Boyle) alibi by any means necessary. GT Folk Awards 2018 BBC Four, 9.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Julie Fowlis introduce highlights from this year’s Radio 2 Folk Awards in Belfast. It features performances from Cara Dillon, Lankum and Eliza Carthy and the Wayward Band. The great Nick Drake will also be inducted into the Hall of Fame, his genius long-established, even if such recognition eluded him during his short life. Producer Dónal Lunny, meanwhile, receives the Lifetime Achievement Award for decades of tireless work promoting the renaissance in Irish music, plus The Armagh Pipers Club are presented with the Good Tradition Award. GT Emma (1996) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 3.00pm Gwyneth Paltrow’s American iciness melts in this deft adaptation of Jane Austen’s classic comic romance. She is Emma Woodhouse, spoilt, charming and an inveterate meddler. Only Mr George Knightley (Jeremy Northam) dares challenge her behaviour – but what are his motives? A clever film with a superb supporting cast, including Toni Collette, Alan Cumming and Ewan McGregor. United 93 (2006) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 9.55pm Director Paul Greengrass’s boneshaking, real-time take on the final hours of the United Airlines plane whose passengers rebelled against their hijackers on September 11, 2001 feels uncomfortably realistic. Greengrass, whose signature rapid cutting made the second and third Bourne films so exciting, proves expert at handling the most infamous atrocity of modern times with intelligence and sobriety. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.00pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. Monday 9 April I spy: a recruit sees if she’s got what it takes to be an SOE agent Credit: BBC Secret Agent Selection: WW2 BBC Two, 9.00pm Not unlike Channel 4’s SAS: Who Dares Wins and BBC Two’s Astronauts: Do You Have What It Takes?, this absorbing new series puts a group of recruits through a series of gruelling physical and psychological challenges to see if they could make the grade as a secret agent according to an established selection test used during the Second World War. This test was used by the Special Operations Executive (SOE) to determine whether recruits from many different walks of life would be capable of being dropped behind enemy lines and surviving as a covert officer with a brief to cause the maximum disruption possible to the enemy in the territory. As with the original SOE, the 14 candidates come from diverse backgrounds (among them a research scientist, a property developer, former police officer, a drag act performer, a retired investment banker and an Army veteran). In the opening episode, they undergo the initial four-day assessment at a remote Scottish country-house estate. The aim is to winnow out weakness and determine who should win a place on the advanced, and suitably terrifying, course in assassination, sabotage and covert intelligence techniques. Gerard O’Donovan Famalam BBC Three, from 10.00am After a successful pilot last year, Vivienne Acheampong, Gbemisola Ikumelo, Roxanne Sternberg, Tom Moutchi and John MacMillan return with more culturally skewed sketches. Once again, they feature William and Funke’s raunchy chat show, misunderstood superhero Eclipse, Croydon’s voodoo practitioner Professor Lofuko, and a version of Midsomer Murders. 800 Words BBC One, 2.15pm If you like The Durrells you will definitely want to watch hit Australian comedy drama 800 Words. This gently funny series follows George (Erik Thomson), a widower, who horrifies his teenaged children when he moves the entire family to a remote seaside town in New Zealand. Springtime on the Farm Channel 5, 8.00pm This is the first of five shows this week celebrating the “great British farmer”, with the help of Yorkshire Vet stars Peter Wright and Julian Norton, Adam Henson of Countryfile and Springwatch’s Lindsey Chapman. In this programme, they explore how to cope with the stresses of lambing. MasterChef: The Finals BBC One, 9.00pm Oodles of challenges lie ahead for the remaining amateur chefs in the final week, which takes them as far afield as Peru ahead of Friday’s concluding cook-off. First, though, they’re off to North Yorkshire to cater a country-house lunch for local grandees and farmers. Lisbon: An Art Lovers’ Guide BBC Four, 9.00pm Having covered Barcelona, St Petersburg and Amsterdam in their first series of city-break guides, historian Dr Janina Ramirez and art critic Alastair Sooke jet off to explore three less obvious, art-rich destinations. Beirut and Baku are perhaps the more intriguing but it opens in Lisbon, which built up its art reserves during the centuries Portugal was part of one of the world’s great empires, and currently boasts one of the hottest contemporary art scenes in Europe. GO Marcella ITV, 9.00pm This drama’s been a little less fraught the second time round but Marcella still pushes the boundaries of credibility. In this concluding part, the heroine (Anna Friel) tracks down the killer, only to suffer one of her unfortunate episodes. GO The Core (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.25pm Rome starts to crumble, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco collapses and pigeons go mental in Trafalgar Square. Something is obviously amiss, and this time it isn’t climate change. In fact, the Earth’s core has stopped rotating and a team of scientists has to build a special burrowing machine to start it spinning again. Hilary Swank, Stanley Tucci and Aaron Eckhart do their best, but the excitement is intermittent. The Emoji Movie (2017) ★☆☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.30pm In this animated comedy set inside a smartphone, Gene (voiced by T J Miller), an emoji with multiple facial features, sets out on a quest to be like his colleagues who have only one. He does so with the help of apps like Spotify and Candy Crush. Sadly, the result is so horrendous that there aren’t enough Patrick Stewart-voiced emojis in the world to express what an ugly, artless exercise this is. Triple 9 (2016) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A gang of criminals and corrupt cops plan to kill a police officer in order to pull off their biggest heist yet in John Hillcoat’s crime thriller. There is a lot to like here: a big opening and a strong cast (with Kate Winslet, Gal Gadot, Anthony Mackie and Chiwetel Ejiofor among them). But it feels like fragments of a great crime drama are missing; it’s enthralling up close, but then the big picture isn’t complete. Tuesday 10 April Back to school: Mark, who has two sons with autism Credit: Channel 4 Class of Mum and Dad Channel 4, 8.00pm Another week, another Channel 4 series about education. Hold off on the black marks, however, because this one is pretty good. The premise is simple: Blackrod Primary School just outside of Bolton has thrown open its doors to a class made up of pupils’ parents (and one grandparent). They’ve agreed to go back to school for the summer term to see what modern education is really like, sports day, Sats tests and all. Naturally, its harder than many of them were expecting – 36-year-old decorator Jonny states early on that he thought he’d be able to slope off for a swift cigarette break rather than having to adhere to strict class rules – but there are some touching stories amid the more obvious moments. Most notably, this opening episode focuses on two parents with challenging home lives – Julia, who is raising her 10-year-old cousin Asha after Asha’s mother died, and Mark, who has two autistic sons. While the parents’ travails are interesting, the children are the real scene-stealers, however, from those delighted that their mothers and fathers are taking part to those who are more sceptical. The pair of five-year-olds who spend their time corpsing in front of the camera are particularly endearing. Sarah Hughes Champions League Football: Manchester City v Liverpool BT Sport 2, 7.45pm The Etihad Stadium is the setting as City and Liverpool fight it out for a place in the semi-finals. Liverpool have the advantage following a 3-0 win at Anfield in the first leg. This Time Next Year ITV, 8.00pm Davina McCall returns with another set of heart-tugging stories of people attempting to transform their lives over the course of a year. First up are two new parents who dream of making life wonderful for their baby girl who has been deaf since birth and a couple desperate to start a family. Come Home BBC One, 9.00pm Danny Brocklehurst’s claustrophobic family drama comes to a head as we flashback to find out exactly what went wrong in Greg (Christopher Eccleston) and Marie’s (Paula Malcomson) marriage. Hospital BBC Two, 9.00pm The engrossing fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with Nottingham University Hospitals Trust struggling to cope with the new NHS ruling regarding the cancellation of all non-urgent surgery. The episode focuses on Val, a 55-year-old with mouth cancer whose surgeon is desperately trying to ensure that her operation goes ahead. Here and Now Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm With only two episodes left to go, Alan Ball’s family drama continues to tread water in the most frustrating ways. On paper, there are a whole bunch of interesting stories in the mix, from Kristen’s (Sosie Bacon) possible relationship with Navid (Marwan Salama) to Ramon’s (Daniel Zovatto) continuing visions, but the problem is nothing much happens with any of them as each story moves on only incrementally each week. In this episode, Audrey (Holly Hunter) finally turns the tables on the perpetually smug Greg (Tim Robbins). Cunk on Britain BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm Diane Morgan’s pitch-perfect send-up of history programmes moves to the Tudor era and beyond as Cunk takes on Henry VIII, aka “The kingiest king who kinged over Britain” before giving us her unique perspective on “Bloody” Mary Tudor (“horrible like the drink”) and Elizabeth I. SH Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The acerbic Sarah Jessica Parker sitcom has been firing on all cylinders throughout its second series – possibly because it’s more interesting watching Frances (Parker) and Robert (the excellent Thomas Haden Church) navigate life after divorce than it was watching them get there. Here, Frances tries to make a new contact in the art world. SH Speed (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm “There’s a bomb on the bus!” is the most famous line and basically the entire plot of one of the best action thrillers of the Nineties. The sizzling chemistry between LAPD Swat specialist Jack Traven (Keanu Reeves) and passenger Annie Porter (Sandra Bullock) sexes up the exhilarating action scenes, while Dennis Hopper is fantastically unhinged as a revenge-driven, retired bomb squad member turned terrorist. Fast & Furious 7 (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm Paul Walker was killed in a car crash part-way through making this film so it was completed with the help of his two younger brothers and some subtle computer graphics. The good news is that this is the best film in the franchise and does justice to Walker. It isn’t polished blockbuster film-making – though if it was, it wouldn’t be Fast & Furious. But it speaks straight to your adrenal glands. The Witches of Eastwick (1987) ★★★☆☆ Syfy, 9.00pm It is remarkable that director George Miller’s daft, unfettered romp of a film works at all. But, thanks to Jack Nicholson’s delicious overacting as Daryl Van Horne, a manic gentleman who closely resembles the devil, and the three gorgeous, single small-town friends, Alexandra (Cher), Jane (Susan Sarandon) and Sukie (Michelle Pfeiffer), who vie for his debased attentions, it somehow does. Wednesday 11 April Family ties: Edgar Ramirez and Penelope Cruz Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s been fascinating to discover the “true” story behind the 1997 murder of fhion designer Gianni Versace in Ryan Murphy’s glitzy drama, which has expertly depicted the inner world of the perpetrator, a Walter Mitty-style serial killer called Andrew Cunanan (a career-defining role for Darren Criss). This episode, however, has a mid-series lull about it as Cunanan ascends to the higher echelons of gay society, shaping himself meticulously into the posh, preppy eye-candy who saw a sugar daddy (or two) as his way to the top. Elsewhere, the Versace siblings return at last. Gianni (Edgar Ramirez), now in failing health decides to champion his insecure sister Donatella (Penélope Cruz in a frightful wig) and turns her into both designer and muse. Despite a lack of characters to root for – the Versaces’ moments of vulnerability dissolve into tedious histrionics and are eclipsed by Cunanan’s cold-blooded machinations – it’s all quite a fabulous mix of fashion, high society and brutal murder, with some interesting commentary on homophobia in the Nineties as well. Vicki Power The Secret Helpers BBC Two, 8.00pm Watch and weep as timid elderly widow Lesley begins a new life as an out gay woman in this life-affirming docu-series. She’s encouraged with warmth and wisdom by amateur “sages” from abroad, who talk to her secretly through a hidden earpiece. From World War to Cold War Yesterday, 8.00pm As the Second World War drew to a close, Churchill, Stalin and Roosevelt met at Yalta in the Crimea to broker post-war peace. This brisk two-part documentary raids the archives for clips and letters from those who attended, and gathers experts and relatives – including FDR’s grandson – to investigate power plays by Stalin that wrong-footed his Allied counterparts. It’s a detailed look at how and why the compromises reached at Yalta were quickly cast aside. Bacchus Uncovered: Ancient God of Ecstasy BBC Four, 9.00pm Historian Bettany Hughes continues to explore ancient civilisations, moving on to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine. Hughes’s odyssey starts under the City of London, where an 1,800-year-old Roman temple to Bacchus was discovered less than 100 years ago, and takes her to Greece, the Middle East and the Caucasus to explore the god’s roots and influence. VP Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Fluffy as candyfloss, this lewd seaside comedy provides some fun, particularly in the retro casting of stars of yesteryear. This week, an exuberant Sammy (Shane Richie) tries to persuade Monty (John Challis) that, after his successful comeback gig, he is ready for an evening slot. One Born Every Minute Channel 4, 9.00pm This feelgood documentary series brings more poignant tales from a Birmingham labour ward. This week we meet Chantell, about to deliver her third child, who regales us with a moving story of how parenthood with partner Phil has healed the wounds of a traumatic past. First Dates Channel 4, 10.00pm The thoughtful dating show pairs up four more couples, but the road to love is bumpy – septuagenarian Deanna finds her date more interested in the waiter than her. More promising is the match between Bianca and Teza, who allow their vulnerabilities to show. VP The Thin Red Line (1998) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 3.10pm This lyrical Second World War drama, directed by Terrence Malick, tells the story of a group of young US soldiers fighting the Japanese for control of the island of Guadalcanal. Full of stars such as Sean Penn and George Clooney, it struggles with its own battle to squeeze in so many characters but is still an atmospheric meditation on the nature of war. Nick Nolte and Adrien Brody also star. The Remains of the Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 3.55pm The success of Merchant Ivory’s adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Thirties-set novel, a well-observed study of regret, is built around its perfectly cast leads: Anthony Hopkins as James, the butler to the doltish aristocrat Lord Darlington (James Fox) and Emma Thompson as a housekeeper who tries to draw him out of his sterile shell. Lush visuals give it an added richness. Transporter 2 (2005) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A martial arts action sequel, in which Jason Statham and Alessandro Gassman are the sporadically thrilling stars. Statham is Frank Martin, who accepts a job as chauffeur to Jack (Hunter Clary), the son of Miami’s politician Jefferson Billings (Matthew Modine). But the local Colombian drug dealers aren’t happy with his boss’s efforts to clean up the city. Cue a kidnapping, and a potentially deadly encounter with a cocaine baron. Thursday 12 April Changing attitudes: Holly and Hollie Credit: BBC Living with the Brainy Bunch BBC Two, 8.00pm Enterprising, PR-conscious Ash Ali is headmaster of Chessington Community College, a fast-improving school with a few problem pupils. Among them are Jack and Hollie who, on the surface, are comically awful teenagers. Hollie gripes constantly, throws strops and storms out of classrooms if things aren’t going her way. Jack is sullen, lazy and has clocked up 15 suspensions in the past year. It will come as no surprise to regular viewers of such documentaries that their behaviour is rooted in low self-esteem, although their parents unquestionably indulge their foibles. Ali’s novel solution is to place Hollie with Holly, tapdancing head girl and gregarious boffin, and Jack with Tharush, a Sri Lankan immigrant by way of Italy, whose talents are only matched by his work ethic. Now that Jack and Hollie are in the bosom of new families for six weeks, it’s hoped that a new environment, greater discipline and rigid routines will see their results improve and attitudes pick up. There are setbacks on the largely familiar narrative trajectory, but it’s cast to perfection and, as a demonstration of the importance of parenting in academic achievement, the experiment gets an A-star. Gabriel Tate European Tour Golf: The Open de Espana Sky Sports Golf, 11.00am The opening day’s play of the event from the Centro Nacional de Golf in Madrid, which was won by Andrew Johnston the last time it was held in 2016. War Above the Trenches Yesterday, 8.00pm This decent two-parter tells the story of the Royal Flying Corps and their battle to win control of the air in the First World War. Based on Peter Hart’s book Bloody April, it draws affectingly on the testimony of veterans to show there was more to the Western Front than trench warfare. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm The modern age draws closer, as Simon Schama tackles the theme of radiance, guiding us through Gothic cathedrals, Baroque Venetian masterpieces and dazzling Japanese woodblock prints. The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm The second real-life case of the series sees Mark Williams-Thomas investigating the 1977 murders of three women in Glasgow. The suspect is Angus Sinclair, who is currently serving a life sentence for killing two other women that same year. We hear from his ex-wife, and learn how he was a prime suspect but escaped charges for the first killings when key evidence went missing. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm This diverting documentary series concludes with a Himalayan trek, a controversial article in the school newspaper and the GCSE retakes that were the goal of the entire enterprise. Will Alfie, Harry, Jack and co see their grades improve? Urban Myths: Marilyn Monroe and Billy Wilder Sky Arts, 9.00pm Sky Arts’ boldly cast series of vaguely apocryphal tales from the pop-culture frontlines returns with a dispatch from the set of Some Like It Hot, the magnificent 1959 comedy that is almost certainly more fun to watch than it was to make. In this minor but entertaining reimagining, Tony Curtis (Alex Pettyfer) is threatening to cuckold Arthur Miller (Dougray Scott) by making off with Marilyn Monroe (Gemma Arterton), whose caprice, drinking and sensitivity is driving director Billy Wilder (James Purefoy) to distraction. GT Still Game BBC One, 9.30pm; BBC Two Wales, 10.00pm Justifying its prime-time BBC One slot, the Scottish sitcom bows out in triumph with a typically well-wrought farce involving a Hollywood stuntman, a disastrous driving lesson and romance for the widowed Isa (Jane McCarry). GT The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Christopher Lee steals the show as the titular assassin, Francisco Scaramanga, in this classic Bond adventure. Roger Moore’s secret agent, in his second outing as 007, must pursue him, with the help of sidekick Mary Goodnight (Britt Ekland), to the villain’s island lair in order to prevent him harnessing the power of the Sun for evil. The confrontations between Moore and Lee are easily the film’s highlights. Swordfish (2001) ★★☆☆☆ TCM, 9.00pm The most often quoted bit of trivia about this film is that Halle Berry was paid an additional £500,000 to go topless. It’s rather lucky she agreed because she’s probably the most appealing aspect of this frenetic thriller. John Travolta and Hugh Jackman put on testosterone-fuelled displays as a morally dubious counter-terrorist agent and the hacker he blackmails into accessing billions of dollars of government money. Some Like It Hot (1959, b/w) ★★★★★ Sky Arts, 9.30pm When two musicians (Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis) witness a mob hit, they flee the state disguised as women in an all-female band, but further complications arise in the form of demure ukulele player Sugar Kane, superbly played by Marilyn Monroe. Billy Wilder’s classic comedy is effortlessly wacky and clever. Before, at 9pm, is Urban Myths, which imagines what happened on the set of this romcom. Friday 13 April Dishing out opinions: John Torode and Gregg Wallace Credit: BBC MasterChef: The Final BBC One, 8.30pm It has taken 25 episodes over seven weeks to whittle down the 56 amateur contestants to three finalists, and in the process, MasterChef 2018 has produced some of the best cooking – and some of the toughest competition – in the series’ long history. (It has been running in one form or another since 1990; and since 2005 in, roughly, its current format with judges Gregg Wallace and John Torode presenting.) This last week has been no exception, with the finalists having to dig deeper than ever to produce the best dishes of their lives and some great moments – notably during the spectacular trip to South America when they met Peruvian superchef Gaston Acurio and took on a service at the fifth best restaurant in the world, the Central in Lima, under Michelin-starred maestro Virgilio Martínez Véliz. In the finale, it’s all about who cooks the best food, though, as the final three return to the studio kitchen to undergo a test of culinary skills and nerve as they set about creating the most important three-course meal of their lives – in the hope of being judged worthy of a title that has launched many a great career: MasterChef champion. Gerard O’Donovan Chef’s Table: Pastry Netflix, from today This mouth-watering spin-off from Netflix’s popular global foodie series Chef’s Table puts the focus entirely on sweet stuff, talking the cameras inside the kitchens of some of the world’s best pastry chefs, among them Christina Tosi’s Milk Bar in New York, Corrado Assenza’s Caffé Sicilia in Noto, Sicily, Jordi Roca’s El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, and Will Goldfarb’s Room4Dessert in Bali. Lost in Space Netflix, from today Not so much a rerun as a spectacular new take on the classic Sixties sci-fi series about a family marooned in space when their ship runs into difficulty on their way to a new colony and crashes on an unknown and surprisingly hostile planet. There are plenty of thrills and impressive visual effects, and Toby Stephens and Molly Parker are excellent as the pioneering Robinson parents John and Judy, while Parker Posey is an enigmatic (and now female) Dr Smith. GO The City & The City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Cop thrillers don’t come much more weirdly dystopian than China Miéville’s award-winning 2009 novel and this ultra-stylish adaptation serves its source material very well. In episode two, Inspector Borlú (David Morrissey) ventures back across the border while investigating the murder of a foreign student. Episodes BBC Two, 10.00pm; Wales, 11.05pm Having overcome last week’s unfortunate episode in this sitcom, Matt (Matt LeBlanc) is back on top and leveraging his spurt in the ratings for all it’s worth, handing Sean (Stephen Mangan) and Beverly (Tamsin Greig) a welcome opportunity for escape. Lee and Dean Channel 4, 10.00pm More rough charm, as life gets complicated for Stevenage’s very own Dumb and Dumber when Lee’s (Miles Chapman) financial worries mount and Dean (Mark O’Sullivan) is persuaded to premiere his poetry at the local arts club. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm Freedom of speech and censorship are under the spotlight as host Mary Beard and guests discuss Theatre Clwyd’s production The Assassination of Katie Hopkins and former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s new book Fascism: A Warning. GO Alien: Covenant (2017) ★★★★★ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm The latest film in the Alien saga from Ridley Scott is arguably a mad scientist movie. It follows the crew of the colony ship Covenant (including Katherine Waterson) as they discover what they think is an uncharted paradise, but what they uncover a threat beyond their imagination. Michael Fassbender puts in a spectacular turn as kindly robot David and his twisted “brother” Walter. Invictus (2009) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.45pm Following the death of Nelson Mandela’s ex-wife Winnie last week, aged 81, here’s Clint Eastwood’s take on South Africa’s World Cup victory in 1995. As the country emerges from apartheid, the newly elected President Mandela (an uncanny Morgan Freeman) sees the potential for the national rugby team, led by François Pienaar (Matt Damon), to be a catalyst for harmony. This is a polished and uplifting film. Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982) ★★★★☆ Gold, 1.40am Much like the Secret Policeman’s Ball, this comedy performance film sees the Monty Python gang take to the stage, but this time they’re in Hollywood. Among the sketches are the Silly Olympics, where athletes compete in absurd sports, The Lumberjack Song, and The Ministry of Silly Walks. This film also features Carol Cleveland in numerous supporting roles. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: Dec goes solo again for the last Saturday Night Takeaway, plus The Voice final
Saturday 7 April Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm It can’t be easy hosting a show as exuberant as Saturday Night Takeaway on your own but Declan Donnelly made a solid if understandably restrained go of it last week. He ensured that the light entertainment series proceeded pretty much as normal in the absence of long-time work partner Ant McPartlin, whose travails were sensibly referenced only in very brief passing (“I’ve got twice the amount of work to do,” Donnelly noted at one point before mock-berating the production crew that “I’ll have to do it myself, like everything else around here this week”). That said, this final episode ups the ante as Donnelly takes the show on the road to the Universal Orlando Resort in Florida. Once there we’re promised a “super-sized” edition featuring stunts, surprises and “extra-special” guests. No word yet as to who those guests will be but expect Donnelly to continue making the best of a difficult situation, buoyed by extra support from Scarlett Moffatt, who is in charge of ensuring that the Place on the Plane winners have a wonderful time, and Stephen Mulhern, who has the possibly less than enviable task of explaining In for a Penny to an American audience. Sarah Hughes Premier League Football: Everton v Liverpool Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30pm Tired, perhaps, from their Champions League quarter-final first leg against Man City, Liverpool face their bitter local rivals Everton at Goodison Park. The home side, who’ve won three of their last six games, haven’t beaten Liverpool since October 2010, when Tim Cahill and Mikel Arteta gave them a 2-0 victory. Premiership Rugby Union: Bath v Leicester Tigers Channel 5, 1.30pm Time was when Bath and Leicester were the titans of English rugby. Currently they are fifth and eighth in the league, respectively. In September, Bath claimed a 27-23 win at Welford Road, as they held on for their first away win at Leicester since 2003, ensuring an unhappy return for George Ford against the club he left in the summer. The two sides also met in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at the Recreation Ground in November, where Bath also emerged victorious, beating Leicester 33-31 on that occasion. Premier League Football: Manchester City v Manchester United Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm What better way for Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City to clinch the title than by beating second-placed Manchester United at the Etihad Stadium. Sixteen points ahead of them in the table, City have been formidable this season, winning 27 of the 31 league games they’ve played. One of those victories came at Old Trafford, with a goal from Nicolas Otamendi giving City a 2-1 victory when these sides met in December. Britain’s Most Historic Towns Channel 4, 8.00pm Alice Roberts is our guide for this new six-part series, which sees her search the UK for the places that best sum up an historical era. The first era is Roman Britain, so Roberts heads to Chester, where she abseils down walls, hunkers in caves and uncovers the truth about the city. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm The medical drama’s storyline about Dylan’s (William Beck) alcoholism continues to be sensitively handled as the medic’s ex-wife Sam (Charlotte Salt) worries about whether she can help him. Meanwhile, Ethan (George Hardy) struggles with his own demons as he realises that a patient is related to his brother’s killer. The Voice UK: Live Final ITV, 8.30pm Every reality TV idea has an allotted shelf life and it’s hard not to feel that musical talent contests have come to the end of their run. For those who disagree, The Voice UK’s grand finale is here and the final four battle it out for public approval. Below the Surface BBC Four, 9.00pm & 9.45pm BBC Four’s latest Scandi drama started off tensely but like its predecessor, Modus, it has gone on to become ever more ludicrous. Now it’s the final two episodes, and Philip Norgaard (Johannes Lassen) faces off against Mark (Jakob Oftebro), the man behind the hostage crisis. Much heartfelt talking follows, although you may end up feeling more sympathetic towards the damaged Mark than the chilly Norgaard. Pearl Jam: Let’s Play Two Sky Arts, 9.00pm When is a music documentary not a music documentary? When it’s also a sports film. This exuberant film, which was made following the Chicago Cubs’ victory in baseball’s World Series in 2016, follows die-hard Cubs fan and Pearl Jam lead singer Eddie Vedder as he cheers on his team during their championship run while also preparing the band for two August shows at the team’s Wrigley Field Stadium. The result is an affectionate portrait of the singer as fan. SH Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm David Farr’s epic series reaches its climax with the arrival of the most famous horse in history. After an uninspiring start, Troy has picked up in recent weeks and the final episode is a well-handled tale of betrayal and death. It’s a curate’s egg of a series, let down by poor casting. SH X-Men (2000) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm Bryan Singer directs an all-star cast that includes Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, Ian McKellen and Halle Berry, in the first of the X-Men franchise. A group of mutants must decide whether to side with Professor Xavier (Stewart) or the evil Magneto (McKellen) in what is a solid opening to the series and which paved the way for plenty of big-budget sequels. This is followed by X-Men 2 and X-Men 3 at 9.00pm and 11.35pm respectively. Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and this inconsistency leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Lethal Weapon 2 (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm Mel Gibson sports his signature Eighties mullet in the second film of this daft-but-fun action franchise. LAPD officer Riggs (Gibson) teams up once again with his partner Murtaugh (Danny Glover) to track down a band of South African criminals while protecting a painfully frenzied witness (Joe Pesci). Naturally, the pair find themselves drawn into violent action sequences orchestrated by stereotypical bad guys. Sunday 8 April Hostess with the mostest: Catherine Tate presents the awards Credit: ITV The Olivier Awards 2018 ITV, 10.20pm Last year, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child swept the board with nine Olivier Awards, something that looked impossible to top. But then came Lin Manuel Miranda’s blockbuster musical Hamilton, whose West End run has received reviews every bit as rapturous as those from its Broadway debut. The show has a record-breaking 13 nominations, which it is thought will be translated into awards. After being snubbed for Jerusalem, Jez Butterworth will surely be rewarded for his equally magisterial play The Ferryman (its eight nominations include best play and best director for Sam Mendes), while contenders in the acting categories include Bryan Cranston for Network, Andrew Garfield for Angels in America and Lesley Manville for Long Day’s Journey into Night. Catherine Tate will be on hosting duties for the event at the Royal Albert Hall, which will, as usual, feature a crop of stellar performances; this one will include a special tribute to Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, which turns 50 this year. Let’s hope the organisers bring together Josephs of the past for a big singalong: Jason Donovan, Phillip Schofield, Ian “H” Watkins and Lee Mead will all, one suspects, be available. Gabriel Tate Sex Robots and Us BBC Three, from 10.00am James Young, an amputee who created his own bionic arm, meets the people who design sex robots and hears about their plans for them, from being given to old people’s homes to “employment” in brothels. But is it the harmless, even socially responsible pursuit thatthey claim? Formula 1: The Bahrain Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 3.30pm After the Australian Grand Prix – in which Sebastian Vettel took advantage of a safety-car blunder to win under pristine Melbourne skies – attention turns to the second round of the season at the Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir. Another blunder cost Lewis Hamilton on this circuit last year – this time it happened in the pit lane, with Vettel capitalising to win by 6.6 seconds. The Generation Game BBC One, 8.00pm How do you top last week’s cavalcade of silliness in this rebooted game show? You rope in Danny Dyer to join Mel Giedroyc, Sue Perkins and panellists Melvin Odoom and Roisin Conaty for challenges that include cake decorating, balloon modelling and dancing the Argentine Tango. The Durrells ITV, 8.00pm In the fourth episode of the popular drama, Larry (Josh O’Connor) visits Athens with two oddly named guests – Captain Creech (James Cosmo) and Prince Jeejeebuoy (Tanmay Dhanania) – in tow. There, they offer advice to Gerry (Milo Parker), who is applying for a new school. Jesus’ Female Disciples: the New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm For centuries, the birth of Christianity was regarded as a largely male affair, with women as only bit-part players. Now, Bible experts Helen Bond and Joan Taylor have discovered evidence that women were involved in everything from preaching and baptising to funding the movement as it grew. This absorbing documentary follows the historians’ progress. Golf: The Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00pm Prepare for a dramatic finale as this year’s first Major – from the Augusta National in Georgia – concludes. Last year, Spain’s Sergio Garcia won the coveted green jacket, beating Justin Rose in a tense play-off. Ordeal by Innocence BBC One, 9.00pm Sarah Phelps’s splendid adaptation continues, as Arthur Calgary (Luke Treadaway) resolves to prove the truth about Jack Argyll’s (Anthony Boyle) alibi by any means necessary. GT Folk Awards 2018 BBC Four, 9.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Julie Fowlis introduce highlights from this year’s Radio 2 Folk Awards in Belfast. It features performances from Cara Dillon, Lankum and Eliza Carthy and the Wayward Band. The great Nick Drake will also be inducted into the Hall of Fame, his genius long-established, even if such recognition eluded him during his short life. Producer Dónal Lunny, meanwhile, receives the Lifetime Achievement Award for decades of tireless work promoting the renaissance in Irish music, plus The Armagh Pipers Club are presented with the Good Tradition Award. GT Emma (1996) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 3.00pm Gwyneth Paltrow’s American iciness melts in this deft adaptation of Jane Austen’s classic comic romance. She is Emma Woodhouse, spoilt, charming and an inveterate meddler. Only Mr George Knightley (Jeremy Northam) dares challenge her behaviour – but what are his motives? A clever film with a superb supporting cast, including Toni Collette, Alan Cumming and Ewan McGregor. United 93 (2006) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 9.55pm Director Paul Greengrass’s boneshaking, real-time take on the final hours of the United Airlines plane whose passengers rebelled against their hijackers on September 11, 2001 feels uncomfortably realistic. Greengrass, whose signature rapid cutting made the second and third Bourne films so exciting, proves expert at handling the most infamous atrocity of modern times with intelligence and sobriety. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.00pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. Monday 9 April I spy: a recruit sees if she’s got what it takes to be an SOE agent Credit: BBC Secret Agent Selection: WW2 BBC Two, 9.00pm Not unlike Channel 4’s SAS: Who Dares Wins and BBC Two’s Astronauts: Do You Have What It Takes?, this absorbing new series puts a group of recruits through a series of gruelling physical and psychological challenges to see if they could make the grade as a secret agent according to an established selection test used during the Second World War. This test was used by the Special Operations Executive (SOE) to determine whether recruits from many different walks of life would be capable of being dropped behind enemy lines and surviving as a covert officer with a brief to cause the maximum disruption possible to the enemy in the territory. As with the original SOE, the 14 candidates come from diverse backgrounds (among them a research scientist, a property developer, former police officer, a drag act performer, a retired investment banker and an Army veteran). In the opening episode, they undergo the initial four-day assessment at a remote Scottish country-house estate. The aim is to winnow out weakness and determine who should win a place on the advanced, and suitably terrifying, course in assassination, sabotage and covert intelligence techniques. Gerard O’Donovan Famalam BBC Three, from 10.00am After a successful pilot last year, Vivienne Acheampong, Gbemisola Ikumelo, Roxanne Sternberg, Tom Moutchi and John MacMillan return with more culturally skewed sketches. Once again, they feature William and Funke’s raunchy chat show, misunderstood superhero Eclipse, Croydon’s voodoo practitioner Professor Lofuko, and a version of Midsomer Murders. 800 Words BBC One, 2.15pm If you like The Durrells you will definitely want to watch hit Australian comedy drama 800 Words. This gently funny series follows George (Erik Thomson), a widower, who horrifies his teenaged children when he moves the entire family to a remote seaside town in New Zealand. Springtime on the Farm Channel 5, 8.00pm This is the first of five shows this week celebrating the “great British farmer”, with the help of Yorkshire Vet stars Peter Wright and Julian Norton, Adam Henson of Countryfile and Springwatch’s Lindsey Chapman. In this programme, they explore how to cope with the stresses of lambing. MasterChef: The Finals BBC One, 9.00pm Oodles of challenges lie ahead for the remaining amateur chefs in the final week, which takes them as far afield as Peru ahead of Friday’s concluding cook-off. First, though, they’re off to North Yorkshire to cater a country-house lunch for local grandees and farmers. Lisbon: An Art Lovers’ Guide BBC Four, 9.00pm Having covered Barcelona, St Petersburg and Amsterdam in their first series of city-break guides, historian Dr Janina Ramirez and art critic Alastair Sooke jet off to explore three less obvious, art-rich destinations. Beirut and Baku are perhaps the more intriguing but it opens in Lisbon, which built up its art reserves during the centuries Portugal was part of one of the world’s great empires, and currently boasts one of the hottest contemporary art scenes in Europe. GO Marcella ITV, 9.00pm This drama’s been a little less fraught the second time round but Marcella still pushes the boundaries of credibility. In this concluding part, the heroine (Anna Friel) tracks down the killer, only to suffer one of her unfortunate episodes. GO The Core (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.25pm Rome starts to crumble, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco collapses and pigeons go mental in Trafalgar Square. Something is obviously amiss, and this time it isn’t climate change. In fact, the Earth’s core has stopped rotating and a team of scientists has to build a special burrowing machine to start it spinning again. Hilary Swank, Stanley Tucci and Aaron Eckhart do their best, but the excitement is intermittent. The Emoji Movie (2017) ★☆☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.30pm In this animated comedy set inside a smartphone, Gene (voiced by T J Miller), an emoji with multiple facial features, sets out on a quest to be like his colleagues who have only one. He does so with the help of apps like Spotify and Candy Crush. Sadly, the result is so horrendous that there aren’t enough Patrick Stewart-voiced emojis in the world to express what an ugly, artless exercise this is. Triple 9 (2016) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A gang of criminals and corrupt cops plan to kill a police officer in order to pull off their biggest heist yet in John Hillcoat’s crime thriller. There is a lot to like here: a big opening and a strong cast (with Kate Winslet, Gal Gadot, Anthony Mackie and Chiwetel Ejiofor among them). But it feels like fragments of a great crime drama are missing; it’s enthralling up close, but then the big picture isn’t complete. Tuesday 10 April Back to school: Mark, who has two sons with autism Credit: Channel 4 Class of Mum and Dad Channel 4, 8.00pm Another week, another Channel 4 series about education. Hold off on the black marks, however, because this one is pretty good. The premise is simple: Blackrod Primary School just outside of Bolton has thrown open its doors to a class made up of pupils’ parents (and one grandparent). They’ve agreed to go back to school for the summer term to see what modern education is really like, sports day, Sats tests and all. Naturally, its harder than many of them were expecting – 36-year-old decorator Jonny states early on that he thought he’d be able to slope off for a swift cigarette break rather than having to adhere to strict class rules – but there are some touching stories amid the more obvious moments. Most notably, this opening episode focuses on two parents with challenging home lives – Julia, who is raising her 10-year-old cousin Asha after Asha’s mother died, and Mark, who has two autistic sons. While the parents’ travails are interesting, the children are the real scene-stealers, however, from those delighted that their mothers and fathers are taking part to those who are more sceptical. The pair of five-year-olds who spend their time corpsing in front of the camera are particularly endearing. Sarah Hughes Champions League Football: Manchester City v Liverpool BT Sport 2, 7.45pm The Etihad Stadium is the setting as City and Liverpool fight it out for a place in the semi-finals. Liverpool have the advantage following a 3-0 win at Anfield in the first leg. This Time Next Year ITV, 8.00pm Davina McCall returns with another set of heart-tugging stories of people attempting to transform their lives over the course of a year. First up are two new parents who dream of making life wonderful for their baby girl who has been deaf since birth and a couple desperate to start a family. Come Home BBC One, 9.00pm Danny Brocklehurst’s claustrophobic family drama comes to a head as we flashback to find out exactly what went wrong in Greg (Christopher Eccleston) and Marie’s (Paula Malcomson) marriage. Hospital BBC Two, 9.00pm The engrossing fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with Nottingham University Hospitals Trust struggling to cope with the new NHS ruling regarding the cancellation of all non-urgent surgery. The episode focuses on Val, a 55-year-old with mouth cancer whose surgeon is desperately trying to ensure that her operation goes ahead. Here and Now Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm With only two episodes left to go, Alan Ball’s family drama continues to tread water in the most frustrating ways. On paper, there are a whole bunch of interesting stories in the mix, from Kristen’s (Sosie Bacon) possible relationship with Navid (Marwan Salama) to Ramon’s (Daniel Zovatto) continuing visions, but the problem is nothing much happens with any of them as each story moves on only incrementally each week. In this episode, Audrey (Holly Hunter) finally turns the tables on the perpetually smug Greg (Tim Robbins). Cunk on Britain BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm Diane Morgan’s pitch-perfect send-up of history programmes moves to the Tudor era and beyond as Cunk takes on Henry VIII, aka “The kingiest king who kinged over Britain” before giving us her unique perspective on “Bloody” Mary Tudor (“horrible like the drink”) and Elizabeth I. SH Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The acerbic Sarah Jessica Parker sitcom has been firing on all cylinders throughout its second series – possibly because it’s more interesting watching Frances (Parker) and Robert (the excellent Thomas Haden Church) navigate life after divorce than it was watching them get there. Here, Frances tries to make a new contact in the art world. SH Speed (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm “There’s a bomb on the bus!” is the most famous line and basically the entire plot of one of the best action thrillers of the Nineties. The sizzling chemistry between LAPD Swat specialist Jack Traven (Keanu Reeves) and passenger Annie Porter (Sandra Bullock) sexes up the exhilarating action scenes, while Dennis Hopper is fantastically unhinged as a revenge-driven, retired bomb squad member turned terrorist. Fast & Furious 7 (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm Paul Walker was killed in a car crash part-way through making this film so it was completed with the help of his two younger brothers and some subtle computer graphics. The good news is that this is the best film in the franchise and does justice to Walker. It isn’t polished blockbuster film-making – though if it was, it wouldn’t be Fast & Furious. But it speaks straight to your adrenal glands. The Witches of Eastwick (1987) ★★★☆☆ Syfy, 9.00pm It is remarkable that director George Miller’s daft, unfettered romp of a film works at all. But, thanks to Jack Nicholson’s delicious overacting as Daryl Van Horne, a manic gentleman who closely resembles the devil, and the three gorgeous, single small-town friends, Alexandra (Cher), Jane (Susan Sarandon) and Sukie (Michelle Pfeiffer), who vie for his debased attentions, it somehow does. Wednesday 11 April Family ties: Edgar Ramirez and Penelope Cruz Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s been fascinating to discover the “true” story behind the 1997 murder of fhion designer Gianni Versace in Ryan Murphy’s glitzy drama, which has expertly depicted the inner world of the perpetrator, a Walter Mitty-style serial killer called Andrew Cunanan (a career-defining role for Darren Criss). This episode, however, has a mid-series lull about it as Cunanan ascends to the higher echelons of gay society, shaping himself meticulously into the posh, preppy eye-candy who saw a sugar daddy (or two) as his way to the top. Elsewhere, the Versace siblings return at last. Gianni (Edgar Ramirez), now in failing health decides to champion his insecure sister Donatella (Penélope Cruz in a frightful wig) and turns her into both designer and muse. Despite a lack of characters to root for – the Versaces’ moments of vulnerability dissolve into tedious histrionics and are eclipsed by Cunanan’s cold-blooded machinations – it’s all quite a fabulous mix of fashion, high society and brutal murder, with some interesting commentary on homophobia in the Nineties as well. Vicki Power The Secret Helpers BBC Two, 8.00pm Watch and weep as timid elderly widow Lesley begins a new life as an out gay woman in this life-affirming docu-series. She’s encouraged with warmth and wisdom by amateur “sages” from abroad, who talk to her secretly through a hidden earpiece. From World War to Cold War Yesterday, 8.00pm As the Second World War drew to a close, Churchill, Stalin and Roosevelt met at Yalta in the Crimea to broker post-war peace. This brisk two-part documentary raids the archives for clips and letters from those who attended, and gathers experts and relatives – including FDR’s grandson – to investigate power plays by Stalin that wrong-footed his Allied counterparts. It’s a detailed look at how and why the compromises reached at Yalta were quickly cast aside. Bacchus Uncovered: Ancient God of Ecstasy BBC Four, 9.00pm Historian Bettany Hughes continues to explore ancient civilisations, moving on to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine. Hughes’s odyssey starts under the City of London, where an 1,800-year-old Roman temple to Bacchus was discovered less than 100 years ago, and takes her to Greece, the Middle East and the Caucasus to explore the god’s roots and influence. VP Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Fluffy as candyfloss, this lewd seaside comedy provides some fun, particularly in the retro casting of stars of yesteryear. This week, an exuberant Sammy (Shane Richie) tries to persuade Monty (John Challis) that, after his successful comeback gig, he is ready for an evening slot. One Born Every Minute Channel 4, 9.00pm This feelgood documentary series brings more poignant tales from a Birmingham labour ward. This week we meet Chantell, about to deliver her third child, who regales us with a moving story of how parenthood with partner Phil has healed the wounds of a traumatic past. First Dates Channel 4, 10.00pm The thoughtful dating show pairs up four more couples, but the road to love is bumpy – septuagenarian Deanna finds her date more interested in the waiter than her. More promising is the match between Bianca and Teza, who allow their vulnerabilities to show. VP The Thin Red Line (1998) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 3.10pm This lyrical Second World War drama, directed by Terrence Malick, tells the story of a group of young US soldiers fighting the Japanese for control of the island of Guadalcanal. Full of stars such as Sean Penn and George Clooney, it struggles with its own battle to squeeze in so many characters but is still an atmospheric meditation on the nature of war. Nick Nolte and Adrien Brody also star. The Remains of the Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 3.55pm The success of Merchant Ivory’s adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Thirties-set novel, a well-observed study of regret, is built around its perfectly cast leads: Anthony Hopkins as James, the butler to the doltish aristocrat Lord Darlington (James Fox) and Emma Thompson as a housekeeper who tries to draw him out of his sterile shell. Lush visuals give it an added richness. Transporter 2 (2005) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A martial arts action sequel, in which Jason Statham and Alessandro Gassman are the sporadically thrilling stars. Statham is Frank Martin, who accepts a job as chauffeur to Jack (Hunter Clary), the son of Miami’s politician Jefferson Billings (Matthew Modine). But the local Colombian drug dealers aren’t happy with his boss’s efforts to clean up the city. Cue a kidnapping, and a potentially deadly encounter with a cocaine baron. Thursday 12 April Changing attitudes: Holly and Hollie Credit: BBC Living with the Brainy Bunch BBC Two, 8.00pm Enterprising, PR-conscious Ash Ali is headmaster of Chessington Community College, a fast-improving school with a few problem pupils. Among them are Jack and Hollie who, on the surface, are comically awful teenagers. Hollie gripes constantly, throws strops and storms out of classrooms if things aren’t going her way. Jack is sullen, lazy and has clocked up 15 suspensions in the past year. It will come as no surprise to regular viewers of such documentaries that their behaviour is rooted in low self-esteem, although their parents unquestionably indulge their foibles. Ali’s novel solution is to place Hollie with Holly, tapdancing head girl and gregarious boffin, and Jack with Tharush, a Sri Lankan immigrant by way of Italy, whose talents are only matched by his work ethic. Now that Jack and Hollie are in the bosom of new families for six weeks, it’s hoped that a new environment, greater discipline and rigid routines will see their results improve and attitudes pick up. There are setbacks on the largely familiar narrative trajectory, but it’s cast to perfection and, as a demonstration of the importance of parenting in academic achievement, the experiment gets an A-star. Gabriel Tate European Tour Golf: The Open de Espana Sky Sports Golf, 11.00am The opening day’s play of the event from the Centro Nacional de Golf in Madrid, which was won by Andrew Johnston the last time it was held in 2016. War Above the Trenches Yesterday, 8.00pm This decent two-parter tells the story of the Royal Flying Corps and their battle to win control of the air in the First World War. Based on Peter Hart’s book Bloody April, it draws affectingly on the testimony of veterans to show there was more to the Western Front than trench warfare. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm The modern age draws closer, as Simon Schama tackles the theme of radiance, guiding us through Gothic cathedrals, Baroque Venetian masterpieces and dazzling Japanese woodblock prints. The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm The second real-life case of the series sees Mark Williams-Thomas investigating the 1977 murders of three women in Glasgow. The suspect is Angus Sinclair, who is currently serving a life sentence for killing two other women that same year. We hear from his ex-wife, and learn how he was a prime suspect but escaped charges for the first killings when key evidence went missing. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm This diverting documentary series concludes with a Himalayan trek, a controversial article in the school newspaper and the GCSE retakes that were the goal of the entire enterprise. Will Alfie, Harry, Jack and co see their grades improve? Urban Myths: Marilyn Monroe and Billy Wilder Sky Arts, 9.00pm Sky Arts’ boldly cast series of vaguely apocryphal tales from the pop-culture frontlines returns with a dispatch from the set of Some Like It Hot, the magnificent 1959 comedy that is almost certainly more fun to watch than it was to make. In this minor but entertaining reimagining, Tony Curtis (Alex Pettyfer) is threatening to cuckold Arthur Miller (Dougray Scott) by making off with Marilyn Monroe (Gemma Arterton), whose caprice, drinking and sensitivity is driving director Billy Wilder (James Purefoy) to distraction. GT Still Game BBC One, 9.30pm; BBC Two Wales, 10.00pm Justifying its prime-time BBC One slot, the Scottish sitcom bows out in triumph with a typically well-wrought farce involving a Hollywood stuntman, a disastrous driving lesson and romance for the widowed Isa (Jane McCarry). GT The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Christopher Lee steals the show as the titular assassin, Francisco Scaramanga, in this classic Bond adventure. Roger Moore’s secret agent, in his second outing as 007, must pursue him, with the help of sidekick Mary Goodnight (Britt Ekland), to the villain’s island lair in order to prevent him harnessing the power of the Sun for evil. The confrontations between Moore and Lee are easily the film’s highlights. Swordfish (2001) ★★☆☆☆ TCM, 9.00pm The most often quoted bit of trivia about this film is that Halle Berry was paid an additional £500,000 to go topless. It’s rather lucky she agreed because she’s probably the most appealing aspect of this frenetic thriller. John Travolta and Hugh Jackman put on testosterone-fuelled displays as a morally dubious counter-terrorist agent and the hacker he blackmails into accessing billions of dollars of government money. Some Like It Hot (1959, b/w) ★★★★★ Sky Arts, 9.30pm When two musicians (Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis) witness a mob hit, they flee the state disguised as women in an all-female band, but further complications arise in the form of demure ukulele player Sugar Kane, superbly played by Marilyn Monroe. Billy Wilder’s classic comedy is effortlessly wacky and clever. Before, at 9pm, is Urban Myths, which imagines what happened on the set of this romcom. Friday 13 April Dishing out opinions: John Torode and Gregg Wallace Credit: BBC MasterChef: The Final BBC One, 8.30pm It has taken 25 episodes over seven weeks to whittle down the 56 amateur contestants to three finalists, and in the process, MasterChef 2018 has produced some of the best cooking – and some of the toughest competition – in the series’ long history. (It has been running in one form or another since 1990; and since 2005 in, roughly, its current format with judges Gregg Wallace and John Torode presenting.) This last week has been no exception, with the finalists having to dig deeper than ever to produce the best dishes of their lives and some great moments – notably during the spectacular trip to South America when they met Peruvian superchef Gaston Acurio and took on a service at the fifth best restaurant in the world, the Central in Lima, under Michelin-starred maestro Virgilio Martínez Véliz. In the finale, it’s all about who cooks the best food, though, as the final three return to the studio kitchen to undergo a test of culinary skills and nerve as they set about creating the most important three-course meal of their lives – in the hope of being judged worthy of a title that has launched many a great career: MasterChef champion. Gerard O’Donovan Chef’s Table: Pastry Netflix, from today This mouth-watering spin-off from Netflix’s popular global foodie series Chef’s Table puts the focus entirely on sweet stuff, talking the cameras inside the kitchens of some of the world’s best pastry chefs, among them Christina Tosi’s Milk Bar in New York, Corrado Assenza’s Caffé Sicilia in Noto, Sicily, Jordi Roca’s El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, and Will Goldfarb’s Room4Dessert in Bali. Lost in Space Netflix, from today Not so much a rerun as a spectacular new take on the classic Sixties sci-fi series about a family marooned in space when their ship runs into difficulty on their way to a new colony and crashes on an unknown and surprisingly hostile planet. There are plenty of thrills and impressive visual effects, and Toby Stephens and Molly Parker are excellent as the pioneering Robinson parents John and Judy, while Parker Posey is an enigmatic (and now female) Dr Smith. GO The City & The City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Cop thrillers don’t come much more weirdly dystopian than China Miéville’s award-winning 2009 novel and this ultra-stylish adaptation serves its source material very well. In episode two, Inspector Borlú (David Morrissey) ventures back across the border while investigating the murder of a foreign student. Episodes BBC Two, 10.00pm; Wales, 11.05pm Having overcome last week’s unfortunate episode in this sitcom, Matt (Matt LeBlanc) is back on top and leveraging his spurt in the ratings for all it’s worth, handing Sean (Stephen Mangan) and Beverly (Tamsin Greig) a welcome opportunity for escape. Lee and Dean Channel 4, 10.00pm More rough charm, as life gets complicated for Stevenage’s very own Dumb and Dumber when Lee’s (Miles Chapman) financial worries mount and Dean (Mark O’Sullivan) is persuaded to premiere his poetry at the local arts club. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm Freedom of speech and censorship are under the spotlight as host Mary Beard and guests discuss Theatre Clwyd’s production The Assassination of Katie Hopkins and former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s new book Fascism: A Warning. GO Alien: Covenant (2017) ★★★★★ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm The latest film in the Alien saga from Ridley Scott is arguably a mad scientist movie. It follows the crew of the colony ship Covenant (including Katherine Waterson) as they discover what they think is an uncharted paradise, but what they uncover a threat beyond their imagination. Michael Fassbender puts in a spectacular turn as kindly robot David and his twisted “brother” Walter. Invictus (2009) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.45pm Following the death of Nelson Mandela’s ex-wife Winnie last week, aged 81, here’s Clint Eastwood’s take on South Africa’s World Cup victory in 1995. As the country emerges from apartheid, the newly elected President Mandela (an uncanny Morgan Freeman) sees the potential for the national rugby team, led by François Pienaar (Matt Damon), to be a catalyst for harmony. This is a polished and uplifting film. Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982) ★★★★☆ Gold, 1.40am Much like the Secret Policeman’s Ball, this comedy performance film sees the Monty Python gang take to the stage, but this time they’re in Hollywood. Among the sketches are the Silly Olympics, where athletes compete in absurd sports, The Lumberjack Song, and The Ministry of Silly Walks. This film also features Carol Cleveland in numerous supporting roles. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Saturday 7 April Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm It can’t be easy hosting a show as exuberant as Saturday Night Takeaway on your own but Declan Donnelly made a solid if understandably restrained go of it last week. He ensured that the light entertainment series proceeded pretty much as normal in the absence of long-time work partner Ant McPartlin, whose travails were sensibly referenced only in very brief passing (“I’ve got twice the amount of work to do,” Donnelly noted at one point before mock-berating the production crew that “I’ll have to do it myself, like everything else around here this week”). That said, this final episode ups the ante as Donnelly takes the show on the road to the Universal Orlando Resort in Florida. Once there we’re promised a “super-sized” edition featuring stunts, surprises and “extra-special” guests. No word yet as to who those guests will be but expect Donnelly to continue making the best of a difficult situation, buoyed by extra support from Scarlett Moffatt, who is in charge of ensuring that the Place on the Plane winners have a wonderful time, and Stephen Mulhern, who has the possibly less than enviable task of explaining In for a Penny to an American audience. Sarah Hughes Premier League Football: Everton v Liverpool Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30pm Tired, perhaps, from their Champions League quarter-final first leg against Man City, Liverpool face their bitter local rivals Everton at Goodison Park. The home side, who’ve won three of their last six games, haven’t beaten Liverpool since October 2010, when Tim Cahill and Mikel Arteta gave them a 2-0 victory. Premiership Rugby Union: Bath v Leicester Tigers Channel 5, 1.30pm Time was when Bath and Leicester were the titans of English rugby. Currently they are fifth and eighth in the league, respectively. In September, Bath claimed a 27-23 win at Welford Road, as they held on for their first away win at Leicester since 2003, ensuring an unhappy return for George Ford against the club he left in the summer. The two sides also met in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at the Recreation Ground in November, where Bath also emerged victorious, beating Leicester 33-31 on that occasion. Premier League Football: Manchester City v Manchester United Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm What better way for Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City to clinch the title than by beating second-placed Manchester United at the Etihad Stadium. Sixteen points ahead of them in the table, City have been formidable this season, winning 27 of the 31 league games they’ve played. One of those victories came at Old Trafford, with a goal from Nicolas Otamendi giving City a 2-1 victory when these sides met in December. Britain’s Most Historic Towns Channel 4, 8.00pm Alice Roberts is our guide for this new six-part series, which sees her search the UK for the places that best sum up an historical era. The first era is Roman Britain, so Roberts heads to Chester, where she abseils down walls, hunkers in caves and uncovers the truth about the city. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm The medical drama’s storyline about Dylan’s (William Beck) alcoholism continues to be sensitively handled as the medic’s ex-wife Sam (Charlotte Salt) worries about whether she can help him. Meanwhile, Ethan (George Hardy) struggles with his own demons as he realises that a patient is related to his brother’s killer. The Voice UK: Live Final ITV, 8.30pm Every reality TV idea has an allotted shelf life and it’s hard not to feel that musical talent contests have come to the end of their run. For those who disagree, The Voice UK’s grand finale is here and the final four battle it out for public approval. Below the Surface BBC Four, 9.00pm & 9.45pm BBC Four’s latest Scandi drama started off tensely but like its predecessor, Modus, it has gone on to become ever more ludicrous. Now it’s the final two episodes, and Philip Norgaard (Johannes Lassen) faces off against Mark (Jakob Oftebro), the man behind the hostage crisis. Much heartfelt talking follows, although you may end up feeling more sympathetic towards the damaged Mark than the chilly Norgaard. Pearl Jam: Let’s Play Two Sky Arts, 9.00pm When is a music documentary not a music documentary? When it’s also a sports film. This exuberant film, which was made following the Chicago Cubs’ victory in baseball’s World Series in 2016, follows die-hard Cubs fan and Pearl Jam lead singer Eddie Vedder as he cheers on his team during their championship run while also preparing the band for two August shows at the team’s Wrigley Field Stadium. The result is an affectionate portrait of the singer as fan. SH Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm David Farr’s epic series reaches its climax with the arrival of the most famous horse in history. After an uninspiring start, Troy has picked up in recent weeks and the final episode is a well-handled tale of betrayal and death. It’s a curate’s egg of a series, let down by poor casting. SH X-Men (2000) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm Bryan Singer directs an all-star cast that includes Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, Ian McKellen and Halle Berry, in the first of the X-Men franchise. A group of mutants must decide whether to side with Professor Xavier (Stewart) or the evil Magneto (McKellen) in what is a solid opening to the series and which paved the way for plenty of big-budget sequels. This is followed by X-Men 2 and X-Men 3 at 9.00pm and 11.35pm respectively. Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and this inconsistency leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Lethal Weapon 2 (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm Mel Gibson sports his signature Eighties mullet in the second film of this daft-but-fun action franchise. LAPD officer Riggs (Gibson) teams up once again with his partner Murtaugh (Danny Glover) to track down a band of South African criminals while protecting a painfully frenzied witness (Joe Pesci). Naturally, the pair find themselves drawn into violent action sequences orchestrated by stereotypical bad guys. Sunday 8 April Hostess with the mostest: Catherine Tate presents the awards Credit: ITV The Olivier Awards 2018 ITV, 10.20pm Last year, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child swept the board with nine Olivier Awards, something that looked impossible to top. But then came Lin Manuel Miranda’s blockbuster musical Hamilton, whose West End run has received reviews every bit as rapturous as those from its Broadway debut. The show has a record-breaking 13 nominations, which it is thought will be translated into awards. After being snubbed for Jerusalem, Jez Butterworth will surely be rewarded for his equally magisterial play The Ferryman (its eight nominations include best play and best director for Sam Mendes), while contenders in the acting categories include Bryan Cranston for Network, Andrew Garfield for Angels in America and Lesley Manville for Long Day’s Journey into Night. Catherine Tate will be on hosting duties for the event at the Royal Albert Hall, which will, as usual, feature a crop of stellar performances; this one will include a special tribute to Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, which turns 50 this year. Let’s hope the organisers bring together Josephs of the past for a big singalong: Jason Donovan, Phillip Schofield, Ian “H” Watkins and Lee Mead will all, one suspects, be available. Gabriel Tate Sex Robots and Us BBC Three, from 10.00am James Young, an amputee who created his own bionic arm, meets the people who design sex robots and hears about their plans for them, from being given to old people’s homes to “employment” in brothels. But is it the harmless, even socially responsible pursuit thatthey claim? Formula 1: The Bahrain Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 3.30pm After the Australian Grand Prix – in which Sebastian Vettel took advantage of a safety-car blunder to win under pristine Melbourne skies – attention turns to the second round of the season at the Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir. Another blunder cost Lewis Hamilton on this circuit last year – this time it happened in the pit lane, with Vettel capitalising to win by 6.6 seconds. The Generation Game BBC One, 8.00pm How do you top last week’s cavalcade of silliness in this rebooted game show? You rope in Danny Dyer to join Mel Giedroyc, Sue Perkins and panellists Melvin Odoom and Roisin Conaty for challenges that include cake decorating, balloon modelling and dancing the Argentine Tango. The Durrells ITV, 8.00pm In the fourth episode of the popular drama, Larry (Josh O’Connor) visits Athens with two oddly named guests – Captain Creech (James Cosmo) and Prince Jeejeebuoy (Tanmay Dhanania) – in tow. There, they offer advice to Gerry (Milo Parker), who is applying for a new school. Jesus’ Female Disciples: the New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm For centuries, the birth of Christianity was regarded as a largely male affair, with women as only bit-part players. Now, Bible experts Helen Bond and Joan Taylor have discovered evidence that women were involved in everything from preaching and baptising to funding the movement as it grew. This absorbing documentary follows the historians’ progress. Golf: The Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00pm Prepare for a dramatic finale as this year’s first Major – from the Augusta National in Georgia – concludes. Last year, Spain’s Sergio Garcia won the coveted green jacket, beating Justin Rose in a tense play-off. Ordeal by Innocence BBC One, 9.00pm Sarah Phelps’s splendid adaptation continues, as Arthur Calgary (Luke Treadaway) resolves to prove the truth about Jack Argyll’s (Anthony Boyle) alibi by any means necessary. GT Folk Awards 2018 BBC Four, 9.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Julie Fowlis introduce highlights from this year’s Radio 2 Folk Awards in Belfast. It features performances from Cara Dillon, Lankum and Eliza Carthy and the Wayward Band. The great Nick Drake will also be inducted into the Hall of Fame, his genius long-established, even if such recognition eluded him during his short life. Producer Dónal Lunny, meanwhile, receives the Lifetime Achievement Award for decades of tireless work promoting the renaissance in Irish music, plus The Armagh Pipers Club are presented with the Good Tradition Award. GT Emma (1996) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 3.00pm Gwyneth Paltrow’s American iciness melts in this deft adaptation of Jane Austen’s classic comic romance. She is Emma Woodhouse, spoilt, charming and an inveterate meddler. Only Mr George Knightley (Jeremy Northam) dares challenge her behaviour – but what are his motives? A clever film with a superb supporting cast, including Toni Collette, Alan Cumming and Ewan McGregor. United 93 (2006) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 9.55pm Director Paul Greengrass’s boneshaking, real-time take on the final hours of the United Airlines plane whose passengers rebelled against their hijackers on September 11, 2001 feels uncomfortably realistic. Greengrass, whose signature rapid cutting made the second and third Bourne films so exciting, proves expert at handling the most infamous atrocity of modern times with intelligence and sobriety. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.00pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. Monday 9 April I spy: a recruit sees if she’s got what it takes to be an SOE agent Credit: BBC Secret Agent Selection: WW2 BBC Two, 9.00pm Not unlike Channel 4’s SAS: Who Dares Wins and BBC Two’s Astronauts: Do You Have What It Takes?, this absorbing new series puts a group of recruits through a series of gruelling physical and psychological challenges to see if they could make the grade as a secret agent according to an established selection test used during the Second World War. This test was used by the Special Operations Executive (SOE) to determine whether recruits from many different walks of life would be capable of being dropped behind enemy lines and surviving as a covert officer with a brief to cause the maximum disruption possible to the enemy in the territory. As with the original SOE, the 14 candidates come from diverse backgrounds (among them a research scientist, a property developer, former police officer, a drag act performer, a retired investment banker and an Army veteran). In the opening episode, they undergo the initial four-day assessment at a remote Scottish country-house estate. The aim is to winnow out weakness and determine who should win a place on the advanced, and suitably terrifying, course in assassination, sabotage and covert intelligence techniques. Gerard O’Donovan Famalam BBC Three, from 10.00am After a successful pilot last year, Vivienne Acheampong, Gbemisola Ikumelo, Roxanne Sternberg, Tom Moutchi and John MacMillan return with more culturally skewed sketches. Once again, they feature William and Funke’s raunchy chat show, misunderstood superhero Eclipse, Croydon’s voodoo practitioner Professor Lofuko, and a version of Midsomer Murders. 800 Words BBC One, 2.15pm If you like The Durrells you will definitely want to watch hit Australian comedy drama 800 Words. This gently funny series follows George (Erik Thomson), a widower, who horrifies his teenaged children when he moves the entire family to a remote seaside town in New Zealand. Springtime on the Farm Channel 5, 8.00pm This is the first of five shows this week celebrating the “great British farmer”, with the help of Yorkshire Vet stars Peter Wright and Julian Norton, Adam Henson of Countryfile and Springwatch’s Lindsey Chapman. In this programme, they explore how to cope with the stresses of lambing. MasterChef: The Finals BBC One, 9.00pm Oodles of challenges lie ahead for the remaining amateur chefs in the final week, which takes them as far afield as Peru ahead of Friday’s concluding cook-off. First, though, they’re off to North Yorkshire to cater a country-house lunch for local grandees and farmers. Lisbon: An Art Lovers’ Guide BBC Four, 9.00pm Having covered Barcelona, St Petersburg and Amsterdam in their first series of city-break guides, historian Dr Janina Ramirez and art critic Alastair Sooke jet off to explore three less obvious, art-rich destinations. Beirut and Baku are perhaps the more intriguing but it opens in Lisbon, which built up its art reserves during the centuries Portugal was part of one of the world’s great empires, and currently boasts one of the hottest contemporary art scenes in Europe. GO Marcella ITV, 9.00pm This drama’s been a little less fraught the second time round but Marcella still pushes the boundaries of credibility. In this concluding part, the heroine (Anna Friel) tracks down the killer, only to suffer one of her unfortunate episodes. GO The Core (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.25pm Rome starts to crumble, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco collapses and pigeons go mental in Trafalgar Square. Something is obviously amiss, and this time it isn’t climate change. In fact, the Earth’s core has stopped rotating and a team of scientists has to build a special burrowing machine to start it spinning again. Hilary Swank, Stanley Tucci and Aaron Eckhart do their best, but the excitement is intermittent. The Emoji Movie (2017) ★☆☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.30pm In this animated comedy set inside a smartphone, Gene (voiced by T J Miller), an emoji with multiple facial features, sets out on a quest to be like his colleagues who have only one. He does so with the help of apps like Spotify and Candy Crush. Sadly, the result is so horrendous that there aren’t enough Patrick Stewart-voiced emojis in the world to express what an ugly, artless exercise this is. Triple 9 (2016) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A gang of criminals and corrupt cops plan to kill a police officer in order to pull off their biggest heist yet in John Hillcoat’s crime thriller. There is a lot to like here: a big opening and a strong cast (with Kate Winslet, Gal Gadot, Anthony Mackie and Chiwetel Ejiofor among them). But it feels like fragments of a great crime drama are missing; it’s enthralling up close, but then the big picture isn’t complete. Tuesday 10 April Back to school: Mark, who has two sons with autism Credit: Channel 4 Class of Mum and Dad Channel 4, 8.00pm Another week, another Channel 4 series about education. Hold off on the black marks, however, because this one is pretty good. The premise is simple: Blackrod Primary School just outside of Bolton has thrown open its doors to a class made up of pupils’ parents (and one grandparent). They’ve agreed to go back to school for the summer term to see what modern education is really like, sports day, Sats tests and all. Naturally, its harder than many of them were expecting – 36-year-old decorator Jonny states early on that he thought he’d be able to slope off for a swift cigarette break rather than having to adhere to strict class rules – but there are some touching stories amid the more obvious moments. Most notably, this opening episode focuses on two parents with challenging home lives – Julia, who is raising her 10-year-old cousin Asha after Asha’s mother died, and Mark, who has two autistic sons. While the parents’ travails are interesting, the children are the real scene-stealers, however, from those delighted that their mothers and fathers are taking part to those who are more sceptical. The pair of five-year-olds who spend their time corpsing in front of the camera are particularly endearing. Sarah Hughes Champions League Football: Manchester City v Liverpool BT Sport 2, 7.45pm The Etihad Stadium is the setting as City and Liverpool fight it out for a place in the semi-finals. Liverpool have the advantage following a 3-0 win at Anfield in the first leg. This Time Next Year ITV, 8.00pm Davina McCall returns with another set of heart-tugging stories of people attempting to transform their lives over the course of a year. First up are two new parents who dream of making life wonderful for their baby girl who has been deaf since birth and a couple desperate to start a family. Come Home BBC One, 9.00pm Danny Brocklehurst’s claustrophobic family drama comes to a head as we flashback to find out exactly what went wrong in Greg (Christopher Eccleston) and Marie’s (Paula Malcomson) marriage. Hospital BBC Two, 9.00pm The engrossing fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with Nottingham University Hospitals Trust struggling to cope with the new NHS ruling regarding the cancellation of all non-urgent surgery. The episode focuses on Val, a 55-year-old with mouth cancer whose surgeon is desperately trying to ensure that her operation goes ahead. Here and Now Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm With only two episodes left to go, Alan Ball’s family drama continues to tread water in the most frustrating ways. On paper, there are a whole bunch of interesting stories in the mix, from Kristen’s (Sosie Bacon) possible relationship with Navid (Marwan Salama) to Ramon’s (Daniel Zovatto) continuing visions, but the problem is nothing much happens with any of them as each story moves on only incrementally each week. In this episode, Audrey (Holly Hunter) finally turns the tables on the perpetually smug Greg (Tim Robbins). Cunk on Britain BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm Diane Morgan’s pitch-perfect send-up of history programmes moves to the Tudor era and beyond as Cunk takes on Henry VIII, aka “The kingiest king who kinged over Britain” before giving us her unique perspective on “Bloody” Mary Tudor (“horrible like the drink”) and Elizabeth I. SH Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The acerbic Sarah Jessica Parker sitcom has been firing on all cylinders throughout its second series – possibly because it’s more interesting watching Frances (Parker) and Robert (the excellent Thomas Haden Church) navigate life after divorce than it was watching them get there. Here, Frances tries to make a new contact in the art world. SH Speed (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm “There’s a bomb on the bus!” is the most famous line and basically the entire plot of one of the best action thrillers of the Nineties. The sizzling chemistry between LAPD Swat specialist Jack Traven (Keanu Reeves) and passenger Annie Porter (Sandra Bullock) sexes up the exhilarating action scenes, while Dennis Hopper is fantastically unhinged as a revenge-driven, retired bomb squad member turned terrorist. Fast & Furious 7 (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm Paul Walker was killed in a car crash part-way through making this film so it was completed with the help of his two younger brothers and some subtle computer graphics. The good news is that this is the best film in the franchise and does justice to Walker. It isn’t polished blockbuster film-making – though if it was, it wouldn’t be Fast & Furious. But it speaks straight to your adrenal glands. The Witches of Eastwick (1987) ★★★☆☆ Syfy, 9.00pm It is remarkable that director George Miller’s daft, unfettered romp of a film works at all. But, thanks to Jack Nicholson’s delicious overacting as Daryl Van Horne, a manic gentleman who closely resembles the devil, and the three gorgeous, single small-town friends, Alexandra (Cher), Jane (Susan Sarandon) and Sukie (Michelle Pfeiffer), who vie for his debased attentions, it somehow does. Wednesday 11 April Family ties: Edgar Ramirez and Penelope Cruz Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s been fascinating to discover the “true” story behind the 1997 murder of fhion designer Gianni Versace in Ryan Murphy’s glitzy drama, which has expertly depicted the inner world of the perpetrator, a Walter Mitty-style serial killer called Andrew Cunanan (a career-defining role for Darren Criss). This episode, however, has a mid-series lull about it as Cunanan ascends to the higher echelons of gay society, shaping himself meticulously into the posh, preppy eye-candy who saw a sugar daddy (or two) as his way to the top. Elsewhere, the Versace siblings return at last. Gianni (Edgar Ramirez), now in failing health decides to champion his insecure sister Donatella (Penélope Cruz in a frightful wig) and turns her into both designer and muse. Despite a lack of characters to root for – the Versaces’ moments of vulnerability dissolve into tedious histrionics and are eclipsed by Cunanan’s cold-blooded machinations – it’s all quite a fabulous mix of fashion, high society and brutal murder, with some interesting commentary on homophobia in the Nineties as well. Vicki Power The Secret Helpers BBC Two, 8.00pm Watch and weep as timid elderly widow Lesley begins a new life as an out gay woman in this life-affirming docu-series. She’s encouraged with warmth and wisdom by amateur “sages” from abroad, who talk to her secretly through a hidden earpiece. From World War to Cold War Yesterday, 8.00pm As the Second World War drew to a close, Churchill, Stalin and Roosevelt met at Yalta in the Crimea to broker post-war peace. This brisk two-part documentary raids the archives for clips and letters from those who attended, and gathers experts and relatives – including FDR’s grandson – to investigate power plays by Stalin that wrong-footed his Allied counterparts. It’s a detailed look at how and why the compromises reached at Yalta were quickly cast aside. Bacchus Uncovered: Ancient God of Ecstasy BBC Four, 9.00pm Historian Bettany Hughes continues to explore ancient civilisations, moving on to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine. Hughes’s odyssey starts under the City of London, where an 1,800-year-old Roman temple to Bacchus was discovered less than 100 years ago, and takes her to Greece, the Middle East and the Caucasus to explore the god’s roots and influence. VP Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Fluffy as candyfloss, this lewd seaside comedy provides some fun, particularly in the retro casting of stars of yesteryear. This week, an exuberant Sammy (Shane Richie) tries to persuade Monty (John Challis) that, after his successful comeback gig, he is ready for an evening slot. One Born Every Minute Channel 4, 9.00pm This feelgood documentary series brings more poignant tales from a Birmingham labour ward. This week we meet Chantell, about to deliver her third child, who regales us with a moving story of how parenthood with partner Phil has healed the wounds of a traumatic past. First Dates Channel 4, 10.00pm The thoughtful dating show pairs up four more couples, but the road to love is bumpy – septuagenarian Deanna finds her date more interested in the waiter than her. More promising is the match between Bianca and Teza, who allow their vulnerabilities to show. VP The Thin Red Line (1998) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 3.10pm This lyrical Second World War drama, directed by Terrence Malick, tells the story of a group of young US soldiers fighting the Japanese for control of the island of Guadalcanal. Full of stars such as Sean Penn and George Clooney, it struggles with its own battle to squeeze in so many characters but is still an atmospheric meditation on the nature of war. Nick Nolte and Adrien Brody also star. The Remains of the Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 3.55pm The success of Merchant Ivory’s adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Thirties-set novel, a well-observed study of regret, is built around its perfectly cast leads: Anthony Hopkins as James, the butler to the doltish aristocrat Lord Darlington (James Fox) and Emma Thompson as a housekeeper who tries to draw him out of his sterile shell. Lush visuals give it an added richness. Transporter 2 (2005) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A martial arts action sequel, in which Jason Statham and Alessandro Gassman are the sporadically thrilling stars. Statham is Frank Martin, who accepts a job as chauffeur to Jack (Hunter Clary), the son of Miami’s politician Jefferson Billings (Matthew Modine). But the local Colombian drug dealers aren’t happy with his boss’s efforts to clean up the city. Cue a kidnapping, and a potentially deadly encounter with a cocaine baron. Thursday 12 April Changing attitudes: Holly and Hollie Credit: BBC Living with the Brainy Bunch BBC Two, 8.00pm Enterprising, PR-conscious Ash Ali is headmaster of Chessington Community College, a fast-improving school with a few problem pupils. Among them are Jack and Hollie who, on the surface, are comically awful teenagers. Hollie gripes constantly, throws strops and storms out of classrooms if things aren’t going her way. Jack is sullen, lazy and has clocked up 15 suspensions in the past year. It will come as no surprise to regular viewers of such documentaries that their behaviour is rooted in low self-esteem, although their parents unquestionably indulge their foibles. Ali’s novel solution is to place Hollie with Holly, tapdancing head girl and gregarious boffin, and Jack with Tharush, a Sri Lankan immigrant by way of Italy, whose talents are only matched by his work ethic. Now that Jack and Hollie are in the bosom of new families for six weeks, it’s hoped that a new environment, greater discipline and rigid routines will see their results improve and attitudes pick up. There are setbacks on the largely familiar narrative trajectory, but it’s cast to perfection and, as a demonstration of the importance of parenting in academic achievement, the experiment gets an A-star. Gabriel Tate European Tour Golf: The Open de Espana Sky Sports Golf, 11.00am The opening day’s play of the event from the Centro Nacional de Golf in Madrid, which was won by Andrew Johnston the last time it was held in 2016. War Above the Trenches Yesterday, 8.00pm This decent two-parter tells the story of the Royal Flying Corps and their battle to win control of the air in the First World War. Based on Peter Hart’s book Bloody April, it draws affectingly on the testimony of veterans to show there was more to the Western Front than trench warfare. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm The modern age draws closer, as Simon Schama tackles the theme of radiance, guiding us through Gothic cathedrals, Baroque Venetian masterpieces and dazzling Japanese woodblock prints. The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm The second real-life case of the series sees Mark Williams-Thomas investigating the 1977 murders of three women in Glasgow. The suspect is Angus Sinclair, who is currently serving a life sentence for killing two other women that same year. We hear from his ex-wife, and learn how he was a prime suspect but escaped charges for the first killings when key evidence went missing. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm This diverting documentary series concludes with a Himalayan trek, a controversial article in the school newspaper and the GCSE retakes that were the goal of the entire enterprise. Will Alfie, Harry, Jack and co see their grades improve? Urban Myths: Marilyn Monroe and Billy Wilder Sky Arts, 9.00pm Sky Arts’ boldly cast series of vaguely apocryphal tales from the pop-culture frontlines returns with a dispatch from the set of Some Like It Hot, the magnificent 1959 comedy that is almost certainly more fun to watch than it was to make. In this minor but entertaining reimagining, Tony Curtis (Alex Pettyfer) is threatening to cuckold Arthur Miller (Dougray Scott) by making off with Marilyn Monroe (Gemma Arterton), whose caprice, drinking and sensitivity is driving director Billy Wilder (James Purefoy) to distraction. GT Still Game BBC One, 9.30pm; BBC Two Wales, 10.00pm Justifying its prime-time BBC One slot, the Scottish sitcom bows out in triumph with a typically well-wrought farce involving a Hollywood stuntman, a disastrous driving lesson and romance for the widowed Isa (Jane McCarry). GT The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Christopher Lee steals the show as the titular assassin, Francisco Scaramanga, in this classic Bond adventure. Roger Moore’s secret agent, in his second outing as 007, must pursue him, with the help of sidekick Mary Goodnight (Britt Ekland), to the villain’s island lair in order to prevent him harnessing the power of the Sun for evil. The confrontations between Moore and Lee are easily the film’s highlights. Swordfish (2001) ★★☆☆☆ TCM, 9.00pm The most often quoted bit of trivia about this film is that Halle Berry was paid an additional £500,000 to go topless. It’s rather lucky she agreed because she’s probably the most appealing aspect of this frenetic thriller. John Travolta and Hugh Jackman put on testosterone-fuelled displays as a morally dubious counter-terrorist agent and the hacker he blackmails into accessing billions of dollars of government money. Some Like It Hot (1959, b/w) ★★★★★ Sky Arts, 9.30pm When two musicians (Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis) witness a mob hit, they flee the state disguised as women in an all-female band, but further complications arise in the form of demure ukulele player Sugar Kane, superbly played by Marilyn Monroe. Billy Wilder’s classic comedy is effortlessly wacky and clever. Before, at 9pm, is Urban Myths, which imagines what happened on the set of this romcom. Friday 13 April Dishing out opinions: John Torode and Gregg Wallace Credit: BBC MasterChef: The Final BBC One, 8.30pm It has taken 25 episodes over seven weeks to whittle down the 56 amateur contestants to three finalists, and in the process, MasterChef 2018 has produced some of the best cooking – and some of the toughest competition – in the series’ long history. (It has been running in one form or another since 1990; and since 2005 in, roughly, its current format with judges Gregg Wallace and John Torode presenting.) This last week has been no exception, with the finalists having to dig deeper than ever to produce the best dishes of their lives and some great moments – notably during the spectacular trip to South America when they met Peruvian superchef Gaston Acurio and took on a service at the fifth best restaurant in the world, the Central in Lima, under Michelin-starred maestro Virgilio Martínez Véliz. In the finale, it’s all about who cooks the best food, though, as the final three return to the studio kitchen to undergo a test of culinary skills and nerve as they set about creating the most important three-course meal of their lives – in the hope of being judged worthy of a title that has launched many a great career: MasterChef champion. Gerard O’Donovan Chef’s Table: Pastry Netflix, from today This mouth-watering spin-off from Netflix’s popular global foodie series Chef’s Table puts the focus entirely on sweet stuff, talking the cameras inside the kitchens of some of the world’s best pastry chefs, among them Christina Tosi’s Milk Bar in New York, Corrado Assenza’s Caffé Sicilia in Noto, Sicily, Jordi Roca’s El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, and Will Goldfarb’s Room4Dessert in Bali. Lost in Space Netflix, from today Not so much a rerun as a spectacular new take on the classic Sixties sci-fi series about a family marooned in space when their ship runs into difficulty on their way to a new colony and crashes on an unknown and surprisingly hostile planet. There are plenty of thrills and impressive visual effects, and Toby Stephens and Molly Parker are excellent as the pioneering Robinson parents John and Judy, while Parker Posey is an enigmatic (and now female) Dr Smith. GO The City & The City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Cop thrillers don’t come much more weirdly dystopian than China Miéville’s award-winning 2009 novel and this ultra-stylish adaptation serves its source material very well. In episode two, Inspector Borlú (David Morrissey) ventures back across the border while investigating the murder of a foreign student. Episodes BBC Two, 10.00pm; Wales, 11.05pm Having overcome last week’s unfortunate episode in this sitcom, Matt (Matt LeBlanc) is back on top and leveraging his spurt in the ratings for all it’s worth, handing Sean (Stephen Mangan) and Beverly (Tamsin Greig) a welcome opportunity for escape. Lee and Dean Channel 4, 10.00pm More rough charm, as life gets complicated for Stevenage’s very own Dumb and Dumber when Lee’s (Miles Chapman) financial worries mount and Dean (Mark O’Sullivan) is persuaded to premiere his poetry at the local arts club. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm Freedom of speech and censorship are under the spotlight as host Mary Beard and guests discuss Theatre Clwyd’s production The Assassination of Katie Hopkins and former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s new book Fascism: A Warning. GO Alien: Covenant (2017) ★★★★★ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm The latest film in the Alien saga from Ridley Scott is arguably a mad scientist movie. It follows the crew of the colony ship Covenant (including Katherine Waterson) as they discover what they think is an uncharted paradise, but what they uncover a threat beyond their imagination. Michael Fassbender puts in a spectacular turn as kindly robot David and his twisted “brother” Walter. Invictus (2009) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.45pm Following the death of Nelson Mandela’s ex-wife Winnie last week, aged 81, here’s Clint Eastwood’s take on South Africa’s World Cup victory in 1995. As the country emerges from apartheid, the newly elected President Mandela (an uncanny Morgan Freeman) sees the potential for the national rugby team, led by François Pienaar (Matt Damon), to be a catalyst for harmony. This is a polished and uplifting film. Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982) ★★★★☆ Gold, 1.40am Much like the Secret Policeman’s Ball, this comedy performance film sees the Monty Python gang take to the stage, but this time they’re in Hollywood. Among the sketches are the Silly Olympics, where athletes compete in absurd sports, The Lumberjack Song, and The Ministry of Silly Walks. This film also features Carol Cleveland in numerous supporting roles. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: Dec goes solo again for the last Saturday Night Takeaway, plus The Voice final
Saturday 7 April Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm It can’t be easy hosting a show as exuberant as Saturday Night Takeaway on your own but Declan Donnelly made a solid if understandably restrained go of it last week. He ensured that the light entertainment series proceeded pretty much as normal in the absence of long-time work partner Ant McPartlin, whose travails were sensibly referenced only in very brief passing (“I’ve got twice the amount of work to do,” Donnelly noted at one point before mock-berating the production crew that “I’ll have to do it myself, like everything else around here this week”). That said, this final episode ups the ante as Donnelly takes the show on the road to the Universal Orlando Resort in Florida. Once there we’re promised a “super-sized” edition featuring stunts, surprises and “extra-special” guests. No word yet as to who those guests will be but expect Donnelly to continue making the best of a difficult situation, buoyed by extra support from Scarlett Moffatt, who is in charge of ensuring that the Place on the Plane winners have a wonderful time, and Stephen Mulhern, who has the possibly less than enviable task of explaining In for a Penny to an American audience. Sarah Hughes Premier League Football: Everton v Liverpool Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30pm Tired, perhaps, from their Champions League quarter-final first leg against Man City, Liverpool face their bitter local rivals Everton at Goodison Park. The home side, who’ve won three of their last six games, haven’t beaten Liverpool since October 2010, when Tim Cahill and Mikel Arteta gave them a 2-0 victory. Premiership Rugby Union: Bath v Leicester Tigers Channel 5, 1.30pm Time was when Bath and Leicester were the titans of English rugby. Currently they are fifth and eighth in the league, respectively. In September, Bath claimed a 27-23 win at Welford Road, as they held on for their first away win at Leicester since 2003, ensuring an unhappy return for George Ford against the club he left in the summer. The two sides also met in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at the Recreation Ground in November, where Bath also emerged victorious, beating Leicester 33-31 on that occasion. Premier League Football: Manchester City v Manchester United Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm What better way for Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City to clinch the title than by beating second-placed Manchester United at the Etihad Stadium. Sixteen points ahead of them in the table, City have been formidable this season, winning 27 of the 31 league games they’ve played. One of those victories came at Old Trafford, with a goal from Nicolas Otamendi giving City a 2-1 victory when these sides met in December. Britain’s Most Historic Towns Channel 4, 8.00pm Alice Roberts is our guide for this new six-part series, which sees her search the UK for the places that best sum up an historical era. The first era is Roman Britain, so Roberts heads to Chester, where she abseils down walls, hunkers in caves and uncovers the truth about the city. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm The medical drama’s storyline about Dylan’s (William Beck) alcoholism continues to be sensitively handled as the medic’s ex-wife Sam (Charlotte Salt) worries about whether she can help him. Meanwhile, Ethan (George Hardy) struggles with his own demons as he realises that a patient is related to his brother’s killer. The Voice UK: Live Final ITV, 8.30pm Every reality TV idea has an allotted shelf life and it’s hard not to feel that musical talent contests have come to the end of their run. For those who disagree, The Voice UK’s grand finale is here and the final four battle it out for public approval. Below the Surface BBC Four, 9.00pm & 9.45pm BBC Four’s latest Scandi drama started off tensely but like its predecessor, Modus, it has gone on to become ever more ludicrous. Now it’s the final two episodes, and Philip Norgaard (Johannes Lassen) faces off against Mark (Jakob Oftebro), the man behind the hostage crisis. Much heartfelt talking follows, although you may end up feeling more sympathetic towards the damaged Mark than the chilly Norgaard. Pearl Jam: Let’s Play Two Sky Arts, 9.00pm When is a music documentary not a music documentary? When it’s also a sports film. This exuberant film, which was made following the Chicago Cubs’ victory in baseball’s World Series in 2016, follows die-hard Cubs fan and Pearl Jam lead singer Eddie Vedder as he cheers on his team during their championship run while also preparing the band for two August shows at the team’s Wrigley Field Stadium. The result is an affectionate portrait of the singer as fan. SH Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm David Farr’s epic series reaches its climax with the arrival of the most famous horse in history. After an uninspiring start, Troy has picked up in recent weeks and the final episode is a well-handled tale of betrayal and death. It’s a curate’s egg of a series, let down by poor casting. SH X-Men (2000) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm Bryan Singer directs an all-star cast that includes Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, Ian McKellen and Halle Berry, in the first of the X-Men franchise. A group of mutants must decide whether to side with Professor Xavier (Stewart) or the evil Magneto (McKellen) in what is a solid opening to the series and which paved the way for plenty of big-budget sequels. This is followed by X-Men 2 and X-Men 3 at 9.00pm and 11.35pm respectively. Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and this inconsistency leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Lethal Weapon 2 (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm Mel Gibson sports his signature Eighties mullet in the second film of this daft-but-fun action franchise. LAPD officer Riggs (Gibson) teams up once again with his partner Murtaugh (Danny Glover) to track down a band of South African criminals while protecting a painfully frenzied witness (Joe Pesci). Naturally, the pair find themselves drawn into violent action sequences orchestrated by stereotypical bad guys. Sunday 8 April Hostess with the mostest: Catherine Tate presents the awards Credit: ITV The Olivier Awards 2018 ITV, 10.20pm Last year, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child swept the board with nine Olivier Awards, something that looked impossible to top. But then came Lin Manuel Miranda’s blockbuster musical Hamilton, whose West End run has received reviews every bit as rapturous as those from its Broadway debut. The show has a record-breaking 13 nominations, which it is thought will be translated into awards. After being snubbed for Jerusalem, Jez Butterworth will surely be rewarded for his equally magisterial play The Ferryman (its eight nominations include best play and best director for Sam Mendes), while contenders in the acting categories include Bryan Cranston for Network, Andrew Garfield for Angels in America and Lesley Manville for Long Day’s Journey into Night. Catherine Tate will be on hosting duties for the event at the Royal Albert Hall, which will, as usual, feature a crop of stellar performances; this one will include a special tribute to Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, which turns 50 this year. Let’s hope the organisers bring together Josephs of the past for a big singalong: Jason Donovan, Phillip Schofield, Ian “H” Watkins and Lee Mead will all, one suspects, be available. Gabriel Tate Sex Robots and Us BBC Three, from 10.00am James Young, an amputee who created his own bionic arm, meets the people who design sex robots and hears about their plans for them, from being given to old people’s homes to “employment” in brothels. But is it the harmless, even socially responsible pursuit thatthey claim? Formula 1: The Bahrain Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 3.30pm After the Australian Grand Prix – in which Sebastian Vettel took advantage of a safety-car blunder to win under pristine Melbourne skies – attention turns to the second round of the season at the Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir. Another blunder cost Lewis Hamilton on this circuit last year – this time it happened in the pit lane, with Vettel capitalising to win by 6.6 seconds. The Generation Game BBC One, 8.00pm How do you top last week’s cavalcade of silliness in this rebooted game show? You rope in Danny Dyer to join Mel Giedroyc, Sue Perkins and panellists Melvin Odoom and Roisin Conaty for challenges that include cake decorating, balloon modelling and dancing the Argentine Tango. The Durrells ITV, 8.00pm In the fourth episode of the popular drama, Larry (Josh O’Connor) visits Athens with two oddly named guests – Captain Creech (James Cosmo) and Prince Jeejeebuoy (Tanmay Dhanania) – in tow. There, they offer advice to Gerry (Milo Parker), who is applying for a new school. Jesus’ Female Disciples: the New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm For centuries, the birth of Christianity was regarded as a largely male affair, with women as only bit-part players. Now, Bible experts Helen Bond and Joan Taylor have discovered evidence that women were involved in everything from preaching and baptising to funding the movement as it grew. This absorbing documentary follows the historians’ progress. Golf: The Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00pm Prepare for a dramatic finale as this year’s first Major – from the Augusta National in Georgia – concludes. Last year, Spain’s Sergio Garcia won the coveted green jacket, beating Justin Rose in a tense play-off. Ordeal by Innocence BBC One, 9.00pm Sarah Phelps’s splendid adaptation continues, as Arthur Calgary (Luke Treadaway) resolves to prove the truth about Jack Argyll’s (Anthony Boyle) alibi by any means necessary. GT Folk Awards 2018 BBC Four, 9.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Julie Fowlis introduce highlights from this year’s Radio 2 Folk Awards in Belfast. It features performances from Cara Dillon, Lankum and Eliza Carthy and the Wayward Band. The great Nick Drake will also be inducted into the Hall of Fame, his genius long-established, even if such recognition eluded him during his short life. Producer Dónal Lunny, meanwhile, receives the Lifetime Achievement Award for decades of tireless work promoting the renaissance in Irish music, plus The Armagh Pipers Club are presented with the Good Tradition Award. GT Emma (1996) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 3.00pm Gwyneth Paltrow’s American iciness melts in this deft adaptation of Jane Austen’s classic comic romance. She is Emma Woodhouse, spoilt, charming and an inveterate meddler. Only Mr George Knightley (Jeremy Northam) dares challenge her behaviour – but what are his motives? A clever film with a superb supporting cast, including Toni Collette, Alan Cumming and Ewan McGregor. United 93 (2006) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 9.55pm Director Paul Greengrass’s boneshaking, real-time take on the final hours of the United Airlines plane whose passengers rebelled against their hijackers on September 11, 2001 feels uncomfortably realistic. Greengrass, whose signature rapid cutting made the second and third Bourne films so exciting, proves expert at handling the most infamous atrocity of modern times with intelligence and sobriety. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.00pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. Monday 9 April I spy: a recruit sees if she’s got what it takes to be an SOE agent Credit: BBC Secret Agent Selection: WW2 BBC Two, 9.00pm Not unlike Channel 4’s SAS: Who Dares Wins and BBC Two’s Astronauts: Do You Have What It Takes?, this absorbing new series puts a group of recruits through a series of gruelling physical and psychological challenges to see if they could make the grade as a secret agent according to an established selection test used during the Second World War. This test was used by the Special Operations Executive (SOE) to determine whether recruits from many different walks of life would be capable of being dropped behind enemy lines and surviving as a covert officer with a brief to cause the maximum disruption possible to the enemy in the territory. As with the original SOE, the 14 candidates come from diverse backgrounds (among them a research scientist, a property developer, former police officer, a drag act performer, a retired investment banker and an Army veteran). In the opening episode, they undergo the initial four-day assessment at a remote Scottish country-house estate. The aim is to winnow out weakness and determine who should win a place on the advanced, and suitably terrifying, course in assassination, sabotage and covert intelligence techniques. Gerard O’Donovan Famalam BBC Three, from 10.00am After a successful pilot last year, Vivienne Acheampong, Gbemisola Ikumelo, Roxanne Sternberg, Tom Moutchi and John MacMillan return with more culturally skewed sketches. Once again, they feature William and Funke’s raunchy chat show, misunderstood superhero Eclipse, Croydon’s voodoo practitioner Professor Lofuko, and a version of Midsomer Murders. 800 Words BBC One, 2.15pm If you like The Durrells you will definitely want to watch hit Australian comedy drama 800 Words. This gently funny series follows George (Erik Thomson), a widower, who horrifies his teenaged children when he moves the entire family to a remote seaside town in New Zealand. Springtime on the Farm Channel 5, 8.00pm This is the first of five shows this week celebrating the “great British farmer”, with the help of Yorkshire Vet stars Peter Wright and Julian Norton, Adam Henson of Countryfile and Springwatch’s Lindsey Chapman. In this programme, they explore how to cope with the stresses of lambing. MasterChef: The Finals BBC One, 9.00pm Oodles of challenges lie ahead for the remaining amateur chefs in the final week, which takes them as far afield as Peru ahead of Friday’s concluding cook-off. First, though, they’re off to North Yorkshire to cater a country-house lunch for local grandees and farmers. Lisbon: An Art Lovers’ Guide BBC Four, 9.00pm Having covered Barcelona, St Petersburg and Amsterdam in their first series of city-break guides, historian Dr Janina Ramirez and art critic Alastair Sooke jet off to explore three less obvious, art-rich destinations. Beirut and Baku are perhaps the more intriguing but it opens in Lisbon, which built up its art reserves during the centuries Portugal was part of one of the world’s great empires, and currently boasts one of the hottest contemporary art scenes in Europe. GO Marcella ITV, 9.00pm This drama’s been a little less fraught the second time round but Marcella still pushes the boundaries of credibility. In this concluding part, the heroine (Anna Friel) tracks down the killer, only to suffer one of her unfortunate episodes. GO The Core (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.25pm Rome starts to crumble, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco collapses and pigeons go mental in Trafalgar Square. Something is obviously amiss, and this time it isn’t climate change. In fact, the Earth’s core has stopped rotating and a team of scientists has to build a special burrowing machine to start it spinning again. Hilary Swank, Stanley Tucci and Aaron Eckhart do their best, but the excitement is intermittent. The Emoji Movie (2017) ★☆☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.30pm In this animated comedy set inside a smartphone, Gene (voiced by T J Miller), an emoji with multiple facial features, sets out on a quest to be like his colleagues who have only one. He does so with the help of apps like Spotify and Candy Crush. Sadly, the result is so horrendous that there aren’t enough Patrick Stewart-voiced emojis in the world to express what an ugly, artless exercise this is. Triple 9 (2016) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A gang of criminals and corrupt cops plan to kill a police officer in order to pull off their biggest heist yet in John Hillcoat’s crime thriller. There is a lot to like here: a big opening and a strong cast (with Kate Winslet, Gal Gadot, Anthony Mackie and Chiwetel Ejiofor among them). But it feels like fragments of a great crime drama are missing; it’s enthralling up close, but then the big picture isn’t complete. Tuesday 10 April Back to school: Mark, who has two sons with autism Credit: Channel 4 Class of Mum and Dad Channel 4, 8.00pm Another week, another Channel 4 series about education. Hold off on the black marks, however, because this one is pretty good. The premise is simple: Blackrod Primary School just outside of Bolton has thrown open its doors to a class made up of pupils’ parents (and one grandparent). They’ve agreed to go back to school for the summer term to see what modern education is really like, sports day, Sats tests and all. Naturally, its harder than many of them were expecting – 36-year-old decorator Jonny states early on that he thought he’d be able to slope off for a swift cigarette break rather than having to adhere to strict class rules – but there are some touching stories amid the more obvious moments. Most notably, this opening episode focuses on two parents with challenging home lives – Julia, who is raising her 10-year-old cousin Asha after Asha’s mother died, and Mark, who has two autistic sons. While the parents’ travails are interesting, the children are the real scene-stealers, however, from those delighted that their mothers and fathers are taking part to those who are more sceptical. The pair of five-year-olds who spend their time corpsing in front of the camera are particularly endearing. Sarah Hughes Champions League Football: Manchester City v Liverpool BT Sport 2, 7.45pm The Etihad Stadium is the setting as City and Liverpool fight it out for a place in the semi-finals. Liverpool have the advantage following a 3-0 win at Anfield in the first leg. This Time Next Year ITV, 8.00pm Davina McCall returns with another set of heart-tugging stories of people attempting to transform their lives over the course of a year. First up are two new parents who dream of making life wonderful for their baby girl who has been deaf since birth and a couple desperate to start a family. Come Home BBC One, 9.00pm Danny Brocklehurst’s claustrophobic family drama comes to a head as we flashback to find out exactly what went wrong in Greg (Christopher Eccleston) and Marie’s (Paula Malcomson) marriage. Hospital BBC Two, 9.00pm The engrossing fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with Nottingham University Hospitals Trust struggling to cope with the new NHS ruling regarding the cancellation of all non-urgent surgery. The episode focuses on Val, a 55-year-old with mouth cancer whose surgeon is desperately trying to ensure that her operation goes ahead. Here and Now Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm With only two episodes left to go, Alan Ball’s family drama continues to tread water in the most frustrating ways. On paper, there are a whole bunch of interesting stories in the mix, from Kristen’s (Sosie Bacon) possible relationship with Navid (Marwan Salama) to Ramon’s (Daniel Zovatto) continuing visions, but the problem is nothing much happens with any of them as each story moves on only incrementally each week. In this episode, Audrey (Holly Hunter) finally turns the tables on the perpetually smug Greg (Tim Robbins). Cunk on Britain BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm Diane Morgan’s pitch-perfect send-up of history programmes moves to the Tudor era and beyond as Cunk takes on Henry VIII, aka “The kingiest king who kinged over Britain” before giving us her unique perspective on “Bloody” Mary Tudor (“horrible like the drink”) and Elizabeth I. SH Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The acerbic Sarah Jessica Parker sitcom has been firing on all cylinders throughout its second series – possibly because it’s more interesting watching Frances (Parker) and Robert (the excellent Thomas Haden Church) navigate life after divorce than it was watching them get there. Here, Frances tries to make a new contact in the art world. SH Speed (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm “There’s a bomb on the bus!” is the most famous line and basically the entire plot of one of the best action thrillers of the Nineties. The sizzling chemistry between LAPD Swat specialist Jack Traven (Keanu Reeves) and passenger Annie Porter (Sandra Bullock) sexes up the exhilarating action scenes, while Dennis Hopper is fantastically unhinged as a revenge-driven, retired bomb squad member turned terrorist. Fast & Furious 7 (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm Paul Walker was killed in a car crash part-way through making this film so it was completed with the help of his two younger brothers and some subtle computer graphics. The good news is that this is the best film in the franchise and does justice to Walker. It isn’t polished blockbuster film-making – though if it was, it wouldn’t be Fast & Furious. But it speaks straight to your adrenal glands. The Witches of Eastwick (1987) ★★★☆☆ Syfy, 9.00pm It is remarkable that director George Miller’s daft, unfettered romp of a film works at all. But, thanks to Jack Nicholson’s delicious overacting as Daryl Van Horne, a manic gentleman who closely resembles the devil, and the three gorgeous, single small-town friends, Alexandra (Cher), Jane (Susan Sarandon) and Sukie (Michelle Pfeiffer), who vie for his debased attentions, it somehow does. Wednesday 11 April Family ties: Edgar Ramirez and Penelope Cruz Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s been fascinating to discover the “true” story behind the 1997 murder of fhion designer Gianni Versace in Ryan Murphy’s glitzy drama, which has expertly depicted the inner world of the perpetrator, a Walter Mitty-style serial killer called Andrew Cunanan (a career-defining role for Darren Criss). This episode, however, has a mid-series lull about it as Cunanan ascends to the higher echelons of gay society, shaping himself meticulously into the posh, preppy eye-candy who saw a sugar daddy (or two) as his way to the top. Elsewhere, the Versace siblings return at last. Gianni (Edgar Ramirez), now in failing health decides to champion his insecure sister Donatella (Penélope Cruz in a frightful wig) and turns her into both designer and muse. Despite a lack of characters to root for – the Versaces’ moments of vulnerability dissolve into tedious histrionics and are eclipsed by Cunanan’s cold-blooded machinations – it’s all quite a fabulous mix of fashion, high society and brutal murder, with some interesting commentary on homophobia in the Nineties as well. Vicki Power The Secret Helpers BBC Two, 8.00pm Watch and weep as timid elderly widow Lesley begins a new life as an out gay woman in this life-affirming docu-series. She’s encouraged with warmth and wisdom by amateur “sages” from abroad, who talk to her secretly through a hidden earpiece. From World War to Cold War Yesterday, 8.00pm As the Second World War drew to a close, Churchill, Stalin and Roosevelt met at Yalta in the Crimea to broker post-war peace. This brisk two-part documentary raids the archives for clips and letters from those who attended, and gathers experts and relatives – including FDR’s grandson – to investigate power plays by Stalin that wrong-footed his Allied counterparts. It’s a detailed look at how and why the compromises reached at Yalta were quickly cast aside. Bacchus Uncovered: Ancient God of Ecstasy BBC Four, 9.00pm Historian Bettany Hughes continues to explore ancient civilisations, moving on to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine. Hughes’s odyssey starts under the City of London, where an 1,800-year-old Roman temple to Bacchus was discovered less than 100 years ago, and takes her to Greece, the Middle East and the Caucasus to explore the god’s roots and influence. VP Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Fluffy as candyfloss, this lewd seaside comedy provides some fun, particularly in the retro casting of stars of yesteryear. This week, an exuberant Sammy (Shane Richie) tries to persuade Monty (John Challis) that, after his successful comeback gig, he is ready for an evening slot. One Born Every Minute Channel 4, 9.00pm This feelgood documentary series brings more poignant tales from a Birmingham labour ward. This week we meet Chantell, about to deliver her third child, who regales us with a moving story of how parenthood with partner Phil has healed the wounds of a traumatic past. First Dates Channel 4, 10.00pm The thoughtful dating show pairs up four more couples, but the road to love is bumpy – septuagenarian Deanna finds her date more interested in the waiter than her. More promising is the match between Bianca and Teza, who allow their vulnerabilities to show. VP The Thin Red Line (1998) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 3.10pm This lyrical Second World War drama, directed by Terrence Malick, tells the story of a group of young US soldiers fighting the Japanese for control of the island of Guadalcanal. Full of stars such as Sean Penn and George Clooney, it struggles with its own battle to squeeze in so many characters but is still an atmospheric meditation on the nature of war. Nick Nolte and Adrien Brody also star. The Remains of the Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 3.55pm The success of Merchant Ivory’s adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Thirties-set novel, a well-observed study of regret, is built around its perfectly cast leads: Anthony Hopkins as James, the butler to the doltish aristocrat Lord Darlington (James Fox) and Emma Thompson as a housekeeper who tries to draw him out of his sterile shell. Lush visuals give it an added richness. Transporter 2 (2005) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A martial arts action sequel, in which Jason Statham and Alessandro Gassman are the sporadically thrilling stars. Statham is Frank Martin, who accepts a job as chauffeur to Jack (Hunter Clary), the son of Miami’s politician Jefferson Billings (Matthew Modine). But the local Colombian drug dealers aren’t happy with his boss’s efforts to clean up the city. Cue a kidnapping, and a potentially deadly encounter with a cocaine baron. Thursday 12 April Changing attitudes: Holly and Hollie Credit: BBC Living with the Brainy Bunch BBC Two, 8.00pm Enterprising, PR-conscious Ash Ali is headmaster of Chessington Community College, a fast-improving school with a few problem pupils. Among them are Jack and Hollie who, on the surface, are comically awful teenagers. Hollie gripes constantly, throws strops and storms out of classrooms if things aren’t going her way. Jack is sullen, lazy and has clocked up 15 suspensions in the past year. It will come as no surprise to regular viewers of such documentaries that their behaviour is rooted in low self-esteem, although their parents unquestionably indulge their foibles. Ali’s novel solution is to place Hollie with Holly, tapdancing head girl and gregarious boffin, and Jack with Tharush, a Sri Lankan immigrant by way of Italy, whose talents are only matched by his work ethic. Now that Jack and Hollie are in the bosom of new families for six weeks, it’s hoped that a new environment, greater discipline and rigid routines will see their results improve and attitudes pick up. There are setbacks on the largely familiar narrative trajectory, but it’s cast to perfection and, as a demonstration of the importance of parenting in academic achievement, the experiment gets an A-star. Gabriel Tate European Tour Golf: The Open de Espana Sky Sports Golf, 11.00am The opening day’s play of the event from the Centro Nacional de Golf in Madrid, which was won by Andrew Johnston the last time it was held in 2016. War Above the Trenches Yesterday, 8.00pm This decent two-parter tells the story of the Royal Flying Corps and their battle to win control of the air in the First World War. Based on Peter Hart’s book Bloody April, it draws affectingly on the testimony of veterans to show there was more to the Western Front than trench warfare. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm The modern age draws closer, as Simon Schama tackles the theme of radiance, guiding us through Gothic cathedrals, Baroque Venetian masterpieces and dazzling Japanese woodblock prints. The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm The second real-life case of the series sees Mark Williams-Thomas investigating the 1977 murders of three women in Glasgow. The suspect is Angus Sinclair, who is currently serving a life sentence for killing two other women that same year. We hear from his ex-wife, and learn how he was a prime suspect but escaped charges for the first killings when key evidence went missing. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm This diverting documentary series concludes with a Himalayan trek, a controversial article in the school newspaper and the GCSE retakes that were the goal of the entire enterprise. Will Alfie, Harry, Jack and co see their grades improve? Urban Myths: Marilyn Monroe and Billy Wilder Sky Arts, 9.00pm Sky Arts’ boldly cast series of vaguely apocryphal tales from the pop-culture frontlines returns with a dispatch from the set of Some Like It Hot, the magnificent 1959 comedy that is almost certainly more fun to watch than it was to make. In this minor but entertaining reimagining, Tony Curtis (Alex Pettyfer) is threatening to cuckold Arthur Miller (Dougray Scott) by making off with Marilyn Monroe (Gemma Arterton), whose caprice, drinking and sensitivity is driving director Billy Wilder (James Purefoy) to distraction. GT Still Game BBC One, 9.30pm; BBC Two Wales, 10.00pm Justifying its prime-time BBC One slot, the Scottish sitcom bows out in triumph with a typically well-wrought farce involving a Hollywood stuntman, a disastrous driving lesson and romance for the widowed Isa (Jane McCarry). GT The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Christopher Lee steals the show as the titular assassin, Francisco Scaramanga, in this classic Bond adventure. Roger Moore’s secret agent, in his second outing as 007, must pursue him, with the help of sidekick Mary Goodnight (Britt Ekland), to the villain’s island lair in order to prevent him harnessing the power of the Sun for evil. The confrontations between Moore and Lee are easily the film’s highlights. Swordfish (2001) ★★☆☆☆ TCM, 9.00pm The most often quoted bit of trivia about this film is that Halle Berry was paid an additional £500,000 to go topless. It’s rather lucky she agreed because she’s probably the most appealing aspect of this frenetic thriller. John Travolta and Hugh Jackman put on testosterone-fuelled displays as a morally dubious counter-terrorist agent and the hacker he blackmails into accessing billions of dollars of government money. Some Like It Hot (1959, b/w) ★★★★★ Sky Arts, 9.30pm When two musicians (Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis) witness a mob hit, they flee the state disguised as women in an all-female band, but further complications arise in the form of demure ukulele player Sugar Kane, superbly played by Marilyn Monroe. Billy Wilder’s classic comedy is effortlessly wacky and clever. Before, at 9pm, is Urban Myths, which imagines what happened on the set of this romcom. Friday 13 April Dishing out opinions: John Torode and Gregg Wallace Credit: BBC MasterChef: The Final BBC One, 8.30pm It has taken 25 episodes over seven weeks to whittle down the 56 amateur contestants to three finalists, and in the process, MasterChef 2018 has produced some of the best cooking – and some of the toughest competition – in the series’ long history. (It has been running in one form or another since 1990; and since 2005 in, roughly, its current format with judges Gregg Wallace and John Torode presenting.) This last week has been no exception, with the finalists having to dig deeper than ever to produce the best dishes of their lives and some great moments – notably during the spectacular trip to South America when they met Peruvian superchef Gaston Acurio and took on a service at the fifth best restaurant in the world, the Central in Lima, under Michelin-starred maestro Virgilio Martínez Véliz. In the finale, it’s all about who cooks the best food, though, as the final three return to the studio kitchen to undergo a test of culinary skills and nerve as they set about creating the most important three-course meal of their lives – in the hope of being judged worthy of a title that has launched many a great career: MasterChef champion. Gerard O’Donovan Chef’s Table: Pastry Netflix, from today This mouth-watering spin-off from Netflix’s popular global foodie series Chef’s Table puts the focus entirely on sweet stuff, talking the cameras inside the kitchens of some of the world’s best pastry chefs, among them Christina Tosi’s Milk Bar in New York, Corrado Assenza’s Caffé Sicilia in Noto, Sicily, Jordi Roca’s El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, and Will Goldfarb’s Room4Dessert in Bali. Lost in Space Netflix, from today Not so much a rerun as a spectacular new take on the classic Sixties sci-fi series about a family marooned in space when their ship runs into difficulty on their way to a new colony and crashes on an unknown and surprisingly hostile planet. There are plenty of thrills and impressive visual effects, and Toby Stephens and Molly Parker are excellent as the pioneering Robinson parents John and Judy, while Parker Posey is an enigmatic (and now female) Dr Smith. GO The City & The City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Cop thrillers don’t come much more weirdly dystopian than China Miéville’s award-winning 2009 novel and this ultra-stylish adaptation serves its source material very well. In episode two, Inspector Borlú (David Morrissey) ventures back across the border while investigating the murder of a foreign student. Episodes BBC Two, 10.00pm; Wales, 11.05pm Having overcome last week’s unfortunate episode in this sitcom, Matt (Matt LeBlanc) is back on top and leveraging his spurt in the ratings for all it’s worth, handing Sean (Stephen Mangan) and Beverly (Tamsin Greig) a welcome opportunity for escape. Lee and Dean Channel 4, 10.00pm More rough charm, as life gets complicated for Stevenage’s very own Dumb and Dumber when Lee’s (Miles Chapman) financial worries mount and Dean (Mark O’Sullivan) is persuaded to premiere his poetry at the local arts club. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm Freedom of speech and censorship are under the spotlight as host Mary Beard and guests discuss Theatre Clwyd’s production The Assassination of Katie Hopkins and former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s new book Fascism: A Warning. GO Alien: Covenant (2017) ★★★★★ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm The latest film in the Alien saga from Ridley Scott is arguably a mad scientist movie. It follows the crew of the colony ship Covenant (including Katherine Waterson) as they discover what they think is an uncharted paradise, but what they uncover a threat beyond their imagination. Michael Fassbender puts in a spectacular turn as kindly robot David and his twisted “brother” Walter. Invictus (2009) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.45pm Following the death of Nelson Mandela’s ex-wife Winnie last week, aged 81, here’s Clint Eastwood’s take on South Africa’s World Cup victory in 1995. As the country emerges from apartheid, the newly elected President Mandela (an uncanny Morgan Freeman) sees the potential for the national rugby team, led by François Pienaar (Matt Damon), to be a catalyst for harmony. This is a polished and uplifting film. Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982) ★★★★☆ Gold, 1.40am Much like the Secret Policeman’s Ball, this comedy performance film sees the Monty Python gang take to the stage, but this time they’re in Hollywood. Among the sketches are the Silly Olympics, where athletes compete in absurd sports, The Lumberjack Song, and The Ministry of Silly Walks. This film also features Carol Cleveland in numerous supporting roles. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Friday 6 April The City & the City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Northern Ireland, 9.30pm “I knew there was another city I dare not see… Just on the other side of where I was supposed to look.” So states Inspector Tyador Borlú (David Morrissey) midway through this engrossing adaptation of China Miéville’s Borgesian novel, which achieves the apparently impossible by bringing a dense and clever book to brilliant, atmospheric life. Borlú, a detective with the Extreme Crime Squad in the rundown vaguely Eastern European city of Beszul, is handed the task of solving the murder of a foreign student. So far, so standard, but what unfolds turns out to be anything but as scriptwriter Tony Grisoni (Red Riding) expertly captures Miéville’s vision of a world in which a city is divided not by a wall or barricade, but by blurred realities the populace is trained from birth not to see. Thus the two cities of Beszul and Ul Qoma coexist in the same space but without acknowledging each other, the town hall their only shared space. To look directly on the other city is to commit “Breach”, bringing about the wrath of the secret police. Grisoni and director Tom Shankland build the tension inexorably as Borlú’s world is slowly but surely upended. An absolute treat. Sarah Hughes Sounds Like Friday Night BBC One, 7.30pm The BBC’s music TV revival didn’t make a huge splash with its first series but it’s still worth checking out, if only because co-host and Radio 1Xtra presenter Dotty is such a likeable presence. Tonight, she’s on the road, while Greg James anchors from the studio. Professor Green, Snow Patrol and Years & Years perform. Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.30pm The satirical quiz show returns for a 55th series, with captains Paul Merton and Ian Hislop joined by presenter Steph McGovern and comedian Josh Widdicombe; Jeremy Paxman hosts. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm In an era when the talk show appears tired somehow Graham Norton manages to keep the format enjoyable. Tonight’s episode, the first in a new series, sees husband-and-wife team Emily Blunt and John Krasinski discuss their horror A Quiet Place. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; N Ireland, 11.35pm Following the kerfuffle over its poorly received first series, the arts show returns with a rejigged format and Mary Beard in the presenter’s chair. Informed debate is promised, although Beard has said that she won’t simply replicate the notoriously combative Newsnight Review. SH BBC Young Musician 2018 BBC Four, 7.30pm The contest kicks off at the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire’s new concert hall. Presenter Josie d’Arby is joined by 1998 finalist Alison Balsom as we meet the final five: violinists Elodie Chousmer-Howelles and Stephanie Childress, double bassist Will Duerden, guitarist Torrin Williams and cellist Maxim Calver. The judges are double bassist Leon Bosch, classical guitarist Miloš Karadaglić, violinist and previous Young Musician of the Year winner, Jennifer Pike. Composer Kerry Andrew and the contestants will perform works by Bach, Brahms and Stravinsky. The Nineties Sky Arts, 9.00pm There’s nothing like seeing the decade you came of age in co-opted for nostalgic TV to make you feel old, but for those who can bear seeing their youth dissected Sky Arts at least does it well. Tonight’s second episode continues the focus on the decade’s TV with The Sopranos and Seinfeld under discussion. SH Fury (2014) ★★★★★ 5STAR, 9.00pm David Ayer’s study of the habits and habitats of the American killer male is an astonishing, stirring drama. It’s Germany 1945, and Sgt Don “Wardaddy” Collie (Brad Pitt) and his team are grinding towards Berlin in a battered M4 Sherman tank. There is no rescue mission, just an agonising rumble from one brush with death to the next. The set-piece battles are gripping, and the raw terror of war is blasted home. Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm The best of Richard Curtis and Hugh Grant’s romcoms about awfully nice chaps dithering over frightfully pretty girls. Grant plays bumbling Charles, who, ah, er, can’t tell what’s, um, going on between him and the scrummy Carrie (Andie MacDowell), who he keeps, gosh, bumping into at weddings. It’s aged pretty well and certainly knocks spots off Love, Actually. Lawless (2012) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 12.45am An adaptation of the historical novel The Wettest County in the World, John Hillcoat’s Prohibition-era western follows three brothers (played by Tom Hardy, Shia LaBeouf and Jason Clarke), who do a tidy business distilling and selling illegal moonshine whiskey. It’s an oddly affectionate clan portrait – the violence the brothers mete out is implicitly forgiven – but the period detail is well observed. Saturday 7 April Saturday night fever: Declan Donnelly presents from Orlando Credit: Rex/Shutterstock Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm It can’t be easy hosting a show as exuberant as Saturday Night Takeaway on your own but Declan Donnelly made a solid if understandably restrained go of it last week. He ensured that the light entertainment series proceeded pretty much as normal in the absence of long-time work partner Ant McPartlin, whose travails were sensibly referenced only in very brief passing (“I’ve got twice the amount of work to do,” Donnelly noted at one point before mock-berating the production crew that “I’ll have to do it myself, like everything else around here this week”). That said, this final episode ups the ante as Donnelly takes the show on the road to the Universal Orlando Resort in Florida. Once there we’re promised a “super-sized” edition featuring stunts, surprises and “extra-special” guests. No word yet as to who those guests will be but expect Donnelly to continue making the best of a difficult situation, buoyed by extra support from Scarlett Moffatt, who is in charge of ensuring that the Place on the Plane winners have a wonderful time, and Stephen Mulhern, who has the possibly less than enviable task of explaining In for a Penny to an American audience. Sarah Hughes Premier League Football: Everton v Liverpool Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30pm Tired, perhaps, from their Champions League quarter-final first leg against Man City, Liverpool face their bitter local rivals Everton at Goodison Park. The home side, who’ve won three of their last six games, haven’t beaten Liverpool since October 2010, when Tim Cahill and Mikel Arteta gave them a 2-0 victory. Premiership Rugby Union: Bath v Leicester Tigers Channel 5, 1.30pm Time was when Bath and Leicester were the titans of English rugby. Currently they are fifth and eighth in the league, respectively. In September, Bath claimed a 27-23 win at Welford Road, as they held on for their first away win at Leicester since 2003, ensuring an unhappy return for George Ford against the club he left in the summer. The two sides also met in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at the Recreation Ground in November, where Bath also emerged victorious, beating Leicester 33-31 on that occasion. Premier League Football: Manchester City v Manchester United Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm What better way for Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City to clinch the title than by beating second-placed Manchester United at the Etihad Stadium. Sixteen points ahead of them in the table, City have been formidable this season, winning 27 of the 31 league games they’ve played. One of those victories came at Old Trafford, with a goal from Nicolas Otamendi giving City a 2-1 victory when these sides met in December. Britain’s Most Historic Towns Channel 4, 8.00pm Alice Roberts is our guide for this new six-part series, which sees her search the UK for the places that best sum up an historical era. The first era is Roman Britain, so Roberts heads to Chester, where she abseils down walls, hunkers in caves and uncovers the truth about the city. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm The medical drama’s storyline about Dylan’s (William Beck) alcoholism continues to be sensitively handled as the medic’s ex-wife Sam (Charlotte Salt) worries about whether she can help him. Meanwhile, Ethan (George Hardy) struggles with his own demons as he realises that a patient is related to his brother’s killer. The Voice UK: Live Final ITV, 8.30pm Every reality TV idea has an allotted shelf life and it’s hard not to feel that musical talent contests have come to the end of their run. For those who disagree, The Voice UK’s grand finale is here and the final four battle it out for public approval. Below the Surface BBC Four, 9.00pm & 9.45pm BBC Four’s latest Scandi drama started off tensely but like its predecessor, Modus, it has gone on to become ever more ludicrous. Now it’s the final two episodes, and Philip Norgaard (Johannes Lassen) faces off against Mark (Jakob Oftebro), the man behind the hostage crisis. Much heartfelt talking follows, although you may end up feeling more sympathetic towards the damaged Mark than the chilly Norgaard. Pearl Jam: Let’s Play Two Sky Arts, 9.00pm When is a music documentary not a music documentary? When it’s also a sports film. This exuberant film, which was made following the Chicago Cubs’ victory in baseball’s World Series in 2016, follows die-hard Cubs fan and Pearl Jam lead singer Eddie Vedder as he cheers on his team during their championship run while also preparing the band for two August shows at the team’s Wrigley Field Stadium. The result is an affectionate portrait of the singer as fan. SH Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm David Farr’s epic series reaches its climax with the arrival of the most famous horse in history. After an uninspiring start, Troy has picked up in recent weeks and the final episode is a well-handled tale of betrayal and death. It’s a curate’s egg of a series, let down by poor casting. SH X-Men (2000) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm Bryan Singer directs an all-star cast that includes Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, Ian McKellen and Halle Berry, in the first of the X-Men franchise. A group of mutants must decide whether to side with Professor Xavier (Stewart) or the evil Magneto (McKellen) in what is a solid opening to the series and which paved the way for plenty of big-budget sequels. This is followed by X-Men 2 and X-Men 3 at 9.00pm and 11.35pm respectively. Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and this inconsistency leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Lethal Weapon 2 (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm Mel Gibson sports his signature Eighties mullet in the second film of this daft-but-fun action franchise. LAPD officer Riggs (Gibson) teams up once again with his partner Murtaugh (Danny Glover) to track down a band of South African criminals while protecting a painfully frenzied witness (Joe Pesci). Naturally, the pair find themselves drawn into violent action sequences orchestrated by stereotypical bad guys. Sunday 8 April Hostess with the mostest: Catherine Tate presents the awards Credit: ITV The Olivier Awards 2018 ITV, 10.20pm Last year, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child swept the board with nine Olivier Awards, something that looked impossible to top. But then came Lin Manuel Miranda’s blockbuster musical Hamilton, whose West End run has received reviews every bit as rapturous as those from its Broadway debut. The show has a record-breaking 13 nominations, which it is thought will be translated into awards. After being snubbed for Jerusalem, Jez Butterworth will surely be rewarded for his equally magisterial play The Ferryman (its eight nominations include best play and best director for Sam Mendes), while contenders in the acting categories include Bryan Cranston for Network, Andrew Garfield for Angels in America and Lesley Manville for Long Day’s Journey into Night. Catherine Tate will be on hosting duties for the event at the Royal Albert Hall, which will, as usual, feature a crop of stellar performances; this one will include a special tribute to Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, which turns 50 this year. Let’s hope the organisers bring together Josephs of the past for a big singalong: Jason Donovan, Phillip Schofield, Ian “H” Watkins and Lee Mead will all, one suspects, be available. Gabriel Tate Sex Robots and Us BBC Three, from 10.00am James Young, an amputee who created his own bionic arm, meets the people who design sex robots and hears about their plans for them, from being given to old people’s homes to “employment” in brothels. But is it the harmless, even socially responsible pursuit thatthey claim? Formula 1: The Bahrain Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 3.30pm After the Australian Grand Prix – in which Sebastian Vettel took advantage of a safety-car blunder to win under pristine Melbourne skies – attention turns to the second round of the season at the Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir. Another blunder cost Lewis Hamilton on this circuit last year – this time it happened in the pit lane, with Vettel capitalising to win by 6.6 seconds. The Generation Game BBC One, 8.00pm How do you top last week’s cavalcade of silliness in this rebooted game show? You rope in Danny Dyer to join Mel Giedroyc, Sue Perkins and panellists Melvin Odoom and Roisin Conaty for challenges that include cake decorating, balloon modelling and dancing the Argentine Tango. The Durrells ITV, 8.00pm In the fourth episode of the popular drama, Larry (Josh O’Connor) visits Athens with two oddly named guests – Captain Creech (James Cosmo) and Prince Jeejeebuoy (Tanmay Dhanania) – in tow. There, they offer advice to Gerry (Milo Parker), who is applying for a new school. Jesus’ Female Disciples: the New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm For centuries, the birth of Christianity was regarded as a largely male affair, with women as only bit-part players. Now, Bible experts Helen Bond and Joan Taylor have discovered evidence that women were involved in everything from preaching and baptising to funding the movement as it grew. This absorbing documentary follows the historians’ progress. Golf: The Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00pm Prepare for a dramatic finale as this year’s first Major – from the Augusta National in Georgia – concludes. Last year, Spain’s Sergio Garcia won the coveted green jacket, beating Justin Rose in a tense play-off. Ordeal by Innocence BBC One, 9.00pm Sarah Phelps’s splendid adaptation continues, as Arthur Calgary (Luke Treadaway) resolves to prove the truth about Jack Argyll’s (Anthony Boyle) alibi by any means necessary. GT Folk Awards 2018 BBC Four, 9.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Julie Fowlis introduce highlights from this year’s Radio 2 Folk Awards in Belfast. It features performances from Cara Dillon, Lankum and Eliza Carthy and the Wayward Band. The great Nick Drake will also be inducted into the Hall of Fame, his genius long-established, even if such recognition eluded him during his short life. Producer Dónal Lunny, meanwhile, receives the Lifetime Achievement Award for decades of tireless work promoting the renaissance in Irish music, plus The Armagh Pipers Club are presented with the Good Tradition Award. GT Emma (1996) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 3.00pm Gwyneth Paltrow’s American iciness melts in this deft adaptation of Jane Austen’s classic comic romance. She is Emma Woodhouse, spoilt, charming and an inveterate meddler. Only Mr George Knightley (Jeremy Northam) dares challenge her behaviour – but what are his motives? A clever film with a superb supporting cast, including Toni Collette, Alan Cumming and Ewan McGregor. United 93 (2006) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 9.55pm Director Paul Greengrass’s boneshaking, real-time take on the final hours of the United Airlines plane whose passengers rebelled against their hijackers on September 11, 2001 feels uncomfortably realistic. Greengrass, whose signature rapid cutting made the second and third Bourne films so exciting, proves expert at handling the most infamous atrocity of modern times with intelligence and sobriety. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.00pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. Monday 9 April I spy: a recruit sees if she’s got what it takes to be an SOE agent Credit: BBC Secret Agent Selection: WW2 BBC Two, 9.00pm Not unlike Channel 4’s SAS: Who Dares Wins and BBC Two’s Astronauts: Do You Have What It Takes?, this absorbing new series puts a group of recruits through a series of gruelling physical and psychological challenges to see if they could make the grade as a secret agent according to an established selection test used during the Second World War. This test was used by the Special Operations Executive (SOE) to determine whether recruits from many different walks of life would be capable of being dropped behind enemy lines and surviving as a covert officer with a brief to cause the maximum disruption possible to the enemy in the territory. As with the original SOE, the 14 candidates come from diverse backgrounds (among them a research scientist, a property developer, former police officer, a drag act performer, a retired investment banker and an Army veteran). In the opening episode, they undergo the initial four-day assessment at a remote Scottish country-house estate. The aim is to winnow out weakness and determine who should win a place on the advanced, and suitably terrifying, course in assassination, sabotage and covert intelligence techniques. Gerard O’Donovan Famalam BBC Three, from 10.00am After a successful pilot last year, Vivienne Acheampong, Gbemisola Ikumelo, Roxanne Sternberg, Tom Moutchi and John MacMillan return with more culturally skewed sketches. Once again, they feature William and Funke’s raunchy chat show, misunderstood superhero Eclipse, Croydon’s voodoo practitioner Professor Lofuko, and a version of Midsomer Murders. 800 Words BBC One, 2.15pm If you like The Durrells you will definitely want to watch hit Australian comedy drama 800 Words. This gently funny series follows George (Erik Thomson), a widower, who horrifies his teenaged children when he moves the entire family to a remote seaside town in New Zealand. Springtime on the Farm Channel 5, 8.00pm This is the first of five shows this week celebrating the “great British farmer”, with the help of Yorkshire Vet stars Peter Wright and Julian Norton, Adam Henson of Countryfile and Springwatch’s Lindsey Chapman. In this programme, they explore how to cope with the stresses of lambing. MasterChef: The Finals BBC One, 9.00pm Oodles of challenges lie ahead for the remaining amateur chefs in the final week, which takes them as far afield as Peru ahead of Friday’s concluding cook-off. First, though, they’re off to North Yorkshire to cater a country-house lunch for local grandees and farmers. Lisbon: An Art Lovers’ Guide BBC Four, 9.00pm Having covered Barcelona, St Petersburg and Amsterdam in their first series of city-break guides, historian Dr Janina Ramirez and art critic Alastair Sooke jet off to explore three less obvious, art-rich destinations. Beirut and Baku are perhaps the more intriguing but it opens in Lisbon, which built up its art reserves during the centuries Portugal was part of one of the world’s great empires, and currently boasts one of the hottest contemporary art scenes in Europe. GO Marcella ITV, 9.00pm This drama’s been a little less fraught the second time round but Marcella still pushes the boundaries of credibility. In this concluding part, the heroine (Anna Friel) tracks down the killer, only to suffer one of her unfortunate episodes. GO The Core (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.25pm Rome starts to crumble, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco collapses and pigeons go mental in Trafalgar Square. Something is obviously amiss, and this time it isn’t climate change. In fact, the Earth’s core has stopped rotating and a team of scientists has to build a special burrowing machine to start it spinning again. Hilary Swank, Stanley Tucci and Aaron Eckhart do their best, but the excitement is intermittent. The Emoji Movie (2017) ★☆☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.30pm In this animated comedy set inside a smartphone, Gene (voiced by T J Miller), an emoji with multiple facial features, sets out on a quest to be like his colleagues who have only one. He does so with the help of apps like Spotify and Candy Crush. Sadly, the result is so horrendous that there aren’t enough Patrick Stewart-voiced emojis in the world to express what an ugly, artless exercise this is. Triple 9 (2016) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A gang of criminals and corrupt cops plan to kill a police officer in order to pull off their biggest heist yet in John Hillcoat’s crime thriller. There is a lot to like here: a big opening and a strong cast (with Kate Winslet, Gal Gadot, Anthony Mackie and Chiwetel Ejiofor among them). But it feels like fragments of a great crime drama are missing; it’s enthralling up close, but then the big picture isn’t complete. Tuesday 10 April Back to school: Mark, who has two sons with autism Credit: Channel 4 Class of Mum and Dad Channel 4, 8.00pm Another week, another Channel 4 series about education. Hold off on the black marks, however, because this one is pretty good. The premise is simple: Blackrod Primary School just outside of Bolton has thrown open its doors to a class made up of pupils’ parents (and one grandparent). They’ve agreed to go back to school for the summer term to see what modern education is really like, sports day, Sats tests and all. Naturally, its harder than many of them were expecting – 36-year-old decorator Jonny states early on that he thought he’d be able to slope off for a swift cigarette break rather than having to adhere to strict class rules – but there are some touching stories amid the more obvious moments. Most notably, this opening episode focuses on two parents with challenging home lives – Julia, who is raising her 10-year-old cousin Asha after Asha’s mother died, and Mark, who has two autistic sons. While the parents’ travails are interesting, the children are the real scene-stealers, however, from those delighted that their mothers and fathers are taking part to those who are more sceptical. The pair of five-year-olds who spend their time corpsing in front of the camera are particularly endearing. Sarah Hughes Champions League Football: Manchester City v Liverpool BT Sport 2, 7.45pm The Etihad Stadium is the setting as City and Liverpool fight it out for a place in the semi-finals. Liverpool have the advantage following a 3-0 win at Anfield in the first leg. This Time Next Year ITV, 8.00pm Davina McCall returns with another set of heart-tugging stories of people attempting to transform their lives over the course of a year. First up are two new parents who dream of making life wonderful for their baby girl who has been deaf since birth and a couple desperate to start a family. Come Home BBC One, 9.00pm Danny Brocklehurst’s claustrophobic family drama comes to a head as we flashback to find out exactly what went wrong in Greg (Christopher Eccleston) and Marie’s (Paula Malcomson) marriage. Hospital BBC Two, 9.00pm The engrossing fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with Nottingham University Hospitals Trust struggling to cope with the new NHS ruling regarding the cancellation of all non-urgent surgery. The episode focuses on Val, a 55-year-old with mouth cancer whose surgeon is desperately trying to ensure that her operation goes ahead. Here and Now Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm With only two episodes left to go, Alan Ball’s family drama continues to tread water in the most frustrating ways. On paper, there are a whole bunch of interesting stories in the mix, from Kristen’s (Sosie Bacon) possible relationship with Navid (Marwan Salama) to Ramon’s (Daniel Zovatto) continuing visions, but the problem is nothing much happens with any of them as each story moves on only incrementally each week. In this episode, Audrey (Holly Hunter) finally turns the tables on the perpetually smug Greg (Tim Robbins). Cunk on Britain BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm Diana Morgan’s pitch-perfect send-up of history programmes moves to the Tudor era and beyond as Cunk takes on Henry VIII, aka “The kingiest king who kinged over Britain” before giving us her unique perspective on “Bloody” Mary Tudor (“horrible like the drink”) and Elizabeth I. SH Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The acerbic Sarah Jessica Parker sitcom has been firing on all cylinders throughout its second series – possibly because it’s more interesting watching Frances (Parker) and Robert (the excellent Thomas Haden Church) navigate life after divorce than it was watching them get there. Here, Frances tries to make a new contact in the art world. SH Speed (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm “There’s a bomb on the bus!” is the most famous line and basically the entire plot of one of the best action thrillers of the Nineties. The sizzling chemistry between LAPD Swat specialist Jack Traven (Keanu Reeves) and passenger Annie Porter (Sandra Bullock) sexes up the exhilarating action scenes, while Dennis Hopper is fantastically unhinged as a revenge-driven, retired bomb squad member turned terrorist. Fast & Furious 7 (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm Paul Walker was killed in a car crash part-way through making this film so it was completed with the help of his two younger brothers and some subtle computer graphics. The good news is that this is the best film in the franchise and does justice to Walker. It isn’t polished blockbuster film-making – though if it was, it wouldn’t be Fast & Furious. But it speaks straight to your adrenal glands. The Witches of Eastwick (1987) ★★★☆☆ Syfy, 9.00pm It is remarkable that director George Miller’s daft, unfettered romp of a film works at all. But, thanks to Jack Nicholson’s delicious overacting as Daryl Van Horne, a manic gentleman who closely resembles the devil, and the three gorgeous, single small-town friends, Alexandra (Cher), Jane (Susan Sarandon) and Sukie (Michelle Pfeiffer), who vie for his debased attentions, it somehow does. Wednesday 11 April Family ties: Edgar Ramirez and Penelope Cruz Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s been fascinating to discover the “true” story behind the 1997 murder of fhion designer Gianni Versace in Ryan Murphy’s glitzy drama, which has expertly depicted the inner world of the perpetrator, a Walter Mitty-style serial killer called Andrew Cunanan (a career-defining role for Darren Criss). This episode, however, has a mid-series lull about it as Cunanan ascends to the higher echelons of gay society, shaping himself meticulously into the posh, preppy eye-candy who saw a sugar daddy (or two) as his way to the top. Elsewhere, the Versace siblings return at last. Gianni (Edgar Ramirez), now in failing health decides to champion his insecure sister Donatella (Penélope Cruz in a frightful wig) and turns her into both designer and muse. Despite a lack of characters to root for – the Versaces’ moments of vulnerability dissolve into tedious histrionics and are eclipsed by Cunanan’s cold-blooded machinations – it’s all quite a fabulous mix of fashion, high society and brutal murder, with some interesting commentary on homophobia in the Nineties as well. Vicki Power The Secret Helpers BBC Two, 8.00pm Watch and weep as timid elderly widow Lesley begins a new life as an out gay woman in this life-affirming docu-series. She’s encouraged with warmth and wisdom by amateur “sages” from abroad, who talk to her secretly through a hidden earpiece. From World War to Cold War Yesterday, 8.00pm As the Second World War drew to a close, Churchill, Stalin and Roosevelt met at Yalta in the Crimea to broker post-war peace. This brisk two-part documentary raids the archives for clips and letters from those who attended, and gathers experts and relatives – including FDR’s grandson – to investigate power plays by Stalin that wrong-footed his Allied counterparts. It’s a detailed look at how and why the compromises reached at Yalta were quickly cast aside. Bacchus Uncovered: Ancient God of Ecstasy BBC Four, 9.00pm Historian Bettany Hughes continues to explore ancient civilisations, moving on to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine. Hughes’s odyssey starts under the City of London, where an 1,800-year-old Roman temple to Bacchus was discovered less than 100 years ago, and takes her to Greece, the Middle East and the Caucasus to explore the god’s roots and influence. VP Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Fluffy as candyfloss, this lewd seaside comedy provides some fun, particularly in the retro casting of stars of yesteryear. This week, an exuberant Sammy (Shane Richie) tries to persuade Monty (John Challis) that, after his successful comeback gig, he is ready for an evening slot. One Born Every Minute Channel 4, 9.00pm This feelgood documentary series brings more poignant tales from a Birmingham labour ward. This week we meet Chantell, about to deliver her third child, who regales us with a moving story of how parenthood with partner Phil has healed the wounds of a traumatic past. First Dates Channel 4, 10.00pm The thoughtful dating show pairs up four more couples, but the road to love is bumpy – septuagenarian Deanna finds her date more interested in the waiter than her. More promising is the match between Bianca and Teza, who allow their vulnerabilities to show. VP The Thin Red Line (1998) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 3.10pm This lyrical Second World War drama, directed by Terrence Malick, tells the story of a group of young US soldiers fighting the Japanese for control of the island of Guadalcanal. Full of stars such as Sean Penn and George Clooney, it struggles with its own battle to squeeze in so many characters but is still an atmospheric meditation on the nature of war. Nick Nolte and Adrien Brody also star. The Remains of the Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 3.55pm The success of Merchant Ivory’s adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Thirties-set novel, a well-observed study of regret, is built around its perfectly cast leads: Anthony Hopkins as James, the butler to the doltish aristocrat Lord Darlington (James Fox) and Emma Thompson as a housekeeper who tries to draw him out of his sterile shell. Lush visuals give it an added richness. Transporter 2 (2005) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A martial arts action sequel, in which Jason Statham and Alessandro Gassman are the sporadically thrilling stars. Statham is Frank Martin, who accepts a job as chauffeur to Jack (Hunter Clary), the son of Miami’s politician Jefferson Billings (Matthew Modine). But the local Colombian drug dealers aren’t happy with his boss’s efforts to clean up the city. Cue a kidnapping, and a potentially deadly encounter with a cocaine baron. Thursday 12 April Changing attitudes: Holly and Hollie Credit: BBC Living with the Brainy Bunch BBC Two, 8.00pm Enterprising, PR-conscious Ash Ali is headmaster of Chessington Community College, a fast-improving school with a few problem pupils. Among them are Jack and Hollie who, on the surface, are comically awful teenagers. Hollie gripes constantly, throws strops and storms out of classrooms if things aren’t going her way. Jack is sullen, lazy and has clocked up 15 suspensions in the past year. It will come as no surprise to regular viewers of such documentaries that their behaviour is rooted in low self-esteem, although their parents unquestionably indulge their foibles. Ali’s novel solution is to place Hollie with Holly, tapdancing head girl and gregarious boffin, and Jack with Tharush, a Sri Lankan immigrant by way of Italy, whose talents are only matched by his work ethic. Now that Jack and Hollie are in the bosom of new families for six weeks, it’s hoped that a new environment, greater discipline and rigid routines will see their results improve and attitudes pick up. There are setbacks on the largely familiar narrative trajectory, but it’s cast to perfection and, as a demonstration of the importance of parenting in academic achievement, the experiment gets an A-star. Gabriel Tate European Tour Golf: The Open de Espana Sky Sports Golf, 11.00am The opening day’s play of the event from the Centro Nacional de Golf in Madrid, which was won by Andrew Johnston the last time it was held in 2016. War Above the Trenches Yesterday, 8.00pm This decent two-parter tells the story of the Royal Flying Corps and their battle to win control of the air in the First World War. Based on Peter Hart’s book Bloody April, it draws affectingly on the testimony of veterans to show there was more to the Western Front than trench warfare. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm The modern age draws closer, as Simon Schama tackles the theme of radiance, guiding us through Gothic cathedrals, Baroque Venetian masterpieces and dazzling Japanese woodblock prints. The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm The second real-life case of the series sees Mark Williams-Thomas investigating the 1977 murders of three women in Glasgow. The suspect is Angus Sinclair, who is currently serving a life sentence for killing two other women that same year. We hear from his ex-wife, and learn how he was a prime suspect but escaped charges for the first killings when key evidence went missing. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm This diverting documentary series concludes with a Himalayan trek, a controversial article in the school newspaper and the GCSE retakes that were the goal of the entire enterprise. Will Alfie, Harry, Jack and co see their grades improve? Urban Myths: Marilyn Monroe and Billy Wilder Sky Arts, 9.00pm Sky Arts’ boldly cast series of vaguely apocryphal tales from the pop-culture frontlines returns with a dispatch from the set of Some Like It Hot, the magnificent 1959 comedy that is almost certainly more fun to watch than it was to make. In this minor but entertaining reimagining, Tony Curtis (Alex Pettyfer) is threatening to cuckold Arthur Miller (Dougray Scott) by making off with Marilyn Monroe (Gemma Arterton), whose caprice, drinking and sensitivity is driving director Billy Wilder (James Purefoy) to distraction. GT Still Game BBC One, 9.30pm; BBC Two Wales, 10.00pm Justifying its prime-time BBC One slot, the Scottish sitcom bows out in triumph with a typically well-wrought farce involving a Hollywood stuntman, a disastrous driving lesson and romance for the widowed Isa (Jane McCarry). GT The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Christopher Lee steals the show as the titular assassin, Francisco Scaramanga, in this classic Bond adventure. Roger Moore’s secret agent, in his second outing as 007, must pursue him, with the help of sidekick Mary Goodnight (Britt Ekland), to the villain’s island lair in order to prevent him harnessing the power of the Sun for evil. The confrontations between Moore and Lee are easily the film’s highlights. Swordfish (2001) ★★☆☆☆ TCM, 9.00pm The most often quoted bit of trivia about this film is that Halle Berry was paid an additional £500,000 to go topless. It’s rather lucky she agreed because she’s probably the most appealing aspect of this frenetic thriller. John Travolta and Hugh Jackman put on testosterone-fuelled displays as a morally dubious counter-terrorist agent and the hacker he blackmails into accessing billions of dollars of government money. Some Like It Hot (1959, b/w) ★★★★★ Sky Arts, 9.30pm When two musicians (Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis) witness a mob hit, they flee the state disguised as women in an all-female band, but further complications arise in the form of demure ukulele player Sugar Kane, superbly played by Marilyn Monroe. Billy Wilder’s classic comedy is effortlessly wacky and clever. Before, at 9pm, is Urban Myths, which imagines what happened on the set of this romcom. Friday 13 April Dishing out opinions: John Torode and Gregg Wallace Credit: BBC MasterChef: The Final BBC One, 8.30pm It has taken 25 episodes over seven weeks to whittle down the 56 amateur contestants to three finalists, and in the process, MasterChef 2018 has produced some of the best cooking – and some of the toughest competition – in the series’ long history. (It has been running in one form or another since 1990; and since 2005 in, roughly, its current format with judges Gregg Wallace and John Torode presenting.) This last week has been no exception, with the finalists having to dig deeper than ever to produce the best dishes of their lives and some great moments – notably during the spectacular trip to South America when they met Peruvian superchef Gaston Acurio and took on a service at the fifth best restaurant in the world, the Central in Lima, under Michelin-starred maestro Virgilio Martínez Véliz. In the finale, it’s all about who cooks the best food, though, as the final three return to the studio kitchen to undergo a test of culinary skills and nerve as they set about creating the most important three-course meal of their lives – in the hope of being judged worthy of a title that has launched many a great career: MasterChef champion. Gerard O’Donovan Chef’s Table: Pastry Netflix, from today This mouth-watering spin-off from Netflix’s popular global foodie series Chef’s Table puts the focus entirely on sweet stuff, talking the cameras inside the kitchens of some of the world’s best pastry chefs, among them Christina Tosi’s Milk Bar in New York, Corrado Assenza’s Caffé Sicilia in Noto, Sicily, Jordi Roca’s El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, and Will Goldfarb’s Room4Dessert in Bali. Lost in Space Netflix, from today Not so much a rerun as a spectacular new take on the classic Sixties sci-fi series about a family marooned in space when their ship runs into difficulty on their way to a new colony and crashes on an unknown and surprisingly hostile planet. There are plenty of thrills and impressive visual effects, and Toby Stephens and Molly Parker are excellent as the pioneering Robinson parents John and Judy, while Parker Posey is an enigmatic (and now female) Dr Smith. GO The City & The City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Cop thrillers don’t come much more weirdly dystopian than China Miéville’s award-winning 2009 novel and this ultra-stylish adaptation serves its source material very well. In episode two, Inspector Borlú (David Morrissey) ventures back across the border while investigating the murder of a foreign student. Episodes BBC Two, 10.00pm; Wales, 11.05pm Having overcome last week’s unfortunate episode in this sitcom, Matt (Matt LeBlanc) is back on top and leveraging his spurt in the ratings for all it’s worth, handing Sean (Stephen Mangan) and Beverly (Tamsin Greig) a welcome opportunity for escape. Lee and Dean Channel 4, 10.00pm More rough charm, as life gets complicated for Stevenage’s very own Dumb and Dumber when Lee’s (Miles Chapman) financial worries mount and Dean (Mark O’Sullivan) is persuaded to premiere his poetry at the local arts club. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm Freedom of speech and censorship are under the spotlight as host Mary Beard and guests discuss Theatre Clwyd’s production The Assassination of Katie Hopkins and former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s new book Fascism: A Warning. GO Alien: Covenant (2017) ★★★★★ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm The latest film in the Alien saga from Ridley Scott is arguably a mad scientist movie. It follows the crew of the colony ship Covenant (including Katherine Waterson) as they discover what they think is an uncharted paradise, but what they uncover a threat beyond their imagination. Michael Fassbender puts in a spectacular turn as kindly robot David and his twisted “brother” Walter. Invictus (2009) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.45pm Following the death of Nelson Mandela’s ex-wife Winnie last week, aged 81, here’s Clint Eastwood’s take on South Africa’s World Cup victory in 1995. As the country emerges from apartheid, the newly elected President Mandela (an uncanny Morgan Freeman) sees the potential for the national rugby team, led by François Pienaar (Matt Damon), to be a catalyst for harmony. This is a polished and uplifting film. Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982) ★★★★☆ Gold, 1.40am Much like the Secret Policeman’s Ball, this comedy performance film sees the Monty Python gang take to the stage, but this time they’re in Hollywood. Among the sketches are the Silly Olympics, where athletes compete in absurd sports, The Lumberjack Song, and The Ministry of Silly Walks. This film also features Carol Cleveland in numerous supporting roles. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate